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Publication numberUS3815720 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 11, 1974
Filing dateSep 8, 1972
Priority dateSep 8, 1972
Also published asCA1003568A1, DE2344729A1, DE2344729B2
Publication numberUS 3815720 A, US 3815720A, US-A-3815720, US3815720 A, US3815720A
InventorsMachanian W, Wheelwright R
Original AssigneeWurlitzer Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Money receiving and credit accumulator system
US 3815720 A
Abstract
A money receiving and credit accumulator system is disclosed herein which can continuously receive coins therein without the need of resetting a memory circuit or the like. The credit pulses and bonus credit pulses produced are stored until such time as a scanning signal transfers these pulses into an up-down counter. This allows a plurality of coin receiving and tune selection boxes to be positioned at remote locations and each coin receiving box can receive money and store credits and bonus credits independent of the other. The number of credits accumulated for each coin or bill is determined by the monetary value of the coin or bill and the number of bonus credits added to the circuit is determined by the total amount of money deposited. The bonus credits are automatically inserted into an up-down counter which forms part of the credit accumulator circuit. The entire credit accumulator circuit is designed to be formed as an integrated circuit on a single monolithic chip.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 91 Machanian et al.

[4 .lune 11, 1974 MONEY RECEIVING AND CREDIT Primary Examiner-Robert B. Reeves ACCUMULATOR SYSTEM Assistant Examiner.loseph J. Rolla Attorney, Agent, or Firm0lson, Trexler, Wolters,

[75] inventors gm zrx mgfi Bushnell & Posse, Ltd.

. Buffalo, both of NY. [73] Assignee: The Wurlitzer Company, Chicago, [57] ABS CT I" A money receiving and credit accumulator s stem is d' 1 d h hi h 1 lSC ose erein w c can continuous y receive Coins [22] Sept 1972 therein without the need of resetting a memory circuit [21] App]. No.: 287,290 or the like. The credit pulses and bonus credit pulses produced are stored until such time as a scanning signal transfers these pulses into an up-down counter. [52] US. Cl. 194/15, 194/1 N This allows a pluramy of coin receiving and tune [51] ll!!- lection boxes to be positioned at remote locations and [58] Field of Search l N each coin receiving box can receive money and store 340/162 274/10 179/63 credits and bonus credits independent of the other. The number of credits accumulated for each coin or- 56 R f d bill is determined by the monetary value of the coin or UNITE; 5,2 2,32 LZ bill and the number of bonus credits added to the circuit is determined by the total amount of money de- 3,042,173 7/1962 Thomas et a1. 194/15 positmi The bonus Credits are automatically inserted g Rockola al into an up-down counter which forms part of the 52152 [2x970 g credit accumulator circuit. The entire credit accumu- 3565227 M97] Flevaris [94/9 R lator circuit is designed to be formed as an integrated circuit on a single monolithic chip.

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1 a SELECTION ALLOW a 3 Z26 GATE INDICATORS MONEY RECEIVKNG AND CREDIT ACCUMULATOR SYSTEM BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to a coin operated circuit arrangement used to register a number of unit credits corresponding to the value of the coin deposited therein for operating vending machines, or the like. More particularly, the circuit arrangement illustrated herein is directed to a coin accumulator circuit which produces bonus credit pulses to provide a bonus or discount credit when a predetermined minimum monetary value is accumulated in the circuit.

Coin accumulator apparatus are used in vending machines of all kinds and have found widespread popularity for use in situations where coin accumulation is necessary because of the cost of particular items may be more than can be obtained by a single coin, or bill. Several coins, or bills, are then necessary to actuate the necessary mechanisms to allow selection of a particular item from the vending machine or to select a musical selection from a juke box or the like. While vending machines in general are anticipated for use with the present invention the coin accumulator and bonus credit circuit arrangement illustrated herein has particular utility when used in conjunction with juke boxes which play record selections of both the 45 r.p.m. and LP types in a conventional and well-known manner.

Heretofore, the deposit of a particular coin denomination within a coin receiving receptacle of a juke box would allow the depositor to select a given number of records to be played. For example, deposit of a cent and 5 cent coin might allow a single selection while the deposit of a quarter might allow two or three selections to be made, thereby providing bonus or discount credits for using coins of larger denomination. Some prior art units are equipped with coin receiving means capable of receiving 50 cent pieces to allow even a greater number of selections and further bonus or discount credits for coins of larger denomination. For example, five or more selections can be provided for a single 50 cent coin. Generally, coin accumulators allow only a given number of selections corresponding to the denomination of the single'coin deposited, andtherefore, penalize the vending machine user who happens to have the right amount of money but in smaller denomination coins.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a coin accumulator and bonus credit circuit arrangement which will accumulate coins of all denominations and register credits for the amount of money received and insert bonus or discount credits into the credit accumulator upon sensing money insertion beyond predetermined amounts regardless of the denomination of the coins used to accumulate the credits.

Another object of this invention is to provide a newa diode matrix or gate, connected to a plurality of movable switch contacts which are actuated by the insertion of coins of different denominations, and may further include a switch operated by sensing the value of a given bill. Each 5 cent input will produce a single clock pulse output from coin input counter which is then applied to a price setting circuit which sets the value of each credit and to a bonus level circuit which will produce discount credits upon sensing a predetermined number of previous regular price credits. Each coin input results in the number of credit pulses or counts which correspond to the number of nickels that can be divided into the coin, that is, a dollar will produce 20 clock pulses from the coin input counter. it will be noted that the coin input encoding network can be altered as desired to accommodate coin values of foreign countries as is necessary.

The price setting circuit is a pre-selected divider circuit used to set the basic price of each selection. in the particular circuit configuration shown the circuit can be manually set to divide the pulse count input by l, 2, 3, 4 or 5 by the use of a single jumper wire connected in circuit with the divider. Thus, if the divider is set at 2, then two nickel pulses will produce a single selection output pulse at the accumulator and thus set the basic price for each selection to two nickels or one dime per play.

The output pulses from the coin actuated circuit are also delivered to a bonus level circuit which supplies additional credit pulses. This bonus credit circuit is formed by a decoder system which has a separate output for each of the quarter levels to be used for bonus levels. The bonus credits can be given in any preset manner desired. The coin accumulator and bonus credit circuit of this invention also includes an oscillator clock circuit which is the clock pulse generator that is common to all of the sections of the logic circuit and also includes a regulated power supply for applying power to all of the circuits in the system. The entire logic circuit can be formed on a single integrated chip to further cut cost and size.

The novel circuit arrangement of this invention provides for minimizing the number of discrete electronic logic circuits needed while also expanding the versatility of the system so that a multiplicity of coin receiving boxes can be positioned at remote locations at tables, counters or booths and are electrically tied into a single juke box control for making selections remotely therefrom. The circuit arrangement includes adivide-by-l, 2, 4 or 5 circuit which counts credits so that on every preselected bonus level a bonus credit pulse is produced so that additional selection credits are created upon registering the first bonus level (5 cents, 10 cents, 20 cents, 25 cents) in the system regardless of the order in which-coins are deposited. The divide (l, 2, 4 or 5) circuit produces a bonus pulse which is stored temporarily in a time delay circuit before it is delivered to the credit and bonus credit accumulator circuit. While the bonus pulse is still in the time delay circuit, the (l, 2, 4 or 5) bonus increment counter will automatically recycle itself upon producing bonus pulse output to again start counting coins which are inserted into thecoin receiving mechanism. A synchronized clock pulse is then delivered to the time delay circuit whereupon the bonus credit or credits stored therein are delivered to the credit and bonus credit accumulator. By storing the credit pulse for a predetermined time interval the bonus increment counter can be actuated in immediate succession by using, for example, six or more successive nickels in a remote selector control box when the bonus increment level is set at 25 cents. Once the bonus pulse is stored in the time delay circuit it can be delivered therefrom to the credit and bonus credit accumulator at a later time corresponding to the scanning or clock pulse time interval. Therefore, the plurality of wall mounted coin receiving selector boxes remotely positioned from a coin operated juke box, or the like, can be scanned one at a time, electronically, and the credit and bonus credits stored therein delivered to the credit and bonus credit accumulator sequentially so that coins deposited in one of the remotely situated coin operated selector boxes will not affect credits in other coin operated selector boxes.

Accordingly, many other objects, features and advantages of this invention will be more fully realized and understood from the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein like reference numerals throughout the various views of the drawings are intended to designate similar elements and components.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a block diagram showing the various circuit stages arranged in accordance with the principles of this invention;

FIG. 2 shows the arrangement of the sheets containing FIGS. 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D and 2E;

FIGS. 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D and 2E illustrate the logic circult of this invention;

FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram showing one form of power supply that can be with this invention;

FIG. 4 is a block diagram illustrating a circuit arrangement whereby extraneous pulses are eliminated from the coin accumulator so that false credits are not given;

FIG. 5 illustrates a wave form showing extraneous pulses which may be produced due to switch bounce when a coin is inserted into the system;

FIG. 6 illustrates extraneous pulses which may be produced by static electricity to give unwanted credits; and

FIG. 7 illustrates the timed delay characteristic of the circuit of FIG. 4 to overcome the effects produced by the extraneous pulses shown in FIGS. 5 and 6.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE ILLUSTRATED EMBODIMENTS FIG. 1 is particularly useful when used in conjunction with a juke box wherein the value of each selection may change in accordance with the number of credits registered which corresponds to the amount of money dex 10 cents play, a deposit of two nickels, or one dime, will I register two-coin credits and 1 selection credit. Upon posited into a coin receiving mechanism. If a single selection is to be made with the system programmed for making the selection the selection credit is cleared from the credit accumulator. However, if 25 cents, in any combination ranging from nickels, dimes and quarters is deposited in the coin receiving mechanism. there will be one coin credit for every 5 cents so deposited plus none, one, or more bonus selection credits which. depending on the bonus program, may allow three or more record selections to be obtained. The number of bonus selections awarded any given user at a particular time will correspond to the total amount of money deposited in the coin receiving mechanism prior to making a first selection. By inserting bonus credit pulses into the circuit, the unit cost per selection decreases as the number of bonus credits afforded the user increases.

This is best illustrated by the block diagram of FIG, 1 wherein the coin input counter 11 includes a coin receiving mechanism, and/or a bill reader for detecting bills, which has an output thereof connected to a basic price selection divisor 12. The basic price selection divisor 12 receives an input signal for each 5 cents of value deposited in the coin receiving mechanism. If the selection base price is 10 cents, as mentioned above, then a divide-by-two circuit will require two pulses from the coin input counter 11. The output of the coin input counter 11 is also delivered to a bonus increment counter circuit 13, andthe normal credit pulses, after being converted to selection credits, are delivered to the selection accumulator 14 which comprises an updown counter. After sensing a predetermined number of normal credit pulses a bonus pulse is generated in the bonus increment counter circuit 13 which, in turn, is delivered to the bonus level counter and the bonus and cancel input counter 16 whereupon this bonus pulse isdelivered to the selection accumulator updown counter 14. The output of the circuit 14 is delivered to a circuit 18 which indicates the number of selections allowed while a circuit arrangement 17 is connected to the bonus and cancel input counter 16 for restarting the circuit thereby preventing a higher number of bonus credit pulses from being supplied'after an initial selection has been made..

More specifically, the coin input counter 11 includes a plurality of coin sensing switches and a five stage binary counter circuit connected to an input encoder arrangement. This will allow a single nickel input to result in one clock pulse output to drive the circuits l2 and 13. Each coin inserted into the coin receiving mechanism of the circuit 11 will result in a number of counts or clock pulses equivalent to the number of nickels that can be divided into the coin so deposited. For example, depositing 10 cents will produce two clock pulses while depositing a dollar in a bill reader will produce 20 clock pulses which are applied both to the basic price selection divisor circuit 12 and to the bonus increment counter circuit 13. The coin input counter and bonus increment counter may include a diode matrix arrangement which can be easily changed by altering the connections thereto so that variations in foreign coinage can be readily compensated for.

The basic priceselection divisor circuit 12 is a prese lected divisor which includes a manually operated pro gramming mechanism sot-hat the basic price per selec- 5 by merely rotating the selected switch. It will be understood that the rotary switch can be'replaced by a plurality of single pole single throw switches or even jumper wires if desired. If the divisor is set to divide by two, then each selection will require two pulses, corresponding to two nickel inputs, for that given selection. However, if three pulses are needed the selection will cost fifteen cents, and so on. Therefore, the basic price per selection can be altered in the field so that maximum return on investment can be obtained. The bonus increment counter circuit 13 accumulates the output pulses from the coin input encoder and provides an output pulse for every I, 2, 4 or 5 input pulses depending on the preset divisor. For example, a divide by five will produce one pulse out for every five pulses in; see FIG. 5, line 25. The divide by l, 2, 4 or 5 is the bonus increment counter. The credit accumulatorcircuit of this invention may be readily adapted to accumulate credits up to 1 dollar and 75 cents or more, thus providing distinct bonus levels (5 cents, cents, cents, cents) at which a different number-of bonus pulses can be inserted into the credit accumulator. Each one of the outputs corresponding to the different bonus level can be connected to any one (or none) of seven preset bonus input selection circuits in the bonus and cancel output counter 16. This allows bonus credits to be given in most any preset manner and the particular bonus credit circuit actuated will be automatically reset upon the user thereof making a selection, this causing actuation of the selection cancel gates 17.

The bonus and cancel input counter is a three stage counter used for insertinga predetermined number of bonus credits and for cancelling credits after a selection has been made. Bonus output pulses or credits cause a count up" condition to prevail in the selection accumulator 14 while credit cancellation as the result of tune selection causes a count down condition to prevail in the selection accumulator 14. Preferably, the selection accumulator 14 includes a simple up-down counter arrangement rather than the more complex adder circuit which requires additional hardware. The selection cancel gates within the circuit 17 are formed by a diode or gate matrix which is preset to obtain the desired number of selection cancel counts for such selections as a single selection, an LP. (long play selection) or TT- selection (top tunes) all of which are preprogrammed into the juke box.

a The selection accumulator circuit 14 includes a five stage up-down counter which will provide a maximum of 31 counts corresponding to the 31 selections that can be stored at one time. The selection accumulator circuit may easily be expanded to store 63 or more selection credits by increasing the number of counter stages to six or more. The selections circuit 18 contains the preset circuitry necessary to provide credit indication for either a single or LP or TT selection to give an indication to the user what types of selections he has remaining.

The entire coin operated credit accumulator and bonus circuit arrangement of FIG. 1 is operated by a regulated power supply 19 which is connected in common to all of the blocks in the figure, and the circuit is controlled by means of an oscillator or clock system 20 which is also connected to all of the blocks in FIG. 1.

Referring now to FIG. 2 the arrangement of the detailed block diagram consisting of FIGS. 2A, 2B, 2C,

2D and 2E is shown. The FIGS. 2A-2D are to be placed on their sides with the top of the drawing to the right of the viewer and FIG. 2B is to be placed upright adjacent FIGS. 2C and 2D as shown.

Referring now to FIG. 2A the circuit arrangement of this invention includes a plurality of momentary contact switch elements 30, 31, 32, 33 and 34 corresponding to coin valuations of 5 cents, 10 cents, 25 cents, 50 cents and 1 dollar, respectively. Preferably, the switches are to be actuated to a grounded condition which represents a logic 0 output in the system. The switch 30 is connected to a source of voltage at terminal 36 through a pair of resistors 37 and 38 which have a common connection connected through a capacitor 39 to ground potential. The capacitor 39 has connected thereto a diode 40 which has its anode connected to a line 41. Similarly, the switch 31 is connected to the B+ terminal 36'through a pair of resistors 42 and 43 which have their common juncture connected to a capacitor 44 to ground potential and to a second diode 46 which also has its anode connected to line 41. The switch 32 is connected to a 8+ terminal 47 through a pair of resistors 48 and 49 which have their common juncture connected to ground potential through a capacitor 50. The capacitor 50 is also connected to a diode 51 which has its anode connected to the common line 41. In like manner the switch 33 is connected to the B+ line 47 through a pair of resistors 52 and 53 which have their common juncture connected tov ground potential through a capacitor 54. The juncture of resistors 52 and 53 and capacitor 54 are connected to line 41 through a diode 56. The switch 34, which corresponds to a l dollar valuation from a bill reader, is connected to a B+ terminal 57 through a pair of resistors 58 and 59 which have their juncture connected to ground potential through a capacitor 60. The juncture of resistors 58 and 59 and capacitor 60 are connected to the line 41 through a diode 61. Therefore, when any of the switches 30-34 are closed and ground potential is applied to the cathode of the respective diodes 40, 46, 5 1, 56 and 61, and the diodes will be forward biased to provide current flow from a 8+ terminal 62 through a pair of series connected resistors 63 and 64.

Resistors 63 and 64 form part of a transistorized differential enabling circuit designated generally by reference numeral 66. The enabling circuit 66 comprises a pair of transistors 67 and 68 connected in such a manner that transistor 68 shunts the emitter resistor 69 of the transistor 67. Therefore, once transistor 67 is rendered operative at a first initial voltage value it requires a higher subsequent voltage value to render the transistor inoperative. Conduction of transistor 67 will apply base emitter current through a transistor 70 which be- .comes saturated to apply ground potential to the clear input of a .IK flip-flop network 71, shown in FIG. 2B.

The logic 0 state developed by closure of switch 30 is applied to one of the inputs of an AND gate 72 and to one of the inputs of an AND gate 73 directly and through AND gate 72 to AND gates 74, 75, and 76 thus registering a one count through AND gate 72 corresponding to a nickel value. Closure of the ten cent switch 31 will produce a logic 0 state at the AND gate 74 and at one of the inputs of an AND gate 75. The pulse from switch 31 is also applied to an input of the AND gate 73 and gate 76. The 25 cent switch 32, when closed, will apply a 0' state to the input of AND gate 72 and through gate 72 to AND gates 74, 75, and 76. On

the other hand,'closure of 50 cent switch 33 will apply a state to the inputs of AND gates 74, 73, 75 responsive to the 50 cent switch 33. Closure of the 1 dollar bill reader switch 34 will apply a 0 state to the AND gates 73 and 76. The outputs of AND gates 72, 73, 74, 75 and 76 are connected to a counter circuit arrangement comprising a plurality of JK flip-flops 77, 78, 79, 80, and 81, respectively which have their 6 outputs connected to the toggle input of the adjacent t'lipflop and the Q outputs of the flip-flops 77, 78, and 79 are connected to a NAND gate 82 which also receives an input from a NOR gate 83 via the flip-flops 80 and 81.

When all of the inputs to NAND gate 82 are high the outputs thereof will go low and apply a logic 0 pulse to the input of NAND gate 84, in FIG. 2B.

The Q output of the JK flip-flop 71 is also connected to an input of the NAND gate 84 and to the input of NAND gate 86, which in turn, has its output connected back to the input of a second NAND gate 87 which is connected in like manner, i.e., with its output connected back to the input of NAND gate 86 and to an output terminal 88 and can be used to energize a coin indicating lamp when the system is in use.

Also connected to an input of the NAND gate 84 is a clock circuit 90 comprising a multivibrator oscillator circuit 91 having an output thereof connected to a pair of AND gates 92 and 93 through a flip-flop circuit 94. The output of AND gate 93 is inverted through an in verter 96 thereby producing pulses which are opposite in polarity to those pulses produced at the output of AND gate 92. This will produce two outputs from the four phase clock circuit which are out of phase by 180. The output from the clock circuit 90 is also applied to the toggle input of the. flip-flop circuit 71, through a line 97, to the input. of a flip-flop circuit 98 and to a NAND gate 99, shown in FIG. 2D. A set reset flip-flop 100 of the bonus level output circuit has one output thereof connected through a line 101 to the input of NAND gate 84 and to the input of an AND gate 102, which, in turn, has the output thereof connected to a gate circuit 103 for resetting a plurality of flip-flop circuits 104, 105, 106.

The clock circuit 90 provides the control pulses for all of the system counting andsequencing operations. As mentioned previously, there is provided two clock signals arranged in a predetermined timed relation from one another, as, for example, 180 out of phase. The first clock pulse at the output of AND gate 92 is the main clock signal while the second clock pulse from the output of the inverter 96 is used to recycle the bonus level indicator circuits, the bonus pulse trigger circuits, and the basic price'counter circuits. Toprovide the two basic'clock signals the output of the multivibrator circuit 91 is applied to the toggle input of the flip-flop circuit 94 and simultaneously to an input of the AND gate 92. This will provide two KHz signals which are 180 out of phase with one another.

' When the coin accumulating circuit is first turned on the overall control circuit or system is set to a cleared or initial condition. This can be done with a transistor circuit which has a first transistor which is turned on which, in turn, results in turning off a second transistor to provide the clear or reset signal. During this initialization period the flip-flop circuits 77, 79, 78, 81 and 80 of the coin input pulse counter are allowed to toggle until all of the Q outputs are at a logic 1. This will cause the output of gate 82 to go to a logic 0 which inhibits further clock pulses; or toggling signals to pass through the gate circuit 84.

Also during the initialization period, i.e., when the system is turned on, the basic price counter circuit is reset directly by the output of the clear circuit which is connected to input terminal 111 of a NAND gate 112 which, in turn, has the output thereof connected to the input of a second AND gate 113. This action will set the clear lines of flip-flop circuits 114, 115 and 116 so that there respective Q outputs are at a logic 0 and their Q outputs are at a logic 1.

Also during the initialization period the reset signal is also routed through the AND gate 103 to reset the flip-flop circuits 104, 105 and 1060f the bonus increment counter circuit. Therefore, the Q outputs are set to a logic 0 while the Q outputs are set to a logic 1. 1n addition, this initialization pulse is delivered to the bonus level output gates 120, 121, 122 and 123 at a terminal' 124 so that the number of bonus pulses to be generated, at the outset of operation, is zero.

A bonus cancel counter circuit 126 is allowed to toggle during the initialization period until all the Q outputs of the individual flip-flop circuits 127, 128 and 129 are at a-logic 1 condition. This action will inhibit further toggling of the flip-flops by setting the NAND gate 130 to a logic 0 which, in turn, inhibits further toggling by means of clock pulses through the NAND gate 99 and NAND gate 131 which has the output thereof connected to the input of the first flip-flop 127.

Also during the initialization period the main updown credit counter 132, FIG. 2C, is reset-to have the output thereof at a logic 0 when the input to the direct clear terminal 133 is at a logic 1. Now that the entire circuit is set to an initial condition, it is ready to perform a credit accumulating and bonus pulse generating function.

Referring back to FIG. 2A, the coin input pulse generator circuit encodes the credit input in order to provide a credit input signal to the other parts of the system in terms of the multiple of the basic unit of credit; in this instance each 5 cents. When a coin is inserted into the coin receiving mechanism, one of the switches 30, 31, 32, 33 or 34 is closed and connected to ground potential. At the outset of operation the Q output of flip-flops 77, 79, 78, 81 and 80 are set at a logic 0. By inserting a nickel to close switch 30 the Q output of these flip-flops are set to a logic 1 state. On the other hand, inserting 10 cents to close switch 31 will set flipflops 79, 78, 81 and 80 to a logic 1 state while flip-flop circuit 77 remains in the logic 0 state. Inserting 25 cents to close-switch 32 will cause flip-flop circuits 77 and 79 and flip-flop circuits 81 and 80 to have their 6 outputs in the logic 1 state while flip-flop circuit 78 has its Q output in the logic 0 state. A 50 cent insertion into the coin mechanism will close switch 33 thereby producing a logic 0 at the 6 output of flip-flop circuits 77' The five flip-flop circuits in the coin counting circuit a are arranged in a count up configuration so that one input pulse is required to set the Q outputs of the flipflops from a state of (11 l l l to a state of (90000). This counter arrangement will reset to an all Q output condition on the first clock pulse received after a count of 31 is reached.

In addition to setting the credit counter, the closing of any one of the coin switches will activate the double threshold circuit 66-which inhibits the clocking of the coin input pulse generator. This is accomplished by the fact that transistor 67 is normally high and when a coin switch is closed the output of transistor 711 goes low thereby forcing the Q output of the flip-flop circuit 71 to a low state thereby blocking the clock pulses at the NAND gate 84. After the coin has passed through the coin receiving mechanism and the appropriate actuated switch is again opened the capacitor 136 is discharged, and after approximately 45 milliseconds, the output of transistor 70 again goes high so that clock pulses will again pass through the NAND gate 84. The next clock pulse changes the Q output of flip-flop circuit 71 to a logical 1 state and allows the clock signals to pass through the NAND gate 84. This action allows the input pulse counter to count up'to an initial state and transmit this credit information into the basic price counter circuit 111).

The basic price counter circuit is a programmable divide-by -n (n l, 2, 3, 4 or 5) counter which is used to set the number of basic units of credit, i.e.,-the number of nickels required, for a single play selection when the coin accumulator circuit of this invention is used in conjunction with a juke box or the like. The desired number of credit pulses required to select a single play is selected by a plug-in program card which may include a rotary switch 138. The credit information from the coin input pulse counter is transmitted to the basic price counter through a NOR gate 139 via a line 140 to the toggle input of the first flip-flop circuit 114. The three flip-flop circuits 114, 115 and 116 make up the basic price counter circuit arrangement and in operation count to a condition one less than the desired number. At a count of n l pulses a logic 1 state is present so that the next clock pulse input therein will be transmitted through an AND gate 142 to the next main credit counter circuit via a line 143 and to the basic price counter reset flip-flop circuit 144.

The Q output of flip-flop circuit 144 is in a normally high state. When a clo c k pulse is transmitted through the AND gate 142 the Q output of flip-flop circuit 144 goes to a logic 0 which, in turn, passes through an AND gate 146 and through the AND gate 113 to a reset line 147 to reset the flip-flop circuits 114, 115 and 116. The next out of phase clock pulse, the pulse developed from the inverter 96, is applied to the counter circuit and will enable the counter circuit so that when the next regular input clock pulse is received it will begin to count.

A partial credit cancel circuit may be included as an optional circuit and connected to a terminal 148 at the input of the AND gate 146. When a partial credit cancel feature is used the cancel pulses from the bonus cancel counter circuit 126 are transmitted through a logic circuit toreset the basic price counter to a 0 count condition whenever a selection is made, However, if a partial credit is to be retained the input terminal 148 receives a hold signal. ln this configuration partial credit is cancelled only when a bonus credit is allowed. The Q output 'of the flip-flop circuit 100 goes to a logic 1 only when a bonus pulse is to be entered into the bonus and cancel input counter circuit. This logic 1 pulse then is transmitted through to cancel any remaining partial credits in the circuit. For example, if a quarter is inserted and the basic price per credit is 10 cents, two single selections will be allowed in the basic price counter. An additional selection(s) will be allowed by the bonus arrangement at the quarter level and will cancel the5 cent partial credit in the basic price counter.

The bonus credit increment counter, comprising flipflop circuits 104, 105 and 1116, will continue to accumulate input pulses from the coin input pulse counter and provide an output pulse therefrom for every five such input pulses when n 5. The output pulses from the coin input pulse counter circuit enter the basic increment counter circuit through a line 151) from the NOR gate 139 to toggle the first input of flip-flop circuit 1114. The three stage binary counter counts to four making the Q output of the flip-flop circuit 106 a logic 1. A fifth clock pulse is then allowed to pass through the output AND gate 151 to a bonus level indicator circuit designated generally by. reference numeral 152. This pulse toggles the bonus trigger flip-flop circuit and the bonus level indicator circuit 152 through a line 154 at the input of a first flip-flop circuit 156. The bonus level indicator circuit 152 includes three flipflop circuits, the flip-flop circuit 156 together with additional flip-flop circuits 157 and 158. The Q output of the flip-flop circuit 100 is used to reset the basic bonus increment counter circuit through the output line 101, the AND gates 102 and 103, and to the reset input circuits of the flip-flops 104, and 106. This action will then reset the flip-flop circuit 1110 to its normal state,

that is with the output terminal Q in the logic 1 state, this being accomplished by the first out of phase clock pulse after the reset signal is applied thereto.

The bonus level indicator circuit 152 is a basic three stage binary counter system which counts the output pulses of the basic bonus increment counter through AND gate 151 in order to determine the bonus level, Le, a 25 cent condition, a 50 cent condition, a 75 cent condition, or a 1 dollar condition. The output of the basic bonus increment counter is transmitted through the AND gate 151 to toggle the input of the first flipflop circuit 156. The normal state of the Q outputs of the flip-flops 156, 157 and 158 is a logic 0. Therefore, a first pulse input will produce a logic 1 pulse at the Q output of flip-flop 156 which, in turn, is passed through an associated buffer AND gate 160 through the'NAND gate to an input terminal of a program card shown generally by the broken lines at 161. A second bonus level is indicated by having a logic 1 output at the Q terminal of flip-flop 157, which, in turn, passes through the buffer AND gate 162 to the NAND gate 121. A third pulse input to the bonus level indicator will toggle flip-flop circuit 158 and produce a logic 1 output therefrom and from the first flip-flop 156 to thereby produce an output signal through NAND gate 122 as the result of a signal passing through the buffer AND gate 163. When the bonus trigger flip-flop circuit 100 toggles to a logic 1 output condition it will allow a pulse to pass through the appropriate output gates 12 0, 121, 122 or 123 to deliver the information to the program card 161. Each bonus level can be programmed individually for up to and including seven bonus credits. The program card setting determines the routing of the bonus pulse to the appropriate AND gates 166, 167 or 168 of the bonus and cancel counter circuit 126.

The bonus credit counter is recycled to a output condition after a first selection on the juke box is made so that accumulation of coins again begins with a first bonus credit being given for the first 25 cents, a second bonus credit being given for the second 25 cents and so on. The reset signal for the bonus credit counter is obtained by the output of a pair of NOR gates 170 and 171 to a line 172 which passes through the input of an AND gate 173 and therefrom through a line 174, FIG. 2C, to the reset line 176 of the bonus credit counter.

The main credit counter is a five stage up-down counter which stores all the accumulated selection 7 whether a count up or a count down condition is set therein. If the output of NOR gate 170 is a logic 1 the pulses applied to the up-down counter will count up in an accumulated mode. However, if the output signal from flip-flop 170 is a logic 0 then the up-down counter will cancel or count down.

A logic 0 output signal from a selection allowed decoder circuit 184, blocks the output of the counter circuit 132 to a (00000) condition and prevents the counter from counting down. The selection allowed decoder circuit also provides a signal to the main credit counter to indicate that a count of 31 has been reached so that it will not recycle itself to 0 at the thirty-second count.

The selection allowed decoder circuit includes a plurality of NAND gates 186, 187, 188 and 189 which have their outputs connected to the card programmer 161 and therefrom to the appropriate indicating circuits. The NAND gate 186 has a switch 190 which may be selected to indicate a top tune selection while the AND gate 187 includes a switch 191 which is selected for an LP record while the AND gate 188 has connected thereto a switch 192 for normal single selections of 45 r.p'.m. records. Closure of one of the switches 190, 191m 192 will set the condition of the circuit so that the proper number of credits and bonus credits will a be collected so that a top tune condition or an LP selection can be made.

The bonus cancel counter circuit 126 delivers data pulses signal information into the main counter circuit 132 in response to bonus trigger pulses or cancel pulses depending on whether the counter is to count up or count down. The output of the program card 161 is decoded by AND gates 166, 167, and 168 and the bonus and cancel counter. These gates (166,167, 168) receive a logic 0 pulse which presets a count in the three stage binary bonus and cancel counter. Whenever a bonus or cancel pulse is entered the output of the NAND gate 130 changes its state to a logic 1, and this signal is used to lock the coin input pulse counter to an off condition. The normal state of the Q outputs of the counters 127, 128 and 129 is (111), and when this condition is present the clock pulses are blocked by the-off condition of NAND gate 99 which, in turn, is responsive to the logic O output of the NAND gate 130.

generally by reference numeral 200 and monitors the state of the main credit counter 132 to provide a credit status information to the selection allowed relays of the juke box via a plurality of switches 201, 202 and 203 connected to transistors 204, 205, and 206, respectively. Aplurality of OR gates 210, 211, 212 and 213 have their outputs connected to certain ones of the contact switches 201, 202 and 203 and the inputs thereof connected back to the output of the main credit counter 132. With a 0 count in the main credit counter 132 the output condition of each of the gates 210, 211, 212 and 213 is as follows. A 0 count 0 output from each gate, a 1 count a single output from gate 213, a 2 count an output from gates 212 and 213, a 3 count outputs from gates 212 and 213, a 4 to 7 count outputs from gates 211, 212 and 213, and a count from between 8 and 31 will produce an output from each of the gates 210, 211, 212 and 213. However, the outputfrom the main credit counter l32 is also delivered to a plurality of AND gates 216, 217, 218 and 219 which acts as an intermediate decoding stage for the main credit counter outputs. These gates operate as follows. A 0 to 2- count will achieve 0 outputs from all of the gates. A 3 count will produce a 1 output from the gate 216 while a 4 count will produce 0 outputs from all of the gates.

A 5 count, however, produces a 1 output from gate 217 while a 6 count produces a l'output from gate 218, and a count of 7 will produce a 1 output from all of the gates. A count of 8, 9 or 10 will again produce a 0 output from all of the gates. An 11 count will produce a 1 output from gate 216 while a 12 count will produce 0 outputs. A 13 count will produce a 1 output from gate 217 and a 14 count will produce a 1 output from the gate 218 while a 15 count will produce a 1 output from all of the gates. Since the only outputs of the main counter are used-to recycle the AND gates it will produce an identical count for the number 16 as well as the number 0 andso forth. I l

The outputs of the AND'gates 216, 217,218 and 219 are connected to one of the inputs of NOR gates 226, 227, 228 and 229 which function as the final decoding stage of the main credit counter circuit 132. The output of these gates will indicate the status of the main credit counter showing'the attained level of credits present in the counter at any given time. Therefore, if the program card setting for LP selections is a three credit level, then as soon as at least three credits have been accumulated in the main credit counter 132 the output of gate 226 will be delivered to the LP enabling relay by energizing transistor 204. In operation the output of the gates 226-229 are 0 when one or two credits are accumulated in the credit accumulator 132. Upon receiving the third credit the output of gate 226 goes positive. Receiving four credits the output of gate 226 remains positive. When a fifth credit is received the output of gate 226 and the output of gate 227 are positive and when six credits are received the outputs of gates 226, 227 and 228 are positive. Upon receiving seven to 31 credits the output of all of the gates is at a logic 1 or a positive condition. The single selection enabling circuit slt ssr s t r svi form at least two to four credits or five to seven credits respectively, that is, the LP selection will require approximately three credits while a top tune selection will I take six or seven credits in most cases. In each case the type of selection will not be allowed until the minimum number of credits for the program desired is set into the main credit accumulator circuit 132.

Referring now to FIG. 3 there is seen a detailed schematic diagram of a voltage regulated power supply designated generally by reference numeral 300. The power supply 300 includes a functional circuit regulator (Motorola 6030) 301 having one output thereof connected to the base electrode of a transistor 302 which, in turn, is connected in series between input and output terminals 303 and 304. Short circuit protection is provided by means of a second transistor 306 which has the emitter thereof connected to a resistor 307 and the collector thereof connected to an output'of the functional circuit regulator 301 and to a capacitor 308. The output of transistor 302 is filtered by means of a plurality of capacitors 309,310 and 311 whereupon the highly filtered and regulated voltage is applied tooutput terminals 313 and 314. A pair of potentiometers 316 and 317 are provided to adjust the operational level of the While a specific voltage regulator circuit is shown herein it will be understood that any voltage regulator circuit providing the necessarycurrent and voltage to]- erance requirementscan be used.

Referring now to FlG. 4 there is seen an alternate input circuit arrangement which can be connected to each of the coin operated switches shown in FIG. 2A. ln this instance the five cent switch 30a is shown, it being understood that all other switch arrangements are typical. Here a plurality of shift register stages 800, 8.01, 802 and 803 have one input thereof connected to the clock circuit and a second input, of the shift register 800, connected to the switch 30a. This circuit arrangement will prevent extraneous pulses due to switch contact bounce or static electricity from entering the credit accumulator which would produce unpaid for credit pulses. For example, FIG. '5 illustrates switch contact bounce at the beginning and end of each switch closure, the rapid making and breaking being-represented by the spikes 806. FIG. 6 shows a plurality of spikes 807 which are sometimes produced as the result of static electricity being introduced into the system.

To prevent this type of switch contact bounce or static electricity from producing unwanted credit pulses the shift registers 800-803 are used to provide a certain time delay in the system so that only after sensing this time delay will an output pulse be developed. For example, FIG. 7 shows the initial part of a switch pulse designated generally by reference numeral 808. The spikes 806, due to switch contact bounce, have a duration of approximately one to 5 milliseconds and the time duration of the shift registers 800-803 is set to be approximately 20 milliseconds, 5 milliseconds each. This will produce an output'through a NOR gate 809, FlG. 4, which may be inverted so as to produce a zero or ground signal at the output line 810. The time delay between the closureof switch 30a and the actualout put pulse on line 810 is represented by the line 811 in FIG. 7. i

The operation of the circuit may be best understood by dividing the pulsing circuit into four distinct areas. First, there are the input matrixing gates 72, 73, 74, 75, and 76 that are responsive to a single switch closure, of the switches 30, 31, 32, 33, and 34, to activate a multiplicity of the counter stages 77, 78, 79, 80, and 81. Secondly, there are the counter stages 77, 78, 79, 80, and 81 that meter out the number of clock pulses called for by the closure of a specific switch. Thirdly, there is the clock pulse gating circuit whichcomprises the gates 82, 83 and 84. The clock pulses come from the oscillator circuit and are gated through the gate circuit 84 to have a number of pulses corresponding to the number of nickel values associated with the coin deposited, this being set forth clearly in applicants specification. However, the mannerin which this is achieved is set forth only generally. Therefore, the following details of operation are deemed helpful. Finally, there is the double-threshold circuit 66 which merely provides the time delay necessary to prevent erroneous switch operation.

The gate circuit 82 reads the state of the Q outputs of the five stage counter comprising flip-flops 77, 78, 79, 80, and 81 and determines that all of the Q outputs are in a logic 1- state. This produces an inhibit signal to be applied to one of the inputs of gate 84 thereby not allowing any of the clock pulses to pass therethrough. The only way that the flip-flops of the counter can have their Q output changed from a logic 1 state to a logic 0 state is to have the input matrix gates activated by closure of the associated coin operated switches. When this occurs, the associated Q outputs will change to a logic 0 state. This action of one or more logic 0 states being sensed at the inputs of gate 82 will enable gate 84 thereby allowing clock pulses to pass therethrough. The clock pulses from gate 84 are delivered to one of the inputs of NOR gate 139 which, in turn, is connected back to the first toggle input of flip-flop 77. The double threshold circuit 66, however, inhabits the gates 84 while the coin switch is closed and holds the inhibit condition for approximately 50 to 60 milliseconds after the 'switch opens. This eliminates the possibility of contact bounce from producing extraneous signals. However, after this time interval the flip-flop circuit 71 will hold the inhibit condition on 'gate 84 until a proper phasing of the clock occurs, i.e., a logic 1 state changing to a logic 0 state. This condition allows the AND gate 84 to begin passing clock pulses which count the flip-flop circuits 77, 78, 79, 80, and 81 back to their initial condition, namely all Q outputs being a logic 1. This then, automatically shuts off the passage of further clock pulses.

' The following is a truth table of the counter flip-flop states and the input matrixing gates which are activated when specic coin switches are closed. The normal state of each coin switch and each input matrix gate output is a logic 1 and the active state of the counter flip-flops is a logic 0.

What has been described is a circuit arrangement whereby the accumulation of coins is accomplished and provides accumulation of credit pulses by a simple counter circuit which enables a bonus pulse circuit for producing a bonus pulse on a predetermined count of 5 the coin inputcounter. It will be understood that the bonus pulse can be produced on a count other than live, as for example three, seven-or nine, as well as any ents are intended to be covered by the term credit units in the following claims.

The invention is claimed as follows:

l. A credit unit receiving and credit accumulating circuit, comprising: a credit unit input encoder system for receiving a plurality of credit units of different denominations for producing aseries of output pulses in response to the value of such credit units, said output pulses corresponding in number to be proportional to the value of each different credit unit; a basic price selection decoder circuit for receiving said series of output pulses from said credit unit input encoder circuit to decode the pulses produced therein to units of the basic selection price; a credit accumulating circuit coupled to said basic price selection decoder circuit and including a circuit for registering credits and for cancelling such credits as they are used during a selection process; a bonus level control circuit responsive to the number of output pulses of said credit unit input encoder, said bonus level control circuit generating a bonus pulse or pulses to be delivered to said credit accumulating circuit as the accumulative number of output pulses from said credit unit input encoder reach successive predetermined numbers, and wherein said credit unit input encoder circuit is operative immediately to repeat its operation of producing output pulses corresponding to the value of credit units inserted therein.

2. The credit unit receiving and credit accumulator circuit according to claim 1 wherein said credit unit input encoder circuit includes a multi-stage counter having a logic encoding network input, and wherein a given credit unit input will result in at least one clock pulse output delivered to said basic price selection divisor circuit, and wherein additional pulse outputs from said credit unit input encoder circuit will correspond to a value which is a multiple of said given credit unit.

3. The credit unit receiving and credit accumulating circuit of claim 1 wherein said basic price selection decoder circuit is a preselected divisor to set the basic price of a selection, and wherein said divisor has a manually operated switch circuit for adjusting the number of pulses from said credit unit input encoder required to produce a single output from said basic price selection circuit.

4. The credit unit receiving and credit accumulating circuit according to claim 3 wherein said switch circuit includes a multi-position switch for adjusting the basic price of a selection to correspond to a given number of pulses from said credit unit input encoder circuit.

5. The credit unit receiving and credit accumulating circuit according to claim 1 wherein said credit accumulating circuit is a multi-stage up down counter.

6. The credit unit receiving and credit accumulating circuit according to claim 1 wherein said bonus level control circuit is a counter and decoder which has a separate output for each of the plurality of levels corresponding to preprogrammed bonus levels, each of said outputs being arranged for connection to said credit accumulator circuit for inserting bonus credit pulses therein, and further including a counter circuit for inserting bonus selections and for cancelling credits after selections have been made.

7. The credit unit receiving and credit accumulating circuit according to claim 1 further including time delay means connected between'credit unit switches and said credit unit input encoding circuit to sense the output pulses produced in response to the insertion ofcredit units for a predetermined time interval thereby eliminating extraneous. noise signals being applied to said credit unit input encoder circuit which would otherwise produce false credit pulses.

8. The credit unit receiving and credit accumulating circuit according to claim'7 wherein said time delay means includes a plurality of storage element circuits interconnected between their output and input terminals, each circuit having a predetermined time controlled by a clock interval between an input pulse and the output pulse produced thereby, said circuits producing saidtime delay.

9. A credit unit receiving and credit accumulating circuit, comprising: a credit unit input encoder system for producing a series of output pulses in response to the value of credit units received, said output pulses corresponding in number to be proportional to the value of each different credit unit; a basic price selection decoder circuit for receiving said series of output pulses from said credit unit inputencoder circuit to decode the pulses produced therein to units of the basic selection price; a credit accumulating circuit coupled to said basic price selection decoder circuit and includ-' ing an up-down counter for'registering credits and for cancelling such credits as they'are used during a selection process; a bonus level-control circuit responsive to said series of output pulses of said credit unit input encoder, said bonus control circuit generating a bonus pulse or pulses to'be delivered to said credit accumulating circuit as the accumulated number of output pulses from said credit unit input encoder reaches successive predetermined numbers, and wherein said credit unit input encoder circuit is operative immediately to repeat its operation of producing output pulses corresponding to the value of credit units inserted therein; a bonus cancel and input counter circuit responsive to said bonus level counter circuit for inserting a bonus and for cancelling credits from said credit accumulator when purchase selections are made; and a selection cancel and input counter gate circuit connected to said bonus cancel circuit for providing a predetermined set condition of certain purchase selections so that the number of credits cancelledfor a given purchase selection is automatieallyobtained.

10. The credit unit receiving and credit accumulator circuit according to claim 9, wherein said credit unit input encoder circuit includes a multi-stage counter having a logic encoder circuit input, and wherein a nickel input will result in a clock pulse output signal which is delivered to said basic price selection divisor circuit, and wherein each additional pulse output from said credit unit input counter will correspond to a value of cents thus providing two pulses for a dime and five pulses for a quarter, pulses for 50 cents and pulses for a dollar 11. The credit unit receiving and credit accumulating circuit of claim 9 wherein said basic price selection circuit is a preselected divisor to set the basic price of a selection, and wherein said divisor has a programmable device for adjusting the number of pulses from said credit input encoder required to produce a basic output from said basic price selection circuit.

12. The credit unit receiving and credit accumulating circuit according to claim 11 wherein said switch means includes a multi-position switch for adjusting the basic price of a selection from between one to a plurality of pulses from said credit unit input encoder circuit. 13. The credit u nit receiving and credit accumulating circuit according to claim 9 wherein said main credit accumulating circuit is a multi-stage up-down counter. 14. The credit unit receiving and credit accumulating circuit according to claim 9 wherein said bonus level control circuit is a counter and decoder which has a separate output for each of the plurality of levels corresponding to preprogrammed bonus levels, each of said outputs being arranged for connection to said credit accumulator for inserting bonus credits therein, and further including a multi-stage counter circuit for inserting bonus credits and for cancelling credits after selections have been made.

15. The credit unit receiving and credit accumulating circuit according to claim 9 further including time delay means connected between said credit unit switches and said credit unit input encoding circuit to sense the output signal produced in response to the insertion of credit units for a predetermined time interval thereby eliminating extraneous signals being applied to said credit unit input encoder circuit which would otherwise produce false credit pulses.

16. The credit unit receiving and credit accumulating circuit according to claim 15 wherein said time delay means includes a plurality of storageelement circuits interconnected between their output and input terminals, each storage element circuit having a predetermined time controlled by a clock interval between an input pulse and the output pulse produced thereby, said storage element circuits producing said time delay.

17. The receiving and accumulating circuit according to claim 9 wherein the circuit for registering and cancellingcredits comprises an up-down counter. I WM UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OFCOQRRECTIN Pat nt N 3,8157Z0 med June 11 1974 William V. Machanian and Robert W. Wheelwright Inventor(s) It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Col. l6, line 59, cancel "and input counter" Col. 16, line 60, after "cancel" insert --and input counter-- Signed and sealed this 5th day of November 1974.

(SEAL) Attest:

McCOY M. GIBSON JR. C. MARSHALL DANN Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents FORM PO-IOSO (1o-s9)' USCOMWDC 8037M,

# U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: I909 0-365-334,

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3894220 *Apr 25, 1974Jul 8, 1975H R Electronics CoVending control system
US4282575 *Aug 10, 1979Aug 4, 1981The Wurlitzer CompanyControl system for vending machine
US4376478 *Oct 10, 1980Mar 15, 1983Kabushiki Kaisha Nippon CoincoControl device for a vending machine including system for confirming vendibility of selected articles
US4498570 *Jan 29, 1982Feb 12, 1985The Coca-Cola CompanyMultiple purchase discount module for a single price vending machine
US4679150 *Mar 7, 1985Jul 7, 1987Kabushiki Kaisha NipponcoincoAutomatic vending machine with discount function
US6367696 *Feb 4, 2000Apr 9, 2002Hitachi, Ltd.IC card processing device, automatic vending device, and selling method
US7637365 *Jun 10, 2004Dec 29, 2009Ringdahl Mark GCar wash with responsive bonus function
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/217
International ClassificationG07F17/30, G07F5/20, G07F5/22, G07F9/00, G07F17/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07F17/305, G07F5/22
European ClassificationG07F17/30B, G07F5/22
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