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Publication numberUS3815578 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 11, 1974
Filing dateMay 11, 1973
Priority dateMay 11, 1973
Also published asDE2422828A1
Publication numberUS 3815578 A, US 3815578A, US-A-3815578, US3815578 A, US3815578A
InventorsBucalo L
Original AssigneeInvestors In Ventures Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of inserting an implant into a portion of a tubular organ whose mucous lining has been partially removed
US 3815578 A
Abstract
An implant to be introduced into a cavity of a living body, as well as a tool and method for implanting. The tool is a reamer for removing a layer of mucosa which lines the lumen of a tubular body organ which is to receive the implant. The implant carries at a part of its exterior a structure for promoting the ingrowth of tissue, and with the use of the tool mucosa is removed only at the part of the tubular organ which is to be in engagement with the structure for promoting the ingrowth of tissue after the implant is introduced into the tubular organ. The implant carries at the region of the structure for promoting the ingrowth of tissue a fastening structure of hook-shaped configuration for hookig into the tissue of the tubular organ from the interior thereof to maintain the tubular organ in engagement with the implant, securely connected thereto, while the tissue has an opportunity to grow into intimate contact with the exterior of the implant.
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United States Patent p191 Bucalo m1 3,815,578 [45] June 11, 1974 i 1 METHOD OF INSERTING AN IMPLANT [75] Inventor: Louis Bucalo, Holbrook, NY. [73] Assignee: Investors In Ventures, Inc., New

York, NY.

[22] Filed: May 11, 1973 [2]] Appl. No.: 359,429

[52] US. Cl. 128/1 R, l 28/304,'l28/334 R [51] Int. Cl A6lm 19/00 [58] Field of Search.... 128/1 R,'303 R, 304, 305, 128/310, 311, 334 R, 334 'C; "3/1 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,983,601 12/1934 Conn 128/34 3,042,021 7/1962 Read 128/1 R 3,221,746 .l2/l965 Noble 128/334 R 3,613,661 10/1971 Shah 128/1 R 3,699,957 [0/1972 Robinson l28/l R 3,704,704 Gonzales l28/l R Primary Examiner-Dalton L. Truluck Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Steinberg & Blake I ABSTRACT growth of tissue after the implant is introduced into the tubular organ. The implant carries at the region of the structure for'promoting the ingrowth'of tissue a fastening structure of hook-shaped configuration for hookig into the tissue of the tubular organ from the interior thereof to maintain the tubular organ in engagement with the implant, securely connected thereto, while the tissue has an opportunity to grow into intimate contact with the exterior of the implant.

7 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures k I m J llllllllllll METHOD OF INSERTING AN IMPLANT INTO A PORTION or A TUBULAR ORGAN WHOSE MUCOUS LINING HAS BEEN PARTIALLY REMOVED I BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to implants to be introduced into the bodies of living beings, as well as to tools and methods utilized in connection with the introduction of such implants.

Although it is known to introduce into the body of a living being, such as a human being, artificial implants such as valves for reversibly interrupting the flow of a fluid in a tubular body organ, one of the most serious problems encountered in connection with such implants is that of securely maintaining the implant at the desired location in the body cavity. Because the implant is located in a body of living tissue, particular problems are encountered because while it is essential to secure the implant in the body of living tissue, at the same time it is necessary for nourishment to reach the living tissue, and living tissue has the property of adapting itself to forces which it encounters in such a way that peculiar problems are encountered in the securing of an implant in the interior of a body cavity. Furthermore, problems are encountered in connection with securely mounting an implant of this type in such a way that the flow of a body fluid can be reliablycontrolled. For example, in the case of a valve, it is essential to secure the valve in thebody cavity in such a way that fluid cannot flow along the exterior of the valve, thus defeating the purpose of the valve. I Moreover, the physicians and surgeons who introduce the implant must have a considerable amount of skill in order to securely situate the implant at the desired location in a reliable manner according to conventional techniques. This required skill is relatively rare, so that with many surgeons the implant is situated in a body cavity without the assurance of a reliable securement of the implant.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is accordingly a primary object of the present 'invention to provide not 'onlyan implant but also a tool and method for implanting, all of which will contribute to elimination of the above drawbacks.

Thus, one of the primary objects-of the present invention is to provide an implanting method according to which an exceedingly secure connection of the implant to the body cavity in the interior thereof will be achieved in a simple highly reliable manner which does not require a great amount of skill on the part of the individual who introduces the-implant.

Also, it is an object of the present invention to provide an implanting method which will assure a reliable ingrowth of tissue into intimate contact with the exterior surface of the implant, to achieve not only a secure connection of the implant but also to prevent body fluid from flowing along the exterior of the implant.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a tool which is easy to manipulate and which places the body tissue in a condition which will contribute greatly to the reliability of the securement of the implant in the body cavity.

Furthermore, it is an object of the present invention to provide an implant which itself has a construction which greatly contributes toward the security of the connection of the implantto the body organ in the interior thereof.

According to the method of the invention the implant carries at its exterior a fastening meanswhich hooks into the tissue of the body organ from the interior thereof for reliably maintaining the implant at the desired location in the body cavity. Alsoin accordance with the invention a layer of mucosa is removed from the inner surface of the body organ which receives the implantat that part of the inner surface which becomes situated next to a means for promoting the ingrowth of tissue into intimate contact with the exterior surface of the implant, the implant being provided v'vith's'uch a means prior to its introduction into the body cavity. Furthermore, according to yet another feature of the invention the body cavity is manipulated in such a way that it will not be subject to undesirable slack which could contribute to faulty operation of the implant.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS The invention is illustrated by way of example in the accompanying drawings which form part of this application and in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevation of a tool according to the invention shown schematically in FIG. 1 during use of the tool, with a handle of the tool being fragmentarily illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. -2 fragmentarily illustrates an implant, FIG. 2 il- I lustrating the relationship between the tool and the implant, in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a transverse section of the tool of FIG. 1

taken along line 33 of FIG. 1 in the direction of the FIG. 5 is a transverse section of the implant of FIG.

4 taken along line 55 of FIG. 4 in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary elevation of another embodiment of an implant which will accomplish the same results as that of FIGS. 4 and 5;

FIG. 7 is a developed view of a sheet from which the fastening means of FIG. 6 is made;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary sectional elevation of the fastening means of FIG. 6 and 7 showing in greater detail how it is mounted on the implant;

FIG. 9 is a schematic illustration of how part of a vas deferens is cut away prior to introduction of the implant, in accordance with a further feature of the present invention; and

FIG. 10 is a schematic representation of how the vas deferens is treated after it has the condition shown in FIG. 9 so as to further contribute to the security of. the mounting of the implant in the vas deferens.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS I schematically illustrated in FIG. 1. As is apparent from FIG. 3, the reaming edges 18 of the shank portion 16 project so as to be able to remove material which in the illustrated example is a layer of mucosa which lines the lumen of the vas deferens 20 which is schematically illustr'ated in FIG. 1.

The tool 12 has at the shank 14 not only the reaming portion 16 but also an elongated tapered portion 22 which has a smooth exterior surface and which generally tapers so that at itsend distant from the reaming portion 16 the portion 22 has a diameter smaller than the portion 16; At this end the portion 22 is followed by a subsequent smooth-surfaced portion 24 of the shank 14 which is of a constant diameter substantially smaller than that of the portion 16, and this portion 24 terminates in a substantially pointed tip 26, shown most clearly in FIG. 1. Thus, after the vas 20 is severed so that an elongated free end portion thereof, as illustrated in FIG. 1, is accessible, the physician or surgeon will introduce into .the vas the shank 14 of the tool 12. For convenience in handling, the reaming portion 16 is fixed at its end distant from the portion 22 to a handle 28 which can be grasped for ease of manipulation of the tool. The tip 26 and the portion 24 serves to guide the tool in the interior along the lumen 30 of the vas 20, and when the right end of the handle 28 engages the free end of the vas 20, the reaming portion 16 will-be situated as illustrated in FIG. 1 so that by rotation of the reamer, which is manually rotated by manual turning of the handle28, it is possible to remove from the interior of the vas 20 a layer of mucosaalong the portion R of the vas, as illustrated in FIG. 1.

The implant which is to be introduced into the vas is in the illustrated example a valve 32 which is fragmentarily illustrated in FIG. 2 and which is of a previously proposed, constuction. This valve 32 has the intermediate housing portion 34 in which a valve member is situated to be moved in order to open and close the valve 32. For this purpose the movable part of the valve has a stem 36 which projects beyond the intermediate portion 34 and which can be turned so as to open and close the valve.

At the intermediate portion 34 the valve 32 has a pair of oppositely directed tubular extensions 38 and 46.

Extension 38 is shown in FIG. 2 extending to the right from the intermediate portion 34. This tubular extension 38 serves as the inlet or outlet for the valve when the valve is in its open position. As is illustrated in FIG. 2, the tubular extension 38 terminates in an elongated outer free end portion 40 which is formed with a slot 42 in order to prevent plugging of the open end of the tubular extension 38.

Between the intermediate portion 34 and its smoothsurfaced elongated free end portion 40, the tubular extension 38 carries a means 44 for promoting the ingrowth of tissue. It is to be understood that the tubular extension 46 which is only fragmentarily illustrated in FIG. 2 as extending from the left from the intermediate portion 34 will have a construction identical with the tubular extension 38. Thus, both the extensions 38 and 46 have a means 44 for promoting the ingrowth of tissue. This means 44 in the illustrated example is of a filamentary construction and takes the form of tine wire which is wound around the tubular extension 38 and which is made of a material which is compatible with the human body. This is of course true of all of the materials used for the implant. This fine wire used for the means 44 for promotingthe ingrowth of tissue can be gold or platinum, for example. However, the means 44 may also take the form of any suitable porous matrix such as porous metal compatible with the human body and sputtered onto the surface of the extension 38 in an evacuated atmosphere. Any of these constructions are possible for the pair of means 44 respectively carried by the extensions 38 and 46 in order to promote the ingrowth of tissue. It is to be noted that this means 44 extends along the tubular extension 38 through the distance R which is the same distance R along the interior of the vas 20 from which the layer of mucosa is removed by the reamer 12. Thus, the extension 38 has a total length L, and the layer of mucosa is removed only along a distance corresponding to the distance R along the extension 38, so that when the implant is introduced into the vas, the elongated free end portion 40 will extend beyond the region from which the layer of mucosa has been removed by the reamer 12. Thus, the length of the reaming portion 16 is carefully selected to correspond to the distance through which the means 44 extends along the extension38, and when this extension 38 is introduced into the vas, only that part of the lumen from which the layer of mucosa has been re-' moved will engage the means 44. The remainder of the interior lining of the lumen beyond the means 44 will retain the mucosa layer, so that a layer of mucosa will indeed engage the elongated portion 40.

The extension 46 is treated in precisely the same way as the extension 38. Thus, the other free end of the vas which is not illustrated in FIG. 1 also has a layer of mucosa removed by the tool 12 in precisely the same way so that when the extension 46 is introduced into the other part of the vas only the part of the lumen from which the layer of mucosa has been removed will engage the means for promoting the ingrowth of tissue which is carried by the extension 46. The elongated free end portion thereof which extends beyond the means for promoting ingrowth of tissue will engage the mucosa lining, as described above in connection with the extension 38.

Thus, referring to FIG. 4, it will be seen that the valve 32 is illustrated with its opposed extensions 38 and 46 respectively situated in the lumens of the pair of the pair of separated vas portions 20 and 50 which have been separated from each other by cutting through the vas prior to introduction of the implant 32. The vas portion 20 is shown with the mucosa layer 48 extending from the right end of the means 44 carried by the extension 38 for promoting ingrowth of tissue, so that the elongated free end portion 40 is in engagement with the mucosa lining 48. In the same way,the free end portion 40 of the extension 46 engages the mucosa lining 52 of the vas portion 50, this lining 52 extending only up to the means 44 which is carried by the extension 46.

As has been set forth above, one of the important factors in introducing an implant such as the implant 32 into the interior of a body cavity such as the interior of the tubular organ 20 or 50 is the reliable securing of the implant in its position in the interior of the body cavity. Experience has shown that the tissue of the vas portions 20 and 50 will very rapidly grow into the pair of means 44 for promoting ingrowth of tissue, so that the tissue of the vas portions 20 and 50 will come into intimate tight engagement with the exterior surface of the exten I sions 38 and 46 at the interstices or pores of the means 44 which promotes the ingrowth of tissue. The removal 5 of the mucosa lining at that part of the organ which engages, at its inner surface, the'means 44 contributes in a highly remarkable manner to the rapid ingrowth of tissue in order to achieve the secure connection between the living tissue and the implant.

However, immediately after the implant has been introduced into the lumen of the tubular organ, itis desirable to maintain the tubular organ and the implant connected to each other until the tissue of the organ has an opportunity to grow into the means 44. Thus, it is possible to suture the vas portions 20 and 50 to each other in order to maintain them in the position shown in FIG. 4 until the tissue grows into the means 44 on the extensions 38 and 46. However, such suturing has proved to be a problem since many surgeons cannot perform the suturing in a fully effective manner. Furthermore, such suturing requires an increased time for the operating procedure, which is undesirable.

Therefore, according to a further feature of the invention the implant 32 is provided with a fastening means 54 capable of fastening the vas portions 20 and 50 onto the extensions 38 and 46 in a highly reliable manner which will maintain the implant in the position shown in FIG. 4 until the tissue grows into the pair of means 44, without requiring the inconvenient suturing or other measures which may be used to retain the components in theposition shown in FIG. 4.

This fastening'means 54 in the example of FIGS. 4 and takes the form of a plurality of-hooks 56 circumferentially distributed about each of the extensions 38 and 46, in the manner shown most clearly in FIG. 5. Thusin the illustrated example there are four hooks 56 circumferentially distributed about the extension 38, and four additional hooks 56 are of course circumferentially distributed about the extension 44, in the manner shown in FIG. 5 according to which the hooks are uniformly distributed angularly about each extension. These hooks 56 are also made of a material which is compatible with the human vas such as gold or platinum, for example. The hooks 56 are of a substantially V-shaped configuration and are each provided with one leg extending alongthe exterior surface of the extension 38 or 46 and held onto the latter by-thc windings of the wire which forms the means 44, as illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5. However, any other suitable mounting of the fastening means on the tubular extensions can be used. For example in the case where the means 44 takes the form of a porous matrix, the hooks 56 are initially positioned in engagement with the exterior surface of the tubular extensions and then the deposited matrix will itself serve to fix the hooks 56 to the exterior surface of each of the extensions 38 and 44. It is to be noted that in addition to a leg which extends along and is fixed to the exterior surface of each extension 38, each hook 56 has an outer inclined leg 58 which terminates in a pointed free end. These inclined legs 58 ofthe hooks 56 are included in such a direction that they permit each extension 38 and 46 to be introduced into the lumen but will prevent removal of each extensionQAny attempt at removal will only result in further digging of the hooks 58 into the tissue which forms the vas portions and 50. Thus, these hooks will serve to provide an exceedingly secure connection between the vas portions 20 and 50 and the tubular extensions of the implant 32, so that there will be sufficient opportunity for the tissue to grow into the pair of means 44 to achieve the secure tight connection which .will not only securely maintain the implant in the position shown in FIG. 4 but which will also reliably prevent any leakage of fluid along the exterior ofthevalve.

ration shown in FIG. 7. It will be noted that these sections have a free jagged edge 64 which extends from a substantially rectangular portion 66, with the free edge 64 extending between a pair of oppositely inclined edge regions 68 which project from the substantially rectangular portion 66. The length of the means 60 is such that it can be wrapped at least once around the tubular extensions 38 and 46in the manner shown in FIG. 6. The wire which is used to form the means 44 can be wrapped around the cylindrical part 70 which is formed from the rectangular portion 66 of the sheet 62. The remaining part, because of the inclined edges 68 and the longer length of the jagged edge 64 forms an outwardly flaring portion 72 terminating in the jagged edge 74 which is thus spaced from the extension 38 and pointed toward the intermediate part 34 of the implant 32, as shown in FIGS. 6 and 8. Thus, the wire which forms the means 44 is securely wrapped around the cylindrical part 70 which is formed from the rectangular portion 62, and part of the wire of the means 44 is also surrounded by the flaring portion 72 which terminates in the jagged edge 64. After the left portion of the wire is wound, as viewed in FIG. 6, the means 60 can be 1 wrapped around the tubular extension 38, and then the remainder of the wire can be wrapped to secure the means 60 in the position shown in FIGS. 6 and 8. In the same way a means 60 is secured to the extension 46.

Therefore, with the embodiment of FIGS. 6-8 when the implant is introduced to the position shown in FIG. 4, the sharp points situated along the jagged edge 64 will dig into the tissue in order to provide an extremely secure'mounting while retaining the implant in position within the body cavityin a manner which permits the tissue to grow freely into the means 44 which promotes the ingrowth of tissue.

Thus, both of the embodiments 54 and 60 of a fastening means according to the invention enable the. implant to be introduced with substantially no resistance into the interior of the tubular organ but prevents removal of the implant once it has been situated in the organ, enabling the tissue of the latter, particularly the part from which the mucosa layer has been removed, to freely grow into the interstices 0r pores of the means According to a further feature of the invention, a vas deferens 76 which is schematically shown in FIG. 9, has an elongated portion cut away, this portion extending only up to the lumen 80, so that the vas 76 is left with an elongated continuous portion 82 as illustrated in FIG. 9. Then the tool 12 is introduced into the free ends of the lumen which are connected by the portion 82 in order to remove themucosa layer as described above in connection with FIG. 1.

Thereafter, the implant is introduced, and this implant preferably has a fastening means, such as the fastening means 54 or the fastening means 60.

The elongated portion 82 of the vas is deflected away from the lumen 80 so as to be formed into apair of flaps 84, as shown in FIG. 10, these flaps of course being integrally connected to each other at their common end 86 which is distant from the vas 76. Then the flaps 84 are simply sutured together.

The result of this feature of the invention is that in addition to all of the advantages discussed above, in connection with the other embodiments, the method of FIGS. 9 and 10 will take up any slack which might otherwise undesirably remain in the tubular organ such as the vas deferens. In addition, if it should happen that any sperm should be capable of traveling along the exterior of the valve, this sperm would necessarily be required to traverse the intermediate portion 34 of the implant 32. However, when the sperm reaches one or the other of the flaps 84, the sperm encounters in effect a path extending perpendicularly away from the lumen, and in this way the possibility of any sperm continuing from one to the other side of the implant is avoided to an even greater extent with the arrangement of FIGS. 9 and 10. V I

It is thus apparent that with the above features of the invention it becomes possible to secure an implant in the interior of a body cavity in a highly reliable manner, while still making it possible to eliminate any inconveniences in the manipulations which must be performed by a surgeon. The features of the invention are of particular value in connection with the introduction of a valve into a vas deferens for reversibly preventing flow of semen-carrying fluid.

What is claimed is:

1. In a method for introducing into the lumen of a tubular organ of a living being an implant which carries at least at part of its exterior a means for promoting the ingrowth of tissue into intimate contact with the exterior surface of the implant, the steps of cutting the tubular organ at least up to the lumen thereof so as to give access to the lumen, removing a layer of mucosa from the. interior of the lumen at least at the part thereof which will be situated at the means for promoting ingrowth of tissue when the implant is subsequently introduced into the lumen, and then introducing the implant into the lumen so that the tissue of the tubular organ engages the means for promoting the ingrowth of tissue without interposition of a mucosa layer between the tissue and the means for promoting the ingrowth of tissue.

2. In a method as recited in claim 1 and wherein the implant has an exterior surface area which does not carry means for promoting the ingrowth of tissue, the removal of the layer of mucosa being carried out only at that part of the lumen which will be situated at the means for promoting the ingrowth of tissue when the implant is subsequently introduced into the lumen, so that an exterior surface area of the implant which does not carry the means for promoting the ingrowth of tissue will be engaged by a layer of mucosa.

3. In a method as recited in claim 1 and wherein the layer of mucosa is removed by reaming. I

4. In a method as recited in claim I and including the additional step of fastening the tubular organ to the implant so that the tissue of the tubular organ which engages the means for promoting the ingrowth of tissue will have an opportunity to grow into said means for additionally securing the tubular organ to the implant.

5. In a method as recited in claim I and wherein the tubular organ is a vas deferens while the implant is a valve having tubular extensions received in the lumen of thevas deferens and carrying at least at part of the exterior surface thereof said means for promoting the ingrowth of tissue which is engaged by the tissue of the vas deferens.

6. In a method as recited in claim 5 and wherein each of said tubular extensions of the valve has an elongated free end portion extending beyond the means for promoting ingrowth of tissue, and the removal of the layer of mucosa being carried out only where the means for promoting the ingrowth of tissue is situated so that the free end portions of the tubular extensions of the valve are engaged by mucosa layers.

7. In a method as recited in claim I and wherein the tubular organ is a vas deferens while the implant is a valve having tubular extensions extending in opposite directions from an intermediate part of the valve and respectively carrying means for promoting the ingrowth of tissue, the cutting of the vas deferens being carried outwith removal of an elongated portion of the vas deferens extending up to the lumen thereof so as to leave at the vas deferens a continuous portion thereof extending between free ends of the lumen into which the tubular extensions are respectively inserted, the step of deflecting the continuous portion of the vas deferens outwardly away from the lumen thereof while drawing the free ends of the lumen toward each other to locate the free ends of the luman directly next to the intermediate portion of the valve while forming from the continuous portion of the vas deferens a pair of flaps which remain integral with each other andv which are situated one beside the other extending laterally away from the lumen, and fastening said flaps to each other so that the free ends of the vas will remain at theintermediate portion'of the valve while the tissue of the vas grows into the means for promoting the ingrowth of tissue.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3918431 *Jan 11, 1974Nov 11, 1975Sinnreich ManfredFallopian tube obturating device
US4013063 *Apr 14, 1975Mar 22, 1977Louis BucaloImplant for reversibly preventing conception
US4024855 *Nov 18, 1975May 24, 1977Louis BucaloMagnetic filamentary structure and method for using the same
US4168708 *Apr 20, 1977Sep 25, 1979Medical Engineering Corp.Blood vessel occlusion means suitable for use in anastomosis
US4259959 *Dec 20, 1978Apr 7, 1981Walker Wesley WSuturing element
US5108418 *Oct 10, 1990Apr 28, 1992Lefebvre Jean MarieDevice implanted in a vessel with lateral legs provided with antagonistically oriented teeth
US5192289 *Dec 23, 1991Mar 9, 1993Avatar Design And Development, Inc.Anastomosis stent and stent selection system
US5207695 *Nov 4, 1991May 4, 1993Trout Iii Hugh HAortic graft, implantation device, and method for repairing aortic aneurysm
US5471997 *Apr 21, 1995Dec 5, 1995Thompson; Leif H.Method of contraception
US6432116Dec 21, 1999Aug 13, 2002Ovion, Inc.Occluding device and method of use
US7398780Oct 25, 2004Jul 15, 2008Ams Research CorporationContraceptive system and method of use
US8113205Feb 21, 2008Feb 14, 2012Conceptus, Inc.Contraceptive system and method of use
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US8235047Mar 30, 2006Aug 7, 2012Conceptus, Inc.Methods and devices for deployment into a lumen
US8616212 *Nov 15, 2011Dec 31, 2013John R. LoganVas deferens or fallopian tubes valve system
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Classifications
U.S. Classification128/843, 606/153, 606/159
International ClassificationA61F6/24, A61F2/04, A61B17/11, A61F6/00, A61B17/03, A61B17/00, A61F6/22, A61F2/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61B17/11, A61F6/22, A61F6/24
European ClassificationA61F6/24, A61F6/22, A61B17/11