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Publication numberUS3817186 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 18, 1974
Filing dateAug 18, 1972
Priority dateAug 18, 1972
Publication numberUS 3817186 A, US 3817186A, US-A-3817186, US3817186 A, US3817186A
InventorsWalsh R
Original AssigneeWalsh R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Interaction railway track and vehicle stabilizing system
US 3817186 A
Abstract
A stabilizing system for railway coaches and locomotives particularly adapted for use in a high speed rail system includes auxiliary rails located along the main tracks in spaced parallel relationship thereto and on opposite sides thereof. The rails define downwardly facing track surfaces for engagement by rollers which extend outwardly on opposite sides from the vehicle trucks or bogies. The rollers are part of a stabilizer apparatus which includes pairs of support frameworks individually pivotably mounted on each truck and joined together by interconnecting linkages. The frameworks each include a basic horizontal frame section hingedly mounted to the truck support structure and resiliently supported above the side frame of the truck by guide devices.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Walsh INTERACTION RAILWAY TRACK AND VEHICLE STABILIZING SYSTEM [76] Inventor: Robert L. Walsh, 3025 Cleveland Ave., N. W., Washington, DC.

[22] Filed: Aug. 18, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 281,752

[52] US. Cl 104/243, 104/246, 105/164, 105/199 A, 105/210, 105/453 [51] Int. Cl. B611 5/00, B61f 9/00, 1361f 13/00 [58] Field of Search 104/242, 243, 244, 245, 104/246, 247; 105/29 R, 164, 210, 453, 199

[111 3,817,186 1 June 18, 1974 3,626,857 12/1971 Omar 104/247 X 3,636,886 l/1972 Lich 105/164 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLlCATIONS 331,618 4/1903 France 104/246 Primary Examiner-Lloyd L. King Assistant Examiner-Howard Beltran Attorney, Agent, or Firm--Larson, Taylor & Hinds [57] ABSTRACT A stabilizing system for railway coaches and locomotives particularly adapted for use in a high speed rail system includes auxiliary rails located along the main tracks in spaced parallel relationship thereto and on opposite sides thereof. The rails define downwardly facing track surfaces for engagement by rollers which extend outwardly on opposite sides from the vehicle trucks or bogies. The rollers are part of a stabilizer apparatus which includes pairs of support frameworks individually pivotably mounted on each truck and joined together by interconnecting linkages. The frameworks each include a basic horizontal frame section hingedly mounted to the truck support structure and resiliently supported above the side frame of the truck by guide devices.

15 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures PATENTEDM w 1914 SHEH 3 HF 5 PATENTEUJUI is n14 SHEET 5 BF 5 INTERACTION RAILWAY TRACK AND VEHICLE STABILIZING SYSTEM FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to stabilizing systems for rail vehicles and, more particularly, to stabilizing systems for high speed rail coaches and locomotives.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION It is a truism to say that there has been a great deal of recent interest in high speed ground rail transportation and, in particular, in providing high speed rail systems in the so-called Northeast Corridor of the United States as an alternative to other modes of transportation. One obvious disadvantage that all rail systems suffer is that they are relatively slow particularly as compared with air shuttles. Thus, although the Amtrack Metroliner is capable of making the New York to Washington run in about 2 re hours, this is still a relatively long time for commuter and other travel as compared with shuttle service. However, should it be possible to increase vehicle speed from the present approximately 125 mph. speed to 175 to 190 mph, the time required for the same trip would be reduced to about one and three-quarter hours, city center to city center, a substantially more competitive figure.

One approach in enabling these high speeds involves the use of relatively lightweight coaches. However, such lightweight coaches require additional means for stabilization particularly for high speeds such as discussed above. Moreover, the problem of providing ade quate vehiclestabilization will undoubtedly present itself regardless of the weight of the vehicle where high speeds are contemplated.

A number of prior art techniques have been utilized to deal with the stabilization of ground rail vehicles. These techniques include the provision of auxiliary stabilizer members or arms which, for example, extend downwardly from the vehicle contact the sides of the rails so as to provide further balancing forces. The following patents deal with this problem, although in some instances, rather generally: U.S. Pat. Nos. 174,437 (Prohias); 1,791,663 (Edson); 2,557,354 (Kivell); 3,084,637 (Kohout); 3,114,332 (Bacon et al.,);

3,626,857 (Omar); 3,636,886 (Lich). This list is, of

course, not intended to be exhaustive but merely representatibve of approaches taken by the prior art.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the invention, a stabilizer system is provided for a railway vehicle which serves in maintaining the vehicle in contact with the tracks on which the vehicle rides. The system includes a pair of auxiliary tracks located in spaced parallel relationship to and on opposite sides of the vehicle tracks and stabilizing apparatus comprising a stabilizer framework pivotably mounted on the vehicle trucks and including members which extend outwardly from the trucks and terminate in means such as rollers or bearings for engaging the track surface. The tracks are formed by auxiliary rails which present a downwardly facing track surface disposed above the bed of the vehicle tracks so as to transmit stabilizing forces from the rollers through the pivoted stabilizer framework to the side frames of the vehicle truck.

The stabilizing system also results in a better quality ride, reduces swaying and provides greater security on curves particularly at high speeds. To this end, the system preferably includes stabilizing members connected between the vehicle coach and the support framework so as to provide further balancing of the coach, and stabilization of the vehicle at high speeds. Such an approach might be of particular value in instances where the railway vehicle is somewhat top heavy and hence maintaining equilibrium might be a problem for the speeds contemplated.

The support framework for each roller or set of rollers preferably includes a basic frame which is pivoted at one end to the truck support structure and is supported above the vehicle truck by resilient guide devices which transmit downward forces, generated by contact between the auxiliary rails and the rollers, to the side frames of the truck so as to tend to maintain the wheels of the truck in contact with the main track. The guide devices preferably comprise inverted U shaped brackets mounted on the truck side frames and including first and second heavy duty coil springs mounted within the bracket above and below the elements which form the sides of the basic support frame of the stabilizer framework.

The tracks are defined by auxiliary rails which are mounted on supports located at spaced locations along the main tracks. These supports are advantageously mounted on steel ties which are substituted for selected ones of the conventional ties, the rail supports and hence the replacement ties being spaced close enough together to prevent sagging of the rails. The side rails can be used to provide inward pressure as well as downward pressure and to this end, a pair of further track surfaces defined by the outermost lateral sidewalls of the rails may be provided, and the stabilizer apparatus modified to include further vertical rollers for engaging these track surfaces.

The support frameworks for the rollers on opposite sides of each truck and these frameworks may be interconnected by suitable linkages. In accordance with one embodiment, a regulator device connected between the linkages controls the interaction between the two frameworks as well as the pressure exerted by the rollers on the tracks. Alternatively, this pressure can be controlled individually for each side.

Other features and advantages of the invention will be set forth in or apparent from the detailed description of preferred embodiments thereof found hereinbelow.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a largely diagrammatic transverse section of a railway coach incorporating the stabilizer apparatus of the invention, the truck and its associated support structure being shown in phantom lines and the stabilizer apparatus being shown in solid lines;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the truck of FIG. 1 with the truck and associated support structure again being shown in phantom lines and the outward portions of the stabilizing apparatus being broken away;

FIG. 3 is a side view of the truck. shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the stabilizing apparatus of FIG. 1 to 4 with the truck and associated support structure omitted apart from one guide device which is shown partially broken away;

FIG. 5 is a detail of the guide device shown in FIG.

FIG. 6 is a plan view of a conventional railway track which has been modified in accordance with the inventron;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view showing the auxiliary rail system of the invention;

FIG. 8 is a side elevational view of a alternate embodiment of the rail system of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a detail of the coach stabilizing arrangement shown in FIG. 1; and

FIG. 10 is a side elevational view of an alternative embodiment of the stabilizing apparatus of FIGS. 1 to 9.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to FIG. 1, a railway car system incorporating the stabilizing apparatus of the invention is shown. A railway coach, generally denoted 10, is mounted on a truck or bogie 12 which is shown in phantom lines in FIG. I to distinguish from the stabilizer framework which is shown in solid lines and is generally denoted 14. The coach l and truck 12 are generally conventional in construction, the coach being supported on truck 12 by a conventional center bearing 16 which receives a downwardly depending boss 18 secured to coach 10 and which is supported by a center bolster plate 20, and associated coil springs 22 (see FIGS. 2 and 3).

The truck 12 includes wheels 12A which are mounted on an axle 12B supported in the side frames or side walls 12C and which ride on rails 24 supported by cross ties 26. Side frames 12C include conventional coil springs 22 mentioned above and the frame work forming side frames 12C defines a plurality of openings 12CO as illustrated in FIG. 3. The truck 12 also includes a connecting and support structure 1285 which can best be seen in FIG. 2 and is also shown in phantom lines in that figure. The support structure includes a spaced series of four transverse support members or truck bolsters 12D which connect side walls 12C together and a pair of longitudinally extending connecting members 12E. The support structure 1285 can also include diagonal struts 12F (See FIGS. 1 and 3) for strengthening and bracing the support structure. It will be appreciated that all types of trucks may not include each of the members making up support structure 1288 and that further members may be added to the existing structure to complete the support structure or the support provided can be modified from the specific arrangement disclosed. Because of the conventional nature of the coach, truck and rail system, further description thereof will be dispensed with apart from those features which are of direct concern to the present invention.

The stabilizer framework 14, which can be best seen in FIGS. 1 and 4 is made up of a number of sections including, each a basic horizontal frame 14A, a vertical frame 14B and a further horizontal frame 14C, each of which includes spaced parallel longitudinal frame members PM spaced apart by a series relatively short, transverse connecting members CM as illustrated. Considering the framework shown in FIG. 4 the basic horizontal frame 14A is connected to the central longitudinal support member 12E through a short connecting member CM which may simply be an extension of the connecting members forming the frame CM. The free ends of connecting members CM are hingedly connected to support member 12E by hinges 14E. The connecting members CM of basic frame 14A extend through guide devices 28 (one of which is shown in FIG. 4 which are also shown in FIGS. 1 to 3 and which which can best be seen in FIG. 5) mounted on the side wall 12C of truck 12. As shown in FIG. 5, guide devices 28 include a housing 28A having an aperture 283 therein through which a corresponding connecting member CM of frame 14A extends. Connecting member CM is resiliently supported within housing 28A by upper and lower heavy duty coil springs 28C and 28D. It will be understood that the guide device shown in FIG. 5 is merely exemplary and that other suitable devices for resiliently guiding and support the connecting members of the support framework can be utilized.

As indicated in FIGS. 1 and 2, horizontal frame 14 extends beyond side frame 12C of the truck and as shown in FIG. 4 shares the outermost frame member FM in common with vertical frame 148, with the frames 14A and 148 being rigidly or fixedly connected together at that member. Similarly, vertical frame 148 shares the lowermost frame member FM with further horizontal frame 14C and is fixedly connected thereto.

The sides of lower frames 14C are formed by transverse connecting members TM which, as shown in FIG. 1, are joined with a like member of the support structure on the opposite side of coach 10 by a connecting linkage 14H which comprises a sleeve into which the ends of members TM telescope. Connecting members TM are supported adjacent their innermost ends by vertical support members VM which depend from longitudinal support members 12E of support structure 12. Compression springs 14] are located between the inner surfaces of vertical support members VM in the area of the junction with the connecting member TM and the ends of connecting sleeve 14H, and between the innermost ends of connecting members TM as shown in FIG. 1. As can best be seen in FIG. 4, the stabilizer framework 14 also includes first series of diagonal strut members SMl which extend between the connecting members CM forming the sides of upper horizontal frame 14A and the base of the vertical sides of the vertical frame 148 and a second series of diagonal struts SM2 which extend between the area of jointure between upper frame 14A and vertical frame 14B and the area of jointure between the outermost frame members of lower frame 14C and the sides thereof formed by transverse connecting members TM. Finally, the transverse connecting members TM each terminate in a roller 30 which is mounted for rotation thereon. As shown in FIGS. I to 3, connecting members TM and strut members SM2 extend outwardly through the openings or apertures 12CO in the side frame 12C of truck 12 so that rollers 30 are positioned a fixed distance from the sides of the truck 12 over the road bed adjacent the ties 26 (see FIG. 1). To provide additional strength, an outer frame member OM, such as shown in FIGS. 1 and 4, can be utilized to connect together the outer free ends of connecting members CM.

Rollers 30 engage or ride on tracks 32 each of which is formed by the downwardly facing surface of an auxiliary side rail 34, there being two side rails 34 which extend along the main rails 24 on opposite sides thereof and parallel thereto (see also FIG. 6). As may perhaps be best seen in FIG. 7, the side rails 34 are supported by inwardly extending support arms 36 which themselves are supported by and secured to vertical support posts 38. It should be noted that the mounting for rails 34 can be made adjustable to vary the height and/or the lateral position of the rails. Posts 38 are themselves mounted on auxiliary steel ties 40. As shown in FIG. 6, ties 40 are located at spaced intervals along the main rails 24 and may simply be used to replace the conventional cross ties 26 at selected, spaced locations. The two rails 34 are identical and hence only one need be considered in detail. Thus, referring to the right-hand track shown in FIGS. 1 and 6, the surface forming track 32 is preferably shaped to conform to the curvature of the rollers 30 and in the preferred embodiment shown in FIG. 1 is of a rounded concave shape which is the reciprocal of the rounded convex shape of the rollers. The tracks 32 are bolted, welded or otherwise secured to support arms 36 which are preferably constructed on structural steel plates 36a strengthened by side wall flanges 36b and formed integrally, in the embodiment under consideration, with similarly constructed vertical support posts 38. Posts 38 are likewise bolted or welded to steel ties 40 which, as shown in FIG. 7, can be formed by U-shaped beams or bars.

Although in the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 to 7, only horizontal rollers 30 are used, it is also possible to employ a second set of vertical rollers 42 which as illustrated in FIG. 8, engage and ride in a track 44 formed by an outwardly facing surface of side rail 34. Each of the second rollers 42 may be mounted for rotation by a vertically extending spindle or shaft 48 mounted on the end of the extension of corresponding connecting member TM forming the axis about which associated roller 30 rotates.

Further, as mentioned above and as illustrated in FIG. 1, means can also be provided to stabilize the coach 10. To this end, a pair of stabilizing rods 50 are provided which are connected between the sides of coach l0 and the connecting members TM of the stabilizer framework 14. As shown in FIG. 9, each of the stabilizin g rods 50 actually comprises a pair of telescoping rods 50a and 50b, lower rod 50a extending into a longitudinal bore in rod 50b so relative movement between the two is permitted. The stabilizing means also includes a damper 52 in the form of a cylindrical sleeve 54 having a longitudinal bore therein in which rods 50a and 50b are received. An annulus 50aa on rod 50a forms a movable piston within sleeve 54 and a spring 56, connected between piston 50aa and the portion of sleeve 54 forming the opening into which rod 50a extends, provides damping. The rods 50a, 50b are preferably connected to the coach at a point relatively high on the coach, as illustrated, so as to provide leverage. This arrangement improves the ride as well as providing balance.

Referring to FIG. 10, an alternate embodiment of the stabilizing apparatus of FIGS. 1 to 9 is shown which is particularly suited for use with locomotives. The embodiment is generally similar to that previously described and like elements are given the same numbers with primes attached. The stabilizer framework 14' includes upper horizontal frame member 60 which generally corresponds to connecting members CM of basic frame 14A and are pivotably connected at one end by hinge 14E to the truck support structure (not shown) and at the other end by hinge 61 to a diagonal or vertical frame member 62. Horizontal frame member 60 extends through a guide device 28' mounted on the top of side truck frame 12C whereas vertical frame member 62 extends through a similar guide 64 mounted on the outer side surface of side truck frame 12C. The vertical frame member 62 is rigidly affixed to a further horizontal frame member 66 which corresponds to the connecting member TM of lower horizontal frame 18C. Members 62 and 66 are pivotably connected, adjacent the intersection thereof, by a hinge 68 to a generally horizontal linkage 70. Linkage 70 connects the stabilizing framework 14' to an actuator or regulator 72 which, for example, can be a suitable electrical, hydraulic or pneumatic device. The drive piston 72a of actuator 72 is pivotably connected to linkage 70 through a further hinge 74. Lower horizontal frame member 66 rotatably mounts a roller 30' which engages a downwardly facing track surface 32' presented by a support arm 36' supported above a support tie 40 by a vertical post 38. The purpose of the embodiment of FIG. 10 is to increase the effective traction of the railway vehicle particularly at high. speeds. To this end, roller 30' is mounted so as to transmit a controlled pressure from the side rail 32' through the support structure 14' to the top of the truck 12C. Guides 28' and 64, through which support members 60 and 62 respectively extend serve in transmitting pressure necessary to provide effective traction. Regulator 72 is used to control this pressure and provides a controlled movement of linkage 70 which is transmitted to the bottom of vertical frame member 62. This movement can be regulated for either side of the stabilizer frame work or for both sides at the same time. To accommodate for the small vertical movement of vertical frame member 62, it might be advisable to mount regulator .72 in guides so as to permit up and down motion. Guide 64 can utilize compression springs similar to guide 28 described above or, alternately, since there will also be some lateral movement, can be a pivoted sleeve mounted in a bracket secured to the side frame 12C.

In accordance with a further modification, the frame members connected to rollers 30 (or 30') can be made to be adjustable so that positioning of the rollers with respect to the side rail tracks can be optimized.

As stated hereinabove, supports 38 and associated ties 40 are spaced close enough together that sagging of the side rails is not a problem. The side rails described are interrupted at the railroad switches and other appropriate locations and slope upwardly at these locations to terminate the connection of the rollers.

Although the invention has been. described with reference to exemplary embodiments thereof, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that variations and modifications may be effected in these embodiments without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention.

I claim:

1. A stabilizing system for a railway vehicle of the type comprising a carrier section and at least one truck section for supporting the carrier section and including wheels which ride on tracks, said system comprising a first and second auxiliary tracks positioned along the tracks upon which the wheels of the vehicle ride in spaced parallel relationship thereto and opposite sides thereof, said auxiliary tracks each com prising means defining a downwardly facing track surface and means for supporting said track surface defining means above the bed of the vehicle tracks;

and stabilizing means for maintaining the vehicle wheels in engagement with the vehicle tracks comprising laterally extending rollers for engaging said auxiliary track surfaces and means located beneath the carrier section and extending laterally outwardly beyond the vehicle truck for pivotably mounting said rollers with respect to the vehicle truckv 2. A system as claimed in claim 1 wherein said auxiliary tracks each include means defining an outwardly facing vertical track surface, said stabilizing means including further vertically extending rollers for engaging said vertical track surface.

3. A system as claimed in claim 2 wherein said downwardly facing track surface and said vertical track surface are formed respectively by the bottom and outside surfaces of an auxiliary rail member which extends parallel to the vehicle tracks.

4. A system as claimed in claim 3 wherein each of said vertical rollers are mounted outwardly of said lateral extending rollers on shaft perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of said laterally extending roller.

5. A system as claimed in claim 1 wherein said track surface defining means each comprise a rail member which extends parallel to the rails of the vehicle track and said track surface supporting means comprises a plurality of auxiliary ties spaced along the vehicle track and extending parallel to the ties of the vehicle track and a pair of upright support members secured to each of said ties for supporting said rail members.

6. A stabilizing system as claimed in claim 1 wherein the height of said tracks is adjustable.

7. A stabilizing system as claimed in claim 1 wherein the lateral positions of said tracks are adjustable.

8. A stabilizing system for a railway vehicle of the type comprising a carrier section, and at least two spaced trucks for supporting the carrier section and including wheels which ride on transversely spaced tracks for the vehicle, said system comprising:

first and second auxiliary tracks which respectively extend along opposite sides of the vehicle tracks in spaced, parallel relationship thereto; and stabilizing means for maintaining the vehicle wheels in engagement with the vehicle tracks and for controlling lateral movement of the vehicle carrier section comprising means extending laterally outward from said trucks for engaging said auxiliary tracks, means for pivotably mounting said track engaging means with respect to the vehicle trucks and axially movable coupling means for coupling the side walls of the vehicle carrier section to said laterally extending means. 9. A stabilizing system as claimed in claim 8 wherein said laterally extending track engaging means comprise a plurality of pairs of opposite extending horizontally roller members and means for supporting said roller members in spaced relationship to the vehicle trucks in engagement with said auxiliary tracks.

10. A stabilizing system as claimed in claim 8 wherein said coupling means comprises spring loaded telescoping rod members connected between the carrier section and the roller member supporting means.

1 l. A stabilizing system for a high speed railway vehicle comprising a coach section supported by a pair of wheeled trucks adapted to ride on transversely spaced main vehicle rails, said system comprising first and second auxiliary rails spaced outwardly from, in parallel relation to, and on opposite sides of, the main vehicle rails and respectively presenting first and second downwardly facing track surfaces disposed above the bed of the main rails,

and stabilizing means for aiding in maintaining the vehicle wheels in engagement with the vehicle rails comprising first and second support frameworks pivotably mounted on each of said trucks, each including means extending laterally outwardly from the side of the truck for engaging said track surfaces, each said framework further including a generally horizontal frame section mounted above the truck and said stabilizing means further including guide means mounted on the side frames of the vehicle trucks for resiliently supporting said horizontal frame section and for transmitting forces transmitted to the support framework from the auxiliary tracks to the side frame, and

linkage means for interconnecting said first and second frameworks.

12. A stabilizing system as claimed in claim 11 wherein said linkage means includes compression spring-loaded connecting linkages for connecting the lower portions of the frameworks.

13. A stabilizing system as claimed in claim 11 said linkage means includes regulator means for regulating the forces transmitted between the two frameworks.

14. A stabilizing system as claimed in claim 11 wherein said guide devices each comprise an inverted U-shaped bracket and first and second coil springs located within said bracket for supporting a side member of said horizontal frame section.

15. A stabilizing system as claimed in claim 11 wherein said engaging means includes rollers having a convex shape in cross section and said track surface comprises a reciprocally-shaped concave surface.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4213396 *Apr 26, 1979Jul 22, 1980Daimler-Benz AktiengesellschaftTraffic system with drive channel and road vehicles mechanically cross guided-therein
US4729322 *Jun 1, 1987Mar 8, 1988Donald W. HarshbergerCantilevered train system
US5381737 *May 25, 1993Jan 17, 1995Trenary; BryantRail truck suspended car transit vehicles
US5671682 *Dec 17, 1993Sep 30, 1997Knorr Bremse AgSway brace with sprung support and supplementary and emergency spring
EP0831178A1 *Sep 20, 1996Mar 25, 1998SLM Schweizerische Lokomotiv- und Maschinenfabrik AGTrack for railway vehicle and railway vehicle for such a track
Classifications
U.S. Classification104/243, 105/210, 105/453, 104/246, 105/199.2, 105/164
International ClassificationB61F9/00
Cooperative ClassificationB61F9/00
European ClassificationB61F9/00