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Publication numberUS3817430 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 18, 1974
Filing dateApr 24, 1972
Priority dateApr 24, 1972
Publication numberUS 3817430 A, US 3817430A, US-A-3817430, US3817430 A, US3817430A
InventorsBorin H
Original AssigneeBorin H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carafe with self-sealing spout
US 3817430 A
Abstract
A receptacle for storing and dispensing liquids comprising a disposable plastic cup and a disposable plastic lid releasably secured over a top of the cup. A flat flexible and resilient flap extends forward from the lid to engage an upper edge of and normally seal a spout extending from the cup. The flap is adapted to automatically lift from the spout as the cup is tipped and liquid presses thereagainst for dispensing from the receptacle through the spout.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Borin [4 1 June 18, 1974 [54] CARAFE WITH SELF-SEALING SPOUT [76] Inventor: Harlan F. Borin, 1326 Yellowstone Dr., Lake Arrowhead, Calif. 92321 22 Filed: Apr.24, 1972 21 Appl. No.: 246,573

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,467,254 9/1923 Tarbet Q. 292/2566 X 1,872,771 8/1932 Little l 222/572 X 2,136.123 11/1938 Baron l l 222/517 2,161,230 6/1939 Nelson l 222/494 X 2,254,164 8/1941 Bernhardt 222/468 X 2,459,073 l/l949 Hamilton 222/572 X 2,993,629 7/1961 Ruhnke 222/570 X 3,208,620 9/1965 Herdering 220/60 X 3,325,044 6/1967 McCutcheon 220/60 Primary ExaminerR0bert B. Reeves Assistant ExaminerJoseph J. Rolla Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Harris, Kern, Wallen &

Tinsley ABSTRACT A receptacle for storing and dispensing liquids comprising a disposable plastic cup and a disposable plastic lid releasably secured over a top of the cup. A fiat flexible and resilient flap extends forward from the lid to engage an upper edge of and normally seal a spout extending from the cup. The flap is adapted to automatically lift from the spout as the cup is tipped and liquid presses thereagainst for dispensing from the receptacle through the spout.

13 Claims, 19 Drawing Figures aamman PATENTEDM 18 I974 SHEU 2W 4 PATENTEUJUMB m4 3317mm sum 3 or 4 1 CARAFE WITH SELF-SEALING SPOUT The present invention relates to receptacles for storing and dispensing liquid and, more particularly, to a receptacle specially adapted for use by hospitals and other institutions. i

In most hospitalstoday, there exists certain general requirements concerning liquid receptacles used by patients. For example, such receptacles must be sterile upon initial use by each different patient and should be scalable against entry of contaminants. Further, such receptacles should be insulated against heat loss and should be of a size and shape which can be easily handled even by bedridden patients.

Presently, such receptacles take the form of metal and heavy plastic carafes. Because of their relatively high cost of manufacture, such receptacles pose a significant expense to hospitals at time of purchase. Unfortunately, the cost associated with such receptacles are of a continuing nature since they require sterilization after each use by a different patient. Sterilization is a time-consuming and therefore relatively expensive procedure for hospitals.

Further, the metal and heavy plastic receptacles now in use by most hospitals have a separate cap. The cap closes the top of the receptacle when not in use and must be removed prior to pouring of liquid from the receptacle. During that time, contaminants may enter the receptacle. Also, because such caps are often seated within the top of the receptacles, their removal can be a difficult and awkward task particularly for bedridden patients. Because of the weight and size of such receptacles, the same is often true of lifting and pouring of liquids therefrom.

In view of the foregoing, it is an object of the present invention to provide a receptacle having a liquidcontaining cup and lid which are so inexpensive that they may be thrown away after use and replaced at a cost less than that required to sterilize present-day receptacles for hospital use.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a receptacle of the foregoing character which is sturdy yet lightweight and easy to handle even by bedridden patients.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a receptacle which is closed at all times against entry of contaminants. I

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a receptacle of the foregoing character which is closed by a lid having a flexible and resilient flap hinged thereto for normally sealing a spout of the receptacle to prevent entry of contaminants and for automatically lifting from the spout as liquid flows thereagainst to permit dispensing of liquid from the receptacle.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide a receptacle for storing and dispensing liquids comprising a disposable plastic cup, a'reusable handlecarrying ringfor releasably receiving the cup and a disposable plastic lid releasably secured to the ring over the top of the cup and having a flexible and resilient flap extending therefrom for normally engaging the upper edge of and sealing a spout extending from the cup and for automatically lifting from the spout as the cup is tipped and liquid presses thereagainst for dispensing from the receptacle through the spout. I

Other objects and advantages of the present invention may be more clearly understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered with the drawings, which, by way of example only, depict various receptacles including the features of the present invention.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a top view of one form of receptacle of the present invention with a portion of a lid removed to expose the interior of the cup and spout of the receptacle;

FIG. 2 is a sectional side view of the receptacle of FIG. 1 taken along the line 22 showing the manner in which the lid seals the top of the cup and spout;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along the line 33 in FIG. 2, showing the manner in which the lid snaps onto the handle-carrying ring of the receptacle;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary side view of the front portion of the receptacle showing the automatic lifting of the lid flap from the spout as the cup is tipped to dispense liquid therefrom;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary top view of a rear portion of a receptacle with a portion of the lid removed to expose an air vent in the cup;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary sectional side view taken along the line 66 in FIG. 5, showing the air vent;

FIGS. 7 and 8 are alternate forms of lids useful in the receptacle of the present invention;

FIG. 9 is a side view of an upper portion of an alternate form of receptacle including upright hook members extending from the ring for securing the lid to the cup;

FIG. 10 is a top view of the receptacle of FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along the line llll in FIG. 10, showing the manner in which the hook members engage the top of the lid to secure the lid to the cup;

FIG. 12 is a front view of the upper portion of another embodiment of the present invention including a strap hinged to the ring and extending over and secur ing the lid to the cup;

FIG. 13 is a front view of the upper portion of still another embodiment of the invention including a strap extending from the lid under the spout supporting portion of the ring to assist in securing the lid to the ring;

I FIG. 14 is an enlarged sectional side view of a front portion of the receptacle taken along the line 14-14 in FIG. 13;

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary top view taken along the line 1515 in FIG. 13;

FIG. 16 is a side view of another form of the present invention including a disposable cup and lid, the lid having a strap extending under a spout of the cup to assist in securing the lid to the cup;

FIG. 17 is a sectional front view of the receptacle of FIG. 16 taken along the line l7l7",

FIG. 18 is a sideview of an upper portion of a preferred form of the present invention including a handholdable disposable plastic cup and a lid having a strap extending under a spout of the cup to assist in securing the lid to the cup; and

FIG. 19 is an enlarged top view (turned of the receptacle of FIG. 18 with portions broken away to expose the connection of the lid to the cup.

Generally speaking the receptacle of the present invention is represented by the numeral 10 and comprises a cup 14 having a spout 16. The top 18 of the cup is sealed by a lid while the spout is normally covered by a flat, flexible, and resilient flap 22 extending from a front of a lid. In this regard, the flap 22 normally rests on an upper edge 24 of the spout to seal the spout and automatically lifts therefrom as liquid in the cup presses thereagainst as during tipping of the cup to dispense liquid from the receptacle through the spout.

Preferably, the cup 14, and the lid 20 and the flap 22, comprise single-piece molded plastic articles. The cup is formed of a lightweight plastic material having good heat insulation characteristics such as Sytrofoam while the lid 20 and flap 22 are ofa flexible and resilient thinwall construction. Because of their construction, the cup and lid may be rapidly and inexpensively massproduced. In fact, their cost is so low that it is more economical for the lid and cup to be disposed of after use than sterilized for reuse.

In the embodiment of the invention shown in FIGS. 16 and 17, the cup 14 is characterized by diametrically opposite inward depressions 14a and 14b equally spaced from the spout 16. The depressions extend upwardly from a bottom of the cup to adjacent the top 18 and combine with a curved rear portion 140 of the cup to define a handle means. The handle means is shaped and dimensioned such that it may be readily grasped in one hand even by a bedridden patient thereby enabling the patient to easily pick up the cup 14 and pour liquid therefrom. In this regard, the depressions 14a and 14b and the rear portion 14c are dimensioned such that in grasping the handle means, the patients thumb fits into one of the depressions while his fingers on the same hand fit into the other depression.

In the embodiments of the invention shown in FIGS. 1-15, the receptacle includes a handle-carrying ring 12 for securely supporting and lifting the cup 14 during the dispensing of liquids. In this regard, a handle 25 extends from the ring and is designed for easy gripping, thereby rendering the receptacle easy to lift and hold even by bedridden hospital patients. Preferably, the handle-carrying ring 12 is reusable and is formed of a sturdy plastic material.

More particularly, and referring to the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 6, the cup 14, in addition to the open top 18, includes a closed bottom 26 having an annular foot or base 28. The base is adapted to rest firmly on a flat table top, tray, or the like and to support the cup in an upright position with its sidewall 30 extending upwardly and outwardly from the bottom at an angle of about 7 from the vertical. Such angulation of the sidewall 30 permits a plurality of like cups to be compactly stacked with the bottom of all but the lowermost cup nesting securely within a top portion of an immediately adjacent cup.

Adjacent the open top 18, the sidewall 30 of the cup 14 includes an outward step 32 to a vertical annular sidewall portion 34 terminating in a lip 36. The lip 36 includes the flat upper edge 38 of the cup 14 and extends between points adjacent opposite sides of the spout 16. With regard to the latter, the spout 16 is preferably located in an arcuate forward edge region of the cup 14. In that region, an upper portion of the annular sidewall 34 flares outwardly at an angle of about 30 to the horizontal. Further, as most clearly illustrated in FIG. 1, the upper edge 24 of the spout l6 follows a curve having a radius less than the radius of the top 18 of the cup to intersect the upper edge 38 at points slightly forward of opposite inwardly curved ends 40 and 42 of the lip 36. Thus formed, the spout includes an upwardly facing open end and a substantially straight upper edge preferably continuous with the upper edge of the cup 14.

As illustrated most clearly in FIGS. 2 and 3, the annular sidewall portion 34 of the cup 14 is adapted to tightly receive the handle-carrying ring 12 such that the cup may be lifted, tipped, and otherwise maneuvered by gripping the handle 25. In'this regard, the ring 12 is an annular thin-walled member having an inner diameter substantially equal to the outer diameter of the annular sidewall portion 34. A lip 44 extends outwardly from the ring 12 and includes an upper edge 46 thereof. The lip 44 closely follows the contour and curve of the lip 36 of the cup 14, including the inwardly curved ends and 42. Thus, the upper edge of the lip 44 is adapted to engage and press upwardly on the lower surface of the lip 36. Further, between the ends of the lip 44,'an upper arcuate portion 48 of the ring flares outwardly at an angle of about 30 to follow the curve and contour of the lower surface of the spout 16. Thus, the ring 12 provides full support for and transmits uniform upwardly forces from the handle 25 to the cup 14 and spout 16 during lifting and pouring of liquids. In this regard, the handle 25 extends outwardly from the ring 12 in a region opposite the arcuate region 48 andbends downwardly along side an upper portion of the cup for easy hand gripping.

As previously indicated, the open top 18 of the cup 14 and spout 16 are covered by the lid 20 and flap 22. The lid and flap are designed to prevent entry of con taminants both while liquid is stored in and during dispensing of'liquids from the cup 14. To accomplish this, the lid 20 and flap 22 have an outer contour following generally the shape of the top of the cup 14 and spout 16. In addition, cooperative means are included on the lid and the cup for releasably securing the lid over the open top of the cup and the flap is constructed to normally seal the spout and to automatically rise from and lower thereto during and following the dispensing of liquid from the cup.

As to the cooperative means, in the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 through 8, a flange 50 extends downwardly from an outer edge of the lid 20 and includes an inwardly extending bead 52 at a lower end thereof. The inner diameter of the flange 50 is substantially equal to the outer diameter of the lip 36 and the height of the flange 50 is just sufficient to allow the bead 52 to snap and lock under the lip 44 and bear against an outer surface of the ring. In this manner, the flange and bead releasably lock the lid over the top of the cup. In addition, opposite ends 54 and 56 of the flange 50 bend inwardly to grip the curved ends of the lips 36 and 44 (such as 40 and 42) to insure a fluid-tight seal between the cup and lid at opposite ends of a connecting region 58 between the flap 22 and the lid.

Preferably, the connecting region 58 is a substantially straight line or connecting strip between the lid and flap and in the embodiment of FIGS. l-6, extends between junctions of the upper edge 38 of the cup and the upper edge 24 of the spout. By junctions is meant the general area between the point where the curved outside of the edge 24 joins the curve outside of the upper edge 38 and the inwardly curved ends 40 and 42 of the lip 36.

In addition to being the connecting region between the lid 20 and flap 22, 58 also represents a hinge means therebetween, that is, the line or strip along which the flap 22 swings in raising and lowering from and to the upper edge 24 of the spout 16. When the lid and flap are formed of a single piece of normally flat plastic, the line or strip is only noticeable when the flap is raised from the spout. However, in the embodiment of FIGS. l-6, there is a molded bend at the connection of the flap and lid and the line is detectable both when the flap lies on the spout and is raised therefrom.

With regard to the structure of the flap 22 illustrated in FIGS. l-6, during molding, the flap is formed at a downward angle of about 5 from the top of the lid. Because of this, the flap moves up and down independent of the lid about the hinge line 58. Also, when the flap is mounted with the lid on top of the cup 14, the flap in engaging the upper edge 24 of the spout is urged upwardly from its normal position. This means that the flap continuously exerts a downward force toward the upper edge 24. When theflap 22 is on the upper edge 24, the force produces a fluidtight seal between the flap and edge to prevent entry of contaminants. As the flap 22 is raised from the upper edge 24 in response to liquid pressing upon the bottom of the flap, as during tipping of the cup 14 in the direction of the spout 16, the flap continues to exert the downward force and effectively floats on the top of the stream of liquid dispensed from the spout. Because the flap rides on the liquid stream, it prevents entry of contaminants into the cup during the dispensing of liquid therefrom. Then, as the cup is returned to its upright position, the flap 22 automatically lowers to the upper edge 24 in response to the downward force to again seal the spout 16. Thus, the lid and flap continuously prevent contaminants from entering the cup and together with the cooperative means provide means for releasably sealing the cup and spout. I I

So complete is the fluidtight seal between the flap and the spout and between the lid and the cup that a vent to atmosphere is required for efficient pouring of liquid from the cup. The vent is illustrated most clearly in FIGS. 5 and 6 and comprises connecting slots 60 and 62. The slot 60 lies in the upper edge 38 of the cup 14 while the slot 62 extends downwardly in the outside of the vertical sidewall portion 34. Such an arrangement permits air at atmospheric pressure to displace liquid as it is poured from the cup 14 through the spout 16 during operation of the receptacle 10.

As illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, the lid 20 carries a tab 64 extending over a top of the handle 25. The tab is designed to assist in connecting and disconnecting the lid and flap to and from the top of the cup. In this regard,

after inserting the cup into the ring 12, the user of the receptacle l fits the lid 20 over the top of the cup and while pulling on the tab 64 snaps the flange 50 downward over the outer edge of the lips 36 and 44 with the inwardly curved ends 54 and S sealed against the curved ends 40 and 42 of the lip 36. In this position, the lid and flap securely seal the open top of the cup 14 and spout 16. Then, when it is desired either to remove the lid or to raise a rear portion thereof to insert liquid or ice or both, the user of the receptacle pulls rearwardly and upwardly on the tab to unsnap a rear portion of the flange 50 and expose the interior of the cup 14. The desired materials then may be deposited into the cup and the cup resealed by lowering the rear portion of the lid and resnapping the flange 50 over the rear portions of the lips 36 and 44.

Alternate forms of lids for use in the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 through 6 are depicted in FIGS. 7 and 8. Portions of the lids corresponding to those illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 6 bear like reference numerals in FIGS. 7 and 8 with an accompanying a and b, respectively. The principal difference between the lids of FIGS. 7 and 8 and those depicted in FIGS. 1 through 6 in the form of the hinge means 58. In FIG. 7, the hinge means 58a comprises a groove in the top of the lid 200. In FIG. 8, the hinge means 58b comprises a bead along the top of the lid 20b. Such hinge means provide a definite separation between the lid and flap and enable the flap to move up and down independent of the lid to open and close the spout. In both cases, the flaps 22a and 22b are formed during molding to bend downwardly at about a 5 angle from the horizontal top of the associated lid. Thus, the flaps function in conjunction with the lids in the same manner as described in connection with FIGS. 1 through 6.

An alternate form of the receptacle 10 is depicted in FIGS. 9, l0, and 11. But for the cooperative means on the lid and ring for releasably holding the lid on the cup, the receptacle 10 is the same as the cup previously described in connection with FIGS. 1 through 6. Accordingly, corresponding components and elements in the receptacle shown in FIGS. 9 through 11 bear the same reference numerals as previously employed in describing the embodiment of FIGS. 1 through 6 and a detailed description thereof will not be repeated.

In the embodiment of FIGS. 9-11, the cooperative means comprises a pair of inwardly facing hook means 66 and 68 and a pair of ears 70 and 72 extending outwardly from the lid 20 to mate with the hook means 66 and 68, respectively. The hook means are located immediately adjacent opposite ends of the lip 44 and each includes a vertical arm 74 projecting outwardly and up-- wardly from the ring 12 to a finger 76 extending inwardly-from the arm to define a hook. The cars 70 and 72 fit tightly under the fingers 76 with straight edges 78 and steps 80 butting against the inner faces and rear edges of the vertical arms 70 to hold the lid 20 down on the top of the cupv 14.

To assist the cooperative means, annular flange 82 extends from the bottom of the lid 20 and is dimensioned to fit tightly within the open top 18 of the cup 14. Thus, to mount the lid 20 on the cup 14 in FIGS. 9-1 1, one simply slides the lid forward to fit the ears 70 and 72 securely in the hook means 66 and 68 and then presses down on the lid to seat the flange 82 in the top of the cup. I

Still another form of the receptacle 10 is depicted in FIG. '12. The embodiment of FIG. 12 resembles that just described in connection with FIGS. 941 except for the cooperative means which includes a strap or locking bar 84. The strap 84is hinged at 86 to one edge of the ring 12 for raising and lowering above the top of the lid 20. An opposite end of the strip 84 includes an opening for receiving a button 88 extending from a bracket 90 secured to a side of the ring opposite the hinge 86. Thus, to secure the lid 20 to the top of the Another form of the receptacle 10 is depicted in FIGS. 13, 14 and 15. But for the cooperative means for releasably holding the lid on the cup, the receptacle is substantially the same as previously described in connection with FIGS. 1 through 6. Accordingly, corresponding components and elements of the receptacle shown in FIGS. 13 through bear the same reference numbers as previously employed in describing the embodiment of FIGS. 1 through 6, and a detailed description thereof will not be repeated.

With regard to the cup 14 illsutrated in FIGS. 13 through 15, it is the same as the cup shown in FIG. 1 and 2 except that the lip 36 extends and blends into the spout 16 rather than terminating in curved ends 40 and 42. Likewise, the flange 50 of the lid rather than terminating in curved ends 54 and 56 continues on the same radius of curvature to adjacent opposite ends of the upper arcuate portion of 48 of the ring, that is the spout supporting portion of the ring. There, the flange 50 steps downwardly to define-a curved strap 92 bearing tightly on the outside of the ring 12 and extending under the arcuate portion 48. In this regard, the curve of the strap 92 is substantially the same as the curvature of the flange 50.

Thus, in assembling the receptacle 10 illustrated in FIGS. 13 15, the cup 14 is first inserted into the ring 12. The user of the receptacle then introduces the spout 12 and arcuate region 48 of the ring 12 between the flat 22 and strap 92. Then, while pulling back on the tab 64 (not shown in FIGS. 13 15), the user snaps the flange 50 with its bead 52 downward over the outer edge of the lips 36 and 44 on the cup and ring to seal the open top of the cup 14 and the spout 16. In this regard, the strap 92 acts to firmly anchor the lid 20 to the top of the cup 14 at the ends of the spout 16 to insure against water leakage from the ends of the spout.

Still another form of the receptacle 10 is depicted in FIGS. 16 and 17. But for the previously described depressions 14a and 14b, the cup 14 included in the receptacle 10 of FIGS. 16 and 17 is the same as described in connection with FIGS. 13 through 15. As previously stated, the depressions 14a and 14b combine with the curved rear portion 14c of the cup to define a handle means for the receptacle. Thus, the receptacle illustrated in FIGS. 16 and 17 does not utilize the handle carrying ring 12 illustrated in the other embodiments of the invention.

The lid 20 and flap 22 of the receptacle 10 shown in FIGS. 16 and 17 are as illustrated in FIGS. 13- 15 as is the cooperative means for securing the lid to the cup. That is, the cooperative means includes the flange 50 extending down from an outer edge of the lid 20 and having a bead 52 extending inwardly from the lower edge of the flange between junctions of the strap 92 and the main portion of the flange. In the embodiment of FIGS. 16 and 17, the height of the flange 50 is just sufficient to allow the bead 52 to snap and lock under the lip 36 of the cup and to bear against an outer surface of the cup. Further, a strap 92 is dimensioned such that an upper edge thereof bears on a lower surface of the spout 16, while an inner surface thereof bears tightly against the side wall of the cup under the spout. Thus, to assemble the receptacle 10 illustrated in FIGS. 16 and 17, the user simply inserts the spout 16 between the strap 92 and the flap 22. He then pulls rearwardly and then downwardly on the lid 20 to allow the flange 50 to fit over the outer edge of the lip 36 and the bead 52 to snap thereunder. This creates an airtight seal for the lip and flap to the cup as previously described.

A preferred form of the receptacle 10 is depicted in 7 FIGS. 18 and 19. As illustrated, the receptacle resembles that described in connection with FIGS. 16 and 17 in that the cup 14 includes side depressions 14a and 14b which combine with the curved rear portion 14c of the cup to define a handle means for the receptacle. Further, the cooperative means includes the flanges 50, the lip 36, and the strap 92 which extends from forward ends of the flange under the spout 16 to assist in releasably securing the lid to the cup. However. important differences reside in the shape of the lip 36 opposite the spout 16 and in the configuration of the bead 52 for snapping under the lip 36.

In particular, the lip 36 includes an arcuate extension 36a diametrically opposite the spout 16. The radius of curvature of the extension 36a is greater than the radius curvatureof the cup and lip 36'to define generally triangular ear-shaped corner portions on opposite sides of a vertical plane bisecting the spout and cup. In this regard, the arcuate extension terminates at edges 36c tangential to the lip 36 and extending at about .a 30 angle to the vertical bisecting plane.

Thus shaped, the extension 36a combines with the spout 16 to define a preferred means for accurately locating the lid 20 on top of the cup 14. In this respect, the lid 20 includes an extension 20a matching the extension 36a and the flange extends between opposite ends of the strap 92 downwardly from an outer marginal edge of the lid to tightly engage the outer surface of the lip 36 and extension 36a. More particularly, to properly locate the lid on the cup, one inserts the spout 16 between the strap 92 and the flap 22 and pulls rearwardly and then downwardly on the tab 64. This causes the flange 50 adjacent the strap 92 to fit over the outer edge of the lip 36 on opposite sides of the spout and the bead 52 to snap thereunder. As the lid is drawn rearwardly and downwardly, the corners defined by the extension 20a mate with and fit over the like corners defined by the extension 36a to properly locate the lid on the cup with the flange 50 tightly engaging the entire outer edge of the lip 36 between opposite ends of the spout 16.

It is important to note in the embodiment shown in FIGS. 18 and 19 that the bead 52 does not extend along the entire length of the inner surface of the flange 50. Rather, there are two beads 52 and 52' starting at junctions of the flange 50 and the strap 92. From the junctions, the beads become progressively narrower until they terminate at points midway between the ends of the strap 92 and the sides of the extension 20a. Thus, in the embodiment of FIGS. 18 and 19, the beads 52 and 52' snap under the lip 36 only in the forward regions of the cup 14. This creates a fluidtight seal at a forward portion of the receptacle which prevents undesired liquid leakage from the receptacle during pouring operations. Yet, at the rear portion of the receptacle, air is able to leak between the flange 50 and the outside of the lip 36 and extension 36a to displace the liquid being poured from the receptacle. Therefore, in the preferred embodiment of the receptacle no specially designed air vent is required.

Further, the absence of the bead 52 at the rear of the receptacle makes for easier attaching and partial removal and removal of the lid 20 from the cup 14. For example, when it is desired to refill the receptacle or to add ice thereto, one simply lifts upward on the tab 64 raising the rear of the lid from the top of the cup. To reseal the top of the cup, the tab and lid are simply lowered. No undesired strain is placed on the marginal edgesof the lip 36 during such operations as would be caused by a bead unsnapping and resnapping under the lip. This is particularly important when the cup is formed of a foam-like plastic material such as Styrofoam which would tend to break upon repeated snapping and unsnapping of such a bead under the lip 36.

7 Further, the absence of the bead 52 in the rear region of the lid makes for easier complete removal of the lid from the cup. ln this regard, the lifting on the tab 64 raises the rear portion of the lid and starts the release of the beads 52 and 52' from the under the lip 36. Because of the tapered nature of the beads, the release progresses in a smooth manner to exert a minimum strain on the forward portion of the lip 36 during removal of the lid from the cup.

While particular forms of receptacles have been described in some detail herein, changes and modifica tions may be made therein without departing from the spirit of the invention. It is therefore intended that the invention be limited in scope only by the terms of the following claims.

I claim: I

l. A receptacle for storing and dispensing liquids, comprising: i

a cup having a vertically extending sidewall, an open top and a spout extending outwardly from said sidewall adjacent said open top and including an upwardly facing open end having a substantially straight upper edge; and

closure means including a single piece of plastic material defining a flat lid for covering said open top of said cup and flat flexible and resilient flap means continuous with and extending outwardly and forwardly from a front of said lid along a line between junctions of said upper edge of said spout and said cup for bearing on said upper edge to seal said spout and for lifting from said upper edge as liquid presses thereagainst with a tipping of said cup to permit dispensing of liquid through said spout, and

cooperative means on said lid and cup for releasably holding said lid on said cup.

2. The receptacle of claim 1 wherein said flap normally bends downward from said lid along said line to bear on said upper edge of and seal said spout.

3. The receptacle of claim 2 wherein said closure means includes hinge means along said connecting line between said flap and said lid for enabling said flap to move up and down independent of said lid to open and close said spout.

4. The receptacle of 1 wherein:

said cup includes flange means on opposite sides of said spout and extending outwardly from said cup adjacent said open top; and

said receptacle further includes handle means on said cup for hand-lifting said receptacle to dispense liquids therefrom through said spout, said handle means comprising a ring for releasably receiving said cup and bearing upwardly against said flange with a handle extending from said ring opposite said spout, a forward portion of said ring opposite said handle being shaped at its upper edge to receive said spout, and

a pair of inwardly facing hook means projecting upward from said ring immediately adjacent opposite ends of said forward portion for tightly receiving outer marginal edge portions of said lid and holding said lid on said cup.

5. The receptacle of claim 4 wherein said outer marginal portions of said lid follow an inner contour of said hooks means and said lid includes a downwardly projecting flange for bearing against an inner surface of said cup adjacent said open top,

6. The receptacle of claim 1 wherein:

said cup includes flange means on opposite sides of said spout and extending outwardly from said cup adjacent said open top;

said receptacle further includes handle means on said cup for hand-lifting said receptacle to dispense liquid therefrom through said spout, said handle means comprising a ring for releasably receiving said cup and bearing upwardly against said flange means with a handle extending from said ring opposite said spout; and

said cooperative means comprises a strap hinged at one end to said ring and extending over a top of said lid for releasable connection to said ring.

7.-The receptacle of claim 1 further comprising: handle means for hand-lifting said cup including a ring for releasably receiving said cup with a handle extending from said ring opposite said spout; lip means projecting outwardly from said receptacle and including a first lip on and projecting from said cup with a lower edge bearing on an upper edge of said ring and a second lip on and projecting from said ring below said first lip; and flange means in said cooperative means and extending downwardly from a lower surface of said lid to snap over said lip means and under said second lip to secure together said lid, cup and ring. 8. The receptacle of claim 7 wherein said flange means commences just forward of said line connecting said flap to said lid, curves inwardly over forward ends of said lip means, and closely follows the contour of said lip means rearwardly toward said handle to create a fluid-tight seal for said lid on said cup'.

9. The receptacle of claim 7 wherein said cooperative means further comprises a strap extending from said flange means on opposite side of said spout and following an outer surface of said ring under said spout to assist in releasably securing said lip to said cup.

10. A receptacle for storing and dispensing liquids, comprising:

a cup having a vertically extending sidewall, an open top and a spout extending outwardly from said sidewall adjacent said open top and including an upwardly facing open end having a substantially straight upper edge; and closure means including a flat lid for covering said open top of said cup,. flat flexible and resilient flap means continuous with and extending outwardly. from said lid for bearing on said upper edge to seal said spout and for lifting from said upper edge as liquid presses thereagainst with a tipping of said cup to permit dispensing of liquid through said spout, and

cooperative means on said lid and cup for releasably holding said lid on said cup including a lip projecting outwardly from and including an upper edge of said cup and extending between opposite ends of said spout.

flange means extending downwardly from a lower surface of said lid to snap over said lip, and

strap means extending downwardly from said lid at opposite sides of said spout and under said spout to assist in securing said lid to said cup 11. The receptacle of claim wherein said flange means extends between opposite ends of said strap means and follows the contour of an outer surface of said lip and wherein said receptacle further includes beads on said flange means for snapping under said lip to releasably secure said lid to said cup, said beads commencing adjacent said opposite ends of said strap means and being of a narrowing width terminating along opposite sides of said lid.

12. The receptacle of claim 11 wherein said lip includes an extension opposite said spout and wherein edge surface against which said flange means may bear. =l

Patent Citations
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US4653671 *May 9, 1985Mar 31, 1987Christene DuffyContainer
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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/494, D07/317, 222/517
International ClassificationA47G19/00, B65D47/08, A47G19/12
Cooperative ClassificationB65D47/0847, A47G19/12
European ClassificationA47G19/12, B65D47/08B4F