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Publication numberUS3818419 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 18, 1974
Filing dateJan 15, 1973
Priority dateJan 15, 1973
Publication numberUS 3818419 A, US 3818419A, US-A-3818419, US3818419 A, US3818419A
InventorsM Crane
Original AssigneeDeutsch Co Elec Comp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Zero insertion force electrical connector
US 3818419 A
Abstract
An electrical connector for a printed circuit board or the like that includes a dielectric body having a slot adapted to admit the edge of a printed circuit board, a row of opposed sring-biased contacts positioned on either side of the longitudinal axis of the body, and an actuating means that includes a cam arrangement which can retract the contacts away from the axis for allowing insertion of the printed circuit board and release of the contacts so that the spring force can cause the contacts to engage the conductors of the printed circuit board, and a lock means for holding the printed circuit board within the connector, the lock means also preventing contact engagement with the printed circuit board prior to full insertion of the printed circuit board into the body.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 [11] 3,818,419 Crane June 18, 1974 ZERO INSERTION FORCE ELECTRICAL nector, 4-1968, Vol. 10, No. 11, p. 1656. CONNECTOR [75] Inventor: Merlin L. Crane, Banning, Calif. Primary Examiner.loseph H. McGlynn [73] Assignee: The Deutsch Company Electronic Attorney Agent or Flrm R'chard can Components Division, Banning, 57 ABSTRACT [22] med. Jan. 1973 An electrical connector for a printed circuit board or PP 323,430 the like that includes a dielectric body having a slot adapted to admit the edge of a printed circuit board, a [52 us. c1. 339/74 R, 339/176 MP 9 f PP ga cqmacts positioned on 51 Int. Cl non 13/62 elther slde of the longlwdmal am of the body, and an [58] Field of Search 339/74, 75, 176 actuating means that includes a cam arrangement which can retract the contacts away from the axis for 5 References Cited fllowinfg insertion of thehprinltled circui; board and reease o t e contacts so t at t e sprlng orce can cause UNITED STATES PATENTS the contacts to engage the conductors of the printed 3,526,869 9/1970 Conrad et al. 339/75 MP circuit board and a lock means for holding the z 1 gg f gfi et printed circuit board within the connector, the lock 3 638 167 1/1972 06611i iiiii etQiI IIINUIII 339/74 R means also Preventing 9 with the 3:744:005 7/1973 Sitzler 339/75 MP Primed circu" board P to full memo" 0f the IBM Technical Bulletin, Gustafson, Low-Stress Con- OTHER U C O printed circuit board into the body.

21 Claims, 15 Drawing Figures PATENTED Jim 1 8 SHEET 2 ll? 4 PATENTED JUN} 8 74 SHEET 3 BF 4 ZERO INSERTION FORCE ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR BACKGROUND or THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to an electrical connector for printed circuit boards or the like.

2. Description of Prior Art In designing electrical connectors, an important criterion has been the minimizing of contact resistance at rated current flow. Excessive resistance or interconnection failure has been avoided through increased contact pressures, longer electrical wipe engagement or both. While this has alleviated problems of contact resistance, a concomitant result has been the creation of high mating forces when the connection is to be made to a printed circuit board. In some instances, mating forces exceed what is normally considered the maximum for manual operation. This difficulty has led to the consideration of zero insertion force connectors for printed circuit boards. Such connectors would provide for contact engagement only after the printed circuit board was inserted into the connector, avoiding any substantial engagement during the insertion and removal steps. Proposals for such connectors are found in Design of Zero Force PC Connectors by Carl Occhipinti, page 149, Electronic Packaging and Production, June, 1970. The prior designs in this area, however, have not achieved all the objectives now considered necessary for a satisfactory zero force connector.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A zero insertion force connector in accordance with the present invention includes an elongated housing of dielectric material, having a longitudinal slot open at one end which is adapted to receive the edge portion of a printed circuit board to which a connection is to be made. Within the housing are transverse walls between which are opposed contacts. There are inner and outer contacts, both of which are of approximately the same length and present curved surfaces adjacent the slot for the printed circuit board. The inner and outer contacts are contoured so as to be in alignment alongside the slot. Either integral with these contacts or adjacent to them are springs for biasing the contacts inwardly for engaging the conductors of the circuit board. The upper ends of the contacts are received in grooves of guide members which also include cam surfaces that are adjacent to additional cams on axially movable slides. When the slides are in one position, the cams move the guides laterally outwardly away from the longitudinal axis, thereby moving the contacts away from the longitudinal slot. In the other position of the slides, the guide members are moved inwardly toward the longitudinal axis, releasing the contacts so that the springs can move the contacts into engagement with the conductors of a printed circuit board received in the slot.

Also included within the housing is a lock which retains the printed circuit board within the connector in the mated position. The lock performs an additional function in preventing the contacts from being moved to the inward position until the printed circuit board is fully received within the housing. In other words, the contacts can engage the printed circuit board only after the board has been moved all the way into the connector, thereby assuring that each contact can engage only the corresponding conductor on the printed circuit board. The lock includes opposed members, actuated by the slides, which can overlap the end of the printed circuit board when it is fully within the housing and prevent its removal. The contacts are released by the slides only after the lock has assumed this position. In the event that the printed circuit board has not been inserted fully, the lock members will strike the side of the board as the slides are moved. This will resist further slide movement so that the contacts are not released and remain in their retracted positions, thereby preventing mismating of the contacts and printed circuit board.

The contacts are in two rows on either side of the longitudinal axis of the connector at the base of the connector housing, resulting in a relatively large grid at the connector exterior to allow wire wrap connections to be made. However, the contacts are contoured to present a single row on either side of the connector axis above the housing base and in the area where the conductors of the printed circuit board are to be engaged. This results in a greater contact density within the connector. Nevertheless, there is a dielectric barrier be tween all adjacent contacts. The lengths of the contacts are approximately the same from the locations of their engagement with the board to their exterior ends where the connections are made. This provides electrical paths of about the same distance, so that there is virtually the same time lag for current flow in all contacts, a factor of significance when the connector is used in a computer.

The design of this invention achieves true zero force entry and removal, as contacts are normally open and held away from the printed circuit board during its insertion and withdrawal. The wall of the longitudinal slot in the housing guides the printed circuit board and assures that it will not become misaligned and engage the retracted contact before the board reaches the fully mated position. The contacts are moved by the springs and retracted through predetermined paths. No extra members are needed to engage the springs to force them inwardly. This, in turn, assures that overstressing of the springs is avoided. The force exerted by the contacts against the conductors of the printed circuit board may be varied to suit particular conditions merely by changing the springs and no other components of the connector, when separate springs are used. Also, the springs may be of relatively heavy material and of poor electrical conductivity. Separate springs permit the contacts to be made without loops, lessening inductance and capacitance. Integral springs, however, possess the advantage of simplicity and increased production economies. The entire design is uncomplicated and capable of long life with undiminished performance.

The connector of this invention allows entry of the printed circuit board either through the end of the connector or downwardly through its top. This eliminates the need for conventional edge guides for the printed circuit board. It also allows three edges of the board to engage connectors, tripling the number of connections that can be made to a single board. This is accomplished by arranging the connectors in a U-shaped pattern, so that the board enters two connectors from their ends and the central connector from its top.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view illustrating the connector of this invention receiving the edge portion of a printed circuit board;

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view taken along line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along line 33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a transverse sectional view taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 2, illustrating the contacts in the released position where they are held by the springs in engagement with the printed circuit board;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4, but with the contacts retracted;

FIG. 6 is a transverse sectional view taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 2, showing the lock for retaining the printed circuit board;

FIGS. 7, 8, 9 and 10 are fragmentary perspective views, partially in section, of the connector housing alone, showing the configurations of different transverse walls within the connector housing;

FIG. 11 is an enlarged perspective view showing the arrangement of the contacts;

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary enlarged perspective view showing the arrangement of one of the outer contacts with its spring biasing it against a printed circuit board;

FIG. 13 is an exploded perspective view of the slide and guide members which actuate the contacts and the lock;

FIG. 14 is an enlarged perspective view of the lock member separated from the remainder of the connector; and

FIG. 15 is an enlarged fragmentary view, taken in the same plane as FIG. 3, showing how the lock will close prior to the release of the contacts.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The connector of this invention includes an elongated body 10 of rigid dielectric material, such as plastic, the body including longitudinal sidewalls l1 and 12 and end walls 13 and 14. There are longitudinal projections 15 and 16 at the lower portions of the end walls 13 and 14, provided with openings 17 and 18 adapted to receive fasteners for attaching the connector to a supporting structure.

lnteriorly, the body 10 includes a plurality of transverse walls 19 which extend between the longitudinal walls 11 and 12. The upper portions of the transverse walls 19 adjacent the longitudinal walls 11 and 12 are provided with rectangular notches 20 and 21 which extend also through the upper wall 22 of the body (see FIG. 7).

Extending longitudinally inwardly from the end wall 14 through the central part of the upper wall 22 is a longitudinal slot 23 which stops short of the opposite end wall 13. The slot 23 extends into the central portions of the transverse walls 19 to a depth below that of the notches 20 and 21. The upper part of the slot 23, above the level of the lower edges of the notches 20 and 21, is bounded by longitudinal walls 24 and 25.

The lower edges 26 of the transverse walls 19 are positioned above the bottom edges 27 and 28 of the sidewalls 11 and 12, respectively. This results in a recess which receives a base 29, also of rigid dielectric material, such as plastic. The base 29 is substantially complementary to the recess that receives it and is suitably secured to the body 10 such as by staking.

Carried by the base 29 are pluralities of inner and outer electrical contacts 30 and 31, respectively. The inner contacts 30 include lower pin ends 32 which project downwardly beyond the lower surface of the base 29 for attachment to electrical conductors. The projecting outer ends of both types of contacts may take any form to permit connection to an adjacent conductor as particular conditions may dictate.

The lower portions 32 of the contacts 30 extend through the base 29 in parallel rows adjacent and on either side of the longitudinal axis of the body 10. The contacts 30 have short offsets 33 immediately above the upper surface 34 of the base 29. The lower portions 32 of the contacts 30 are aligned with alternate transverse walls 19, which have notches 35 and 36 to receive the offsets 33 of the two rows of contacts 30. The inner contacts 30, above the offsets 33, have upwardly extending portions 37, which are curved outwardly so as to present convex surfaces adjacent the longitudinal walls 11 and 12. The upper contact portions 37 are intermediate adjacent pairs of transverse walls 19 of the body. By virture of their offsets 33, the contacts 30 on opposite sides of the longitudinal axis of the body have their upper arcuate portions 37 positioned in alternate spaces between the transverse walls 19. At the upper ends of the arcuate portions 37 there are sharper bends 38 leading to outwardly extending, short. horizontal portions 39 terminating in upwardly bent tabs 40.

The outer contacts 31 have lower ends 41 similar to the ends 32 of the inner contacts 30. The ends 41 of the contacts 31 are in parallel rows adjacent the walls 11 and 12 of the body, and aligned transversely of the body with the ends 32 of the contacts 30. There are offsets 42 in the contacts 31 which are received in notches 43 and 44 adjacent the outer edges of alternate transverse walls 19. Horizontal portions 45 extend inwardly from the offsets 42, and from the inner ends of these portions are upwardly extending arcuate sections 46. These upper parts of the contacts 31 are positioned between alternate adjacent pairs of transverse walls 19 of the body. The upper parts of the contacts 31 also are located alternately on either side of the center line of the body by virture of the offsets 42. The contacts 31 in this manner become positioned so that they are facing and opposite from the contacts 30. At the upper ends of the contacts 31 are bends 47 connecting to outwardly extending horizontal portions 48 and upwardly projecting tabs 49. The horizontal portions 48 and tabs 49 correspond to the portions 39 and of the contacts 30. The bends 38 and 47, as well as the tabs 40 and 49 of the contacts 30 and 31, respectively, are aligned longitudinally of the body 10.

Outside the upper portion of each contact is a spring 50. The lower loop portions 51 of the springs 50 for the contacts 31 rest upon the horizontal parts of these contacts (see FIG. 12). The springs for the other contacts 30 are supported by bosses 52 which project upwardly from the upper surface 34 of the base 29 outwardly of the contacts 30. There are inner upper legs of the springs 50 which bear against the contacts 30 and 31, while the outer legs of the springs engage the longitudinal walls 11 and 12 of the body 10. This biases the upper portions of the contacts inwardly toward the longitudinal axis of the connector. While shown as separate elements, the springs 50 also may be made integral with the contacts 30 and 31.

Extending through the notches and 21 in the walls 19 are guides 54 and 55 for the contacts and 31. As appears in the transverse sectional views of FIGS. 4 and 5, the members 54 and 55 have straight longitudinal grooves 56 and 57 in their lower surfaces, which receive the tabs and 49 at the upper ends of the contacts 30 and 31, respectively. There are lugs 59 and 60 at the ends of the guides 54 and which extend downwardly between parallel transverse walls 61 and 62 adjacent one end, and 63 and 64 adjacent the other end of the body (see FIG. 3). The series of notches 21 and 22 extend through these walls, allowing the guides 54 and 55 to enter the body 10 to be positioned in this manner. The lugs 59 and prevent longitudinal movement of the guides 54 and 55 relative to the body 10. Along the upper surfaces of the guide members 54 and 55 are cam elements 66 and 67, respectively, having vertical cam surfaces facing toward the longitudinal axis of the connector, as may be seen in FIG. 2 and the exploded perspective of FIG. 13. There are raised portions 68 and recessed portions 69 on the cam 66, with similar raised and recessed portions 70 and 71 on the cam 67. The central outer vertical surfaces 72 and 73 of the guides 54 and 55 are inset and engaged by undulant springs 74 and 75. This biases the guides inwardly toward the center of the connector. The notches 21 and 22 are of sufficient width to allow limited lateral movement of the guides 54 and 55 relative to the housing 10, maintained in a straight path, and prevented from shifting longitudinally, by the lugs 59 and 60 between the adjacent parallel walls 61 and 62, and 63 and 64.

Also extending through the notches 20 and 21 in the transverse walls of the body 10 are metal slides 76 and 77. The slides include outer vertical cam faces 78 and 79, respectively, having raised portions 80 and 81 and recessed portions 82 and 83. The slides fit immediately below the upper wall 22 of the body, above the guides 54 and 55, but with their cam surfaces adjacent the cam surfaces of the guides. The inner edges 84 and 85 of the slides 76 and 77 bear against the longitudinal walls 24 and 25 of the slot 23, held there by the springs 74 and 75 acting through the guides 54 and 55. The slides 76 and 77 have ends 86 and 87, respectively, which extend outwardly through complementary openings 88 and 89 in the end wall 14 of the body 10. This provides a means to move the slides 76 and 77 longitudinally from the exterior of the body 10.

Within the body 10 adjacent the end wall 14 is a lock member 90, made of spring material, positioned between the transverse wall 64 and an adjacent transverse wall 91 which is parallel to the wall 64. The lower portion of the lock is of generally triangular configuration, as seen in FIGS. 6 and 14, with a base 92 from which extend upwardly convergent sides 93 and 94. Transversely of the body 10, the base 92 of the lock is substantially the full width of the space between the longitudinal walls 11 and 12. Longitudinally of the body, the thickness of the lock 90 approximates the spacing between the walls 64 and 91.

The base 92 includes outwardly projecting tabs 95 and 96 which extend between the lower edges 97 and 98 of the transverse walls 64 and 91 and the upper surface of the base 29. The walls 64 and 91 stop short of the base 29 so that the tabs 95 and 96 of the base 92 of the lock can fit beneath the lower edges 97 and 98 to help hold the lock in position.

Above the convergent side portions 93 and 94, the lock is bent outwardly and terminates in rounded, generally vertical ends 99 and 100. The latter parts of the lock bear resiliently against short cam surfaces 101 and 102 on the inner edges of the slides 76 and 77 adjacent their outer ends 86 and 87.

The portion 103 of the cam 101 adjacent the end 86 of the slide 76 is longitudinal and relatively close to the central axis of the connector. The opposite end 104 of the cam 101 is farther away from the longitudinal axis of the connector. The two sections 103 and 104 are connected by an inclined portion 105. The cam 102 is similar, having a straight portion 106 adjacent the end 87 of the slide 77 and relatively close to the longitudinal axis, with the opposite end 107 farther away from the longitudinal axis. An inclined part 108 connects the sections 106 and 107 of the cam 102.

The longitudinal slot 23 in the body 10 terminates at the transverse wall 62 adjacent the end 13 of the body. The opposite end of the slot 23 is open, however, extending through the end wall 14. This allows the edge portion of a printed circuit board 109 to be slid longitudinally of the connector through the slot 23 to fit within the central portion of the body.

Before the printed circuit board 109 is admitted into the connector, the slides 76 and 77 are pulled out wardly, or to the right as illustrated. This moves the cams 101 and 102 to positions where the upper ends 99 and of the lock 90 are located in the inner end portions 107 and 104 of the cams. This allows the side parts 93 and 94 of the lock to spring apart, as shown in phantom in FIG. 6, so that they will not interfere with movement of the printed circuit board 109 into the connector through the slot 23.

Also, with the slides 76 and 77 pulled outwardly, the raised portions 80 and 81 of their larger cam faces 78 and 79 are brought into engagement with the raised portions 68 and 70 of the cam elements 66 and 67 of the guides 54 and 55, respectively. This moves the guides 54 and 55 laterally outwardly away from the longitudinal axis of the connector, as seen in phantom in FIG. 3. When this is done, the walls of the lower grooves 56 and 57 in the guides 54 and 55, respectively, reacting against the end tabs 40 and 49 of the contacts 30 and 31, move the contacts back away from the longitudinal axis of the connector, as appears in FIG. 5. This opens a channel through the connector which allows free entry of the edge portion of the printed circuit board 109.

When the printed circuit board has been slid into position through the slot 23, the slides 76 and 77 are moved back inwardly. The upper end 99 and 100 of the lock 90 then become positioned at the outer longitudinal portions 103 and 106 of the cams 101 and 102, respectively. This moves the two side parts 93 and 94 of the lock inwardly so that they overlap the end of the printed circuit board 109 and prevent its removal, as shown in solid lines in FIG. 6.

The inward movement of the slides 76 and 77 also positions their raised portions 80 and 81 adjacent the recesses 69 and 71 of the cam portions 66 and 67 of the guides 54 and 55, respectively. This allows the springs 50 to move the contacts 30 and 31 inwardly toward the central axis of the connector. As a result, the bends 38 and 47 of the contacts 30 and 31 are brought to bear against the opposite sides of the circuit board 109, making electrical contact with the conductors 110 on the circuit board (see FIG. 4).

The linear travel of the slides 76 and 77 to move the ends 99 and 100 of the lock 90 from the cam ends 104 and 107 to the opposite cam portions 103 and 106 is less than that required to move the raised surfaces of the cams 76 and 77 out of interengagement with the raised portions of the cams 66 and 67 of the guides 54 and 55. In other words, before the raised cam surfaces 80 of the slide 76 disengage the raised cam surfaces 68 of the adjacent guide 54, the end 99 of the lock 90 will have been moved inwardly. Similarly, the end 100 of the other side of the lock 90 will be moved inwardly prior to the movement of the raised cam surfaces 81 of the slide 77 to the recess 71 of the cam 67 of the guide 55. This effect can be seen in FIG. l5, where the slides 76 and 77 are in an intermediate position with the lock moved inwardly, but the guides 54 and 55 held outwardly.

This means that no electrical engagement of the contacts is possible until the printed circuit board is fully inserted into the connector. If the printed circuit board is not pushed all the way into the connector, the slides cannot be moved a sufficient distance to release the contacts. This is because the lock will engage the sides of the circuit board and resist further movement of the slides, and the contacts will be held away from the circuit board. Only after the circuit board has advanced far enough to permit the lock to close will the contacts be allowed to bear against the sides of the cir cuit board. Therefore, whenever there is engagement between the contacts and the printed circuit board, there is assurance that the contacts are mated properly with the circuit board, each engaging its corresponding conductor. Improper mating of the connector and printed circuit board thereby is prevented.

The foregoing detailed description is to be clearly understood as given by way of illustration and example only, the spirit and scope of this invention being limited solely by the appended claims.

1 claim:

1. An electrical connector comprising a body,

said body having a slot adapted to receive an edge portion of a printed circuit board so that said edge portion can enter said body. said slot having an open outer end through which said printed circuit board can be moved, a plurality of contacts in said body, and an actuating means, said actuating means including means for moving said contacts between a retracted position relatively remote from said slot in which no engagement is made with a printed circuit board in said slot and an extended position relatively adjacent said slot for engaging said printed circuit board, and lock means adjacent said open outer end of said slot and movable between a released position in which a printed circuit board is movable in said slot, and a locked position for retaining such a printed circuit board in said slot, said lock means including a duality of members relatively spaced apart from each other when said lock means is in said released position for allowing a printed circuit board to enter said slot, and relatively adjacent each other when said lock means is in said locked position, said duality of members extending into said slot and overlapping the end of said printed circuit board when said lock means is in said locked position and said printed circuit board is entirely received in said slot, and means for preventing said contacts from moving from said retracted position to said extended position prior to said movement of said lock means from said released position to said locked position, said duality of levers when said means is moved from said released position toward said locked position being engageable with the side of a printed circuit board that is in said slot but not entirely received therein. for thereby preventing further movement of said lock means toward said locked position and preventing said actuating means from moving said contacts to said extended position. 2. A device as recited in claim 1 which said actuating means includes a movable member having a surface having a predetermined contour,

said lock means engaging said surface for movement of said lock means in accordance with the contour of said surface. 3. An electrical connector comprising a body.

said body having a slot adapted to receive an edge portion of a printed circuit board so that said edge portion can enter said body, said slot having an open outer end through which said printed circuit board can be moved, a plurality of contacts in said body,

said contacts being in a row adjacent said slot, and an actuating means, said actuating means including means for moving said contacts between a retracted position relatively remote from said slot in which no engagement is made with a printed circuit board in said slot and an extended position relatively adjacent said slot for engaging said printed circuit board, said means for moving said contacts including resilient means biasing said contacts toward said extended position thereof, an elongated member substantially parallel to said slot and movable between a position remote from said slot and a position adjacent thereto, said contacts having portions engaged by said member, whereby said member can move said contacts to said retracted position and can release said contacts for movement to said extended position thereof, means for permitting said member to move a limited distance laterally for allowing said movement of said member between said remote and adjacent positions thereof, means for preventing substantial longitudinal movement of said member, resilient means biasing said member to said position thereof adjacent said slot, an elongated slide substantially parallel to said slot, said slide projecting outwardly beyond said body at a location adjacent said open outer end of said slot,

means guiding said slide for movement longitudinally thereof while preventing substantial lateral movement thereof, said member and said slide having cooperative cam means for causing said slide to move said member laterally upon such longitudinal movement of said slide, and lock means movable between a released position in which a printed circuit board is movable in said slot, and a locked position for retaining such a printed circuit board in said slot, said slide including a cam surface engaging said lock means for movement of said lock means between said released and locked positions thereof,

said lock means including a member having an end resiliently biased into engagement with said cam surface for following the contour of said cam surface upon said longitudinal movement of said slide, and means for preventing said contacts from moving from said retracted position to said extended position prior to said movement of said lock means from said released position to said locked position.

4. An electrical connector comprising a body,

said body having an aperture adapted to receive a portion of a printed circuit board,

a plurality of contacts in said body movable between retracted positions relatively remote from said aperture in which no engagement is made with a printed circuit board in said aperture and extended positions relatively adjacent said aperture for engaging said printed circuit board,

and an actuating means,

said actuating means including resilient means on the sides of said contacts remote from said aperture for biasing said contacts toward said extended positions thereof,

means for moving said contacts to said retracted positions in opposition to said resilient means,

means for releasing said contacts for permitting said resilient means to move said contacts to said extended positions, lock means movable between a released position in which a printed circuit board is movable in said aperture, and a locked position for retaining such a printed circuit board in said aperture, and means for preventing said contacts from moving said retracted positions to said extended positions prior to said movement of said lock means from said released position to said locked position. 5. A device as recited in claim 4 in which said actuating means includes movable cam means, and means interconnecting said cam means and said contacts for causing said contacts to move between said extended and retracted positions thereof upon one increment of movement of said cam means, and releasing said contacts for movement by said resilient means from said retracted to said extended position upon a different increment of movement of said cam means. 6. A device as recited in claim 4 in which said actuating means includes 5 a movable member,

said movable member including a first cam, and a guide member engaging said contacts,

said guide member including a second cam, said movable member being movable relative to said guide member for causing said first cam to react against said second cam for causing said guide member to move so as to move said contacts between said extended and retracted positions thereof, and for releasing said contacts for movement to said extended position thereof by said resilient means.

7. A device as recited in claim 6 including in addition resilient means biasing said guide member in a direction in which said guide member will so release said contacts.

8. A device as recited in claim 7 in which said movable member is an elongated longitudinally movable element,

and said guide member is an elongated longitudinally fixed element,

said guide member having recess means therein for receiving portions of said contacts,

said guide member being laterally movable in response to the reaction of said first and second cams.

9. A device as recited in claim 8 in which said recess means in said guide member is an elongated groove facing said contacts,

said contacts having distal end portions received in said groove for thereby providing for movement of said contacts by said guide member.

10. A device as recited in claim 9 in which said contacts are in opposed rows on either side of said aperture.

11. A device as recited in claim 4 in which said aperture is a slot allowing an edge portion of a printed circuit board to enter said body, said slot having an open outer end through which said printed circuit board can be moved.

12. A device as recited in claim 11 in which said contacts are in a row adjacent said slot,

said actuating means including a member movable between a position remote from said slot and a position adjacent thereto, said contacts having portions engaged by said member, whereby said member can move said contacts to said retracted position and can release said contacts for movement to said extended position thereof.

13. A device as recited in claim 12 in which said member is an elongated element substantially 60 parallel to said slot,

and including means for permitting said member to move a limited distance laterally for allowing said movement of said member between said remote and adjacent positons thereof, 65 and means for preventing substantial longitudinal movement of said member.

14. A device as recited in claim 13 in which said actuating means includes an elongated slide substantially parallel to said slot,

and means guiding said slide for movement longitudinally thereof while preventing substantial lateral movement thereof, said member and said slide having cooperative cam means for causing said slide to move said member laterally upon such longitudinal movement of said slide.

15. A device as recited in claim 14 including in addition resilient means biasing said member to said position thereof adjacent said slot.

16. A device as recited in claim 14 in which there are two rows of said contacts positioned one on either side of said slot, two of said members positioned one on either side of said slot, and two of said siides positioned one on either side of said slot.

17. A device as recited in claim 14 in which said slide projects outwardly beyond said body at a location adjacent said open outer end of said slot.

18. A device as recited in claim 17 in which said slide includes means engaging said lock means for movement of said lock means between said released and locked positions thereof.

19. A device as recited in claim 11 in which said body includes a plurality of spaced parallel transverse walls defining a plurality of spaces within said body,

said contacts being positioned individually in said spaces.

20. A device as recited in claim 19 in which said contacts include portions extending to the exterior of said body for connection with adjacent conductors, said contacts being in two rows at the exterior of said body and contoured so that they are in said row within said body adjacent said slot.

21. A device as recited in claim 20 in which said body includes a base portion,

said portions of said contacts extending through said base portion in said two rows,

said portions of said contacts being aligned with said transverse walls said contacts having offset parts so as to provide additional portions within said spaces,

said transverse walls being notched adjacent said base portion,

said offset parts being received in said notches.

UNITED :STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3 2 a Dated June 18, 1974 Merlin L. Crane Inventor(s) It is cer 'tified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 8, line 12, after "said", secondoccu'rrence,

insert lock line 21 after "claim 1'' insert in Signed and sealed this 26th day of November 1974.

(SEAL) Attest:

.McCOY M. GIBSON JR.

Attesting Officer C. MARSHALL DANN Commissioner of Patents FORM PC4050 0-69) A uscoMM-oc scene-P69 U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 9 93 o

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US3553630 *Jan 29, 1968Jan 5, 1971Elco CorpLow insertion force connector
US3611259 *Jul 31, 1969Oct 5, 1971Bunker RamoZero insertion force receptacle for flat circuit bearing elements
US3638167 *Apr 13, 1970Jan 25, 1972Bunker RamoControlled insertion force receptacle for flat circuit bearing elements
US3744005 *Jul 2, 1971Jul 3, 1973Berg Electronics IncZero force type connector block
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *IBM Technical Bulletin, Gustafson, Low Stress Connector, 4 1968, Vol. 10, No. 11, p. 1656.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3897991 *Feb 15, 1974Aug 5, 1975Amp IncZero insertion force connector
US3899234 *Mar 20, 1974Aug 12, 1975Amp IncLow insertion force cam actuated printed circuit board connector
US3990761 *Aug 11, 1975Nov 9, 1976Gte Sylvania IncorporatedZero force connector assembly
US4021091 *Jun 13, 1975May 3, 1977International Telephone And Telegraph CorporationZero force printed circuit board connector
US4026014 *Jun 26, 1975May 31, 1977Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.Method of making connector assembly for printed wiring board
US4060300 *Jan 31, 1977Nov 29, 1977Gte Sylvania IncorporatedLongitudinally actuated zero force connector
US4080027 *Jul 30, 1976Mar 21, 1978Gte Sylvania IncorporatedElectrical contact and connector
US4080032 *Apr 13, 1977Mar 21, 1978Amp IncorporatedZero insertion force connector
US4085990 *Mar 25, 1977Apr 25, 1978Gte Sylvania, IncorporatedLongitudinally actuated zero force connector
US4169644 *Oct 26, 1977Oct 2, 1979Bonhomme F RElectrical connection devices
US4178053 *Feb 13, 1978Dec 11, 1979Ncr CorporationZero-insertion force electrical connector
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Classifications
U.S. Classification439/267
International ClassificationH01R12/18, H01R12/16
Cooperative ClassificationH01R12/89
European ClassificationH01R23/68B4A