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Publication numberUS3815278 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 11, 1974
Filing dateAug 5, 1971
Priority dateAug 5, 1971
Publication numberUS 3815278 A, US 3815278A, US-A-3815278, US3815278 A, US3815278A
InventorsBeaton A, Beaton V, Schnell D
Original AssigneeBeaton A, Beaton V, Schnell D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic electro-mechanical rodent trap
US 3815278 A
Abstract
A device for effectively trapping, killing and disposing of rodents and ectoparasites. A rectangular housing including a trapping chamber extending the length of the housing to form a runway into which the rodents pass. Arranged on opposite sides of and parallel to the runway is a pair of electrically chargable plates held in a normally open position. These electro-mechanically controlled plates are responsive to a photosensitive device triggered by passage of a rodent into the runway which causes the plates to close by spring tension on the rodent. The plates are attached to a pair of rotable support arms whereby the rodent is mechanically placed in a disposal chamber attached to the housing where the dead rodent is debugged and retained until removal from the area. The electro-mechanical circuitry automatically resets the plates so the device may be recycled independent of any operator action.
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[ June 11, 1974 United States Patent [191 Beaton et al.

[ 1 AUTOMATIC ELECTRO-MECHANICAL 9 9 92 /l 3/ 43 .4 e m .mm r mm r CW 09 56 99 NH 1 1 44 1 2 23 RODENT TRAP [76] Inventors: Arthur L. Beaton, 38lO-l6th Ave.,

North, St. Petersburg, Fla. 33064; Primary Examinernwamer Camp Dietrich H. Schnell, l1447-78th Attorney, Agent or Firm-Stein, Qrman & Fisher Ave., North, Ridgewood Apts. N0.

[57] ABSTRACT A device for effectively trapping, killing and disposing of rodents and ectoparasites. A rectangular housing 202, Seminole, Fla. 33060; Victor A. Beaton, 3852-l6th Ave., North, St. Petersburg, Fla.

Aug. 5,

[22] Filed:

211 App]. No: 169,332

[52] 43/99 [51] Int. A0lm 19/00 controlled plates are responsive to a photosensitive device triggered by passage of a rodent into the runway which causes the plates to close by spring tension on the'rodent. The plates are attached to a pair of rotable support arms whereby the rodent is mechanically placed in a disposal chamber attached to the housing where the dead rodent is debugged and retained until removal from the area. The electro-mechanical circuitry automatically resets the plates so the device may be recycled independent of any operator action.

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11 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures 1 PATENTEDJun 1 1 1924 sass: 1-ur 5 PAIENIEDJUM 1 1 1314 PATENTEDJuM 1 1 m4 SHEET t (If 5 mOE ATTORNEYS.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to an automatic electromechanical rodent exterminator. More specifically, this invention relates to a housing that forms a runway and includes a pair of electrically chargable plates which when triggered close a rodent passing through the runway and administer a predetermined dose of electric current.

2. Description of the Prior Art Rats have accompanied man to most of the areas of the world he has settled. The major source of concern regarding rats is that they are carriers of dangerous diseases. Rats are responsible for spread of a number of diseases, either directly, as by contamination of human food with their urine or feces, or indirectly, by way of rodent fleas and mites. The more common of these diseases are: Rate-Bite Fever, Leptospirosis, Salmonellosis, Trichinosis, Murine Typhus Fever, Plague, and Rickettsialpox; As a result they have been responsible for more human illness and deaths than any other group of mammals.

The worst of these, bubonic plague was reported as recently as January 1971, when the plague was identi-. fied from a lot of 50 fleas collected from 23 Norway rats traped in Tacoma, Washington. These fleas may infect household pets and eventually may reach and infect human beings.

In addition rodents have been among the most persis tent and damaging pests in causing enormous economic losses. They consume or contaminate vast quantities of food and feed in stores and warehouses as well as destroy other property.

No reliable estimate of the rat population of the United States is available as a basis for calculating these losses, but the figure of one rat for every person is frequently quoted. Assuming improvements in environmental sanitation and rodent control has reduced by one-half, then the United States has some 100,000,000 rats. Since each rat damages between $1 and $10 worth of food and other materials per year by gnawing and feeding, the total direct economic losses to'the United States could be $1,000,000,000 annually. In addition, rats contaminate 5 to times more.

In his efforts to rid himself of this nemesis, man has attempted to eliminate the sources of food and shelter for these rats. However, the greatest amount of effort has been in poisons and traps.

Present methods of trapping rats rely upon luring or enticing the animal into a trapping device. Unfortunately, rats are neurotic and keenly aware of changes in their environment. Thus the effectiveness of such devices has been limited.

As a result the most popular and effective method of killing rats is by poisoning. Still, rats often appear to have a sharp intelligence in matters directly related to their survival and are able to recognizev a poison and stop from consuming fatal quantities of such poisons. Accordingly, researchers have been developing poisons that act slowly and indirectly, so that rats won't associate deaths with the poisons.

Currently most rodenticides are generally grouped into two categories: one shot" poisons and anticoagulants.

In general, rats show poor acceptance ness to one-shot poisons.

The most effective of the new poisons are the anticoagulants. These act to thin the blood thus reducing the and bait shyclotting ability of the blood which causes internal hemorrhaging. Since the process occurs over a period of several days or weeks the rats cannot associate the painless bleeding with the bait and do not become bait shy. However, they must eat some bait every dayuntil death, which usually takes from 5 to 14 days. In addition, widely. used cereal based anticoagulants must be sheltered from the weather in bait. stations which require continuous attention. Unfortunately, even when effective the rat usually dies in an undesirable area such as behind equipment or inside walls causing a poignant, repugnant odor.

Despite their limited effectiveness mechanical traps for capturing and exterminating rodents have been known in the'art for years. A review of numeraous electro-mechanical devices developed] shows advances in the sophistication of the art as disclosed in prior art patents such as:

. Pat. No. Pat. No. Pat. No. Pat. No. Pat. No.

. Pat. No.

.. Pat. No.

2,348,729 2,360,651 2,469,454 2,472,806 2,490,017 2,515,947 3,064,386 Pat. No. 3,075,316 Pat. No.-2,348,729 discloses an automatic trap for exterminating rodents comprising abox-like casing including a passage extending the entire length of the box providing a clear and generally uninterrupted trapping zone which fonns a mere continuation of the floor or other surface upon whichthe trap may rest.

As the animal passes into the trapping zone it trips a wire extending across the passage at a height best calculated to infringe the animal traversing the passage to automatically commence the cycle of operation which includes positively and forceable moving the animal to a confined area where it vis electrocuted. Following electrocution the body is automatically moved to a further zone to free the electrocution area for another animal. Immediately following electrocution and removal of the animal-from the electrocution area the trap is reset for entryof other animals into the trapping zone.

Another prior art trap under US. Pat. No. 2,360,651

comprises a casing which includes a clear passageway. This apparatus employs a photosensitive cell arranged within the passageway which senses and triggers the operation by the presence of the animal in the trapping zone. This initial interruption energizes the circuitry whereby a pair of opposing plate members are clamped together and electrocute the trapped animal by electrodes carried on the opposing faces of the plates. Still clamped together, the plates are pivoted together and the animal is ejected from between the plates. The plates are then automatically returned to the original position for further trapping and disposing.

US. Pat. No. 2,515,947, c o-pending with US. Pat. No. 2,360,651 differs only in that the operation for executing the the animal by electrocution is complete and the electrodes are de-energized before movement of the animal to the point of ejection for reasons of safety.

- the body of the rodent which will instantly kill the animal. The patent discloses a removable drawer into which a dead rodent may be depositioned. However, the body is not necessarily dislodged from the needles from the backward swinging movement of the lever in which case the rodent may become impaled upon the striking lever thereby prohibiting unattached repeated use.

Another prior art patent, U.S. Pat. No. 3,075,316 shows a rodent exterminator wherein a rodent is initially attracted to a trapping compartment and from there urged by heat to an exterminating comparting which includes exposed high voltage conductors. The rodent engages a switch actuator in the exterminating compartment thereby causing a high voltage to be impressed on the exposed conductors which quickly electrocutes the rodent. From there the rodent is deposited in a storage compartment which is removable from the rodent exterminator housing allowing for the ultimate disposal of the dead rodents without requiring the user to touch the dead animals. As with many of the previously described patents this apparatus includes automatic recycling operation for repeated and continuous USC.

Despite the endless efforts to contain and reduce the rat populationfederal officials and other authorities report that on a nationwide bases the rat population continues to increase for lack of adequate means to trap and exterminate these rodents.

This failure may be attributed in large measure to the failure to recognize the intelligence and habits of these rodents such as that rodents travel in runways in absolute darkness, identify poison foods that have killed other rodents and immediately sense danger from newly placed traps, food,.and other objects. In addition, it must be recognized that rats follow a true Dar winian survival pattern. As a colony realizes its number is being decreased the birth rate will sharply increase to sustain a relatively constant level. This necessitates the isolation of the dead rats from the colony to prevent this inborn sense of survival.

Thus a review of the existing art shows a wide area for improvement for capitalizing on these known habits and characteristics.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to an automatic electromechanical rodent exterminator for trapping, killing and debugging rodents. Realizing the fallacies and short comings of existing devices and believing that the rat is vunerable only through natural instincts, the subject invention comprises an effective trap and method for exterminating and debugging these rodents.

More specifically, the exterminator includes a rectangular housing including a trapping chamber extending the length of the hosuing to form a runway. Arranged on opposite sides of the trapping chamber is a pair of rotatably mounted trapping plates. Arranged on these trapping plates is a plurality of electrically chargeable electrodes. Extending perpendicularly across either end of the runway is a lamp, photodiode combination located at a height suitable to sense the passage of an animal into the trapping chamber.

Detachably mounted to the side of the housing is a disposal chamber which communicates with the trapping chamber through a door attached to the side of the housing. The disposal chamber, which is designed to hold approximately 40 average size rats, contains an insecticide to exterminate parasites on the captured animal. Since the disposal chamber may comprise a disposable container, the container is easily replaced and disposed of without the necessity of exposing the contents to the surrounding environment. Alternatively a screen mesh wire enclosure may be substituted for the disposable container to capturelive animals.

The trapping plates are mechanically coupled to an electric motor through a series of support members and interconnecting levers.

In operation the trap is placed over a well travelled runway which is found either by visual means, observing droppings and wear markings, or with the aid of an ultraviolet lamp to detect urine trails since the rat travel from his nesting area to his fodd and water supply by these prior established runways, baiting is not necessary. However, any known food that the particular colony is damaging can be scattered along this runway. In addition, urine may be used as an attractant for the rodents. The unique construction of the subject invention provides a runway which is free and clear of any foreign and strange objects. This permits the rat to enter the trap unaware and without warning.

Upon entering the trapping chamberthe rodent interrupts the light rays emanating from the lamp toward the photodiode causing the trap to arm. Interruption of the second lamp, photo diode'combination causes the trapping plates to close, trapping the rat between them. At the same instant, a predetermined voltage is applied to the plate electrodes, odorlessly killing the rat. Alternatively the voltage may be reduced to permit the live capture of animals.

AFter a preset lapsed time, the voltage is removed from the electrodes. Power is then applied to the electric motor which through the action of the interconnecting levers and support members rotates the plates upward and outward. As the plates approach the full extend of their travel they push open the disposal door. After the plates reach the full extent of their movement, the rodent is automatically ejected into the disposal chamber. The body is then pushed outward from the base of the housing by a vertically disposed pusher plate. The motor then resets the trapping plates to their normally open position in preparation for subsequent capture and recycle operations. Thus it can be seen that applicants unique structure and combination of elements provides an effective, efficient means of trapping, killing and disposing of rodents and parasites. By constructing a clear runway and separate disposal chamber, investigating animals are not warned of the impending'danger to them. In addition since the animal is shocked no burning or singeing odor is created to warn survivors. In addition, the trapping plates do not close on the captured rat with sufficient force to puncture the skin. Therefore there is no bleeding or the'like to warn other animals of the impending danger.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention, reference should be had to the following detailed description taken in connection with accompanying drawings which:

FIG. 1 is a partially cross-sectioned perspective view of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is an end view of the trap housing taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 1 with the trapping means in the open position.

FIG. 3 is a detailed end view of the trapping means in the closed position.

FIG. 4 is a detailed end view of the trapping means in the ejection position.

FIG. 5 is a pusher plate in extended position.

FIG. 6 is a detailed drawing of the casing containing circuitry with external switches.

FIG. 7 is a schematic diagram of the electrical circuitry.

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION As shown in FIG. 1, the present invention includes a housing 10 with vertically disposed sides 12, 14, 16,

and 18 and disposal chamber 20 detachably mounted on side 16. Door 19, hingedly attached to side 16, is held in the normally closed position by magnet 21. Apertures 22 formed in the lower portion vertical surfaces 14 and 18 lead to trappping chamber 24 which extends the length of housing 10 to form a runway.

As best seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, mounted internally on sides 14 and 18 are support members 26. Depending downwardly from each member 26 are substantially L- shaped plate mounts 28 and 30 and ejector lever 32. Corresponding plate mounts 28 are held in fixed parallel relation to one another at each end of the trapping chamber 24 by rollers cooperatively engaging members 26. Similarly, corresponding plate mounts and ejector levers 32 are held in fixed parallel relation to one another at each end of trapping chamber 24 by interconnecting rods 27 and 29 respectively.

Trapping plate 34 including 'a plurality of electrodes 35 is attached at each end to mounts 28. Trapping plate 36 includes a plurality of electrodes 37 and is slidably mounted at each end on ejector levers 32 by the cooperative engagement of slot 38 and nipple 39. The lower portion of plate 36, which is rotatably attached to plate mount 30 at 40, is held in operative positionby spring member 41 connected to plate mount 30.

The upper portion of plate mounts 28 and 30 are operatively coupled to eachother by pin 56 mounted on plate mount 30. Spring 42 interconnects plates 28 and 30 tending to pull the plates together.

Solenoid 44 is operatively coupled to actuating L- shaped lever 46 which is pivoted on rod 27. Motor arm 50 of electric motor 48 is coupled to plate 30 by arms 52, and 54.

As seen in FIGS. 4 and 5 a pusher system includes slidable pusher plate 58 disposed within chamber 20. Plate 58 is interconnected to actuating means including levers 60, 62, and 64 by horizontally disposed members 66 fixed at each end. Retainer springs 68 are attached to the lower portion of housing 10 and to lever 64 to hold pusher plate 58in the normally retracted position. Notch 70 formed on lever 64 and tit 72 on member 71 mounted on rod 27 cooperate in combination with lever 60, 62, and 64 to extend the pusher system.

The disposal chamber 20 detachably attached to housing 10 may comprise a disposable container or wire mesh screen enclosure. Also included in chamber 20 is heating element 23, insecticide holder 125 and mercury vapor lamp 31.

As best seen in FIG. 6 switch actuator 74 is arranged on rod 27 to mechanically engage switches located externally on casing 76 more fully described below.

A light sensitive arming and triggering system comprises photodiodes 78 and 79 arranged at each end of the trapping chamber 24 on side 16. Arranged on side 12 directly opposite photodiodes are incandescant lamps 80 and 81 beamed across chamber 24 perpendicularly through apertures 82 formed in plates 34 and 36 to impinge on photodiodes 78 and 79 respectively. Alternatively a single photodiode, lamp combination arranged at the mid-point of the trapping chamber 24 may be used.

A low heat gelatin filter (not shown) is used to filter the incandesant lamps. This combination provides a low cost, long life energy source.

A schematic diagram of the electrical circuitry is shown inFIG. 7. A volt alternating current is applied through plug 200 to junctions 201 and 202..F use 204 is connected between junctions 201 and 206. The alternating voltage is applied to the primary 207 of transformer 208 through conductors 2'10 and 212; to electric motor 214 by conductor 216 through switch 218 in the normally closed position and conductor 220 and from junction 206 through conductor 222, triple pole double throw contacts 224(3) of relay 332 in the deenergized position, and conductor 226; to solenoid 44 through switch 218 in the normally open position and conductor 230 and through contacts 224(2) of relay 332 in the energized position and conductor 232. Also connected to the alternating voltage is thermostatically controlled heating element 234 designed to close at 50 F and open at 70 F through thermocouple 236. By closing switch 238, the element is activated continuously independent of ambient temperature. The 110 VAC is rectified to 12.5 VDC through rectifier 240 coupled across the secondary 209 of transformer 208.

Resistor 242 and capacitor 244 are connected in parallel across output of rectifier 240. The anodes of SCRs 246 and 284 in series with resistors 247 and 286 respectively are connected to DC. rectifier 240 through conductor 248 while their cathodes is connected to ground through conductor 250. Photodiodes 78 and 79 are connected to gates of SCRs 246 and 284 through junctions 254 and 292 respectively. Junction 254 is connected to junction 256 located between resistor 258 and capacitor 260 while junction 292 is located between resistor 294 and capacitor 295. The base of transistor 262 is connected through resistor 264 to junction 266 while the collector is connected to anode of silicon unilateral switch 268 through junction 270 located between series connected resistor 272 and capacitor 274.

Also connected to junction 270 is the collector of tran sistor 276 with theemitter to ground and base connected to the anode of SCR 278 through series resistor 280 and capacitor 282 and to the anode of SCR284 by resistor 280.

SCRs 278 and 298 connected in series with resistors 288 and 300 respectively are connected across conductors 248 and 250. The gates of sCRs 278 and 298 are connected to base 1 of unijunction transistor 296. Anode of SCR 298 is connected to the anode of SCR 246 through series capacitors 302 and 304. Base 2 of unijunction transistor 296 is connected to conductor 248 through resistor 306 while base 1 is connected to conductor 250 through resistor 308. The emitter of transistor 296 connected between series variable resistor 310 and variable capacitor 312 at junction 314 which leads to switch 340(2) and thence to ground.

Lamps 80 and 81 are connected to conductor 248 through junctions 322 and 324.

The gate of SCR 326 is connected to silicon unilateral switch 268 through conductor 328 and the cathode to ground through conductor 330. Anode of SCR 326 is connected to relay 332.

Secondary 211 of transformer is connected to plate 34 which goes to ground through fuse 334 and through contact 224( 1) when relay 332 is energized to variable resistor 336 and then to plate 36.

Photodiodes 78 and 79 are shunted by switches 338 and 340(1) respectively when switches 338 and 340( 1) are in the normally closed position by switch actuator 74.

Mercury vapor lamp 31 in series with resistor 33 is connected across conductors 204 and 212.

In operation the trap is placed over a well traveled runway which is found either by visual means, observing droppings and wear marks, or with the aid of an ultraviolet lamp to detect urine trails- To set the trap, trapping plates 34 and 36 are manually opened and held open by arms 52 and 54 aligned over center point 56. In this position switch actuator 74 mechanically opens switches 218, 338, 340(1) and closes 340(2).

With power applied, relay 332 and solenoid 44 are deenergized. Lamps 80 and 81 are beamed on photodiodes 78 and 79 respectively keeping the photodiodes at low resistance preventing capacitors 260 and 295 from charging thereby keeping silicon controlled rectifiers 246 and 289 in a non-conducting state. Transistors 262 and 276 are saturated preventing capacitor 274 from charging to the firing voltage of silicon unilateral switch 268.

With relay 332 deenergized no power is applied to the motor 214 or solenoid 44. Since switch 340(2) is closed capacitor 312 of the timing circuit comprising resistor 310 and capacitor 312 is grounded thus stopping the timing circuit.

Upon entering the trapping chamber 24 the rodent interrupts the light rays emanating from lamp 80 causing the resistance of photodiode 78 to increase and inhibit current flow therethrough. Capacitor 260 is thereby caused to charge and fire SCR 246 which causes transistor 262 to go into a nonconducting state.

The animal then interrupts light from lamp 81 impinging on photodiode '79 which causes capacitor 295 switch 268 firing SCR 326 causing relay 332 to energize.

Line voltage is applied through switch-218 and relay 332 to the solenoid 44. Solenoid 44 energizes and me chanically moves folding arms 52 and 54 by means of the short leg of the L-shaped lever 46 thereby allowing the plates 34 and 36 to close through the spring action of springs 42 holding the rodent between them. At the same time line voltage is applied through the relay 332 to the plates 34 and 36 shocking and paralyzing the rodent and finally killing it. Switches 338 and 340(1) in FIG. 7 close to prevent interference during ejection and resetting cycle while switch 340(2) opens starting the timing circuit.

After the preset time delay, capacitor 312 charges to the firing voltage of unijunction transistor 296 which, in turn, fires SCRs 278 and 298 momentarily on. The commutating pulse of SCR 298 is coupled through capacitors 302 and 304 to SCRs 326 and 246 and turns them off; the commutating pulse of SCR 278 is coupled through capacitor 282 to SCR 284 and turns it off. The relay 332 deenergized throwing contacts 224 thereby removing the voltage from the plates 34 and 36 and applying voltage through switch 218 and relay 332 to the motor 214.

As the motor 214 operates lever 50 pulls arms 52 and 54 causing the closed plate mounts 28 and 30 and ejector lever 32 to pivot upward through their turning points 27 and 29 respectively. As seen in FIG. 4 thepull on these members causes trapping plates 34 and 36 with the dead rodent between them to tilt outwards to the side, pushing the door 19 open. After the plates 34 and 36 reach a position outside the trap the pushing action of ejector lever 32 causes plate 36 to rotate outwardly about pivot point 40 and ride down plate 34 dropping the rodent in front of the pusher plate 58.

At the highest point of the mounts 28 and 30 outside the trapping chamber 24 tit 72 will catch and ride in notch 70. As the motor 214 continues to turn the mounts 28 and 30 will then be lowered around their turning point and tilted back in the trap. As mounts 28 and 30 are lowered, the tit 72 engaged in notch lifts levers 62 and 64 upward forcing lever 60downward and moving member 66 and plate 58 outward relative to theside of housing 10. At a predetermined point, the curved outer edge of member 71 cams against lever 64 forcing tit 72 out of notch 70 permitting spring 68 to return plate 58 to its normal retracted position. After the mounts 28 and 30 are returned to starting position the turning power of the motor 214 and motor lever 50 apply pressure on the plate mount 30 causing arms 52,

and 54 to straighten forcing mounts 28 and 30 to remain open. As soon as the mounts 28 and 30 reach their open position switch actuator 74 mechanically opens switch 218 disconnecting the VAC return from the motor 214 stopping the motor. Simultaneously switches 338 and 340(1) are opened causing current to flow through photodiodes 78 and 79 at low resistance and switch 340(2) is closed grounding capacitor 312.

The cycle is completed and the trap is set and ready foranother catch.

Power rheostat 336 permits adjustment of the trapping plate voltage from 50 to 500 volts from secondary winding 211. Also a bridge rectifier with the AC input connected across secondary winding 211 with one side connected to relay 332 contacts 224(1) and the other side connected to the plate 34 will allow DC current to be used for the shocking of the trapped animal.

The time constant of resistor 310 and capacitor 312 RC network may be adjusted from one second to three hundred seconds thus allowing the relay 332 to remain energized for any period within this time range.

The unique disposal chamber 20 permitsthe use of an insecticide such as heavier than air vapors of D.D.V.P., dichlorvinyl dimethyl phosphate, to kill the ectoparasites on the animals. This is in contrast to present methods of killing rats, which allow the fleas to escape. As previously described, heating element assures evaporation of the insecticide and secondarily provides enough heat that a rat would seek refuge from the cold.

If desired, the rodent can be captured rather than killed by reducing the voltage of the trapping plates 4 providing a wire mesh enclosure to capture the rodent, instead of the disposable container.

Of course, a'number of components are substitutable such as power And gate or a low power And gate with power transistor used to energize the relay.

Also infrared emitting diodes and sensors may be substituted for the lamp and sensor shown. Similarly either a heat emitting bulb for the lamp and a thermistor for the sensor may be substituted or a UHF low power transmitter for the lamp and a UHF receiver for the sensor may be substituted.

A transformer may be substituted for the power rheostat 336 as a means of varying the AC or DC voltage to the plates 34 and 3.6. The secondary winding of the transformer, in place of secondary winding 211, is tapped at 50 volt increments with each tap connected to contact of a rotary selector switch. The wires of the switch is connected to plate 34 while the other side of the winding is routed to plate 36 shown through relay contacts 224(1).

ln addition the device may be operated from a 12 volt battery using a commercial 12 VDC to l VAC converter.

The mercury vapor lamp 31 disinfects the disposal chamber 20. in addition, it may be substituted for the heating element 234 when field operations do not permit sufficient power to operate element 234.

It will-thus be seen that the objects set forth above among those made apparent from the preceding description, are efficiently attained and, since certain changes may be made in the above articles without departing from the scope of the invention it is intended that all matter contained in the above description and shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

It is also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention herein described, and all statements of the scope of the invention which, as a matter of language, might be said to fall therebetween.

Now that the invention has been described,

What is claimed is;

1. An electro-mechanical animal trap comprising a housing including a trapping chamber extending the length of said housing forming a substantially clear runway, trapping means pivotally mounted in said trapping chamber, an external disposal chamber attached to said housing, motor means mounted on said housing, said housing including a door formed thereon to normally isolate said disposal chamber from said trapping chamber, said trapping means comprises first and second trapping plates depending from rotatable first and second plate mounts arranged at each end of the said trapping plates, said first and second. plate mounts operatively coupled to each other by coupling means, said second plate mount coupled to said motor means by movable interconnecting linkage having a first and second position, said interconnecting linkage and said coupling means cooperatively holding said trapping plates open relative to each other on opposite sides of said runway when said interconnecting linkage is in said first position, said motor means operatively coupled to said interconnecting linkage to move said interconnecting linkage between said first and said second position, said trapping plates being mechanically interconnected to each other by bias means to close relative to each other causing said plates to capture an animal therebetween, means for moving said interconnecting linkage out of said first position to release said trapping plates from open position, said second trapping plate being movably attached to an ejector lever pivotally attached to said housing, said second trapping plate being rotatably attached to said second plate mounts, whereby said second plate mounts and said ejector lever cooperate to cause said second trapping plate to rotate outwardly relative to said first trapping plate as said first and second plate mounts are rotated by said motor means in moving said interconnected linkage to said second position thereby ejecting a captured animal into said disposal chamber, means for starting said motor a predetermined time after said trapping plates are closed on an animal to rotate said plate mounts, said housing further including pusher means disposed in said disposal chamber, said pusher means having a first and second position and being operatively coupled to said motor means by interconnecting means to move said pusher meansbetween said first and said second position, said pusher means being arranged relative to said door to move from said first to said second position to relocate animals ejected away from the area immediately adjacent to said housing to permit repeated ejection, actuating means arranged in said trapping chamber to trigger said trapping means and electromechanical recycling means to reset trap when a trapped animal is ejected into said disposal chamber.

2. A trap as in claim 1 wherein said actuating means comprises at least one energy emitting source and at least one energy sensing element disposed in said trapping chamber in cooperative relation to one another which in combination sense the presence of an animal in said trapping chamber and triggers said means for moving said interconnected linkage out of said first position. I

3. A trap as in claim 1 wherein said actuating means comprises at least one light source and photodiode disposed in said trapping chamber in cooperative alignment with one another whereby the passage of an animal between said light source impinging on' said photodiode causes said means for moving said interconnected linkage out of said first position to operate, releasing said trapping plates to close on said animal.

4. A trap as in claim 3 further comprising a low heat gelatin filter mounted adjacent to said light source between said light source and said photodiode whereby the light emanating from said light source is filtered.

5. A trap as in claim 1 wherein said disposal chamber include insecticide means mounted therein whereby parasites on a captured animal are exterminated when said animal is in said disposal chamber.

6. A trap as in claim wherein said insecticide means comprises a strip of heavier than air evaporating pesticide.

7. A trap as in claim 6 wherein said disposal chamber includes a heating element mounted therein whereby said insecticide means is evaporated regardless of ambient temperature.

8. A trap as in claim 1 wherein said disposal chamber comprises a substantially rectangular wire mesh screen whereby live animals may be caught and survive for a period of time without being removed from said trap.

9. A trap as in claim 1 wherein said bias means includes at least one spring to close said plates relative to each other under recoil tension of said spring, said spring being adjustable to vary the force exerted between said trapping plates.

' 10. A trap as in claim 1 wherein said disposal chamber comprises a flexible container detachably connected to said housing, said container being removable from said housing without directly contacting the interior of said container.

11. A trap as in claim 1 wherein said actuating means comprises a first and second energy emitting source and a first and second energy sensing element disposed in said trapping chamber, said first energy emitting source and said first energy sensing element and said second energy emitting source and said energy sensing element respectively positioned in cooperative relation to one another to trigger said means for moving said interconncting linkage out of said first position.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4483094 *Aug 30, 1982Nov 20, 1984Mckee James ERodent exterminating apparatus
US4949500 *Feb 19, 1987Aug 21, 1990Lawrence V. M. StoneInsect or vermin trap
US5224287 *Dec 6, 1991Jul 6, 1993Knudsen Henrik MRattrap
US6445301Sep 12, 2000Sep 3, 2002Liphatech, Inc.Electronic pest monitoring system and method
US6836999Oct 20, 2003Jan 4, 2005Woodstream CorporationCPU-controlled, rearming, high voltage output circuit for electronic animal trap
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Classifications
U.S. Classification43/99
International ClassificationA01M23/38, A01M23/00
Cooperative ClassificationA01M23/38
European ClassificationA01M23/38