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Publication numberUS3816865 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 18, 1974
Filing dateMay 4, 1972
Priority dateMay 4, 1972
Publication numberUS 3816865 A, US 3816865A, US-A-3816865, US3816865 A, US3816865A
InventorsRagan R
Original AssigneeRagan R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sectional canoe
US 3816865 A
Abstract
A canoe is formed of two separable sections which may be disconnected for use in travelling, storage and handling. The canoe sections include an inner keel, an angularly curved bow or stern piece, outwardly bowed gunwales connected at one end to the top of the curved piece, and an abutment flange connecting to the other ends of the outwardly bowed gunwales. The body is formed of foam plastic, honeycombed paper or the like, the foam plastic being perforated. The body is preferably covered with fiberglass or the like. An outer keel and bow and stern forming members oppose the inner keel and curved bow or stern piece and are secured thereto.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Ragan SECTIONAL CANOE [76] Inventor: Robert O. Ragan, 134 W. 49th St.,

Minneapolis, Minn. 55409 [22] Filed: May 4, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 250,381

[52] U.S. Cl. 9/2 S, 114/77 R [51] Int. Cl B63b 7/04 [58] Field of Search 9/2 R, 2 S, 2 C, 2 F, 2 A,

9/6, 1 R; 114/77 R, 77 A, 140, 65

[ June 18, 1974 Primary Examiner-Duane A. Reger Assistant ExaminerD. C. Butler [5 7] ABSTRACT A canoe is formed of two separable sections which may be disconnected for use in travelling, storage and handling. The canoe sections include an inner keel, an angularly curved bow or stem piece, outwardly bowed gunwales connected at one end to the top of the curved piece, and an abutment flange connecting to the other ends of the outwardly bowed gunwales. The body is formed of foam plastic, honeycombed paper or the like, the foam plastic being perforated. The body is preferably covered with fiberglass or the like. An outer keel and bow and stem forming members oppose the inner keel and curved bow or stern piece and are secured thereto.

1 Claim, 13 Drawing Figures PAIENTEDJunmmm 3.816365 sum 2 (IF 3 SECTIONAL CANOE This invention relates to an improvement in sectional canoe and deals particularly with a canoe which is formed in two separable sections so that it may be more easily constructed, handled and stored.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Boats which are capable of being separated into sections have been previously produced. For example, Pat. No. 1,527,089 issued Feb. 17, 1925 to C. M. Shipley shows a canoe provided with detachable end sections which are hingedly connected along a center line so that one section may fold upon the other. Canoes have also been formed of plastic material. However, these patents normally show bodies formed of rigid synthetic plastic. For example, Pat. No. 3,348,246 issued Oct. 24, 1967 to E. L. Vidal shows a canoe which may be formed in Sections and which is formed of rigid plastic. A feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a canoe of the type described in which the body of the canoe is buoyant.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to an improvement in sectional canoe including a forward section and a rear section, the two sections being each provided with a substantially U-shaped abutment flange designed to engage against the abutment flange of the other section. Each section includes an inner keel member connected at one end to a bow piece or a stern piece. As indicated in the drawings, both sections of the canoe may be identical in construction. Alternatively, the rear or stern section may be provided with a square end designed to accommodate a lightweight outboard motor.

In the form illustrated, gunwale members are attached at one end to the upper extremity of the bow or stem piece, and bow outwardly with respect thereto. A U-shaped abutment flange is secured to the other ends of the gunwale members as well as to the other end of the inner keel member. Thus each section includes a rigid frame having members which are integrally connected at their forward ends, and which are attached to the abutment flange at their other ends.

A feature of the present invention lies in the provision of a canoe having a body wall formed of material such as urthanefoam which extends outwardly of the abutment flange, the inner keel, the bow or stem piece connected to the inner keel, and outwardly or portions of the gunwale strips. This body wall has its inner and outer surfaces covered with fiberglass cloth and polyester resin to seal the body of the wall completely. The foam plastic body wall materially increases the buoyancy of the canoe.

The rigid frame structure would permit the use of other buoyant materials, such as foamed polyethylene, foam styrene, expanded honeycomb. Even felt or cork could be used if suitably protected from puncture by proper inside and inside surfacing with fiberglass and resin, or even cemented hard plastic sheets. The use of foam in blanket form has certain advantages.

A feature of the present invention resides in the provision of an outer keel extending beneath the longitudinal center of the body wall in opposed relation to the inner keel. Spacers are provided between the inner keel and outer keel to prevent the body wall from being crushed as the keels are secured together.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a canoe of the type described in which the gunwales are preferably formed in right angular cross section with one flange thereof extending inwardly of the upper extremity of the body wall, and the other flange extending over the upper surface of the body wall. In preferred form, the vertical flange is notched at intervals. A molding strip lies inwardly of this vertical flange of the gunwale, and closes the notches. Accordingly, the notches form spaced apertures through which water within the body of the canoe may be drained by turning the canoe on its side.

A further feature of the present: invention resides in the provision of a thwart extending across the canoe body at the upper ends of the U-shaped abutment flange of at least one of the sections. This thwart tends to prevent any spreading of the canoe walls and reinforces the abutment flanges.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a canoe of the type described in which the outer keel includes a fixed portion on the bow section, a fixed portion on the stern section, and a removable portion extending across the joint between the two sections and assisting in holding the two sections together. This removable section is. removed when the two sections are taken apart.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the provision of an effective means of sealing the two abutment flanges to prevent leakage of water therebetween. Compressible strips of sponge rubber or the like are provided between the abutment flanges. A first strip is applied to the outer surface of one abutment flange near the outer extremity thereof, and a second strip is applied to the other abutment flange near the inner edge thereof. Bolts are provided to connect the abutment flanges, the bolts extending through the flanges between the two spaced gasket strips, drawing the two sections together and effectively sealing the abutment flanges together.

These and other objects and novel features of the present invention will be more clearly and fully set forth in the following specification and claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of my canoe in its assembled form.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a canoe in its disassembled form.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the frame about which the canoe body is formed.

FIG. 4 is a rear elevational view of one of the sections.

FIG. 5 is a vertical section through the inner keel, the outer keel, and the body wall showing the general arrangement of parts therein.

FIG. 6 is a sectional view through one of the gunwales of the canoe, the position of the section being indicated by the lines 6-6 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 7 is a diagramatic view showing a loop anchored to the gunwales and projecting beyond the curved bow or stem forming piece.

FIG. 8 is a vertical sectional view through the joint connecting the bow and stem sections.

FIG. 9 is a side elevational view of the canoe in inverted position showing the removable keel section.

FIG. 10 is a bottom plan view of a portion of the keel of the canoe.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view showing the connection between the fixed outer keel sections and the removable outer keel section.

FIG. 12 is a horizontal section through the end portion of the canoe.

FIG. 13 is an end elevational detail showing a modified form of keel.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The canoe A is indicated in general in its assembled form in FIGS. 1 and 9 of the drawings, and is shown as including a bow section 10 and a stern section 11. In the particular arrangement illustrated, the two sections are of identical form. Obviously, the rear section may be provided with a transversely extending rear end or transom designed to accommodate a light weight outboard motor or sailing tiller. Furthermore, while the sections 10 and 11 are shown as being of the same size, this is merely a matter of choice.

FIG. 3 of the drawings indicates the main elements of the rigid frame about which one or both of the sections is formed. As indicated in this figure, the frame includes an inner keel strip 12 arranged in overlapping relation with a curved bow forming frame member 13 which is notched as indicated at 14 to accommodate the keel 12. The upper portion of the bow forming piece 13 is shaped into triangular cross section as indicated at 15. Gunwale forming strips 16 are secured on opposite sides of the triangular end portion 15, and bow outwardly as indicated. A generally U-shaped abutment flange 17 is centrally notched along its undersurface as indicated at 19 to accommodate the end of the inner keel 12. The upper end 20 of each U- shaped abutment flange 17 is notched as indicated at 21 to accommodate portions of the gunwale strips 16.

As is indicated in FIG. 3, the gunwale strips 16 include a generally vertically inner flange 22, and a generally horizontal flange 23. The vertical flange 22 is notched or cut away at intervals as indicated at 24. The purpose of this arrangement is to simplify the task of draining water from the interior of the canoe.

In actual practice, the hull of the canoe is formed by spaced templets which are shaped corresponding to the interior of the body wall. This arrangement permits a wall liner sheet to be drawn over the templets and form the interior of the hull. In any event, the body of the wall is preferably formed of foam plastic which is flexed to produce the desired body wall contour. In actual practice, this foam plastic extends beneath the inner keel member and extends outwardly of the gunwale forming strips and outwardly of the curved bow or stern forming piece.

As indicated in FIG. 5 of the drawings, a lower keel 25 is secured beneath the foam plastic body wall 26 in opposed relation to the inner keel 12. A strip 27 of fiberglass cloth impregnated with an epoxy resin overlies a portion of the body wall 26 which is beneath the inner keel 12. Holes 29 are drilled through the plastic foam body wall 26, and short lengths of dowel 30 are adhered to the undersurface of the strip 27 centrally of the inner keel 12. The short lengths of dowel 30 are of a thickness substantially equal to the thickness of the body wall 26. An outer layer 31 of fiberglass cloth impregnated with resin is applied to the outer surface of the body wall 26, the keel 25 is secured extending longitudinally of the inner keel 12 by screws 32 extending into the lower ends of the dowel 30. As is evidenced from FIGS. 5 and 10 of the drawings, the screws 32 are arranged in somewhat offset relation to eliminate the chance of splitting the keel 25. Preferably, a metal strip 33 underlies the undersurface of the keel 25 and acts as its protection therefore.

As is indicated in FIG. 5 of the drawings, a layer of fiberglass cloth 34 forms the lining of the hull, and is secured to extend over the inner keel 12, hermetically sealing this member. The liners 34 combined with the strip 27 underlying the inner keel 12 serves to seal the interior of the canoe from leakage from about the screws 32. Furthermore, as the screws 32 extend through the fiberglass and clamp the lower keel 25 to the dowels 30, an effective seal is provided.

As is indicated in FIG. 6 of the drawings, a strip 35 of fiberglass cloth is folded into inverted U-shape about the upper marginal edge of the body wall 26, and the outer covering 31 and inner liner 34 overlie the folded strip 35 and are adhered thereto. FIG. 6 illustrates the outer and inner fiberglass layers to be integral. If preferred, the upper edges of the coverings 31 and 34 may be overlapped over the base portion 36 of the folded strips 35. As indicated in FIG. 6 the upper edge of the body wall extends outwardly of the vertical flange 22 of the gunwale forming strips 16 and beneath the horizontal flange 23 of each strip.

As is also indicated in FIG. 6, a molding strip 37 is secured inwardly of the vertical flange 22 of each gunwale strip 16, and an outer molding strip 39 is secured outwardly of the upper portion of the body wall 26. The moldings are held in proper relation to the gunwale forming strips by dowels 40 extending through to the various elements at the upper edge of each wall.

With reference now to FIGS. 9 and 11 of the drawings, it will be noted that the lower keel 25 includes fixed end portions 41, and a removable central portion 42 which overlaps the joint between the two sections 10 and 11. As indicated in FIG. 11, a V-shaped notch 43 is provided in the end of each of the fixed sections 41, the notch 43 inclining from its bottom surface to the upper surface which is cemented or otherwise fixed to the canoe bolt, such attachment being in addition to the fastening screws 32. As indicated in the drawings, the keel 12 is of trapezoidal cross sectional shape, with the wider base of the keel uppermost and attached to the canoe, this face being indicated by the numeral 44, while the narrow parallel face 45 forms the undersurface of the keel. The ends of the removable section 42 are provided with inclined pointed ends 46 which fit into the notches 43.

With reference now to the FIG. 8 of the drawings, it will be noted that the abutment flanges 17 are enclosed by extensions of the outer fiberglass cloth covering 31 or the inner covering 34. In order to effectively seal the joints between the abutment flanges 17, an outer gasket 50 is adhered outwardly of the abutment flange 17 of one section, and a similar gasket 51 is adhered outwardly of the other abutments flange 17 near the inner surface thereof. Spaced apertures 52 are provided through the abutment flanges intermediate the outer gasket 50 and the inner gasket 51, and bolts 53 extend through the apertures and may be tightened to seal the two sections together. As previously described, the removable section 42 of the lower keel also serves to assist in holding the sections together.

As indicated in FIG. 12 of the drawings, a series of flexible strips 54, 54 and 55 secured by screw 56 extend outwardly of the outer surface of the bow or stern forming piece13, overlying the joint between the various fiberglass layers. A resilient bumper 57 is applied over the strips to enclose the same. This may be formed by splitting a length of flexible tubing longitudinally, and spreading the tube apart to engage about the strips. Alternatively, the member 57 may be formed of metal or other protective material.

A mooring loop 59 comprises a generally U-shaped bracket member, the sides of which converge slightly toward one another, and are connected to outwardly bowed portion 60 designed to engage on opposite sides of the member 57. The ends 61 of the loop diverge apart, and are secured to the gunwales by fastening means such as 62.

A thwart 63 extends across the upper extremity of the abutment flange 17 of one of the sections to provide a further brace for the canoe, and also to provide a means of lifting or turning the canoe. Triangular gussets 64 are provided within the gunwales at the pointed ends of the sections. Seats 65 are supported upon transversely extending supports 66 which are suspended from the gunwales of the sections by threaded rods 67 or other suitable hanger means. The position of the seats is somewhat of a matter of choice.

In some instances an outer keel is not desired, the owner preferring the outer surface to be smooth and uninterrupted. FIG. 13 shows the U-shaped abutment flange 17 provided with a trapezoidally shaped notch 70 above the notch 19 holding the inner keel 12, and a supplementary keel 71 engaged in the notch 70 and overlying the inner keel 12. The supplementary keel 71 is secured in place by screws 72 which extend through the supplementary keel and into the inner keel 12, these screws preferably extending downwardly into the dowels underlying the inner keel. The resulting structure is virtually as strong as the previously described structure, and eliminates the outer keel.

In accordance with the Patent Office Statutes, l have described the principles of construction and operation of my sectional canoe and method of making the same, and while I have endeavored to set forth the best em bodiment thereof, I desire to have it understood that changes may be made within the scope of the following claims without departing from the spirit of my invention.

I claim:

1. A canoe including:

a pair of separable sections detachably secured in end abutting relation, at least the front section including:

an inner keel, a curved bow piece secured to the forward end of said inner keel and curving upwardly therefrom,

a pair of gunwale members secured at their forward ends to the upper end of said bow piece and bowing outwardly therefrom,

a generally U-shaped abutment member secured to the rear ends of said gunwales and said inner keel,

a body wall curved to form the forward end of the canoe body and extending beneath said inner keel and outwardly of said curved bow piece and outwardly of at least portions of said gunwale members,

a covering of fiberglass on the inner and outer surfaces of said body wall,

an outer bow member lying outwardly of said bow piece and secured thereto,

spacers extending between the inner and outer keels substantially equal in length to the thickness of the body wall.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1817557 *May 11, 1929Aug 4, 1931Hans HartFolding boat
US2406085 *May 19, 1944Aug 20, 1946Link Edwin ASectional canoe or the like
US3023431 *Oct 10, 1957Mar 6, 1962Applegate RexSectional boat
US3435470 *Aug 7, 1967Apr 1, 1969Krenzler Leo MFoam-filled boat hull
US3561024 *Jun 6, 1969Feb 9, 1971Allen D PrattMethod of making boat hulls and the like and a starter shell kit therefor
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3996634 *Nov 24, 1975Dec 14, 1976Grind Robert ESectional boat
US4936238 *May 15, 1989Jun 26, 1990Childress Joseph BBoat that can have different bow sections and/or stern sections to perform in different work functions bolted together with a watertight sealant therebetween
US5016557 *Dec 6, 1989May 21, 1991Miller William JModular rowing shell
US5647297 *Aug 1, 1994Jul 15, 1997Norseman Marine Products, Inc.Foam stabilized watercraft
US5870965 *Mar 26, 1997Feb 16, 1999Norseman Marine Products, Inc.For use on a body of water
US8783204 *Aug 28, 2012Jul 22, 2014John HeroldCollapsible kayak
CN101691132BAug 4, 2009May 23, 2012骆恩浩Fastening device of fabricated ship
EP0875447A1 *Apr 29, 1998Nov 4, 1998Van Schijndel & De Hoog v.o.f.Method of forming a structure and structure thus formed
Classifications
U.S. Classification114/352, 114/77.00R
International ClassificationB63B7/04, B63B5/00, B63B7/00, B63B5/24
Cooperative ClassificationB63B7/04, B63B5/24
European ClassificationB63B7/04, B63B5/24