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Publication numberUS3815285 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 11, 1974
Filing dateMay 3, 1972
Priority dateMay 3, 1972
Publication numberUS 3815285 A, US 3815285A, US-A-3815285, US3815285 A, US3815285A
InventorsKuyper H
Original AssigneeRolscreen Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Covered window sash and method for making the same
US 3815285 A
Abstract
A clad or covered window sash and a method for making the same. Aluminum panels are permanently mounted so as to cover the exterior portions of a wood window sash. The aluminum panels are coextensive with the rails and stiles which define the sash. The panels include hook portions on both of their outer edges which engage with edge portions provided on both the inner and outer peripheries of the wooden sashes and stiles. The metal panels are secured to each of the rails and stiles of an assembled wooden sash without any fasteners and they are snapped into position over the exterior portion of each of the stiles and rails.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Paten n91 Kuyper June 11, 1974 COVERED WINDOW SASH AND METHOD FOR MAKING THE SAME [75] Inventor: Herman S. Kuyper, Knoxville, Iowa [73] Assignee: Rolscreen Company, Pella, lowa 3,555,735 1/1971 Weikert 49/501 3,667,179 6/1972 Eisenberg 49/504 X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 877,294 9/1961 Great Britain 49/501 943,963 12/1963 GreatBritain 49/501 Primary Examiner-Kenneth Downey Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Mo1inare, Allegretti, Newitt & Witcoff [57] ABSTRACT A clad or covered window sash and a method for making the same. Aluminum panels are permanently mounted so as to cover the exterior portions of a wood window sash. The aluminum panels are coextensive with the rails and stiles which define the sash. The panels include hook portions on. both of their outer edges which engage with edge portions provided on both the inner and outer peripheries of the wooden sashes and stiles. The metal panels are secured-to each of the rails and stiles of an assembled wooden sash without any'fasteners and they are snapped into position over the exterior portion of each of the stiles and rails.

11 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures PATENTEflJun 1 I new SHEEI 1 0f 3 PATENTEDJIJH 1 1 mm SHEET 3 OF 3 COVERED WINDOW SASH AND METHOD FOR MAKING THE SAME This invention relates to an improved window construction and it particularly relates to a wooden sash which has its exterior portion, normally exposed to the weather, covered by protective metal cladding and it also relates to a method for constructing such metal clad wooden windowsash.

Windows, both sashes and frames, are commonly constructed entirely of wood. It is also common to construct both sashes and frames entirely of metal, principally aluminum. One of the principal reasons why metal frames and sashes are selected over wooden frames and sashes is the significant reduction in time and expense required for the external maintenance of metal, as opposed to wood windows. This is particularly true in the case of large office and commercial buildings, wherein the external maintenance expenses are desirably kept at a'minimum. At the same time, one of the principal reasons why wood windows are not selected for use overall metal windows is that normal good maintenance requires painting of the exposed wood every few years. As a result, in large commercial buildings, the periodic painting needed for wood windows is sometimes considered undesireably expensive.

On the other hand, wood frames and sashes are selected over metal windows when the internal appearance of the windows is of primary concern. Generally, the internal appearance of a wood window is considered superior to that of an all metal window. For example, from the standpoint of appearance and beauty, particularly interior, when wood windows are stained or painted, their inside appearance is far more pleasing than that of metal windows. Also, even if metal windows are painted, there is generally an adhering problem and peeling and chipping of the paint from. the metal is quite common. If all-metal windows are not painted, their internal appearance is generally not as visually pleasing as a properly stained or painted wood window.

In addition to the appearance advantage that wood windows have over metal windows, there is a significant functional advantage of wood windows over metal windows. This advantage is particularly apparent in cold climates where the significantly better insulating qualities of wood are apparent in comparison to the relatively poor insulating qualities of the all-metal windows. The poor insulating qualities of metal have the disadvantage of resulting in a heating loss in the cold months and a cooling loss in the summer. Also, in cold climates, condensation and frost often develop along the metal frames and sashes, even if insulating glass panels are used. Such condensation development creates an unsightly appearance, as well as maintenance and cleaning problems.

From the above, it is seen that the principal disadvantage of wood windows over metal windows may be overcome by applying a permanent covering. of some type over theexterior portion of the wood windows that are subject to weather conditions. The two materi als that come to mind for this purpose are plastic and metal. Plastic cover panels have the disadvantage of having a limited life since plastics known to be useful for such a purpose are subject to sunlight and oxygen deterioration after a period of years.

As a result of the foregoing, it is considered desirable to cover the exterior wood portions of the window frame and window sash with metal, preferably alumi-' num. As far as the frame iteself is concerned, it has been known to construct extruded aluminum sills, jambs, and heads which are interconnected to interior wood portions. The use of heavy extruded aluminum members'for the sash portion of the window is consid-' ered undesireable from a material cost standpoint. Also, assembly would be costly as it would probably be necessary to slide the cladding on the stiles and rails and it would probably not be possible to assemble the matal cladding or covering over a fully assembled sash. By having a design which pennits assembly of the cladding to an assembled sash, the sash could be selectively covered with metal cladding or could be used without cladding, thereby permitting the use of one assembly line to make sashes, regardless if some of the assembled sashes are ultimately clad. Also, in assembling the metal panels to the wood sash, consideration should be given to maintaining assembly costs at a minimum while retaining a desireable external appearance. Thus, external fasteners, which not only create appearance problems but which also add labor and material costs, are to beavoided.

' SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION making the same wherein the window sashes are primarily constructed of wood and are covered or clad by an exterior protective metal panel.

It is also an object of this invention to provide an improved clad or covered window sash assembly wherein the disadvantages of prior art constructions are sub stantially avoided.

It is another object of this invention to provide an improved metal clad wood window and method for making the same wherein metal panels are assembled to the sash without the use of fasteners and following complete assembly of the wood sash.

,It is a further object of this invention to provide an improved clad window sash wherein cooperating ele-. ments are provided on the wood sash and on the metal clad panels for fixedly holding the panels to the sash without external fasteners.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a metal clad window sash and method for making the same wherein the product and method are particularly characterized by their simplicity and economy of construction, manufacture, and assembly.

It is also a further object of this invention to provide a metal clad window sash wherein the metal panels are snapped directly in place over the wood stiles and rails of the sash without the use of any fasteners and following the complete assembly of the wood sash including a suitable glazing panel.

It is yet another object of this invention to provide an improved metal clad window sash wherein the construction and method for making the same may be used in conjunction with a variety of window products, including double-hung windows, casement windows, and sliding glass doors.

It is also another object of this invention to provide a metal clad window sash wherein the metal cladding includes portions which have a dual function of engaging the wood stiles and rails of the sash for securement thereto and of sealably biting into the sealing material located between the glazing panel and the window frame. 4

Further purposes and objects of this invention will appear as the specification proceeds.

The foregoing objects are accomplished by providing a wood window sash which includes upright spaced stiles interconnected by spaced top and bottom rails, an exterior portion being included on each of the rails and stiles, a metalpanel being permanently mounted adjacent to the exterior side of each of said rails and stiles, and cooperating means, including hook portions on said panels and edge portions on said exterior portions of said stiles and rails, for securing said panels in place on a pre-assembled sash, said cooperating means being devoid of other fastener means.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Particular embodiments of the present invention are illustrated in the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a'pictorial, partially broken view of my improved metal clad window sash used in conjunction with a casement type window;

FIG. 2 is a partially broken, pictorial view, of a double hung window wherein my improved metal clad window sash construction is used;

FIG. 3 is a partially broken, pictorial view, of my improved metal clad sash construction used in conjunction with sliding glass doors;

FIG. 4 is a pictorial view, in section, of a typical metal panel prior to assembly to a window sash;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged cross-sectional viewof a metal cladding panel, as it is being assembled, in one manner, to a preassembled window sash;

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 5, except the metal cladding panel is shown as it is being assembled, in another manner, to a preassembled window sash;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of a typical metal panel assembled in place to a window sash; and

FIG. 8 is a broken, partially sectioned front view of a corner of a metal cladding panel assembled in-place over the exterior of a window sash.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to FIGS. 1 3, my improved clad window, generally 10, is shown as used as a casement window (FIG. 1), generally 12, on a double hung window (FIG. 2), generally 14, and on a sliding glass door assembly (FIG. 3), generally 16.

Referring first to FIG. 1, clad window sash 10 is shown on the casement window 12. Although the window frame 18 in FIG. 1 is shown constructed from wood, it is to be understood that it is preferable for not onlythe window sash 12 to be clad, but also for the window frame 18 to be clad so that all the advantages of my invention can be better realized. The embodiment of FIG. 1, however, does show that the window sill 20, the head 22, and the window jambs 24, may, if desired, be made of wood while the sash can be clad. Also, for convenience of illustration, the mechanical parts of the window 12, such as window cranks, and the like, have not been shown in the embodiment of FIG.

1 as well as the other embodiments shown. In the embodiment of FIG. 1, only the easement window sash 26 has protective cladding panels 28, 30, and 32 covering the wood upper rail 34, stiles 36, and bottom rail 38.

In the casement window 12, an outer glazing panel 40 is received in a continuous rabbet 42 provided in the inner perimeter of the sash 26, and a wood glass stop 44 is cemented along the inner rim of the sash 26 to hold the glazing panel 40 in place. In the window 12, a double glazing panel 46, removable from the room interior, is mounted in the window 12 so as to provide an air space for insulation between the panels 40 and 46.

'In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the panels 28, 30 and 32 are preferably made of rolled, formed aluminum, as about .024 inches thick, and are assembled directly to a fully assembled sash 26 having the glazing panel 40 therein. In assembling the protective cladding panels 28, 30 and 32 to the sash 26, the bottom panel 32 is first mounted on or secured to the bottom rail 38. The stile panels 30 are then assembled over the stiles 36, in order that the lower ends of the stile panels 30 overlap the lateral outer edges of the bottom rail panel 32. After installing the stile panels 30, the top protective panel 28 is placed over the top rail 32 so as to overlap the upper ends of the stile panels 30. By incorporating a method of installing the cladding panels over the assembled sash 26, in this manner, lap joints 48, or overlapping beveled or mitered ends, assist in providing a weather or moisture seal to avoid moisture forming between the metal cladding panels 28, 30 and 32, and the rails 34 and 38 and stiles 36. Such weather seal results since the lateral beveled ends of the top rail panel 28 overlap the beveled upper ends of the stile panels 30, causing rainwater to pass or flow over the lap joint 48, Similarly, the rain water or moisture dripping down the stile panel 30 flows overbottom lap joints 48. As will be described hereinafter in greater detail, a sealant is also provided at each of the lap joints 48.

Referring to the embodiment of FIG. 2, the protective cladding is used on the double hung window 14. In the embodiment of FIG. 2, the window sill 50, the head 52, and the window jambs 54, all have an exterior protective cover of extruded aluminum. As shown, the sill extrusion 56 is interconnected to an interior wood sill portion 58. Similarly, the jamb extrusions 60 are secured to wood jamb portions (not shown). A head extrusion 62 is interconnected to the interior wood portion of the head 52 of the window 14. The head 52, like the sill, 50, and jambs, retains the interior appearance of wood while the window frame has an exterior metal of the desired color, as a coating of a high temperature baked acrylic polymer.

The upper sash 64 of the double hung window 14 has a protective panel 66 secured to the top rail 68, a protective panel 70 secured to each of the upright stiles and a clad panel 72 is secured to the bottom rail 74. As in the embodiment of FIG. 1, the bottom panel 72 is installed first to the bottom rail 74, then thestile panels 70 are mounted on the stiles so as to define a lap joint 76 at each of the bottom corners, and finally the upper protective panel 68 is mounted'in place so as to provide the desired lap joints 76 at the upper corners.

The bottom protective panel 72 on the bottom rail 74 has a somewhat different cross-sectional shape from the protective panels 66 and 68 used on the top rail 68 and on the stiles. As seen in FIG. 2, the bottom panel 72 has an outer stepped portion which receives the frame of a window screen (not shown). Also, a planar bottom portion 80 extends across the entire lower surface of the bottom rail 74 so as to cover the entire surface and protect 'itfrom exposure to weathercondithe stile panels 88are installed to provide the appropriate lap joints 94.at the lower corners; finally, the top panel 84 is installedover the beveled upper ends of the stile panels 88 in order to provide the desired lap joints 94 at the upper corners. In the lower sash 82 of the embodiment of FIG. 2, thetop panel 84 has a somewhat different cross-sectional shape than the panels 88 and 4 90. This difference results from the requirement that the top check rail 86 is to have an interior appearance of wood. A continuous lip 96 is received within a groove provided in the exterior face of the top rail 86. A Weatherstrip seal 97 is positioned on the inner face of the bottom check rail 74 and, in the closed position, bears against the outer, upright face of the top protective panel 84 of the lower sash82.'

As in the embodiment of FIG. 1, the lap joints 94 and the lap joints 76 preferably have associated therewith asealing mastic or material which will be hereinafter discussed in greater detail.

Referring to the embodiment of FIG.'3, my clad window design is shown used with the sliding glass door construction 16. As in the embodiment of FIG. 2, the embodiment of FIG. 3 has a window frame 98 which is constructed on its exterior of extruded aluminum. An extruded aluminum sill 100 is provided on the exterior and is interconnected to a wooden portion of the sill which is located on the interior only. Similarly, an extruded aluminum jamb 102 and an extruded aluminum head 104. are rigidly interconnected to the wood portions of the jamb and head. Each door 106 is constructed insubstantially the same manner, it being understoodthat one of the doors 106 is fixed while the other is moving. In both cases, the doors 106 include double glazing panels 108 for thermal insulation purposes. The bottom rail 11 0 is covered by a protective panel 1l2,the stiles of the doors 106 are covered by protective panels 114, and the top rail 116 of each door 106 is covered by a top protective panel 118. As in the embodiment of FIGS. 1 and 2, the lower panel 112 is installed on the assembled door 106 first, then the stile panels 114 are installed so as to overlap the bottom panel 1 12 and provide suitable lap joints 120 at the bottom corners; finally, the top panel 118 is installed so as to overlap the beveled upper ends of the stile panels 114 so as to provide the lap joints 120 at the upper corners of the door 106. Again, for convenience of illustration, the hardware used on the sliding doors 106 is not shown, as such details form no part of this invention.

Referring to FIG. 4, there is shown a typical enlarged pictorial view, in section, of a typical panel section of the type used in the embodiments of FIGS. 1 3. The only places of the embodiments of FIGS. 1 3 which do not use the design shown in FIG. 4 are the panels 72 and 84 onthe check rails 74 and 86 of the double hung window 14 of FIG. 2. In the panel embodiment of FIG.

4, the panel, generally 122 includes a generally upright planar portion 124 which is positioned exterior and adjacent the vertical outer faces of the stiles and rails which define the sashes in the embodiments of FIGS. 1- 3. The portions of the assembled panels 122 define an outer and inner perimeter. Each outer perimeter section of each panel has a rearwardly extending section 126 which terminates with an outwardly directed hook portion 128. Each section 126 extends at substantially a right angle to the planar portion 124. Each inner perimeter section of the panels. 1122 includes an upwardly and inwardly angled section 130 which terminates with an inturned hook 132. Preferably, each panel is constructed of roll-formed aluminum having a thickness of about 0.024 inches. Although material other than metal, such as extruded plastic, could be used to form the panel 122, metal, as aluminum, is preferably used because of the ability of the aluminum to withstand adverse weather conditions and sunlight. Furthermore, in view of the method of assembling the panels to the assembled sash, it is impoatant that the material used for the panels has sufficient resiliency, without the danger of breakage; an aluminum panel has been found to have these desired qualities.

, With respect to the check rail panels 72 and 84, their structures are different from each other and from the conventional cladding or panels. The panel 72 on the upper sash 64 has a hook 132 and an angle section 130, as with the panel 122, shown in FIG. 4. The panel 72 also has a planar portion 124, as with the panel .122. The bottom portion 162 of the panel 72, as previously describedextends across the entire bottom of the bottom rail 74 and has the stepped portion 164 to receive a screen (not shown). An uptume d continuouslip 166 is received by the rear, lower corner of the bottom rail 184. As to the check rail 86 in the lower sash 82, the panel 84 includes the hook 132 and angledsection 130. The panel 84, however, has a front portion 168 which terminates in the continuous lip received in the front or exterior face of the check rail 86..

Referring to FIGS. 5 7, one of the important advantages of my invention is simplicity and ease by which the panels 122, as shown in FIG. 4, may be assembled directly to an otherwise fully assembled sash. The panels 122 are constructed so as to be snapped in place over the interior wood portions of the fully assembled stilesand rails,without the use of any external fastener means.

Referring to FIG. 5, one method of assembling the panel 122 to a rail 134, for example, is shown. In this embodiment the hook section 128 is first placed into engagement with an inwardly facing edge or ledge 136 defined along the outer perimeter or periphery of the jamb 134. The upper hook 132 is then slid or forced along a slanted surface'138 provided on the inner perimeter of the jamb 134, and the hook 132 is forced around an edge where it engages the jamb, as best shown in FIG. 7. It is also important for the downwardly extending hook 132 to s-ealably bite into the sealing mastic 142 which maybe used to seal the peripheryof an insulating glass panel 144. In this way, a weather-tight seal is provided between each panelv 122 and the inner periphery of the wood sections of the window sash.

Alternatively, the panel 122, referring to FIG. 6, may be assembled to the stile or rail 134 by having the upper hook 132 first placed into engagement with the upper edge 140 and then the other hook 128 is passed over the beveled surface 146 and slid over the outer exterior portion 148 until the hook 128 engages or snaps over the ledge 136. It is thus seen that the panel 122 is per manently installed on the window sash without the use of external fasteners and after the entire window, including the glass, has been constructed. A further advantage of the applicant's construction is that the window sash may be used with or without the metal cladding since the sash is designed not only to receive the metal cladding, but, even without the metal cladding, it has substantially the same external appearance of a normal wood window.

Referring to FIG. 8, an enlarged section of a lap joint 150 such as that shown in FIGS. 1 3 is shown. The lap joint 150, shown is the type which would be positioned at a lower corner section. The stile panel 152 has its beveled lower edge overlapping the beveled lateral edge of the bottom rail panel 154 by a small amount, as A; 1 inch. Prior to placing the bottom rail panel 154 in place, a strip of mastic as a butyl rubber mastic 156 is laid on the lateral beveled edge of the panel 154, which edge passes from the inner corner 158 to the outer corner 160 of the intersecting rail and stile. After the overlapping panel is placed thereover, the mastic 156 acts as a further weather seal between the panels 122 and the wooden portions of the sash. All areas of the adjacent metal panels and wood window portions that are normally exposed to moisture are thereby provided with a moisture seal. Also, by placing the protective panels in place on a sash in the manner described to provide the desired lap joints, there is essentially no build-up of moisture between the wood sections and the metal panels. Although there is no sealing mastic between the panels and the window sash along the edge defined by the hooks 128 and ledges 136, even after an extended period of exposure to weather, there has been no moisture build-up found.

From the foregoing description, it is seen that I have provided a uniquely constructed window sash having a protective panel, as aluminum, clad or sheathed over a wood window sash. In this way, the insulating properties of the wood window is preserved while the exterior is covered with a weather proof metal paneling which is protected with an enamel having the desired color, resulting in minimal exterior maintenance problems for the windows. At the same time, the interior beauty of the wood is preserved. The particular design does not use additional fasteners and the cladding is mounted on the windows following complete assembly of the windows merely by snapping each panel in place over the sections of the sash.

While in the foregoing, there has been provided a detailed description of particular embodiments of the present invention, it is to be understood that all equivalents obvious to those having skill in the art are to be included within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent 1. A window sash comprising, in combination, upright and elongated spaced wood stiles interconnected by top and bottom spaced and elongated wood rails, an exterior portion on each of said rails and stiles, a continuous inwardly directed rabbet defined by said interconnected rails and stiles, window glass received within said rabbet, means positioned within said rabbet for providing a weather seal between said rails and stiles and said window glass, said exterior portions of said stiles and rails having a continuous inner edge portion defining an outer wall for said continuous rabbet, a continuous inner peripheral portion defined on said inner edge portion, a continuous outer peripheral portion spaced outwardly from said inner peripheral portion defined on said exterior portion, a plurality of elongated, flexible, metallic panels mounted over and adjacent each of said exterior stile and rail portions and defining a continuous protective covering for said exterior stile and rail portions, the ends of adjacent panels being in substantial overlapping relationship, weather seal means defined at said overlapping ends, each of said panels having inner and outer edge portions, longitudinal hook means defined on said inner and outer edge portions, said inner and outer hook means cooperating with both said inner and outer peripheral portions, respectively, for defining the sole means for securing said panels to said stiles and rails, said longitudinal hook means on said inner edge portions cooperating with said weather seal means to define a seal therewith, said hook means and said peripheral portions being constructed and arranged to have said hook means pass over said peripheral portions of said stiles and rails in a direction transverse to the length of said elongated stiles and rails and into permanent securing relationship with said peripheral portions of said stiles and rails, thereby defining said sole securing means therebetween.

2. The article of claim I wherein said window sash is a double hung window sash.

3. The article of claim 1 wherein said window sash is a casement window sash. I

4. The article of claim 1 wherein said window sash is a sliding glass door.

5. The article of claim 1 wherein said panels are rollformed aluminum.

6. The article of claim 1 wherein said weather seal means includes the protective panel at said top rail of said sash overlapping the upper ends of the protective panels covering said upright stiles, and the lower ends of said stile covering panels overlapping the lateral ends of said panel covering said bottom rail.

7. The article of claim 1' wherein said weather seal means includes a sealing material positioned between said sash and the overlapping ends of said panels.

8. In a window sash of the type which includes spaced, upright and elongated wood stiles interconnected by top and bottom spaced and elongated wood rails, an exterior portion on each of said stiles and rails, a continuous inwardly facing rabbet defined by said interconnected rails and stiles, window glass fixedly received within said rabbet, means positioned in said rabbet for providing a weather seal between said rails and stiles and said window glass, said exterior portions of said stiles and rails having a continuous inner edge portion defining an outer wall for said continuous rabbet, the improvement comprising a continuous inner peripheral portion defined on said inner edge portion, a continuous outer peripheral portion spaced ouwardly from said inner peripheral portion defined on said exterior portion, a plurality of elongated, flexible, metallic panels mounted over and adjacent each of said exterior stile and rail portions for defining a continuous protective covering for said exterior stile and rail portions, the ends of adjacent panels being in substantial overlapping relationship, each of said panels having inner and outer edge portions, longitudinal hook means defined on said inner and outer edge portions, said inner and outer hook means cooperating with said inner and outer peripheral portions, respectively, for defining the sole means for securing said panels to said stiles and rails, said inner longitudinal hook means cooperating with said weather seal means to define a weather seal there with, said hook means and said peripheral portions being constructed and arranged to have said hook means pass over said peripheral portions of said stiles and rails in a direction transverse to the length of said stiles and rails and into permanent securing relationship with said peripheral portions of said stiles and rails, thereby defining said sole securing means therebetween.

9. The article of claim 8 wherein said panels are rollformed aluminum.

10. The article of claim 8 wherein said weather seal means includes sealing materials provided between said sash and said panels where said ends of said panels are in said overlapping relationship.

11. The article of claim 8 wherein said weather seal means includes the protective panel for said top rail overlapping the upper ends of the protective panels covering said upright stiles, and the lower ends of said stile covering panels overlapping the lateral ends of said panel covering said bottom rail.

* F IR

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Classifications
U.S. Classification49/501, 52/656.6, 52/717.1, 49/504
International ClassificationE06B3/30
Cooperative ClassificationE06B3/302
European ClassificationE06B3/30A2