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Publication numberUS3818665 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 25, 1974
Filing dateDec 1, 1972
Priority dateDec 1, 1972
Publication numberUS 3818665 A, US 3818665A, US-A-3818665, US3818665 A, US3818665A
InventorsRogers W
Original AssigneeJohns Manville
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Block-type wall assembly and method of constructing the same
US 3818665 A
Abstract
A method of fastening sheet material such as a decorative panel to the planar surface of a block-type wall and the ultimately constructed block-type wall assembly is disclosed herein. The block-type wall is comprised of a plurality of substantially rectangular blocks such as masonry blocks which are spaced apart from one another and held together by mortar type material disposed within substantially all the spaces between the blocks, with the exception of specific ones thereof. These specific unmortared spaces are provided for receiving carefully designed fastening members which are preferably held within the specific spaces by additional mortar type material. In this manner, battens or other such objects can be readily and positively secured to the fastening members or inserts and therefore held against the planar surface of the block-type wall in an economical, rapid, uncomplicated and reliable fashion.
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[ BLOCK-TYPE WALL ASSEMBLY AND METHOD OF CONSTRUCTING THE SAME June 25, 1974 Primary ExaminerAlfred C. Perham Attorney, Agent, or FirmRobert M. Krone; Stephen [75] Inventor: 22:11am M. Rogers, Jr., Littleton, C Shear [73] Assignee: Johns-Manville Corporation,

Greenwood Village, NY. [57] ABSTRACT [22] Filed; 1, 1972 A method of fastening sheet material such as a decorative panel to the planar surface of a. block-type wall l l PP 311,197 and the ultimately constructed block-type wall assembly is disclosed herein. The block-type wall is com- 1521 US. c1 52/375, 52/508 52/714 prised a plurality Of Substantially rectangular blcks 52/741 such as masonry blocks which are spaced apart from 151 1 1m. 01 E04b 2/42 one another and held wgether by mortar type material 581 Field of Search 52/366 372-375 disposed within substantially all the Spaces between 52/714 508 1 the blocks, with the exception of specific ones thereof.

These specific unmortared spaces are provided for re- [56] References Cited ceivmg carefully des gned fastening members wh1ch are preferably held within the speclfic spaces by add1- UNITED STATES PATENTS tional mortar type material. In this manner, battens or 936,322 10/1909 Jeffers 52/373 th r uch bjects can be readily and positively 53. 1,343,801 8/1920 Hudson 52/373 Cured to the fastening members or inserts and there l ci ilifs clli llllllllllllllllll fore held against the planar surface of the block-type 2 101 952 12/1937 01m11.11111""Z11113111117527551 x wall in an economical rapid uncomplicated and Tell 2.117.833 5/l938 Wellner 52/698 x able fashlon- 2,309,420 H1943 Taylor 1 52/714 X 3.545152 12/1970 Knohl 52/372 2 Clams 7 Drawmg F'gures 11 I2 '4 22 10 l 12 l l l l l -11 11 11 1 11 11 L I i 11 1| 1| 1 11 41/ ,2 l l l l l l/ l l l l1 1' 11 1 11 1 J F i 1 11 11 l l l l l 1 1 11 1| 11 v A a 11 11 4M" i BLOCK-TYPE WALL ASSEMBLY AND METHOD OF CONSTRUCTING THE SAME BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates generally to wall assemblies and more particularly to a block-type wall assembly and a method of attaching objects such as decorative sheet material to a block-type wall comprising part of the assembly.

With continuous growth in the building industry and with rising labor and material costs attributed thereto, it has been increasingly important to find ways of slowing down the inflationary'trend without jeopardizing quality of construction. This is especially true in high rise structures where labor is so costly. For example, one large expense has been the labor cost in reliably fastening decorative sheet material to masonry or other such blocks often used in framing high rise structures.

Heretofore, there have been many suggested methods of attaching sheet material or other such articles to masonry blocks, the more reliable ones, in many cases, being economically prohibitive. One method suggested by the prior art is to provide a prepoured concrete.

block having a batten or other such article fastening means embedded therein in a prefabricated fashion. While this arrangement may be reliable in its construction, it is relatively expensive to make, especially where different sized blocks are required for varying uses. Other methods such as, for example, driving hardened steel nails or other such means directly into the masonry block have been suggested but are subject to pull-out and therefore, not completely satisfactory.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the foregoing, an object of the present invention is to provide a novel block-type wall assembly which is economically constructed and which provides reliable fastening means for attaching articles such as battens thereto.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel method of attaching decorative sheet material or other articles to a block-type wall in an economical, reliable and uncomplicated fashion.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention overcomes many of the deficiencies of the prior art and achieves the foregoing objects as well as other objects and features by providing a novel, economical, reliable and uncomplicated method of positively attaching sheet material or other articles to the planar surface of a block-type wall as well as providing the ultimately constructed block-type wall assembly. In accordance with the present invention, carefully designed fastening members or inserts are disposed within predetermined unmortared spaces between adjacent masonry or other such blocks and, because of the particular design of the fastening members, the latter are reliably held in place. This procedure is preferably accomplished during initial construction of the block wall and can be done in an economical, reliable and rapid fashion. Once the fastening members are fixed at various predetermined points, articles, such as battens can be readily and positively attached thereto.

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BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a partially broken away frontal view of a block-type wall assembly constructed in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a fastening member constructed in accordance with the present invention and utilized in the wall assembly of FIG. 1. I

FIG. 3 is an enlarged perspective view of a section of the block-type wall assembly of FIG. I.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged top sectional view illustrating the fastening arrangement utilized in the wall assembly of FIG. 1. I

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a modified fastening member of the present invention.

FIG. 6 is a top view of the fastening member illustrated in FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is an enlarged top view of a section of the wall assembly shown in FIG. 1, however illustrating the modified fastening member shown in FIGS. 5 and 6.,

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Turning now to the drawings, wherein like components are designated by like reference numerals throughout the various figures, a block-type wall assembly, constructed in accordance with tbe present invention, is illustrated in FIG. 1 and generally designated by the reference numeral 10. The assembly is comprised of a block wall 11 constructed of a plurality of masonry or other such rectangular blocks 12 which are preferably equally spaced apart and held together in a brick-laid fashion by means of mortar or other such material 14 disposed within the spaces. In this manner, the common frontal surfaces 16 of the blocks together define a planar surface to which a decorative panel 18 or other article can be attached in a novel, economical, reliable and uncomplicated fashion. This is achieved by utilizing a plurality of carefully designed fastening members which, as will be seen hereinafter, are disposed within unmortared spaces between predetermined adjacent blocks in an uncomplicated and reliable manner. Once the fastening members are secured between the blocks, various articles such as, for example, hanger bars or battens may be readily and positively attached thereto for securement to the planar surface of block wall 11. v I

In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1, the fastening members, generally designated by the reference numeral 20, are positioned so as to define-a plurality of vertically spaced rows along the planar surface of the block wall. In this manner, vertically spaced and horizontally extending battens 22 may be easily fastened to the attaching members. Thereafter, the decorative panel 18 may be conventionally held to the battens for covering the block wall.

Turning to FIG. 2, attention is directed to fastening member 20, which is preferably integrally constructed of sheet metal and roll formed or otherwise formed to the desired configuration. As illustrated and in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, the fastening member includes a pair of spaced apart and substantially parallel leg portions 24 which are preferably rectangular in configuration. The leg portions are joined together at their forward most edges by a frontal end portion or face 26, which is also preferably rectangular in shape, but substantially narrower than the leg portions, the frontal end portion being adapted to receive fastening means for attachment of articles thereto.

Fastening member also includes a pair of flanged portions 28 respectively connected with the rearward most edges of leg portions 24. As illustrated best in FIG. 4, each of the flanged portions extends outwardly at an angle from its respective leg portion, the angle preferably being slightly greater than 90. As will be seen hereinafter, these flanged portions are provided for reliably holding the fastening member within an unmortared space between predetermined adjacent blocks.

Turning to FIGS. 3 and 4, the manner in which a given fastening member 20 is disposed within an unmortared space between predetermined adjacent blocks 12 is shown. As best illustrated in FIG. 3, a typical masonry block includes a plurality of 'centrally lo cated and longitudinally spaced cavities 30 extending vertically therethrough and partial cavities 32 located at opposite ends of the block. In any given row of blocks, adjacent blocks are positioned relative to one another so as to leave a predetermined space 34 therebetween, as best shown in FIG. 4. As stated above, in most cases, these spaces are initially filled with mortartype material during construction of block wall 11.

However, as also stated above, preselected spaces are ately positioned adjacent the side of one block before positioning an adjacent block in a given row. The fastening members are positioned such that frontal end portion or face 26 of each is preferably parallel and substantially flush with the common frontal surfaces 16 of the adjacent blocks and such that rearward most flanged portions 28 extend behind rearwa'rdly located portions 36 of the adjacent blocks within partial cavities 32 (see FIG. 4). In order to further secure the fastening member in this position, mortar type material 38 is preferably provided within initially open space 34 between leg portions 24 and the adjacent blocks. In addition, mortar type material 40 may be provided between the flanged portions 28 and rearwardly located portions 36 of the block. While the mortar type material, designated 38 and 40, may be appropriately located in any suitable manner, it is preferably coated or buttered to the fastening member before the latter is inserted into the otherwise open space 34. This, of course, facilitates the procedure.

With fastening members 20 designed and positioned in the foregoing manner, it should be apparent that readily accessible and reliably held means are provided for attaching foreign articles such as battens to the planar surface of block wall 11. As illustrated best in FIG. 4, a given batten is positioned against the planar surface so as to engage against the frontal end portions or faces 26 of aligned fastening members 20. Screws 42 or other such means are then provided through the batten and end portions 26 so as to extend between leg portions 24. In this regard, the threaded portion of each screw 42 is preferably dimensioned so as to cut into leg portions 24 as it is inserted therebetween. This, of

course, provides additional holding power. The battens or other such articles, if constructed of metal, could be welded to the fastening members.

Once the battens 22 are attached in the foregoing manner, the decorative panel or panels 18 may be readily attached thereto in a conventional manner. In fact, as stated above, articles other than battens may be readily held to the planar walled surface of wall 11 by attaching these articles directly to the fastening members 20 in the same manner just described.

In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the fastening member 20 preferably extends the entire length of initially unmortared space 34, as best seen in FIG. 3, and, of course, is slightly narrower than the space so as to leave room for motar type material therebetween. In an actual working embodiment, the fastening members are roll formed or otherwise shaped and cut to approximately 7 inch lengths, which is generally the height of standard masonry blocks, and the overall thickness is'approximately 1/4 inch, thereby leaving sufficient room in the normal spacing of approximately 3/8 inch between the blocks. Fastening members 20 could, however, be substantially shorter in length and positioned horizontally between rows of blocks such that flanged portions 28 enter within aligned cavities 30 of adjacent upper and lower blocks.

With block-type wall assembly 10 constructed in the foregoing manner, attention is now directed to the way in which it is preferably assembled. Specifically, individual rows of the masonry block 12 are laid in the conventional brick-type fashion with mortar type material disposed between adjacent blocks. However, various spaces between preselected adjacent blocks are left unmortared so that the attaching members 20 may be inserted therein. Upon laying a given row of blocks which includes the open or unmortared spaces, the attaching members may be inserted therein from the top of the space prior to laying the next subsequent row of blocks. By the same token, the fastening member can be placed into position during assembly of a given row. More specifically, a fastening member can be positioned adjacent one block before the next block in a given row is placed into position.

As stated above, the fastening members are preferably coated or buttered with mortar or other such material prior to insertion into the spaces. In this regard, also prior to insertion of the fastening members, additional mortar type material is preferably disposed within and at the bottom of the space, directly on top of an underlying block. In this manner, when the fastening member is placed into position, the prelocated mortar material tends to ooze between leg portions 24 and directly behind frontal end portion 26. In this manner, the fastening members are further prevented from moving inwardly in response to force applied to the frontal end portion 26 when a screw or other such means is inserted therein. After the block wall has been completed or during construction thereof, the various articles such as battens 22 may be readily attached to the fastening members in the aforedescribed manner.

From the foregoing, it should be readily apparent that fastening members 24 may be reliably held in place in wall 11 with very little deviation in assembling the wall and without appreciably changing the general apprearance of the wall. In addition, while the fastening members have been shown and described in a vertical space between adjacent blocks of a given row, it should be understood that the same could be provided in a horizontal space between adjacent rows.

Turning now to FIGS. 7, attention is directed to a slightly modified fastening member as generally designated by the reference numeral 44. Fastening member 44 includes spaced apart and parallel leg portions 46 and rearward flanged portions 48 similar to previously described leg portions 24 and flanged portions 28 of fastening member 20. The fastening member 44 also includes a frontal end portion or face 50 which is adapted to receive screws or other such fastening means. The frontal end portion in turn, includes a pair of forward most flanged portions 52 which, as illustrated best in FIG. 6, are respectively connected to and extend outwardly from the forward most edges of leg portions 46 at an angle of preferably 90 and join the outer most edges of face 50. In this manner, when fastening member 44 is inserted into an unmortared space between preselected adjacent blocks, as illustrated in FIG. 7, frontal end portion 50 and flange portions 52 rest substantially flush against and parallel with the frontal surfaces of the adjacent blocks. In this manner, when a screw or other such fastening means is provided in the manner shown in FIG. 7, the flange portions 52 prevent the attaching member from moving into the space. Apart from this difference, fastening member 44 would preferably be provided within an unmortared space in the same manner set forth above with respect to fastening member 20.

I claim:

1. A block-type wall assembly, comprising:

a. a plurality of substantially rectangular blocks substantially equally spaced apart from one another and including common frontal surfaces which together define a substantially planar surface;

b. mortar-type material disposed within substantially all the spaces between said blocks with the exception of specific vertically extending spaces between predetermined adjacent blocks in given rows, said specific spaces together defining a plurality of vertically spaced and horizontally extending rows of such spaces;

0. a plurality of integrally formed fastening members equal in number to the number of said specific spaces between predetermined adjacent blocks, each of said fastening members including:

i. a pair of substantially parallel leg portions spaced apart from one another a distance slightly less than the width of said specific spaces,

ii. an end portion connected with and joining substantially the entire lengths of adjacent ends of said leg portions, said end portion including a pair of frontal flange portions extending outwardly at angles from said leg portions, and

iii. a pair of rearward flange portions respectively connected with opposite adjacent ends of said leg portions and extending outwardly at angles therefrom;

d. each of said fastening members being disposed within a respective one of said specific spaces such that said frontal flange portions abut against the frontal surfaces of those predetermined blocks defining said specific space, such that said end portion protrudes slightly outwardly from said planar walled surface and such that said rearward flange portions respectively extend behind rearwardly located portions of the predetermined blocks defining said specific space;

e. mortar-type material disposed between the leg portions of said fastening members and adjacent surfaces of those predetermined blocks defining said specific spaces;

f. mortar-type material disposed between the rearward flange portions of said fastening members and said rearwardly located portions of said predetermined blocks;

g. a plurality of longitudinal support members adapted for supporting sheet material adjacent said planar walled surface, said support members being horizontally positioned adjacent said walled surface in respective engagement with the end portions of predetermined groups of said fastening members;

h. means for holding said support members to said end portions, said holding means including threaded screws, the threaded portions of which extend through said support members and end portions and between the leg portions of said fastening members, said threaded portions being dimensioned so as to cut into said leg portions for further securement to said fastening members; and

. sheet material positioned against and held to said support members so as to cover said planar walled surface.

2. A method of attaching sheet material to the planar surface of a block-type wall comprised of a plurality of substantially rectangular blocks spaced apart from one another, including frontal surfaces defining said walled surface, and including motar type material disposed within substantially all of the spaces between said blocks with the exception of specific spaces between predetermined adjacent blocks, said method comprising:

a. providing at least two fastening members, each of which includes:

i. a pair of spaced-apart and substantially parallel leg portions,

ii. an end portion connected with and joining adjacent ends of said leg portions,

iii. a back pair of flange portions respectively connected with opposite adjacent ends of said leg portions and extending outwardly at angles therefrom, and

iv. a pair of front flange portions respectively connected with the joined ends of said leg portions and extending outwardly therefrom;

b. positioning each of said fastening members within a respective one of said specific spaces such that said end portion is substantially parallel with said planar surface, such that said back flange portions respectively extend behind rearwardly located portions of adjacent blocks defining said specific spaces and such that said front flange portions are positioned substantially to abut against the frontal portions of predetermined adjacent blocks;

c. placing mortar-type material between the leg portions of said fastening members and adjacent surfaces of those blocks defining the specific spaces within which the fastening members are positioned;

providing threaded screws each having a threaded portion of a greater outer crosssectional diameter than the space between the leg portions of said fastening members, and

ii. positioning said threaded portions through said support member and end portions and between said leg portions so that said threaded portion cuts into said leg portions; and

g. fastening sheet material to said support member.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US936322 *Sep 2, 1908Oct 12, 1909William Morris JeffersWall-plug.
US1348801 *Jun 11, 1918Aug 3, 1920Henry HudsonInsert for concrete and the like, to receive nails and other fasteners, or building elements
US1682662 *Aug 20, 1926Aug 28, 1928Butterworth Samuel DNailing block
US1685491 *Jul 22, 1927Sep 25, 1928Johnson Carl MNailing strip or block
US2101952 *Feb 14, 1935Dec 14, 1937Christian Olsen AndersBuilding construction
US2117833 *Mar 15, 1937May 17, 1938Wellner George WFabricated finished plaster construction
US2309420 *Apr 11, 1941Jan 26, 1943Taylor Francis MFurring bracket
US3545152 *Jul 3, 1968Dec 8, 1970Illinois Tool WorksConcrete insert
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3924056 *Dec 13, 1973Dec 2, 1975Locicero James TSlotted masonry wall structure and metal stud therefor
US4693657 *Mar 31, 1986Sep 15, 1987Voplex CorporationAutomotive panel bracket
US7762033 *Mar 29, 2006Jul 27, 2010Scott Robert EWall construction system and method
US20070245660 *Mar 29, 2006Oct 25, 2007Scott Robert EWall construction system and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/375, 52/745.9, 52/508, 52/714
International ClassificationE04C1/39, E04C1/00, E04F13/08
Cooperative ClassificationE04C1/39, E04F13/0805
European ClassificationE04F13/08B2B, E04C1/39