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Publication numberUS3815824 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 11, 1974
Filing dateDec 29, 1972
Priority dateDec 29, 1972
Publication numberUS 3815824 A, US 3815824A, US-A-3815824, US3815824 A, US3815824A
InventorsOlson R
Original AssigneeOlson E Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sand spreader
US 3815824 A
Abstract
A sand spreader having a spreader assembly mounted on a discharge end portion of the chute of a ready-mix, or mixer-body, truck, and the like. A hopper assembly is arrangeable in the discharge end portion of the chute for controlling a fluent material flow from the chute to the spreader assembly.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Olson i 1 SAND SPREADER [75] Inventor: Roger E. Olson, Albert Lea, Minn.

[73] Assignee: Emil Olson, Inc., Albert Lea, Minn.

[22] Filed: Dec. 29, 1972 a 21 Appl. No.: 319,737

[52] US. Cl 239/674, 239/684, 291/32,

404/101 [51] Int. Cl. Elllc 19/20 [58] Fieldof Search 239/657, 685, 664, 686,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 737,484 8/1903 Rinderknecht 239/686 2,018,609 10/1935 Dull et a1. 291/32 X 2,190,619 2/1940 Watson 239/687 X 2,303,876

12/1942 Gaddis 239/674 June 11, 1974 2,496,504 2/1950 Tarrant 239/657 x 3,559,894 2/1971 Murray 239/681 x 3,583,645 6/1971 Murray 239/681 x FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 523,187 3/1956 Canada 239/684 254,178 12/1948 Switzerland 239/684 Primary ExaminerLloyd L. King Assistant EraminerAndres Kashnikow Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Clarence A. OBrien; Harvey B. Jacobson [57] ABSTRACT A sand spreader having a spreader assembly mounted on a discharge end portion of the chute of a readymix, or mixer-body, truck, and the like. A hopper assembly is arrangeable in the discharge end portion of the chute for controlling a fluent material flow from the chute to the spreader assembly.

7 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PATENTEnJuu I ma SHEET 10F 3 Him mimwm l 1924 3.8 15824 SHEET 2 BF 3 Fig.2

PATENTEDJuu 11 m4 1815824 sum anr 3 Fig.3

SAND SPREADER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates generally to spreaders, and particularly to a spreader attachment for ready-mix, or mixer-body, trucks, and the like.

2. Description of the Prior Art Operators of ready-mix concrete trucks, and the like, located in cold-winter areas are faced with the fact that concrete cannot be poured during extremely cold, or subfreezing, weather. This means that these trucks, which represent a substantial investment, are not needed to perform their normal function for perhaps several months a year. It is, of course, economically undesirable to have this capital equipment sitting idle for such periods of time.

Another problem encountered in cold-winter areas is the deicing of roads. In order to deice slippery roads, a fluent mixture of chloride (salt) and sand is frequently applied to slippery roads. However, this mixture presents a problem in that a uniform mix should be obtained for optimum results.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the present invention to provide apparatus which will permit utilization 'of mixer-body trucks, and the like, during extremely cold weather.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a spreader assembly for attachment to a chute of a mixer-body truck, and the like.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a hopper assembly arrangeable in a chute for directing a fluent material flow toward a spreader associated with the chute.

It is yet anotherobject of the present invention to provide a sand spreader and truck combination which will deliver to a road, and the like, a well mixed mixture of a chloride and sand.

These and other objects are achieved according to the present invention by providing a spreader assembly mountable on a discharge end portion of a chute. Advantageously, a hopper assembly according to the present invention is arranged in the discharge end portion of the chute for controlling a material flow from the chute to the spreader assembly.

A preferred spreader assembly according to the present invention has: a frame; a spreader member rotatably mounted on the frame; a motor and drive train mounted on the frame for rotating the spreader memher; and brackets arranged for supporting the frame from the discharge end portion of a chute.

A preferred hopper assembly according to the present invention is specifically intended for use with chutes which converge toward their discharge end. This assembly may have: a pair of side plates arranged converging toward the discharge opening of the chute; a cover plate connected to and arranged between the side plates; a framework connected to the side plates adjacent the discharge opening; and a deflecting plate adjustably mounted on the framework and arranged for directing material passing through the discharge open ing toward the spreader assembly.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had 2 to the accompanying drawings, forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a fragmentary, perspective view showing spreader and hopper assemblies according to the present invention mounted on the chute of a truck having a mixer-body. FIG. 2 is a fragmentary, top plan view showing the chute, spreader assembly, and hopper assembly of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary, sectional view taken generally along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken generally along the line 4-4 of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a sectional view, partly cut away, taken generally along the line 5-5 of FIG. 3.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS FIG. 1 of the drawings shows a mixer-body l0 arranged on a truck 11, and provided with a discharge port 12 and a chute 14 arranged for receiving a fluent material from port 12. Since the construction of readymix trucks, and the like, is well known and conventional, the details of the construction of truck 11 will not be set out herein. A spreader assembly 16 according to the present invention is mounted on the discharge end portion of chute 14, while a hopper assembly 18 is arranged in the same discharge end portion for controlling a fluent material flow from chute 14 to assembly l6. Chute 14 is illustrated as converging toward its discharge end, as is conventional and commonly used. It is to be understood that a hopper assembly according to the present invention may be designed for arrangementin other kinds of chute configurations if so desired.

The inner surface of chute 14, which is the surface contacted by a material (not shown), is advantageously lined with a heat insulating, synthetic material, such as urethane to protect the, for example, metal from which the chute is constructed. If the chute was unlined, the chloride in the mixture would react with ice formed on the surface of the chute and possibly damage the underlying metal.

Referring now to FIGS. 2 to 4 of the drawings, hopper assembly 18 has a pair of side plates 20 and 22 arranged converging toward the discharge opening 23 of chute 14. The converging walls of chute 12 will hold plates 20, 22 in position, and partially define a sloping trough down which fluent material may pass. A cover plate 24 is connected to longitudinal edges of plates 20, 22, and is arranged adjacent the top of chute 14 to form therewith a partial hopper. Once hopper assembly 18 is arranged in chute 14, the converging walls of chute 14 will have plates 20, 22 forced against them and lodged. Longitudinal members 26 and 28 together with a crossbar 30 form a framework which is connected to plates 20, 22 as by flanges 32, 34. The connection of the framework may be by, for example, welds. A deflecting plate 36 is adjustably mounted as bybolts and the like on members 26, 28 of the framework, and is arranged for directing fluent material passing through opening 23 toward assembly 16. Slots (not shown) in plate 36 will permit its adjustment in the direction of the arrows in FIG. 3. This adjustment is advantageous for regulating material flow. Plate 36 causes assembly 18 to function as a collecting hopper.

FIGS. 3 and 5 of the drawings best show assembly 16 as having a frame formed by a planar base plate 38. A spreader disk 40 provided with throwing bars 42 is rotatably mounted on plate 38 in a manner to be set out below. Disk 40 is rotated by a motor 44 mounted on plate 38 by a mounting bracket 46. This motor 44, which is arranged extending perpendicularly from a one side of plate 38, rotates a shaft 48, mounted on plate 40 as by a bearing 50 and arranged extending parallel to motor 44 from both parallel sides of plate 38, by means of a drive train including sprockets 52 and 54 mounted on shaft 48 and motor 44, respectively, and a sprocket chain 56. The entire drive train is mounted on the same side of plate 38 as motor 44, and is shielded by a housing 58. Disk 40 is affixed in a conventional manner to shaft 48 on the side of plate 38 opposed to the side on which motor 44 and the drive train are arranged.

A pair of brackets 60 and 62 are connected to lugs 64 and 65, respectively, provided on chute 14, and to plate 38 at a point adjacent motor 44 to partially support assembly 16 on the chute. A U-shaped bracket 66 is mounted on plate 38 adjacent shaft-48. This bracket 66 is formed by a pair of parallel legs 68 and 70 joined by a back portion 72, which may be, for example, welded to plate 38. All of brackets 60, 62, and 66 extend away from plate 38, and past disk 40 toward chute l4. Lugs 74 and 76, which, like lugs 64, 65, may be, for example, welded to chute 14, are advantageously provided for connecting legs 68 and 70, respectively, to chute 14.

Referring again to FIG. 1 of the drawings, a line 78 is illustrated as running from truck 11 to motor 44. This line may be a fluid hose or electric power line feeding a fluid or electric motor, respectively; alternatively, line 78 could be eliminated, and motor 44 could be a self-contained, for example, gasoline, motor.

A truck 11, when provided with a spreader assembly 16, may distribute a, for example, mixture of a chloride and sand onto slippery roads and the like by first placing the chloride and sand into body in a similar manner to the insertion of materials for, for example, concrete. Body 10 may then be rotated so as to thoroughly mix the ingredients. This thorough mixing has the advantage of reducing the amount of chloride needed. Once mixed, the chloride and sand may be fed at a constant and easy rate of flow down chute 14, to spreader assembly 16. Hopper assembly 18 will insure that the mixture is directed toward disk 40. If desired, a conventional snowplow (not shown) may be provided at the front end of truck 11 foruse in conjunction with the sand spreader.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described-and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

I. A spreader assembly, comprising, in combination:

a. a frame;

b. a spreader member rotatably mounted j on the frame; c. means mounted on the frame for rotating the spreader member; and d. means for supporting the frame from a discharge end portion of a chute, and including a hopper assembly arranged in a discharge end portion of the chute for controlling a material flow from the chute to the spreader assembly, the hopper assembly including a pair of side plates arranged converging toward the discharge end portion of the chute and held by adjacent converging walls of the chute partially defining a sloping trough. 2. A structure as defined in claim 1, wherein the frame includes a planar base plate, and the rotating means includes a motor mounted on and arranged ex- 1 train, and the spreader member is affixed to the shafton the side of the base plate opposed to the one side.

3. A structure as defined in claim 2, wherein the supporting means includes a bracket connected to the base plate adjacent the motor and a U-shaped bracket mounted on the base plate adjacent the shaft, all of the brackets extending away from the base plate and past the spreader member.

4. a hopper assembly for arrangement in the discharge end portion of a chute, comprising, in combination:

a. a pair of side plates arranged converging toward a discharge opening of a chute, and arrangeable in the chute for being held by converging walls partially defining a sloping trough of the chute;

b. a cover plate connected to and arranged between the side plates, the cover and side plates arrangeable for directing fluent material in the trough;

c. a framework connected to the side plates adjacent the discharge opening; and

d. a deflecting plate adjustably mounted on the framework and arranged for directing toward the spreader assembly material passing through the chute and discharge opening.

5. in combination with a truck ready-mix body having a discharge port and a chute having converging walls partially defining a sloping trough, and arranged for receiving material from the discharge port, a

spreader assembly mounted on a discharge end portion of the chute, the spreader assembly comprising, in combination:

i. a frame; ii. a spreader member rotatably mounted on the frame; iii. means mounted on the frame for rotating the spreader member; and iv. means for supporting the frame from the chute discharge end portion, and a hopper assembly including a pair of side plates arranged converging toward the discharge end portion of the chute and held by the converging walls'of the chute. 6. A structure as defined in claim 5, wherein the frame includes a planar base plate, and the rotating means includes a motor mounted on and arranged extending perpendicularly from a one side of the base plate, a drive train connected to the motor and ar- 7. A structure as defined in claim 6, wherein the supporting means includes a bracket connected to the base plate adjacent the motor and a U-shaped bracket mounted on the base plate adjacent the shaft, all of the brackets extending away from the base plate and past the spreader member.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US737484 *Jul 26, 1902Aug 25, 1903Charles J RinderknechtBroadcast seeder.
US2018609 *Apr 20, 1935Oct 22, 1935Dull Waldo NSand distributing device
US2190619 *Oct 13, 1937Feb 13, 1940Paul MutzfeldSand scatterer
US2303876 *Dec 20, 1939Dec 1, 1942Roy GaddisApparatus for sanding highways
US2496504 *Aug 9, 1946Feb 7, 1950Tarrant Fred KSpreader hopper and mounting attachment
US3559894 *Nov 18, 1968Feb 2, 1971Tarrant Mfg CoMaterial-spreading apparatus with interchangeable material conveyor assemblies
US3583645 *Jun 9, 1969Jun 8, 1971Tarrant Mfg CoConveyor-type hydraulic-powered endgate spreader
CA523187A *Mar 27, 1956J. Chase SidneyRoad sanding machines
CH254178A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4571119 *Sep 29, 1983Feb 18, 1986Jones James FRoadway patching attachment for dump trucks
US4842202 *Feb 28, 1986Jun 27, 1989C. Van Der Lely N.V.Spreader
US7670081Jan 17, 2008Mar 2, 2010Lithocrete, Inc.Method of forming surface seeded particulate
US7753293 *Dec 11, 2007Jul 13, 2010Farmer Thomas EBroadcast spreader mechanism for an all terrain vehicle and the like
US9267284Feb 11, 2014Feb 23, 2016Lithocrete, Inc.Decorative concrete and method of installing the same
US9580915Jan 19, 2016Feb 28, 2017Lithocrete, Inc.Decorative concrete and method of installing the same
US20040041295 *Sep 2, 2003Mar 4, 2004Shaw Lee A.Method of forming surface seeded particulate
US20060083591 *Dec 6, 2005Apr 20, 2006Shaw Lee AMethod of forming surface seeded particulate
US20070104538 *Dec 20, 2006May 10, 2007Shaw Lee AMethod of forming surface seeded particulate
US20080112757 *Jan 17, 2008May 15, 2008Shaw Lee AMethod of forming surface seeded particulate
US20090114746 *Dec 11, 2007May 7, 2009Farmer Thomas EBroadcast spreader mechanism for an all terrain vehicle and the like
US20100111604 *Jan 13, 2010May 6, 2010Shaw Lee AMethod of forming surface seeded particulate
US20100180528 *Jan 21, 2009Jul 22, 2010Shaw Ronald DDecorative concrete and method of installing the same
EP1127982A3 *Feb 16, 2001Jul 30, 2003Küpper-Weisser GmbHDevice for spreading pre-wetted granular material
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/674, 291/32, 239/684, 404/101
International ClassificationE01C19/20, E01C19/00
Cooperative ClassificationE01C19/203
European ClassificationE01C19/20C3C