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Publication numberUS3816676 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 11, 1974
Filing dateMar 3, 1972
Priority dateMar 3, 1972
Publication numberUS 3816676 A, US 3816676A, US-A-3816676, US3816676 A, US3816676A
InventorsSi Ling Is Ao
Original AssigneeSi Ling Is Ao
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic telephone dialer with three-dimensional conductive matrix switch assembly
US 3816676 A
Images(9)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 11 IsAo [ June 11, 1974 AUTOMATIC TELEPHONE DIALER WITH THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONDUCTIVE MATRIX SWITCH ASSEMBLY [76] Inventor: Si-Ling IsAo, 39-1 Alley 30, Lane 172 Keelung Rd. Section 1, Taipei, China [22] Filed: Mar. 3, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 231,551

[52] U.S. Cl. 200/1 R, 200/5 R, 200/18,

179/90 [51] Int. Cl. H01h 9/00, H04n 1/26 [58] Field of Search 200/1 R, 5 R, 5 A, 16 C,

200/16 D, 166 BA, 18, 16 E; 179/90 R, 90 B, 90 BD, 90 K; 340/359, 364, 365 R Primary Examiner.1ames R. Scott Attorney, Agent, or FirmBrowne, Beveridge, De- Grandi & Kline [57] ABSTRACT An encoding device for an automatic telephone repertory dialer in which a plurality of rows and columns of elongated conducting elements which constitute a three dimensional matrix of conducting elements are selectively contacted by encoding means which are removably mounted and which encode different telephone numbers at different longitudinal positions on the conducting elements. The encoding means may be needles having two conducting portions thereon which are removably inserted in holes in an inverted U- shaped member movable between a first position in which the needles are out of contact with the elements and a second position in which the needles are in contact with the elements or may be conducting inserts which may be removably mounted on the arms of a movable mounting member.

An impulse generating, or frequency generating, sampling system is used to sample the encoding device when a selected push button is depressed. The impulse generating system emits impulses corresponding to the digit encoded which impulses are terminated by a circuit which is closed when the encoded conducting elements is contacted by the sampling system. The frequency generating system emits two signals of different frequency for each digit encoded which frequencies are determined by appropriate capacitors connected into an oscillator system by the encoding means If the encoding device is used in a PBX installation, the conducting elements are encoded by a member which contacts successive conducting elements in a row or column.

19 Claims, 44 Drawing Figures MTENTEDJUN 1 1 I974 SHEET 2 OF 9 FIG 3 FIG. 3A

PATENTEDJUN 11 m4 3.816.}576

SHEET 5 OF 9 He. 7m

g257 v Q Hem i e l i FIGJIEI) FIG. 1B]

PATENTEDJUM 1 1 m4 3.8161676 SHEET GDP 9 FIG. 8B

IST DIGIT 2ND DIGIT I LEFT RIGHT LEFT RIGHT 0 N0 NEEDLE N0 NEEDLE 0 PAIENTEIIJIJN 1 1 I974 SHEET 8 [IF 9 a CA 262 zeal I] 263f 2623] 232 262 FIG. IOB

285 FIG. III\ FIG. loll FIG. IIB

ARTIFICIAL LOAD AUTOMATIC TELEPHONE DIALER WITH THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONDUCTIVE MATRIX SWITCH ASSEMBLY This invention relates to improved automatic repertory dialers and call transmitters. In recent years because of the great convenience which they offer both automatic repertory dialers and call transmitters have gained increased popularity. An automatic repertory dialer has a plurality of predetermined telephone numbers stored therein and is a device which automatically dials a selected one of the predetermined telephone numbers upon activation of appropriate means such as a selected push button by the subscriber. The repertory dialer is thus effective'to completely eliminate manual dialing and its attendant disadvantages such as slowness and the possibility of error. Repertory dialers find their greatest usefulness in a situation where a subscriber has occasion to call the same telephone number repeatedly over a period of time. Thus, many businesses who have clientsor accounts who must be telephoned repeatedly over a period of time have found great use for repertory dialers as have private individuals who have occassion to call the same telephone numbers repeatedly.

A call transmitter, sometimes known as a push button telephone is a device which replaces the conventional circular telephone dial with a series of push buttons, each one of which corresponds to a different hole in the conventional circular dial and each push button when depressed is operative to signal adifferent telephone digit. A telephone number is thus dialed with a call transmitter by depressing an appropriate combination of push buttons. Call transmitters, because of the convenience which they afford, have made. great strides in replacing the circular telephone dial in recent years.

Automatic repertory dialers of the prior art while providing great advantages over manual dialing systems have suffered from several disadvantages. For instance, in many repertory dialers of the prior art it has not been possible to store large numbers of coded telephone numbers in a single relatively compact device. Where it has been possible to store a large number of telephone numbers, the resultant devices have either been expensive to manufacture or excessively complicated mechanically.

An important disadvantage of many prior art repertory dialers has been their inability to provide means by which the subscriber can change the encoded telephone numbers which are stored in thedevice. Thus, for such dialers, it has been necessary for the subscriber to resort to skilled personnel to provide the service of changing the encoded telephone numbers. This has been extremely bothersome, for instance in the case of business subscribers who are continually adding new accounts and dropping old ones.

An dditional disadvantage of many prior art repertory dialers is that they required several operations to be performed to initiate each call. For example in repertory dialers which use punched cards to store telephone numbers it is necessary for the subscriber to select a card from a tile and insert in a slot before the call is made and replace the card in the tile after the call is made. In dialers using magnetic recording of telephone numbers, it is necessary for the subscriber to rotate a knob to align the recording head to the selected position and then to depress a start button. Hence these di- '2 alers have been time consuming and somewhat inconvenient to use.

The present invention obviates the above disadvantages by providing repertory dialers and call transmitters which are extremely compact and economical and which have the capability of storing a large number of telephone numbers. Additionally, the present invention provides a repertory dialer in which the subscriber may change the stored telephone numbers by himself without resort to skilled personnel and in which he may start and complete a call by pressing only a single button.

It is therefore an object of the invention to provide an improved repertory dialer which is compact and economical and allows a great number of telephone numbers to be stored in a single device.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a repertory dialer where the telephone numbers which are stored in the dialer may be changed by the subscriber himself without resort to skilled personnel.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a rep ertory dialer wherein a subscriber may start and complete a call by pressing only a single push button.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a repertory dialer for a PBX system which incorporates a novel system of coding.

It is a further object of the invention to provide improved distributor systems for use with repertory dialers and call transmitters.

The above objects are accomplished by providing a repertory dialer having an encoding device which is comprised of at least a plurality of rows and columns of elongated conducting elements such as conducting wires which constitute a three dimensional matrix of conducting elements. Telephone numbers are encoded on each matrix of conducting elements by encoding means which selectively connect conducting elements in each row or column to each other. According to one feature of the invention a plurality of telephone numbers may be encoded on each matrix of elongated conducting elements by utilizing different longitudinal positions on the elongated conducting elements to encode different telephone numbers. Encoding the same matrix of conducting elements with different telephone numbers at different longitudinal locations enables many telephone numbers to be stored in a relatively compact area.

According to the encoding scheme of the invention, novel mounting means are provided for the encoding means which allow the encoding means to be removed by the subscriber and replaced with different encoding means to change the telephone number encoded. In one embodiment, the-mounting means have. a plurality of holes therein corresponding to rows or columns of the conducting elements and the encoding means are elongated members of different lengths which removably fit in the holes and extend to contact different conducting elements in the rows or columns. In another embodiment the mounting means include a plurality of arms which extend parallel to a corresponding plurality of rows or columns of conducting elements and the arms have conducting inserts of various lengths removably positioned thereon which connect different conducting elements of the rows or columns together.

Any of the repertory dialers of the invention may be used in conjunction with a call transmitter when the subscriber desires to call a telephone number which is not stored in the device. The call transmitter, as the repertory dialer, uses the plurality of conducting elements to generate signals indicative of particular digits.

Additionally, any of the repertory dialers of the invention may be used with either distributor systems which generate impulses to correspond to the telephone digits or with distributor systems which generate multi-frequency signals to correspond to the telephone digits. One distributor system according to the invention provides a first sampling means for sampling predetermined row elements in successive columns of conducting elements and a second sampling means for sampling the rows of each column of conducting elements while the first sampling means samples the predetermined row element in that column. An initial impulse is emitted and thereafter an impulse is emitted for each row of elements sampled until the element is contacted in the row which has been connected to the predetermined row in that column by the encoding means. When that element is contacted, a circuit is completed which inhibits further impulses from being emitted with the result that the total number of impulses emitted corresponds to the number of the row encoded by the encoding means.

According to another distributor system according to the invention, capacitors from two groups are selectively connected to simultaneously sample elements in rows or columns by encoding means and each simultaneous sampling results in one low frequency and one high frequency signal being emitted which together are indicative of a digit. A sampling switch is provided which has intermediate positions between the positions to which the row or column elements are connected, the capacitors being charged when the sampling switch rests on the intermediate positions and being discharged to control the frequency of an oscillator means to emit said frequencies when the switch is at the positions to which the row or column elements are connected.

In the drawings:

FIG. I is a schematic representation of an encoding device for an automatic repertory dialer according to the invention.

FIG. 2 is a schematic representation of the encoding needles used in the encoding device of FIG. 1.

FIG. 2a is a cross-sectional view of one of the encoding needles employed in the invention.

FIG. 3 is a top view of rows of the conducting elements of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3A is a side view of a board for supporting a row of conducting elements of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3b is a drawing showing how a conducting element flexes when it is contacted by the bottom part of an encoding needle.

FIG. 4 is a drawing of the locking bar structure used in the device of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a schematic representation of a different embodiment of an encoding device for an automatic repertory dialer according to the invention.

FIGS. 5A and B are a detailed side view and top view respectively of the element 207 shown in FIG. 5.

FIG. 6 is a side view which shows the cooperation of encoding mounting means 206 and locking bar 217.

FIGS. 7A-.7Ee show various embodiments of encoding inserts for use with the automatic repertory dialing of FIG. 5.

FIG. 8 is a schematic representation of an encoding device for a PBX repertory dialer according to the invention and FIG. 8A is a portion of member 307 which is not shown in FIG. 8.

FIG. 8B is a top view of a portion of the encoding device of FIG. 8.

FIGS. 9A and B show the encoding scheme used with the encoding device of FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is a schematic diagram of a distributor system for generating impulses according to the invention.

FIGS. 10A and B are pictorial representations of a call transmitter which may be used in conjunction with the distributor systems of FIG. 10 to generate impulses.

FIG. 11 is a schematic diagram of a distributor system for generating multi-frequency signals according to the invention.

FIGS. 11A and B are pictorial representations of a call transmitter which may be used in conjunction with the distributor system of FIG. 11 to generate multifrequency signals.

FIG. 12 is a schematic of a distributor system for generating impulses for use with the PBX system of FIG. 8.

FIG. 1 shows a sectional view of a first embodiment of an encoding device according to the invention. Housing 131 which may be a rectangular housing of metal, plastic or any suitable material, has mounted on its base surface 101, a plurality of support means 140. Between each two adjacent support means a matrix of elongated conducting elements is located. These conducting elements run perpendicular to the plane of the page in FIG. 1 and may be mounted at their ends on grooved insulating boards which may be made of plastic, bakelite or any other insulating material as shown in FIGS. 3 and 3A. In FIGS. 3 and 3A, a horizontal row of conducting elements 150 is supported at both ends in grooves 161 of boards 160. Springs 162 are shown in FIG. 3 to keep the conducting elements separated from each other. Boards I60 which support the different rows of conducting elements are stacked on top of each other and may be supported on base plate 101 by any conventional means. The conducting elements of the invention in the preferred embodiment are flexible elongated wires but may also be rigid metallic strips or rods. While the conducting elements are disclosed as being circular in cross section they can also be square or rectangular.

Each matrix of conducting elements has a plurality of telephone numbers encoded on it, different telephone numbers being encoded at different longitudinal locations on the conducting elements. FIG. 1 shows one telephone number encoded on each matrix of conducting elements 170, and 190. Actually, each matrix has many telephone numbers encoded on its conducting elements in corresponding planes behind the plane of the paper.

The number of columns of conducting elements in each matrix is equal to the maximum number of digits in a telephone number which is to be encoded. The number of rows of conducting elements 150 is equal to one less than the number of choices which exists for each digit. Thus in a typical telephone system there would be nine rows of conducting element 150, the zero or lOth digit being represented by not encoding any conducting element. Additionally, there is a top row of conducting elements 151 above member 110, a row of conducting elements 152 immediately below member 110 and, if desired, a bottom row of conducting elements 158 may be added as will be explained later. Elements 158 are shown in FIG. 1 only in conjunction with matrix 190.

As may be seen by reference to FIG. 3, all of the conducting elements 150, 152 and 158 in a given row are connected to each other by wire 153. Each of the rows of conducting elements however are separated from each other by insulating mounting boards 160. Also as may be seen in FIG. 3, each of the conducting elements of rows 151 are insulatedfrom each other and are led from element 160 separately.

Bottom plate 101 has several support means 140 bolted to it along its length. Each of the bars 140 has drilled therein a plurality of holes 141. Inverted U- shaped members 143 are comprised of side portions 111 which are connected to each other by bridge portions 110. Side portions 111 have four cylindrical rods 144 projecting therefrom. These rods 144 are inserted into and secured in holes 141. A coil spring 145 spring biases inverted U-shaped member 143 to the position shown in FIG. 1. If desired, another spring 145 may be provided at thev cylindrical projection 144 beneath the projection at which spring 145 is illustrated in FIG. 1. Each inverted U-shaped member 143 has a plurality of holes 104 in its bridge portion 110 equal to the maximum number of digits in a telephone number to be encoded. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 1 the bridge portion of each inverted'U-shaped member is provided with ten holes corresponding to ten columns of conducting elements.

FIG. 2 shows encoding needles 147 of different lengths which are inserted into the holes 104 in bridge portion 110 to extend down to different rows of conducting elements 150 which correspond to the different telephone digits. Each encoding needle 147 is comprised of two conducting end portions 148 and 154 which are electrically connected to each other through the middle portion of the encoding needle which'is covered with an insulating sleeve 149. Conducting end 148 is enlarged so that when the conducting needles are placed in the holes 104 the enlarged end portion prevents them from sliding through the holes.

FIG. 2a is a cross-sectional view of one of the encoding needles. It is seen that conducting end portions 900 and 901 are connected to each other by conducting portion 902 which is covered by insulative material 903.

As shown in FIG. 2 each encoding needle of different length corresponds to a different telephone digit to be encoded. The top row of elements 150 corresponds to the telephone digit 1, the second row 150 to the digit 2, and so on down to the ninth row which corresponds to the digit nine. A zero corresponds to no row of the conducting elements being encoded. Thus, by appropriate selection of conducting needles, matrix 170 is seen to have the telephone number 7658901346 encoded thereon. Each encoding needle is positioned to connect one of conducting elements 151 to a conducting element in a row 150 which corresponds to the telephone digit which is encoded.

If a telephone system which uses less than ten digits to a telephone number is being used then an end pin 156 as shown in FIG. 2 is placed in the hole 104'following the last digit. Thus, as is seen, only 7 and 8 digits are encoded'respectively on matrices 180 and land end pins are placed in the 8th and 9th holes 104 respectively. End pin 156 is of alength to connect row of conducting element 151 to row 152. While end pin 156 is shown in FIG. 2 as having an insulating sleeve thereon, an insulating sleeve is not necessary. As will be described later in conjunction with the distributor system of the invention, such a connection is operative to terminate the automatic dialing of the telephone number.

If it is desired to dial a telephone number where it is necessary to wait for a dial tone after several digits have been dialed before dialing is resumed a pause pin 157 as is seen in FIG. 2 is placed in the appropriate hole 104. Pause needle 157 is the longest of all of the encoding needles and when placed in hole 104 is operative to connect a conducting element 151 to a lowermost conducting element 158 which is shown in matrix 190. As in conjunction with one of the distributor systems of the invention, this connection causes a pause in the automatic dialing to enable receipt of a dial tone.

After the encoding needles have been inserted in holes 104, bar 163 is placed on top of the top conducting portions of the encoding needles to secure the needles in position. Bar 163 has a hole at each longitudinal end thereof and screws 164 which are molded onto the bridge portion project through these holes and are fastened with bolts to secure members 163 and 143 together.

Bar 163 has member 165 projecting from its top. Member 165 may be located either in the middle of 163 as shown in conjunction with matrix 170, at the left end of element 163 as shown in conjunction with matrix 180 or at the right end of element 163 as shown in conjunction with matrix 190. Member 165 has an oblique surface at its top which when depressed with the oblique surface 166 of push button extension 168 will cause the member 163 as well as the inverted U-shaped member 143 to which it is attached to move to the right. When inverted U-shaped member 143 moves to the right, it carries with it all of the encoding needles which are then operative to selectively contact the matrix of conducting element to encode the telephone number on the conducting elements.

FIG. 3b shows how a conducting element flexes when it is contacted by the bottom of an encoding needle. Thus, encoding element 907 is shown suspended between members 160. Dotted line 907 represents the position of the encoding element when it is not contacted by an encoding needle, while solid line 907 shows the deflected position of the encoding element when it is contacted by encoding needle 906.

As can be seen in FIG. 1 projecting number 165 is displaced when a corresponding push button is depressed by a person making a call. When push button 115 is pressed, push button extensions 124 and 168 move downward until the oblique surface 165 is contacted by the oblique surface 166. Each push button 115 is normally held at its upper position by coil spring 132 and by pin and hole 133 on stem 124. Each stem 124 has two notches 134. When the push button is in its upper position the lower notch 134 engages locking bar 125. When the push button is depressed downwardly the stem 124 pushes bar away until the upper notch of 124 engages the locking bar. When the subscriber's finger is removed from the selected push button 115 the button is held at its lower position by the locking bar 125.

Locking bars 125 are attached to each other by means of frame 127 as shown in FIG. 4. When any push button is depressed the locking bar 125 associated with it is pushed sidewards carrying with it the frame 127. Member 178 is a side member of the frame 127 and has short rods 177 and 179 projecting from its surface.

Relay 126 as shown in FIG. 4 has armature 171 having two bent ends 172 and 173. 174 and 175 are the ends of a movable leaf spring and a fixed leaf spring respectively. Relay 126 and leaf springs 174 and 175 are located on plate 122 shown in FIG. 1. A bent element 176 has one end fixed on relay 126 and the other end on leaf spring tip 174 which prevents leaf spring 174 from moving towards leaf spring 175 as shown in FIG. 4. Element 176 engages short rod 177 at a point in its middle section.

When a push button is depressed a particular locking bar 125 is pushed to the right and carries with it the frame 127. Side piece 178 moves sidewards carrying rods 177 and 179 with it. Rod 177 pushes bent element 176 upwards to free 174 which springs into contact with 175 thereby completing an electrical circuit which is operative to start the distributing means to sample the matrix of conducting elements. Depressing any push button therefore enables a matrix of conducting elements and simultaneously causes the encoded matrix of conducting elements to be time sampled by the distributing means.

When the call is completed the relay 126 operates attracting armature 171 to the right in FIG. 4. Bent portion 173 of armature 171 pushes short rod 179 and thereby side piece 178 and 177 to the right to free the depressed push button 115. At the same time bent portion 172 of armature 171 pushes leaf spring 174 to the right to break electrical contact between 174 and 175. The middle of 176 will again engage rod 177 to keep contacts 174 and 175 separated and the unit is thus in a position to again switch the distributing system on when the next push button is depressed.

Push buttons 115 project through holes in top plate 103 of housing 130. Housing 130 has plate 123 therein through which extensions 124 of push buttoms 115 pass. Screws 129 are used to attach plates 103, 123, and 122 together. These screws are inserted through upper spacer 128 and threaded through lower spacer 128a. When it is desired to re-encode one or more of the matrices of conducting elements with a new telephone number, several screws used to affix housing 130 and 131 together at convenient locations (not shown) are removed and the entire upper unit including and above plate 122 is lifted off to afford the subscriber access to bars 163 which are removed to enable changing the encoding needles.

It is to be understood that while only 3 matrices of conducting elements are shown from left to right in FIG. 1, any number of matrices may be provided in an actual system. Also while only one plane of the conducting elements is shown in FIG. 1, it is to be understood that the conducting elements are elongated and run perpendicular to the plane of the paper and that each matrix of conducting elements such as 170,180 and 190 have a number of inverted U-shaped members 143 associated with it and that the encoding needles mounted in each inverted U-shaped members contacts the elongated conducting elements at different longitudinal locations encoding thereon different telephone numbers. Support members run into the plane of the paper in FIG. 1 across the length of the housing or in the alternative separate support members 140 may be used to mount each inverted U-shaped member which encodes the same matrix of conducting elements. In an actual device built according to the invention, 108 telephone numbers were encoded. Not only are all of the conducting elements 150, 152 and 158 in the same row connected together electrically, but also the conducting elements of the corresponding columns of the respective matrices may be connected together to present to the sampling means an effective single matrix. In other words, each element in the first column of matrix 170 would be connected to the corresponding elements in the first column of matrices 180 and 190 and so on.

In FIGS. 1 to 4 the legend I is representative of surfaces which should be insulative and the legend C is representative of surfaces which should be conductive. Additionally, parts 110, 111, 115, 124, 125, 143, 144, 149, 160, 163, 165, 166 and 168 should be made of insulative material, while parts 129, 132, 145, 146, 147, 148, to 154, 156 to 158, 162, 164, 170 to 177, 179, and should be made of conductive material.

FIG. 5 shows a second embodiment of a repertory dialer according to the invention. FIG. 5 is a sectional view of housing 205 which has push buttons 202 protruding through holes in top surface 240. Plate 241 provides a fixed surface against which protrusions 242 on push button arm 213 rests when push buttons 202 are in the upper position. As in the embodiment of FIG. I, each push button 202 corresponds to a different encoded telephone number and when pressed will automatically encode the telephone number on the matrix of conducting elements 215 and simultaneously cause one of the distributor systems of the invention to time sample the encoded elements. As in the embodiment of FIG. 1, while the conducting elements 215 are disclosed as being flexible wires of circular cross section they can be rigid metallic strips or rods and may be of square or rectangular cross section. For clarity of illustration no locking mechanism is shown for the buttons 202 in FIG. 5 but a locking mechanism similar to that shown in FIGS. 1 and 4 may be used.

Housing 205 is divided into three compartments; left and right compartments 200 and 201 and middle compartment 204. The middle compartment may be used to store the electrical components of the distributor system which is used in conjunction with the encoding device.

Right and left hand cover plates 205a and 205b are removable to afford the subscriber access to the right and left compartments, respectively, in order to insert and remove encoding mounting means 206. Compartments 200 and 201 have a plastic insert 207 secured therein, which may be glued or bolted to the housing. 207 may be seen most clearly in side view 5A and top view 58. In FIG. 5 a side section of 207 is seen and 207 extends perpendicular to the plane of the paper parallel to conducting elements 215. Member 207 which may be made of plastic has projecting portions 209 on its top surface and further has a plurality of grooves 208a which extend from surface 208b in FIG. 5A to the level of dotted line 208a in FIG. 5A. A top view of member 207 showing the grooves 208a is seen in FIG. 5B. Memher 207 likewise has vertical grooves 208 which are continuations of the horizontal grooves 208a.

A side view of encoding mounting means 206 having arms 214 is shown in FIG. 6. Encoding mounting means 206 is shown inserted into compartments 200 and 201 in FIG. 5. Notches 216 in displacement member 210 which is the top arm of mounting means 206 are slipped over the protruding portions 209 of member 207 and the end of arm 210 is inserted in hole 212 in push button arm 213. Topmost encoding arm 214a shown in FIG. 6 is inserted in one of the grooves 208a and the ends of the encoding arms are inserted in a vertical groove 208.

When push button 202a in FIG. 5 is depressed, it carries displacement member 210 down with it until notches 216 engage projecting portions 209 of member 207. Before or when notches 216 engage arms 209 contacts 223 and 224 will be pushed closed by member 210 starting the electrical operation of the distributor system. Also in this position the arms 214 will be in contact with the conducting element 215 of the matrix, as is shown in left hand compartment 200.

When arm 210 moves down, its tip 211 is engaged under locking bar 217 shown in FIG. 6 (not shown in FIG. 5) which does not release until the telephone call is completed.

It is to be understood that FIG. 5 shows only a single encoding mounting means 206 cooperating with conducting elements 215 but that there are actually a plurality of encoding mounting means 206 behind one shown in FIG. 5 encoding the conducting elements at different longitudinal positions. Each encoding means fits in a different groove 208 of element 207. Locking bar 217 is a long bar which extends perpendicular to the plane of the paper so that all arms 210 of all encoding mounting means 206 may be secured beneath it. Locking bar 217 is mounted at each end on a vertical bar 218 only one of which is shown in FIG. 6. Bars 218 are mounted on shaft 219 and are held together by a bar 220 at their middle portion so that locking bar 217 is moved as a single piece. Locking bar 217 is normally pulled to the right position by spring 221 limited by stopper 222. Displacement member 210 pushes locking bar 217 to the left, and is locked at its lower position during calling. When the call is completed, member 218 is attracted by a relay to the left to free tip 211 of member 210 and member 210 and its associated push button 202 are pushed upward by coil springs 225.

FIGS. 7A to 7E show the various types of encoding inserts which may be attached to encoding arms 214 to connect two conducting elements 215 in the same row to each other. The encoding inserts may be so arranged to encode conducting elements 215 for either impulse signalling or multi-frequency signalling. FIG. 7B shows an arm 214 arranged for impulse signalling. In such an arrangement an end column is the control column, 1abelled C in FIG. 7B and corresponds to conducting element 151 in FIG. 1. Encoding inserts 239 of different lengths would then connect the control element to one of the other elements in the same manner as encoding needles 147 in FIG. 1 connect conducting elements 151 to elements 150. As is the case of all of the conducting elements within the same row in FIG. 1, all of the elements within the same column in FIG. 5 would ducting elements L, L1, L2, L3, L4, H, H1, H2, and H3 are used to generate frequencies correspondingto a single digit. A low frequency tone is generated by connecting the L element to either L1, L2, L3 or L4 and a high frequency tone is generated by connecting the H element to one of H1, H2, or H3. As soon in FIG. 7A the conducting inserts are arranged to effect such connections. A combination of a particular low frequency tone and a particular high frequency tone corresponds to a digit. Thus, in the embodiment of FIG. 7A two digits are encoded on one arm, and 7 arms are shown in FIG. 6 on encoding number 206, meaning that telephone numbers comprised of up to 14 digits may be encoded with the encoding mounting means 206.

The encoding inserts of the invention will now be described in greater detail. In FIG. 7A, a portion of encoding mounting means 206 is shown. Thus, trunk portion 231 is shown with enlarged views of two arms 214. Encoding means 206 may be made of any rigid material such as for instance plastic or bakelite. Encoding inserts 235 are of a rigid or flexible conducting material such as metal or metallic foil. The inserts are in the shape of an'inverted U and actually are comprised of two parallel inverted U-shaped members connected by two cross-pieces 236, one of which is shown in end view 7Aa. As shown in that figure, the cross section of arms 214 is rectangular and the encoding inserts fit onto the rectangular cross section. They may be secured to arms 214 either by pressure fitting or by cementing. As is seen, the inserts are of different lengths to connect conducting elements L to either L1, L2, L3 or L4 and conducting elements H to either H1, H2, or H3. Two telephone digits are shown encoded side by side in FIG. 7A.

In the embodiment of FIG. 7B, arm 214 is seen to have a groove 242 running along its length. Additionally, the cross sectional area of arms 214 is continually changing from the cross sectional area of FIG. 7B taken at line a-a to the cross sectional area of FIG. 7Bb taken at line bb which are shown in FIGS. 7, 7Bb and FIG. 7Ba as cross sectional areas 244 and 243 respectively. Encoding inserts 239 are comprised of a longitudinal cylindrical element 246 which is compression fit into groove 242 and hook-like elements 247 at each end. Hook-like elements 247 are shaped to grasp the cross sections of arms 214 at sections 244. Hence, the inserts may be attached to the arms without the aid of cement. However, if desired, cement may be used for a more permanent attachment.

FIG. 7C shows a third type of encoding system. Here encoding inserts 245 shown from the side of FIG. 7Ca and from the bottom in FIG. 7Cb are molded into the arms 214. The arms 214 as shown in FIG. 7Cc are detachable from the trunk 231. Each arm has a flange 249 at its end which fits into trunk 231 by conventional mechanical means. For instance, trunk 231 may have grooves therein into which flange members 249 fit to hold members 214 perpendicular to trunk 231. In the alternative, members 249 may have an adhesive surface 250 which when pressed to a support member in trunk 231 will adhere and hold arms 214 perpendicular to the trunk. In this embodiment instead of selecting encoding inserts to encode a particular telephone number, particular pre-encoded arms are chosen by the subscriber.

Another type of encoding insert is shown in FIG. 7D. Here, adhacent sections 257 and 258 of arm 214 are shown respectively at cross sections A-A and B-B of FIGS. 7Da and 7Db. Rectangular strips of conducting foil 255 shown in FIG. 7Dc are wrapped around and over sections 257 and 258 as shown in FIG. 7Dd to result in encoding inserts of different lengths. The encoding inserts may be cemented if desired. In the altemative, rigid conducting inserts pre-shaped to the shape shown in FIG. 7Dd may be slipped over sections 257 and 258.

If rigid conducting elements instead of flexible conducting elements are used it is advantageous to use flexible instead of rigid encoding inserts and such an arrangement is shown in FIG. 7E. Encoding mounting means 291 (shown in FIG. 7E) may be made of a single piece of plastic or bakelite and has arms 292 on which are mounted encoding inserts 293 shown in FIG. 7Ea which have flexible conducting fingers 295 shown in cross section in FIG. 7E0. Encoding inserts 263 may be made of any suitable conducting material and the ends 294 as shown at AA' in FIG. 7Ea and in cross section in FIG. 7Eb may be flexible so they can be wrapped around arm 292 as shown at FIG. 7Ee and at cross ection in FIG. 7Ed. In FIG. 7E2 insert 293 is shown mounted on arm 292 and the two conducting fingers 295 are spaced so as to connect appropriate conducting elements to each other. The spacing 1 shown in FIG. 7Ea will be different with different inserts 293. to connect different conducting elements together.

It should be noted that the legends I and C in FIGS. 5 to 7 represent surfaces which are insulative and conductive respectively. Additionally, parts 202, 206 to 211, 213, 214, 231, 249, 291 and 293 should be made of insulative material while parts 215, 218 to 225, 235, 236, 239, 245 to 247, 255, 256 and 293 to 295 should be made of conductive material.

FIG. 8 shows an automatic repertory dialer which may be used with a PBX station. When any one of the push buttons 302 is depressed, a two-digit telephone number is encoded on the corresponding matrix of conducting elements and bars 300 move to the right and operate a switch which begins the time sampling of the conducting elements. The repertory dialer shown in FIG. 8 may be used with the impulse generating distributor means shown in FIG. 12, or with a multi-frequency signalling system, the design of which would be within the skill of a'worker in the art.

The repertory dialer of FIG. 8 is housed in housing 312. Base plate 304 has mounted thereon several elongated bars 306 which extend perpendicular to the plane of the drawing across the length of the housing and which provide slots'into which fit the encoding bars 307. As in the other embodiments, the conducting elements 310 are elongated elements which extend perpendicular to the plane of the paper. Each encoding bar 307 has a plurality of encoding members 309 projecting from it. Bars 307 move from an upper position in which member 381 abuts shelf 380 to a lower position in which upper slots 384 engagev locking bars 300.

Nine conducting elements are used to encode the first digit of the two-digit-telephone number and ten conducting elements are used to encode the second digit of the two-digit telephone number. Thus, in matrix 350 the top two rows of conducting elements have 9 conducting elements to encode the first digit thereon and the bottom two rows have 10 elements to encode the second digit thereon. Encoding members 309 are rigidly attached to encoding bar 307 and may not be altered by the subscriber. If the top part of the housing, however, above plate 370 is made removable from the bottom part of the housing, the bar itself may be changed by the subscriber to change the telephone number encoded.

One matrix of conducting elements is shared by both encoding bar 307 and encoding bar 307a, each of which encodes a different telephone number. Thus, encoding members 309a and 30% project rightwardly from encoding bar 307 and encoding members 3090 and 309d extend leftwardly from encoding bar 307a to encode two telephone numbers on the matrix 350. Encoding members 309c and 309d are shown in FIG. 8A and as shown in FIG. 8B encoding members 309a and 30% are secured to bar 307 in a plane different from the plane that encoding members 3090 and 309d are secured to bar 307a. When the subscriber presses a push button, surface 315 of the push button extension contacts surface 316 of the encoding bar extension and pushes down encoding bar 307 which carries with it encoding members 309. I

The encoding scheme for the first digit is shown in FIG. 9A, odd digits being shown encoded by member 307 and even digits being shown encoded by member 307a. The second digit is shown encoded in FIG. 9B both members 307 and 307a being shown encoding all of the digits. In FIG. 9A when all nine conducting elements are covered, one impulse is emitted corresponding to the telephone digit 1, when one conducting element is left uncovered two impulses are emitted corresponding to telephone digit 2 and so. This will be more fully explained in conjunction with the sampling means of FIG. 12. FIG. 9B shows the possibilities for the second digit of the telephone number from O to 9. In the encoding scheme for the second digit when one conducting element is left uncovered, one impulse corresponding to the digit 1 is emitted, when two conducting elements are left uncovered, two impulses corresponding to the digit 2 are emitted, and so on, as will be further explained in conjunction with FIG. 12.

Conducting elements 310 may be of the same type and may be mounted in the same way as described in conjunction with the embodiments of FIGS. 1 and 5. Additionally, all corresponding conducting elements 310 in different matrices are connected together to present an effective single matrix to the sampling means. For instance, in FIG. 8 elements 330, 331 and 332 are connected together as are all other corresponding elements in different matrices.

While the encoding device of FIG. 8 has been shown in connection with the transmission of two digits for a telephone number, it should be appreciated that by the addition of more conducting members and larger matrices of conducting elements, the telephone numbers transmitted may comprise any given number of digits. Additionally, a call transmitter may be added to FIG. 8 by merely adding push buttons 302 which have encoding bars 307 having only two encoding members 309 projecting therefrom which will encode only a single digit when depressed. Ten such push buttons each encoding a different digit may be used.

It should be noted that the legends I and C as used in FIGS. 8 and 9 represent insulative and conductive surfaces respectively. Additionally, it should be noted that parts 302 and 315 should be made of insulative material, while parts 305 to 307, 309, 310, 316,

330 to 332 and 350 should be made of conductive material.

FIG. shows one embodiment of a distributor system according to the invention which is used-to time sample the rows and columns of conducting elements of the encoding devices of either FIG. 1 or FIG. 5. If it is used with the encoding device of FIG. 5, then the coding system shown in FIG. 78 should be used. Other encoding systems may be used if appropriately moditied. The distributor system of FIG. 10 emits a number of impulses which correspond to the encoded digit. Thus, where the 7th conducting element 150 in FIG. 1 is connected to conducting element 151 by an encoding needle, the system of FIG. 10 will emit 7 impulses.

The distributor system may be located in the same general housing as the encoding device of the repertory dialer. For instance, referring to FIG. 1, the distributor system could be located in a bottom housing (not shown) which would attach to bottom plate 101. In the embodiment of FIG. 5, as discussed, the distributor system would be located in the middle compartment 204 of housing 205.

Briefly, the operation of the system of FIG. 10 is as follows: Each point 402a, 402b, 402e, etc. in FIG. 10 represents one of the controlling conducting elements 151 in the repertory dialer of FIG. 1, Mom of the control elements C in the repertory dialer of FIG. 5. The wires 403 in FIG. 10 represent the needles 147 in FIG. 1. The wires 104 in FIG. 10 represent conducting elements 150 in the encoding device of FIG. 1 and corresponding conducting elements 215 in the embodiment of FIG. 5. Taking the embodiment of FIG. 1 as an example, the first encoding needle in that Figure connects the seventh conducting element 150 to the conducting element 151. Thus, in FIG. 10 the heavy dot on wire 404(g) indicates that the 7th element 150 is encoded and that element 404(3) is electrically connected to point 4020 by the encoding means 403a. Thus each heavy dot in FIG. 10 indicates that a conducting element at the row at which it appears is connected to the corresponding point 402 directly below it by an encoding means 403.

Rotating shafts A, B and C are geared together. Arm 417 is a timing mechanism and each time it completes a revolution it steps arm 413 one contact 416 ahead. Each time shaft B completes a revolution it steps shaft arm 450 one contact 451 ahead. Let us assume that arm 450 is on contact 451(a) which would mean that the conducting elements in the line of402(a) are being sampled. Each time arm 413 contacts a contact 415 or 416 contacts 435 open and close emitting an impulse in the lines L, L2. Thus when arm 450 is connected to contact 451(11), arm 413 will move from segment 414 to contacts 415 and 416(a) to 416(g) emitting seven impulses until it encounters contact 416(g) which terminates the emission of impulses. Element 404(g) is connected to contact 416(g) and is also connected to point 402(0) by the encoding means. This connection by means of circuitry which will be detailed later stops the system from emitting impulses. Shaft B completes its rotation which steps shaft C ahead so that arm 450 contacts contact 451(b) which is connected to point 402(b). Arm 413 would then traverse 6 contact 416(a) to 416(/) emitting 6 impulses before the encoding means connecting element 404(f) to point 402(b) terminates the emission of impulses. In this manner, each of the digits encoded on the matrix of conducting elements is sampled.

The operation of FIG. 10 will now be explained in greater detail. It should be noted that while onlynine rows of conducting elements 404 which correspond to elements are shown in FIG. 10, this is because the elements 150 in the various matrices are connected to each other as previously described. Shaft A is driven by a synchronous motor through a set of reduction gears to reduce the speed of the shaft A to 10 revolutions per second. Segments 411 and 412 are respectively conducting and insulating segments of a ring which surrounds sweeping arm 417 which is attached to shaft A. Segments 411 and 412 are proportioned so that sweeping arm 17 contacts 411 for 40 percent of the revolutions. On the shaft B there is a stepping arm 413 and a gear with 15 oblique teeth. Segment 414 is a conducting segment which extends for about 96 around shaft B. 415 is a contact which does not have a conducting element attached to it. 416(a) to 416(1') are nine contacts, adjacent contacts 416 occupying 24 degrees.

Shaft A has a cam located thereon. This cam cooperates with a standard lever mechanism as is well known in the art and the gear having 15 teeth on shaft B so that each revolution of shaft A advances stepping arm 413 of shaft B one-fifteenth of one revolution. Since shaft A rotates at 10 revolutions per second, stepping arm 413 rotates in 15 steps per revolution in 1.5 seconds. Shafts A and B rotate in the same direction which for example can be the direction of the arrows in FIG. 10.

Shaft C, as will be explained in greater detail below,

is rotated by an armature of RL4 engaging a toothed gear. Shaft C returns to its initial position by a coil spring when a locking lever engaged on the toothed gear is removed by relay RL6.

The lines L1 and L2 are connected to the incoming lines from the central telephone station and the lines T1 and T2 are connected to a conventional digital telephone set. Plug 421 is plugged to the electrical outlet and the automatic dialer is ready for use. When a pushbutton corresponding to a specific telephone number is pushed, contact 422 in FIG. 10 which corresponds to either contacts 174 and 175 in FIG. 4 or 223 and 224 in FIG. 5 close. This completes the circuit for the starting relay RLl which closes a pair of contacts 425 thereby closing the circuit to the full wave bridge rectitier circuit 427 through a fuse 426. Contact 422 may be locked mechanically as shown in FIGS. 4 and 6 until released by RLS or may close only temporarily to cause relay RLl to operate and then open, RLl being locked by its own second pair of contacts 428.

The motor circuit is completed through the third pair of contacts 429 of RLl. The motor starts to rotate, rotating with it shaft A. A DC voltage is also applied to various circuits thorugh a second fuse '420.

Relay RL2 closes when current flows from El, 420, RL2, wire 431, segment 414, stepping arm 413, wire 432, 433, and E2. Contacts 435 of RL2 close. When stepping arm 413 moves to contact 415, the above circuit is opened and the current through RL2 is determined by the position of sweep arm 417 on 411 and 412. The contact 435 of RL2 opens or closes accordingly. Stepping arm 413 moves over contacts 416 stepby-step until a complete revolution of shaft B is almost completed. Near the completion of the revolution projecting portion 436 of cam 437 pushes insulating stem 438 which closes contacts 439 thereby causing current to flow through E1, wire 440, R114, closed contacts 474, contacts 439, wire 433, and E2. RL4 operates and pushes stepping arm 450 one step forward to contact 451a. Before this time projecting portion 442 of cam 443 which is mounted on shaft C kept contacts 444 closed to connect T2 to L2 thereby rendering the opening and closing of contacts 435 of no effect upon the signals transmitted to lines L1 and L2.

When shaft C moves to contact 451(a), projecting portion 442 of cam 443 opens contacts 444. The telephone circuit T1 and T2 is removed from the line circuit and the automatic telephone dialer circuit is effectively inserted into the line circuit. Current flows through L1 to contact 435 if closed and back to L2. Now the opening and closing of contacts 435 is effective to send impulses of 60 ms duration into the line circuit.

When stepping cam 413 contacts conducting segments 414 relay RL2 operates. This provides a time interval of 0.5 seconds between successive telephone digits. When arm 413 rests at contact 415, the current through RL2 is determined by the opening and closing of sweeping arm 417 on segments 411 and 412. Therefore, while stepping arm 413 is on contact 415, one revolution of arm 417 causes contacts 435 to operate which sends one impulse into the lines L1, L2. During the next revolution of sweeping arm 417 stepping arm 413 moves to the first contact 416 where it rests for l revolution of sweeping arm 417. An impulse is sent out or not while sweeping arm 413 is on contact 416(a) depending upon whether or not the circuit between 402(a) and 404(a) is completed by the first encoding needle of FIG. 1 or the first encoding insert of FIG. 5. In the example shown in FIG. 10, it is the seventh conducting element 404(g) corresponding to the seventh conducting element 150 in the embodiment of FIG. 1 which is connected by the encoding needle to 402(a). Hence while arm 413 rests on each of 416(a) to 416(f) sweeping arm 417 sends out one impulse. Added to the impulse sent out when the arm contacted contact 415,

seven impulses are emitted altogether. When arm 413 contacts contact 416(g), a circuit through a relay RL3 is completed which inhibits further operation of contacts 435 and therefore inhibits further impulses from being emitted. This circuit is completed through E2, wire 433, 432, 413, 416(g), 404(g), 403(a), 402(a), 451(a), 450, wires 452, 453, RL3, and El.

Relay RL3 operates two pairs of contacts 454 and 455. Contacts 454 are self-locking contacts for RL3, the circuit being completed through RL3, 454, contact 456, and wire 433. The contacts 455 short the circuit between wires 431 and 434 rendering relay RL2 operating, thus closing contacts 435. Therefore, operation of relay RL3 ensures that no more impulses are emitted by relay RL2.

When stepping arm 413 arrives at conducting segment 414 again cam 437 opens contacts 456 thereby opening the relay RL3. Contacts 439 then close once and operation of RL4-causes the stepping arm 450 to move to the position 451(b) where it stays for 1.5 seconds while stepping arm 413 traverses all of the conducting elements associated with contact 402(b). Contacts 435 of RL2 are caused to open and close in the same manner as described above and for the particular encoding shown in FIG. 10 the system will emit six impulses. FIG. 10 shows the encoding of the telephone number 765-980-1446. After the last digit 6 is emitted, stepping arm 450 comes to rest on the contact 461. Relays RI.L3 and RL6 are designed so that when RL3 is connected in series with RL6 both relays will not operate. Now that RL3 is short-circuited by stepping arm 450, RL6 will operate. RL6 is a relay for pulling out a locking lever from the toothed gear to permit stepping arm 450 to be returned to its original position along the direction of the dotted arrow by a coil spring (toothed gear and coil spring not shown). RL6 is a slow releasing relay. Its slow releasing action causes itself to be locked by its own contact 466.

Cam 462 is mounted on shaft C and rotates with it. Contacts 468 are opened at all times except at the home position of arm 450 which is also the home position of cam 462. At the home position concave portion 463 causes insulating rod 464 to close contacts 468. It also loses a second pair of contacts 467. Relay RL5 is the relay 126 in the embodiment of FIG. 4. After all impulses have been sent out and the shaft C returns to its home position, RLS operates through contacts 467 and 468, and either opens contacts 422 mechanically or opens its contacts 470 thereby opening the circuit of RL].

Contacts 469 of relay RL6 closes the circuit for RL2 when relay RL6 operates thereby preventing the emitting of impulses during the time when the stepping arm 450 is returning to its home position. The electrical source is cut off by the releasing of relay RLl. This stops the motor. RLS also releases the depressed push button, cam 443 cuts out the repertory dialing circuit and connects the telephone circuit T1 and T2 to the lines L1 and L2. This completes the cycle of a telephone call, and the subscriber will hear either a ring or busy signal from lines L1 and L2.

If it is desired to call a telephone number of less than 10 digits then an end pin shown at 156 in FIG. 2 is placed in the appropriate hole 104 which connects conducting elements 151 with conducting elements 152 in FIG. 1. In the embodiment of FIG. 5 a similar connection could be made. When stepping arm 450 arrives at the contact which is connected to the conducting element which has the end pin, the arm will be connected through 402 and 402 to conducting element 152 which is shown as wire 405 in FIG. 10 and RL6 will operate as described above, terminating the telephone call.

If it is desired to dial a telephone number in which it is necessary to wait for a dial tone after several digits have been sent, a pause needle, as shown at 157 in FIG. 2 is inserted in the appropriate position which connects element 151 to 158 in FIG. 1. When stepping arm 450 arrives at the contact connected to the element which has the same needle, a new circuit is completed through E2, RL6, 465, 499, wire 452, 450, 451 which is now connected to element 158 in FIG. 1 through 402 and 403 (158 is shown as 491 in FIG. 10), relay RL9, wire 440, E1. RL6 and RL9 are designed so that when they are connected in series, RL6 does not operate but RL9 does operate. RL9 opens contacts 495 in the motor circuit and causes its stopping temporarily. The motor is designed so that 413 stops at the middle of 414 and no impulse is emitted. After the dial tone is heard, the subscriber pushes a button which closes contacts 492 which starts the motor running again. The button should be held for about 0.5 to 1 second so that the motor will be kept running by a cam 494 and its associated contacts 493 even after the releasing of the button. 494 and 493 are designed so that 493 closes when 413 does not touch 414. The temporary depressing of the button also closes contacts 496, thereby locking relay RL3 through 454. No impulses will be emitted until the next revolution of the shaft B and subsequent revolutions are operative to emit subsequent digits.

If the subscriber desires to cancel a call, he pushes the button 497 thereby closing the circuit for relay RL6 through contacts 498 and 465. RL6 is locked by its own contacts 466 even after key 497 is released. The circuit operates as if the end of the call has been reached. The openings of contacts'499 and 465 are used to eliminate a short circuit between E1 and E2.

If it is desired to leave the handset on the telephone during the automatic calling operation, an AC. relay N is added which closes contacts 551 when current from the AG. source is supplied through either contacts 560 or 561 and contacts 552 which are closed when the handset is on the telephone and open when handset is off the telephone. The relay N operates only after contacts 560 closed by its relay RLl, then relay N is locked by its own contacts 561. Those two pairs of contacts assure that relay N operates only when repertory dialer is used. Closure of contacts 551 inserts resistor 553 into the circuit which is of a high resistance. The incoming ringing tone or busy tone as the case may be will then be heard from speaker 555 after amplified by transistor amplifier A. When the handset is lifted so that the subscriber may speak, contacts 552 open to cut the circuit out.

As previously discussed, call transmitters may be added to the repertory dialer of the present invention. The way that such a call transmitter would operate with the distributor means of the invention is shown in FIG. 10. The call transmitter is represented by the numeral 471 including the keys K to K9 which. when depressed are operative to send impulses corresponding to the digits zero to nine. Additionally, normally open contacts 472, 473 are added and normally closed contacts 475 and 474 are inserted in wires 476 and 477 respectively.

The digits 0 to 9 are encoded onto a plurality of rows of conducting elements by connecting appropriate rows to the wire 482. Thus, when key K1 is depressed conducting element 404a will be connected to wire 482 and when key K2 is depressed conducting element 404b will be connected to wire 482. An actual physical embodiment of a call transmitter is shown in FIG. A and 108. In FIG. 10A wires 2620 to 2621' represent the wires 404 in FIG. 10 and wires 262 which are connected to each other represent the wire 482. In FIG. 10B keys K1 and K6 of FIG. 10A are shown in cross section and it is seen that keys K1 and K6 are similar to the keys shown in FIG. 1. It is to be understood that the call transmitter of FIGS. 10A and 108 when used in conjunction with the repertory dialer of FIG. 1 would be located in the same housing.

When any of keys K1 to K6 are depressed as shown in FIG. 10B the conducting tips of the keys connect the appropriate wire 262a to i to one of the wires 262. Thus, when K1 is depressed tip 263a connects the upper wire 262 to wire 262a. When K6 is depressed wire 262f is connected to the lower wire 262.

When the subscriber wants to make a telephone call, he picks up a handset and listens for a dial tone. He then pushes desired keys from KO to K9 according to the telephone number. The depression of keys K0 to K9 besides completing the circuit between one of the 404s through the key contact to the wire 482, closes common contact 472 by a mechanical linkage (not shown) and operates relay RL10. Contact 488 of RL10 closes and RL10 is locked by its own contacts 489. The motor M starts to run while contact 478 of RL10 closes to supply DC power to the circuit. Contacts 474 and 475 are opened by RL10, thus cutting out the telephone circuit and the unnecessary electrical circuit of relay RL4. Contacts 479 close temporarily during the depressing of any key KO to K9 so that 435 closes before 475 opens to avoid the emission of an undesired impulse.

The rotation of sweeping arm 417 causes relay RL2 to operate as in the repertory dialer and impulses are sent into the line circuit in the same way, the number of impulses depending on the key which is depressed. Thus, if key K3 is depressed, three impulses will be emitted, one when sending arm 413 comes to contact 415, one when it comes to 416(a) and one when it comes to 416(b). When it comes to 416(0) a circuit is completed through 404(0) the contacts of K3 and wire 482 and relay RL7 operates. RL7 operates through contact 481, RL7, 482, qontact of K3, 483, 404, 416, 413, 432, and 433. RL7 locked by its own contacts 484, closes its contact 473, operating RL2 and thus no more impulses will be emitted during the remainder of the revolution of the stepping arm 413 to its home position.

, RL7 also closes contact 485. Can 486 rotates with shaft B and when stepping arm 413 reaches 414, the concave portion of 486 closes 487 and operates relay RL8 which releases the locking mechanism of the key and also opens its contacts 490 which opens relay RL10 and stops the motor.

FIG. 11 illustrates a second form of distributor system which may be used with the encoding devices of the invention. FIG. 11 is a multi-frequency generating distributor system which generates two tones to correspond to each telephone digit and may be used with the encoding scheme of FIGS. 7A and D. Additionally, the encoding systems of FIGS. 7B and FIG. 1 may be adapted for use with the multi-frequency generating distributing system.

Referring to FIG. 7A encoding inserts 235 connect an L conducting element to one of the elements L1, L2, L3 or L4 and an H conducting element to one of the elements H1, H2, or H3. Referring to FIG. 11, the capacitors C1, C2, C3 and C4 are connected to L1, L2, L3 and L4 and the capacitors C5, C6 and C7 are connected to the elements H1, H2, and H3, respectively (Connections not shown).

The conducting elements L and H are connected to the terminals 1, 2, 14 of stepping switch 602, the elements L being connected to the inside terminals and the elements H being connected to the-outside terminals. In FIG. 11 elements L are indicated by 603(a), 603(b), etc. and elements H are indicated by 604(a), 604(b), etc. As shown at point 680 along element 603(a), element 603(a) is connected to capacitor C1. Because the first L1 is connected to C1 in an actual device, the connection of the first L to C1 at point 680 means that the first L is connected to the first L1 by an encoding insert.

Element 604(a) is shown at point 690 to be connected to capacitor C6 which means that in FIG. 7A an encoding insert connects the first H to H2, H2 being connected in an actual device to C6. In FIG. 11 only the elements 603(a) and 604(a) are shown as being connected to the capacitors but actually up to all fourteen of the elements 603, 604 may be encoded if the telephone number has fourteen digits.

Positions 0, 1.5, 2.5 13.5 of stepping switch 602 are not wired. Each position 1, 2, 3 14 has two posts connected to the wires 603 and 604 respectively. Members B, C, and D are mounted on the same shaft. C is a gear, the teeth of which push an insulating rod 605 to close contacts 606 and 607 and open contact 608. D' is an oblique gear having twice as many teeth as C. Stepping arm B of switch 602 is at the home position when C has one of its teeth pushing on insulating member 605 as shown in FIG. 11.

Transistor 611 has its base connected to two coils 612 and 613 which are in series each being shunted by voltage limiting diodes 614 and 615 respectively. Coil 642 and 643 are connected to the emitter through a dropping resistor 616. The collector of the transistor is connected to the junction point P of the speech circuit to which is also connected the resistor 617 and the wire 618. Diode 619 is connected to resistor 617 and coil 633 is connected to the switch contacts 606. Coils 613, 643 and 633 are mounted on an iron core as are coils 612, 642 and 632. Capacitors Clto C7 are connected to the coils 632 and 633 as shown.

.When any push button of the repertory dialers is depressed a conventional circuit is activated which may be somewhat similar to the circuit of FIG. to supply a DC. voltage to the circuits. Telephone lines L1 and L2 are connected through the hook switch contacts 651 and 652. When a subscriber lifts up the hand set these contacts close andthe voltage from the telephone lines is applied to coils 632 and 633. When a subscriber pushes a selected button, the capacitor 621 is charged then afterwards relay L operatesits armature, pushing stepping arm B and gears C and D one step to cause stepping arm B to touch the post 1.

' In FIG. 11, 603((1) is connected to C1 and 604(a) is connected to C6. As explained above, these connections are made through the encoding means of FIGS. 5 and 7. When B rotates to position 1, gear C rotates so that insulating member 605 is at a position between adjacent teeth and contacts 606 and 607 open. Coils 633 and 632 discharge through capacitors Cl and C6 respectively. The output frequencies of transistor 61 1 are determined by the coils in the emitter circuit and the capacitors which are connected into the circuit by means of the stepping switch. Thus, each time stepping arm B steps to a whole-numbered step, two frequencies are emitted, one being a low frequency determined by one of capacitors C1 to C4 and one being a high frequency determined by one of capacitors C5 to C7. Each pair of frequencies corresponds to a different digit. When B is on position 1 in FIG. 1 1, then a low frequency signal corresponding to Cl and a high frequency signal corresponding to C6 are emitted.

Contact 608 shunts the speech circuit through resistor 620. A short time later relay L releases andthen operates again moving the stepping arm B to the position 1.5 at which position gear C has a tooth pushing insulating element 605 to close 606 and 607 charging coils 632 and 633 again. A short time later relay L operates again moving stepping arm B to position 2 and moving gear C to a position so that insulating member 605 is between adjacent teeth and again the capacitors which are connected to position 2 discharge emitting one low frequency and one high frequency signal.

When stepping arm B reaches the end of a revolution, a set of contacts 8B3 and SB4 are mechanically closed. Closure of these contacts operates relay V which opens contacts VCl and VC2 and closes contacts VC3 and VC4 which lock themselves. Core 624 of relay V pulls armature 626 so that tip 625 frees itself from the teeth of gear D, the other end 627 pushing 605 down so that stepping arm B and gears C and D may return to their home positions by means of a coiled spring (not shown). When. stepping arm B reaches the end of a revolution, a pair of contact S81 and SB2 close temporarily to operate the relay 0 which in turn releases the depressed push button. The action of relay L changing state quickly returns arm B to its resting position 0.

Stepping switch 635 which has therein arm A is used if a temporary pause is desired after several telephone digits are sent out. Switch 635 has the same positions as switch 602 but has positions 1.5, 2.5, wired and positions 1, 2, not wired. Stepping arm A is at the 0 home position when stepping arm B is at the 0 home position. If a wire 636 is connected from post 3.5 for example of switch 635, to relay W, relay W will operate after three digits are sent out in turn opening contacts WC1 and WC2 and stopping relay L from operating. Wire 636 may take the form of an appropriate encoding means such as those disclosed and its exact form will be apparent to those skilled in the art. Now the subscriber may wait for the dial tone. After hearing it he pushes releasing key 637 which opens relay W closing contacts WC1 and WC2. Relay L operates again to send the subsequent digits to complete the telephone call. I

A call transmitter as shown at 671 may be used with the distributing system of FIG. 11. Seven conducting elements 685 are connectedto capacitors Cl to C7 respectively. When any key is depressed, one of 6850 to 685d connected to C1 to C4 and another one of 685e to 685g connected to C5 to C7 are connected by the two tips of that key to wire 686. For instance, when the button corresponding to the digit 1 is depressed, capacitor C1 and C5 will be connected in the circuit through two tips of K1, wire 686a, 686 to coils 632 and 633 respectively and one low and one high tone corresponding to the digit one will be emitted. The same is true for the other keys. Contacts 672, 673 and 674 are also added with the call transmitter. Every time a key is depressed 672 and 674 open and 673 closes and the signails are emitted.

A physical embodiment of a call transmitter to be used with the signalling system of FIG. 11 is shown in FIGS. 11A and 11B. Wires 282 which are connected together corresponds to wire 686, 686a in FIG. 11 and wires 282a g correspond to wires 685a 685g in FIG. 1 1. As shown in FIG. 11B conducting tips 283 when depressed connect wire 282 and two of wires 282a to 2823 in the representation of FIG. 11 thereby connecting wire 686 to two of the capacitors C1 to C7. Therefore, when each key is depressed one low frequency and one high frequency signal indicative of that key are emitted.

FIG. 12 shows a distributing system to be used with the PBX repertory dialer shown in FIG. 8. In FIG. 12 the motor circuit is shown at the left and the encoding

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6265842 *Jun 9, 1999Jul 24, 2001Con-X CorporationCross-connect method and apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification200/1.00R, 379/356.1, 200/5.00R, 200/18
International ClassificationH04M1/274
Cooperative ClassificationH04M1/274
European ClassificationH04M1/274