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Publication numberUS3815735 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 11, 1974
Filing dateJun 28, 1972
Priority dateJun 28, 1972
Publication numberUS 3815735 A, US 3815735A, US-A-3815735, US3815735 A, US3815735A
InventorsCucuo B
Original AssigneePioneer Packaging Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carton
US 3815735 A
Abstract
This invention relates to a carton for holding a ball with diametrically disposed portions of its surface exposed, said carton having rectangularly arranged side walls with closure flaps at the lower and upper ends which collectively form spaced parallel flat, bottom and top walls, the distance between which corresponds substantially to the diameter of the ball, wherein two of the side walls are convex and the distance between them corresponds substantially to said diameter of the ball and wherein the other two sides are concave and contain centrally located openings of substantially elliptical configuration through which diametrical surface portions of the ball project; and a blank adapted to be folded up to form the aforesaid carton.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 91 Qucuo CARTON [75] Inventor: Beniamin J. Cucuo, Springfield,

Mass.

[73] Assignee: Pioneer Packaging, Inc., Chicopee,

Mass.

[22] Filed: June 28, 1972 [2]] Appl. No.: 267,105

[52] US. Cl. 206/485, 229/8, 229/52 B [51] Int. Cl B65d 5/46, B65d 5/50 [58] Field of Search 206/4514, 45.3], 46 B;

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,903,180 9/1959 Holmes l. 229/52 B X 3,369,727 2/l968 Wright 229/8 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,089,231 11/1967 Great Britain 206/4514 June 11, 1974 Primary ExaminerLeonard Summer Attorney, Agent, or FirmDike, Bronstein, Roberts & Cushman 5 7 ABSTRACT This invention relates to a carton for holding a ball with diametrically disposed portions of its surface exposed, said carton having rectangularly arranged side walls with closure flaps at the lower and upper ends which collectively form spaced parallel flat, bottom and top walls, the distance between which corresponds substantially to the diameter of the ball, wherein two of the side walls are convex and the distance between them corresponds substantially to said diameter of the ball and wherein the other two sides are concave and contain centrally located openings of substantially elliptical configuration through which diametrical surface portions of the ball project; and a blank adapted to be folded up to form the aforesaid carton.

12 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures CARTON BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Basketballs, footballs, volley balls, tennis balls, baseballs and golf balls and the like are commonly sold packaged in cartons of appropriate shape, the latter being marked to identify the article according to its quality, size, make and so forth. In spite of the external legends identifying the particular ball most customers want to see the ball to determine from its general appearance and the texture of its jacket whether or not to make a purchase and so most customers will open the carton and remove the ball to examine it. If the closure flap is tightly engaged it can be easily torn in opening the package and frequently a customer, after having removed the ball and replacing it, will not bother to reclose the carton and so a subsequent purchaser will discard the opened carton for a fresh carton. As the result there is considerable disarray and some loss to the retailer. The purpose of this invention is to provide a carton containing openings through which portions, preferably diametrically disposed portions of reasonable area of the ball, are exposed thus enabling the customer to see the ball and any surface markings of identification as well as the texture and finish of the surface cover. The carton, as illustrated herein, is designed to receive balls of all kinds provided they are symmetrical with respect to their axes and is formed up of a relatively simple one-piece blank.

SUMMARY As herein illustrated, there is shown a carton for holding a ball having right-angularly disposed X, Y and Z axes of predetermined length, wherein the X and Z axes are of equal length, comprising rectangularly arranged curved side walls and closure flaps at the lower and upper ends thereof which collectively form spaced parallel flat bottom and top walls of rectangular configuration, said side walls and closure flaps being comprised of a flexible material; characterized in that two of the opposed side walls are convex and the other two concave, that the distance between the bottom and top walls is substantially equal to the length of the Y axis, that midway between the bottom and top the distance between the convex walls is substantially equal to the length of the X axis and between the concave walls less than the length of the X axis, that said concave walls contain centrally located aligned openings through which portions of the convex surface of the ball project and that said upper ends of the side walls have a collective length at least equal to the circumference of the ball in a plane perpendicular to the Y axis and containing the X and Z axes, such that said flexible side walls at said upper ends can be distended to receive said ball when disposed in said carton with the Y axis perpendicular with respect to the bottom and top walls. The convex and concave side walls are substantially cylindrical in curvature and the openings in the concave side walls are substantially elliptical, corresponding to the projections of circles having diameters corresponding to the diameters of the segments of the spherical portions of the ball which are to be exposed through the walls projected onto the cylindrical surfaces of the side walls. When the ball is spherical as, for example, a basketball the distance between the bottom and top walls is substantially equal to the distance between the convex side walls midway between the bottom and top. When the ball is elliptical, for example a football, the distance between the bottom and top walls is greater than the distance between the convex walls midway between the bottom and top walls. There are dust flaps at the ends of two of the opposed side walls folded across the bottom and top and there are closure flaps at the ends of the other two walls folded across the dust flaps provided with interengageable cooperative elements by means of which they are secured in overlapping engagement. These closure flaps at one end of the carton embody handle means for carrying the carton.

The blank for folding the carton comprises a substantially rectangular sheet of flexible cardboard having spaced parallel, longitudinally extending straight fold lines, the distance between which corresponds substantially to the length of the Y axis of the ball to be placed therein and the lengths of which correspond substantially to the circumference of the ball in a plane perpendicular to the Y axis and containing the X and Z axes, said sheet being divided into four panels by transversely extending curved fold lines, such that each panel has end and side edges. The side edges of the alternate panels are concave and the side edges of the intermediate panels are convex. The widths of the alternate panels at their ends are equal to the widths of the intermediate panels midway between their ends and the intermediate panels have centrally located, substantially elliptical openings. The sheet is adapted to be folded on the curved fold lines to dispose the panels rectangularly and there is means at one end of the sheet for joining the two end panels to each other. The aforesaid means comprises a part connected to one of the end panels and foldable relative thereto into engagement with the other panel. For a spherical ball the distance between the longitudinal fold lines is substantially equal to the widths of the alternate panels midway between their ends. For an elliptical ball the distance between the longitudinal fold lines is greater than the widths of the intermediate panels midway between their ends. There are dust flaps hingedly connected to the opposite ends of the intermediate panels and closure flaps hingedly connected to'the opposite ends of the alternate panels.

The invention will now be described in greater detail with reference to the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a top view of a carton for holding a spherical ball;

FIG. 2 is an elevation as seen from one side of the carton;

FIG. 3 is an elevation as seen from a side at right angles to that shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a bottom view of the carton;

FIG. 5 is a horizontal section taken on the line 5-5 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is an elevation corresponding to FIG. 2 for an elliptical ball;

FIG. 7 is an elevation as seen from the right side of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a plan view of a blank for the carton illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 3; and

FIG. 9 is a plan view of the blank shown in FIG. 8 partially folded for shipping purposes.

Referring to the drawings (FIGS. 1, 2 and 3), the carton 10 is shown designed to receive a basketball BB which is of spherical configuration so that its X, Y and Z axes are all of the same length. The carton has rectangularly disposed side walls 12, 14, 16 and 18, the side walls 12 and 16, as shown in FIG. 3, being situated opposite each other and being outwardly convex and the side walls 14 and 18, as shown in FIG. 2, being situated opposite each other and being inwardly concave. At the lower and upper ends of the side walls 14, 18 there are dust flaps 20, 22 and at the lower and upper ends of the side walls 12 and 14 there are closure flaps 24 and 26. The dust and closure flaps at the bottom and top collectively form, when folded over the bottom and top openings, spaced parallel, substantially rectangular bottom and top walls 28 and 30.

As clearly shown in FIG. 2 the distance between the bottom and top walls 28 and 30 is substantially equal to the diameter of the basketball BB, the distance between the convex' walls 12 and 16 midway between the bottom and top is substantially equal to the diameter of the basketball and the distance between the concave side walls 14 and 18 is less than the diameter of the basketball. The concave side walls l4, 18 contain centrally located, substantially elliptical openings 32 and 34 through which the spherical segments of the basketball project. The configuration of the openings is determined by projecting a circle of a diameter corresponding to the diameters of the segmental portions of the ball which are to project from the carton, projected onto the concave surfaces of the side walls 14 and 18.

Since a spherical ball, such as a basketball, has equal length X, Y and Z axes the distance between the bottom and top walls 28 and 30 and between the convex walls 12 and 16 may be substantially the same, but in any case must be no less than the diameter of the ball. Additionally, the widths of the upper and lower ends of the side walls 12 and 16 must be equal to the widths of the side walls 14 and 18 midway between their ends and the collective lengths of the ends of the several walls must be equal to the circumference of the ball at mid-diameter. This latter dimension is necessary to permit the ball to be inserted into the carton.

On the top wall 30 there are handle elements 3434 formed, respectively, at the distal ends of the closure flaps 24, 26 which are folded upwardly in parallel relation and which collectively provide a handle structure for carrying the carton.

As thus far described the carton is shown as designed for a spherical ball, such as a basketball; however, it is equally adaptable to an elliptical ball such as a football PE in which case, as shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, the distance between the bottom and top walls 28 and 30 corresponds substantially to the length of the football, that is, the long axis of the ellipse, the distance between the convex side walls 12 and 16 is substantially equal to the diameter of the football midway between its ends, that is, the short axis of the ellipse, and the distance between the concave side walls 14 and 18 is substantially less than the diameter of the football midway between its ends. The elliptical openings 32, 34 in the concave side walls correspond to projections of the elliptical bases of the segmental portions of the surface of the football projected on the concave surfaces of the side walls. Except for the depth of the carton, that is, the distance between the bottom and top, the carton designed for a football is similar to that for a basketball in that the lengths of the ends of the several panels must be no less than the circumference of the football at its minor axis and the widths of the side walls 12 and 16 at their ends must be equal to the widths of the side walls 14 and 18 midway between their ends.

The carton is made of paperboard such as commonly used for packaging articles of this kind and is formed up of a blank 36, as shown in FIG. 8, comprising a substantially rectangular sheet of board on which there are spaced parallel, longitudinally extending fold lines 38-38, outwardly of which there are dust flaps -20, 2222 andthe closure flaps 2424, 2626, and transversely extending fold lines 40. 42, 44. 46

. which divide the sheet into four panels which comprise the side walls 12, 14, 16 and 18 and a sealing flap 48, the latter being connected to one of the end panels. The other end panel has a concave edge 50 corresponding in curvature to the fold lines 40, 42, 44, 46. all of which have the same curvature. The distance between the fold lines 3838 corresponds to the Y axis of the ball, the lengths of the fold lines 38-38 correspond to the circumference of the ball and the lengths of the ends of the panels 12 and 16 correspond substantially to the widths of the panels 14 and 18. The elliptical openings 32, 34 are formed centrally of the side walls 14 and 18 and as related before are formed by projecting a circle corresponding in diameter to the segmental portion of the sphere which is to extend from the carton onto a cylindrical surface corresponding to the curvature of the concave walls 12 and 16.

As a preliminary step in the formation of the carton from the blank the latter is partially folded with its opposite ends joined as shown in FIG. 9. To this end fold lines 52-52 are formed midway between the opposite sides of the side walls 12 and 16 so as to divide the sheet into two equal parts A and B, whereupon the left half of the panel 12 is folded upwardly from the plane of the drawing and over onto the right-half. The righthalf of the panel 16 together with the whole of the panel 18 and the flap 48 are folded upwardly from the plane of the drawing and over onto the panel 14 and onto the folded panel 12 and the flap 48 is adhesively secured to the folded left half of the panel 12. As thus folded the dust flaps of the two side walls 14 and 18 are superposed and the closure flaps of the two side walls 12 and 16 are folded midway between their ends and superposed as shown in FIG. 9.

To set the partially folded blank up for use the superposed sections A and B are spread apart and the side walls l2, 14, 16 and 18 caused to take up rectangular positions with respect to each other whereupon the dust flaps at the lower end are folded inwardly over the lower open end and the closure flaps are folded inwardly over the dust flaps and engaged. The ball is now inserted through the open upper end and since the collective length of the upper ends of the side walls correspond to the major diameter of the ball the latter can be easily thrust into the container and into a position to extend through the openings in the side walls 12 and 16 whereupon the dust flaps are folded over the open top and the closure flaps over the dust flaps and interengaged. Finally the handle portions are folded at right angles to the closure flaps.

A blank for the carton shown in FIGS. 6 and 7 would be made in the same fashion as that shown in FIG. 8 except that the distance between the longitudinally extending fold lines will be greater than the distance between the edges of the panels 14 and 18, that is, equal to the length of the football.

It is to be observed that while the collective lengths of the upper and lower ends of the side walls must be at least equal to the circumference of the ball that the collective lengths of these ends may be greater than the circumference. The limiting factors in this respect are the use of more cardboard than is necessary which would be uneconomical and the proportions which would be unattractive.

The cartons illustrated for both spherical and elliptical balls may be used to hold correspondingly shaped articles other than balls which it may be desirable to package in such fashion as to expose portions thereof for customer examination. Moreover, it is within the scope of the invention to construct the carton with six or eight side walls rather than four by dividing the blank transversely into six or eight panels.

The carton as thus constructed is admirably suited for the intended purpose since it enables the customer to readily see the ball without having to remove it from the carton and from the standpoint that the blank of which it is made can be died out flat stock, assembled flat for ease of shipment and easily erected for use.

It should be understood that the present disclosure is for the purpose of illustration only and that this invention includes all modifications and equivalents falling within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A carton comprising rectangularly arranged curved sidewalls having sides and ends and closure means at the ends of the sidewalls which form bottom and top walls of rectangular configuration, said sidewalls and end walls being comprised of a flexible material, characterized in that two of the opposed sidewalls are convex, another two are concave and the end walls are flat, that the interior distance between the convex side walls midway between the top and bottom walls is substantially equal to the interior distance between the top and bottom walls, that the interior distance between the concave side walls midway between the top and bottom walls is less than the interior distance between the top and bottom walls and that said concave walls contain centrally located aligned openings of curvilinear configuration of such dimension that the convex surface of a body deposed within the carton having x and z axes corresponding to the distance between the top and bottom will project through said openings in engagement with the edges thereof, and that said upper ends of the sidewalls have a collective length at least equal to the circumference of a circle whose radius is equal to one-half the distance between the top and bottom wall, so that said flexible sidewalls at said upper ends can be distended to receive a body of said radius.

2. A carton according to claim 1, wherein the collective lengths of the lower ends of the side walls correspond to that of the upper ends of the side walls so that the carton is symmetrical.

3. A carton according to claim 1, wherein the convex side walls have a substantially cylindrical curvature.

4. A carton according to claim 1, wherein the concave side walls have a substantially cylindrical curvature and the openings therein are substantially elliptical.

5. A carton according to claim 1, wherein the closure means comprises dust flaps on two of the opposed side walls at the lower and upper ends thereof foldable across the bottom and top openings and closure flaps on the other two opposed side walls at the lower and upper ends provided with interengageable components by means of which they may be secured in overlapping engagement across the bottom and top openings.

6. A carton according to claim 5, wherein the closure flaps at the top of the carton embody handle members adapted to be disposed in a position perpendicular to the top when the closure flaps are interengaged.

7. A carton according to claim 1, wherein the convex side walls contain fold lines medially thereof from bottom to top.

8. A flat blank for forming a carton comprising a sub stantially rectangular sheet of flexible board having spaced parallel longitudinally extending fold lines and transverselly extending longitudinally spaced curved fold lines intersecting the longitudinally extending fold lines which collectively divide the sheet into four panels such that the ends of each panel coincide with the longitudinally extending fold lines and the side edges are transverse thereto, and outwardly of the longitudinally extended fold lines there are closure members which collectively form the ends of the carton when the blank is folded on such fold lines, said side edges of the alternate panels being concave and the side edges of the intermediate panels being convex, wherein the width of the alternate panels at their ends are equal to the width of the intermediate panels midway between their ends and wherein the intermediate panels contain centrally located, substantially curvilinear openings, said sheet being adapted to be folded on said transversely extending fold lines to dispose the panels rectilinearly, means at one end of the sheet for joining the two end panels of the sheet to each other and means associated with the closure members interengageable by folding of the closure members to form the ends of the carton.

9. A blank according to claim 8, wherein said means for joining the end panels comprises a part hingedly connected to one of the end panels and foldable relative thereto into engagement with the other of the end panels, said part being adapted to be fastened to saidother end panel.

10. A blank according to claim 8, wherein said closure members comprise dust flaps and closure flaps disposed outwardly of the longitudinally extending fold lines hingedly connected to the ends of the, panels.

11. A blank according to claim 8, wherein the panels having the concave edges are divided medially by hinge lines.

12. A carton blank according to claim 8, folded on fold lines medially of the panels having the concave

Patent Citations
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US3369727 *Jun 17, 1966Feb 20, 1968Timmy E. WrightContainer
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3987893 *Jan 22, 1976Oct 26, 1976Champion International CorporationDisplay carton and blank therefor
US3987995 *Jul 15, 1974Oct 26, 1976Hamasaki Leslie TDisplay device
US4191289 *Jan 2, 1979Mar 4, 1980Champion International CorporationHourglass carton
US4362239 *Oct 14, 1980Dec 7, 1982Champion International CorporationDisplay card with concave panel
US4420077 *Oct 9, 1981Dec 13, 1983Champion International CorporationDisplay card with concave panel
US4570787 *May 7, 1985Feb 18, 1986Westvaco CorporationDisplay device
US4691824 *Oct 30, 1986Sep 8, 1987Schindler Edgar CWrap-around packaging
US4779726 *Jul 20, 1987Oct 25, 1988Pratt Mykl SPackaging
US4972948 *May 18, 1990Nov 27, 1990Shinzo SaikiMulti-module golf ball sleeve
US5379894 *Mar 25, 1993Jan 10, 1995Ivy Hill CorporationPaperboard package
US5695056 *Nov 8, 1996Dec 9, 1997Fila U.S.A., Inc.Ball package
US6036010 *May 19, 1999Mar 14, 2000Sports Licensing, Inc.Game ball display box and method for assembling same
US6199692 *May 10, 1996Mar 13, 2001Van Ness Plastic Molding Inc.Reduced material box design for round objects
US6390299 *Jan 29, 2001May 21, 2002Westvaco Corp.Paperboard carrier for prepared food
US6568528Aug 24, 2001May 27, 2003Inland Paperboard And Packaging, Inc.Display container
US6615985Jun 7, 2002Sep 9, 2003Indiana Carton CompanySleeve box
US7331505 *Nov 28, 2005Feb 19, 2008Meadwestvaco Packaging Systems, LlcCarton for tapered articles
US7478743Feb 28, 2007Jan 20, 2009Holley Jr John MCarton for tapered and cylindrical articles
WO1994021528A1 *Mar 25, 1994Sep 29, 1994Ivy Hill CorpPaperboard package
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/485, 229/185, 206/315.9, 229/116.1, 229/117.14
International ClassificationB65D5/462, B65D5/50, B65D5/46
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/46, B65D5/50
European ClassificationB65D5/50, B65D5/46