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Publication numberUS3818676 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 25, 1974
Filing dateSep 1, 1972
Priority dateSep 7, 1971
Publication numberUS 3818676 A, US 3818676A, US-A-3818676, US3818676 A, US3818676A
InventorsDumbill C, Russell F
Original AssigneeBrown & Williamson Tobacco
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Packaging machines
US 3818676 A
Abstract
A packaging machine for assembling packages consisting of an inner shell into which the package contents are inserted, the loaded inner shell being inserted into an outer shell. The machine comprises vertical magazines for the empty shells, control means, means for extracting the empty shells from the magazines, means for erecting said shell and for feeding the contents into the inner shell and the inner shell into the outer shell and means for conveying the complete package to a further work station. All the movements imparted to the parts of the package and to the complete package are effected by means operating rectilinearly and all the movements may be effected sequentially by fluid operated means controlled by a fluid logic circuit. Means may also be provided to automatically orient each package into a particular position during its travel through the conveying means and means may be provided whereby movement of a package through the machine controls the sequence of operations.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Russell et al.

[4 June 25, 1974 [541 "PACKAGING MACHINES [75] Inventors: Frederick Russell; Cyril G. Dumbill,

both of Southampton, England [73] Assignee: Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation, Louisville, Ky.

22 Filed: Sept. 1, 1972 21 Appl. N 285,656

52 us. c1. 53/173, 53/169 51 Int. Cl 1365b 19/18 53 Field 61 Search 53/169, 186, 170, 173; 137/814, 1342; 198/33 AB, 33 AC; 193/43 R, 43 B [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,966,020 12/1960 Bacsak 53/185 X 3,347,251 10/1967 Gobhai 137/314 X 3,412,652 11/1968 McIntyre 53/186 3,425,373 2/1969 Miller et al..; 112/219 B 3,441,996 5/1969 Boothe 29/157.1 R X 3,721,256 3/1973 Barnard. 137/814 X Primary Examiner-Travis S. McGehee Assistant Examiner-John Sipos Attorney, Agent, or Firm-'-Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow & Garrett [5 7] ABSTRACT A packaging machine for assembling packages consisting of an inner shell into which the package contents are inserted, the loaded inner shell being inserted into an outer shell. The machine comprises vertical magazines for the empty shells, control means, means for extracting the empty shells from the magazines, means for erecting said shell and for feeding the contents into the inner shell and the inner shell into the outer shell and means for conveying the complete package to a further work station. All the movements imparted to v the parts of the package and to the complete package are effected by means operating rectilinearly and all the movements may be effected sequentially by fluid operated means controlled by a fluid logic circuit. Means may also be provided to automatically orient each package into a particular position during its travel through the conveying means and means may be provided whereby movement of a package through the machine controls the sequence of operations.

16 Claims, 15 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJUNZEISM SHEET 1 0F 5 FIG].

PATENTEDJUNZS m4 sum 2 or 5 FIG. 2b

FIG. 20

FIG.3.

PAIENTEDJIINZSIQH 3,818,676

SHEET 5 BF 5 FIGBG.

PACKAGING MACHINES This invention relates to improvements in packaging machines, especially to machines for assembling packages in the form of so-called double-shell packs the contents of which can be single objects or a group of objects which may be for example rod-like such as cigarettes or the like. t v

A double-shell pack consists of a preformed hollow rectangular tube, the inner shell, into which is inserted an object, or a bundle of objects such as cigarettes, which may be prewrapped, for example in a foil wrapping, this rectangular inner tube or shell together with its enclosed contents, then'being inserted into another hollow rectangular tube, the outer shell, and thus forming a complete package.

According to the invention, there is provided a packaging machine for producing a package comprising an inner shell containing the contents of the package and an outer shell which contains theinner shell, said machine including a first, verticalmagazine .containing inner shells and a second vertical magazine containing outer shells, control means, means for extracting the inner and outer shells from the lower end of each magazine, means for erecting said shells, means for feeding the contents of the package into the inner shell, means for moving the inner shell and contents into the outer shell and means for conveying the assembled package to a further package handling station.

In a particular embodiment of the invention, all the movements imparted to the individual parts of the package and the assembled package by the control means are effected by means operating rectilinearly, and are preferably produced by using pneumatically operated cylinders with pistons which are automatically controlled by a mechanism employing fluidic logic circuits. Such a machine is particularly suitable for use with a conventional pre-packing machine.

One embodiment of the invention will now be described by way of an example and with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which for the purpose of the ensuing description inessential parts have been omitted for clarity.

In the drawings;

FIG. I illustrates the basic sequence of the packaging operation;

FIG. 2(a) thru 2(d) illustrate the shell opening and erecting sequence;

FIG. 3 is a schematic plan view ofthe packaging machine below the outlets of the shell magazine;

FIG. 4 is a side elevation showing the insertion of the package contents into the inner shell;

FIGS. 5 and 6 are perspective diagrams of the package orienting arrangement;

FIG. 7 is a perspective diagram showing the discharge of a package from the orienting arrangement;

FIGS. 80 and 8b illustrate a back pressure jet;

FIGS. 9a and 9b are diagrams of a turbulence amplifier; and

FIG; 10 illustrates the means which guide one part of the package into another.

As shown in FIG. 1, a typical pack consists of two rectangular tubes. The tubes or shells are made on special machinery, being creased at the corners and supplied to the user in a flattened state.

The inner shell 1 has to be erected, i.e., changed from its flattened state to a rectangular open tube before the product 2 can be slid into the inner shell.

The outer shell 3 is also supplied in a flattened state. It also has to be erected and then the inner shell 1, complete with contents 2 (the product) is slid into it and FIG. 1 illustrates schematically the sequence of these operations.

The flattened shells l and 3 are loaded into magazines or hoppers 4 (FIG. 2) which deliver the shells l and'3 to the machine and preferably the hoppers 4 (FIG. 2) which deliver the shells l and 3 to the machine and preferably the hoppers 4 for the flattened shells are made from a transparent plastics material for visibility and lightness and they may be adjustable for shell size, within limits. Ideally they are separate components, being attached to the baseplate for example by quickrelease toggle clamps and located by dowels. This quick-release facility greatly assists clearing a jam if it occurs or the changing one type of shell for another.

The flattened shells 1, 3 are placed in their respective I magazines or hoppers 4, as shown in FIG. 2a, and also as shown in FIGS. 2a are supported by four lipped plate springs 5 allowing sufficient space for the removal from the stack and opening and erection of the bottom shell. Situated above the lipped plate springs 5 are two tapered pieces or deflector members 6, which narrow the width of the hopper, thus making the shells stack at an angle to the horizontal.

When leaving the tapered pieces 6 thelower shells 1, 3 separate on one side as shown in FIG. 2a. This as shown in FIG. 2b is to allow space for a slight buckling of the shell which is being withdrawn from the base of the stack by the suction disc 7 seen in FIGS. 2c and 2dv which is mounted on the end of the piston rod 8 of a pneumatic cylinder (not shown). As the suction disc 7 and shell are descending, an arm 9, attached to the piston rod 8, situated below the suction disc 7 operates a shell opening lever 10 which rotates about a fixed pivot 11 to open and erect the shell as shown in FIG. 2d. At this stage the shell is retained in position by suction and is ready to receive the product.

The mechanism described above presents an open ended hollow inner shell 1 to the product. A similar arrangement opens and erects the outer shell 3 to receive the filled inner shell 1. The product 2 may be slid into the shell 1 by any convenient means which provides rectilinear motion of a pusher. In this particular embodiment and as shown n FIGS. 3 and 4 a pusher 12 on the end of a piston rod of a pneumatic cylinder 13 serves this purpose; the product 2 ispositioned in front of the pusher 12 by a vertically reciprocable platform 14 forming part of the delivery mechanism of a prepacking machine. A suitable aperture 15 is provided in the base of the machine toallow the platform 14 to deliver the contents 2 to the pusher'12.

It is necessary to provide guides for the entry of the contents 2 'into the inner shell 1 to prevent the contents from catching on the edges of the shell and preferably a guide is provided for each of the four edges of the mouth of the inner shellQEach consists, in this embodiment, of a flexible flat spring 16 as shown in FIG. 10. Normally, the springs 16 stand erect to allow the shell to be drawn vertically downwards past them. As the contents 2 are pushed towards the shell 1, the springs 16 are deflected into the mouth of the shell 1 thus providing the necessary guidance. When the contents 2 are fully inserted in the shell 1 the springs 16 regain their normal position, leaving the inner shell free to be moved sideways into the outer shell 3.

Similar guide springs 16 are fitted at the outer shell filling position, to allow easy entry of the inner shell into the outer shell.

At the end of its stroke, the pusher 12 of the cylinder 13 remains in its forward position to act as a side guide for the inner shell 1 while it is entering the outer shell 3.

The sliding of the inner shell 1 into the outer shell 3 is performed by a second pusher 17 on the piston rod of a pneumatic cylinder 18.

It will be seen from FIG. 3 that the axis of the cylinder 18 is on the centre line of the shell opening devices under the hoppers (not shown); it is therefore not possible to use a flat, continuous plate as the pusher 17 on the end of the piston rod of the cylinder 18. A cross head 19 is therefore fitted to the piston rod of cylinder 18 which carries two side rods 20; each side rod 20 carries a part of the pusher 17. The effect is, therefore, of a flat pusher with a gap in the middle, the gap allowing the pusher 17 to pass on either side of the shell opening device.

This arrangement also allows the piston rod of a cylinder 21 carrying the suction disc 7 to operate when the pusher of the cylinder 18 is fully forward. The suction disc 7 rises ready to draw down the next inner shell 1 whilst the pusher 17 of the cylinder 18 is fully advanced. This arrangement considerably reduces the total cycle time, thus increasing the rate of production.

The complete pack is removed by a third cylinder 23 shown in FIG. 3. The pusher 24 is similar to that on the cylinder 18, being divided to clear the shell opening lever for the outer shell. This constroction allows a suction disc 7 on the piston rod of a cylinder 26 to rise whilst the pusher 24 of the cylinder 23 is fully forward, again reducing the cycle time. Also, the pusher 17 on the piston rod of the cylinder 18 remains forward, acting as a side guide for the complete pack during its subsequent movement towards the package orienting arrangement.

The complete packages are discharged from below the outer shell hopper seen in FIG. 3 in the direction of the arrow 25. The packages are conveyed along the base plate between suitable guides and are fed to a package orienting or toppling arrangement as shown in FIG. 5. At the end of the guides and adjacent to the edge of the base plate is a brush or other type of retainer 27 to prevent'over-run of the package before reaching a toppling block 28. The top of the toppling block 28 is level with or slightly below the level of the base plate. As the packages are pushed along, the leading pack on the toppling block moves to an end stop 29. It is then supported by less than one half its width. The pack then topples down and over on to its side on to the next platform as shown in FIG. 6. Again, it is supported by less than one half its length and so topples down and over on its end on to the base of the collator channel 32 as illustrated in FIGS. 7. When the pack comes to rest on the base of the channel 32 it blocks off a back pressure jet 30, which through a fluidic system, operates a pneumatic cylinder 31 to move the pack along the collator channel 32. The back pressure jet is shown in more detail in FIGS. 80 and 8b and when the pack moves along the collator channel 32 it then frees the back pressure jet 30 to signal the cylinder 31 to return to its original position.

By this method, packages may be collated on any desired end or side face of the pack by suitable design of the toppling block 28.

The operation of the various pneumatic cylinders are controlled by a fluidic circuit, using commercially available components.

The basic component of the system is a turbulence amplifier for example as illustrated schematically in FIGS. 9a and 9b.

This consists essentially of a flow of air from a very small inlet pipe 33 across a gap into the entry of a similar small outlet pipe 34. If the air pressure at the inlet is for example at 4 inches W.G., sufficient air enters the outlet pipe 34 to produce a pressure of I inch W. G., in the outlet pipe. Surrounding these two small pipes is a tubular-sleeve 35, into the side of which are fixed small tubes or control jets 36 directed at the main stream of air passing from the inlet tube to the outlet tube. If a small stream of air be directed from one of the side jets, the main air stream is deflected away from the outlet pipe and the air pressure in the outlet pipe falls from 1 inch W.G. to zero.

The turbulence amplifier constitutes the logic element of a NOT or NOR element of the logic circuit. Several turbulence amplifiers may be combined together to form the logic elements of a FLIP FLOP, an AND element, and NAND element and so on. A control circuit can then be designed exactly as an equivalent electronic control circuit.

Each output of a fluidic control circuit has to control air at high pressure. In a typical system this is effected by means of a step-up relay. This change of pressure from a turbulence amplifier of 1 inch W.G. to zero is sufficient to turn on, or off, the high pressure air flow. The high pressure air is used with conventional components to operate pneumatic cylinders etc.,

The principle of a small jet of air passing from an inlet tube or pipe across a gap to enter an outlet tube or pipe is used as a means of applying a signal to a turbulence amplifier. If some solid object is inserted into the gap, the air jet is interrupted and the pressure in the outlet tube falls from 1 inch W.G. to zero. This device is known as an interruptible jet.

For the packing machine of the invention, a timer is incorporated using interruptible jets which control the motions, in sequence, of all the pneumatic cylinders involved, except that of the collator. A series of interruptible jets is arranged circumferentially round a shaft driven by the pre-packer or by an electric motor if no pre-packer is used. The shaft carries projections which act as interrupters for the interruptible jets.

Another method of supplying a control pulse or signal to a turbulence amplifier is by means of a back pressure jet. The back pressure jet 30 shown in FIG. 7 has small open recess to which air at 4 inches W.G. is fed through inlet pipe 38 and an outlet pipe 39 for example as shown in FIGS. 8a and 8b. If the recess 30 is open, no air will enter the outlet pipe 39 since the air escapes through the open recess; if the recess 30 is covered with a solid object such as a package as in FIG. 7, then air passes through the outlet pipe 39 and provides a signal.

This type of back pressure jet is used throughout the packer to provide signals to provide a safety circuit.

All the piston rods have theirlength of stroke controlled by adjustablestops. Each stop is fitted with a back pressure jet and a blade attached to the respective piston rodcovers the back pressure jet at the end of each stroke and so provides a signal to a turbulence amplifier to register that the piston has successfully completed its stroke. If a piston fails to complete its stroke,due to a malfunction, this actuates the safety circuit so that the normal subsequent motions of any other pistons are inhibited and the whole machine is stopped at the end of the cycle.

The normal starting and stopping of the packer is effected through the fluidic control circuit.

The sequence of operations illustrated with particular reference to FIG. 3 may be summarised as follows:

The contents are raised on the platform 14 from a preceding work station through an opening 15 in the base plate as seen in FIG. 4 level with the top of the base plate, and aligned with the cylinder 13.

The piston rod of cylinder 18, is in its forward position from the previous cycle and the piston rod of cylinder 2], is now raised and the associated suction disc 7 comes in contact with the unopened bottom of a shell 1 and suction is applied while the piston rod of cylinder 18 returns to its inward position.

The'piston rod of cylinder 21 is then lowered taking the lower inner shell with it. Before the piston rod of cylinder 21 reaches the end of its stroke, the shell opening lever 10 is brought into operation and when the piston rod of cylinder 21 reaches the end of its inward stroke, the inner shell 1 is fully opened and held in place by suction. I

The piston rod of cylinder 13, now advances and moves the contents off the lifting platform 14 into the opened inner shell 1. The piston rod of cylinder 23 now moves forward to reject the completed previous package and the piston rod of cylinder 26 is now raised so that the associated suction disc 7 comes in contact with the next unopened bottom outer shell 3. j

The piston rod of cylinder 23 is now retracted to its inward position and suction is applied to the suction disc 7'on the piston rod of cylinder 26 which is now lowered at the same'time taking the lowest outer shell 3 with it. Before the rod reaches the end of its inward stroke, the associated shell opening lever 10 is brought into operation. When the piston rod reaches the end of its stroke the outer shell is fully opened and held in place by suction.

The vacuum is now released from the suction disc 7 associated with cylinder 21 and the piston rod of cylinder 18 moves the loaded inner shell 1 into the outer shell 3. To complete'the cycle, the piston rod of cylinder 13 returns to its inward position and suction is released from the cylinder suction disc 7 associated with cylinder 26, completing the cycles. The next actuation of the cylinder 23 moves the assembled package out from underneath the outer shell hopper or magazine.

In a modified embodiment of the invention, either or both shells may be made of a rigid, preformed tubular material, such as a synthetic plastics material, in which case the hoppers will be modified to allow each shell to be fed to the appropriate suction disc. In most cases, each shell will be open at both ends. However, where desired either or both shells may have one end closed.

The edges of the shell may also be shaped or cut away 6 to allow easier access to the contents of the package or to facilitate separation of the inner and outer shells.

We claim:

1. A packaging machine for producing a package comprising an inner shell containing the contents of the package and an outer shell which contains the inner shell, said machine comprising:

a. first magazine for retaining inner shells;

b. second magazine for retaining outer shells:

c. means for extracting said inner shells singularly from said first magazine and moving said inner shell downwardly from said magazine to a first position;

d. means operatively associated with said extraction means for erecting said inner shell whereby the inner shell is open for receipt of the contents of its first position;

e. means operatively associated with said extraction means for inserting the contents into said inner shell at said first position;

f. means for extracting said outer shells singularly from said second magazine and moving said outer shell downwardly to a first position, the first position of said inner and outer shells being in the same plane;

g. means operatively associated with said extraction means for erecting said outer shell with an open side of said shell facing said inner shell and contents whereby said outer shell is open at its first position for receipt of the inner shell and contents.

I h. means for moving said inner shell and contents along said plane and into said outer shell;

i. control means for activating the various means in the desired time sequence.

2. A packaging machine according to claim 1, wherein all the movements imparted to the individual parts of the package by the extraction and insertion means are effected by means operating rectilinearly.

3. -A packaging machine according to claim 1 wherein the movements imparted to the individual parts of the package by the extraction and insertion means are imparted by fluid operated means controlled by a logic circuit.

4. A packaging machine according to claim 1 wherein flexible guide means are associated with an open end of each erected shell which guide the part of the package being inserted therein into the respective shell.

5. A packaging machine according to claim 1 wherein each vertical movement of the inner and outer shells by the extraction means is provided by a reciprocating member supplied with vacuum and each horizontal movement by said insertion means is provided by a reciprocable pusher member.

6. A packaging machine according to claim 1 wherein the movement of the package through the machine actuates the control means.

7. A packaging machine according to claim 3 wherein the logic circuit is a fluid logic circuit.

8. A packaging machine according to claim 1 wherein the operation of the machine is controlled by a fluid logic circuit actuating fluid operated members, said circuit including at least one turbulence amplifier and means to cause the fluid circuit to apply control signals to the turbulence amplifier comprising a plurality of fluid jets, the control signals being produced by selective obstruction of said jets.

9. A packaging machine according to claim 1 wherein the erecting means for said inner and outer shells is operatively connected to the respective extraction means and responsive to the downward movement of said shell to open said shell whereby the shell is open at its first position.

10. A packaging machine according to claim 9 wherein said extraction means for extracting at least one of said inner or outer shells is comprised of a suction disc mounted on means for vertically moving said disc to a position to engage a side of the lowermost shell in said magazine and to a spaced position beneath said magazine and wherein the erecting means associated with said extraction means comprises a shell opening lever pivotally mounted about a point and swingable to engage the edge of said shell to force said shell to an open position while the side of said shell is held by the suction disc and means on said vertical movement means and engagable with said opening lever to pivot said lever responsive to the downward movement of said vertical movement means to engage the edge of said shell and erect said shell.

11. A packaging machine according to claim 10 wherein the magazine associated with said extraction and erecting means defines an opening at its bottom and includes members having lip portions extending into said opening for supporting opposed edges of said shells, said lip portions being spaced so that the lowermost shell in the magazine may be engaged by the suction disc, being to clear said lips and ultimately displace downwardly to said first position.

12. A packaging machine according to claim 11 wherein said magazine includes an upwardly tapered member spaced above said lip portion on one side of said magazine to narrow the dimension of said magazine downwardly causing the shells to stack at an angle above said tapered member.

13. A packaging machine according to claim 1 wherein said first positions respectively of said inner and outer shells lie in the same horizontal plane and said means for moving said inner shell and contents into said outer shell moves said inner shell and contents along said horizontal plane.

14. A packaging machine for producing a package comprising an inner shell containing the contents of the package and an outer shell which contains the inner shell, said machine including a first, vertical magazine containing inner shells and a second vertical magazine containing outer shells, controll means, means for extracting the inner and outer shells from the lower end of each magazine, means for feeding the contents of the package into the inner shell, means for moving the inner shell and contents into the outer shell and means for conveying the assembled package to a further package handling station, wherein each magazine is provided adjacent its outlet with means to partially open a shell still in the magazine and means are associated with each magazine to erect each shell as it is withdrawn, wherein the means for partially opening the shell comprise a deflector member and spring means and the associated shell erecting means comprises a shell-opening lever actuated by means associated with a vacuum member which withdraws each shell from its magazine.

15. A packaging machine for producing a package comprising an inner shell containing contents of the package and an outer shell which contains the inner shell, said machine including a first, vertical magazine containing inner shells and a second vertical magazine containing outer shells, control means, means for extracting the inner and outer shells from the lower end of each magazine, means for feeding the contents of the package into the inner shell, means for moving the inner shell and contents into the outer shell and means for conveying the assembled package to a further package handling station, wherein each vertical movement of the inner and outer shells is provided by a reciprocating member supplied with vacuum and each horizontal movement is provided by a reciprocable pusher member; wherein the pusher member is divided to permit the reciprocation of the pusher past the vacuum member when the vacuum member is in its extended condition.

16. A packaging machine for producing a package comprising an inner shell containing the contents of the package and an outer shell which contains the inner shell, said machine including a first, vertical magazine containing inner shells and a second vertical magazine containing outer shells, control means, means for extracting the inner and outer shells from the lower end of each magazine, means for feeding the contents of the package into the inner shell, means for moving the inner shell and contents into the outer shell and means for conveying the assembled package to a further package handling station, said conveying means including a package orienting means comprising a pair of inclined surfaces, the first said surface being arranged to tilt a package about a horizontal axis parallel to the direction in which each package is conveyed from the outer shell filling point and the second inclined surface being arranged below said first surface and inclined in a direction which causes a package leaving the first surface to rotate about a horizontal axis at right angles to the first mentioned horizontal axis.

v u Nn n STA'IIICS vA'rmiN'I Oman .CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,815,676 7 I I Dated June 25, 1974 V i v lnvent usj ffi e'derick Ruse e11 et 'al '7 It is certified' 'that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Lettersv Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

On the first page of the printed patent, in the heading, aft-er the line "[21] Appl. No. 1285 656" I insert Foreign Application Priority Data Septemberj, 1971 Great B1"itain....416 92/7l- Signed; and js eeled this 3rd day' of bec'ember 1974.

V (SEAL) Attest:

McCOY M. GIBSON JR, I 1 c. MARSHALL DANN Arresting Officer 1 Commissioner of Patents UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patant NO- s. 518.676 Dated June 25, 1974 Inventor(s) Frederick Russell et a1 It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Col. 3, line 36, change "constroction" to construction Col. 4, line 24; change "w. G. to W.G.

Col. 6, 1ine 9, claim 1, change "Wm Col. 6, line 16, claim 1,- change "of" (second occurrence) to at Col. 6, line 30, claim 1, change to C01. 7, line 30, claim 11 change "being" to bent Col. 7, line 33, claim 12, change "tapered" to tapering Col. "7, line 49, claim 14, change "controll" to control ga;;aand sealed-' mie- 29th? da o f: oerbb r 197 a; A

(SEAL) Attest:

MCCOY M. GIBSON JR. C. MARSHALL DANN Arresting Officer Commissioner of Patents 3 FORM P0-105O (10-69) USCOMM-DC 60376-P69 fr u.$. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: I969 0-3s6-334

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4835944 *Nov 2, 1987Jun 6, 1989Herrin Robert MCarton nesting apparatus and method
US5080227 *Oct 4, 1990Jan 14, 1992Focke & Co., (Gmbh & Co.)Pack made of thin cardboard, especially for cigarettes
US5588276 *Dec 5, 1994Dec 31, 1996Terjung; Herman F.Sleeving machine
US5916078 *Apr 24, 1996Jun 29, 1999Herrin; Robert M.Container stuffing or nesting apparatus
US6306070Dec 29, 1999Oct 23, 2001Robert M. HerrinApparatus for erecting and sealing flat containers and associated methods
US7797910 *Jun 27, 2008Sep 21, 2010Meadwestvaco CorporationLoading apparatus
EP0421311A1 *Sep 29, 1990Apr 10, 1991Focke & Co. (GmbH & Co.)Thin cardboard package, especially for cigarettes
EP2746166A1 *Nov 19, 2013Jun 25, 2014Focke & Co. (GmbH & Co.)Method and device for manufacturing a package for cigarettes
Classifications
U.S. Classification53/173, 53/169
International ClassificationB65B19/00, B65B19/18
Cooperative ClassificationB65B19/18
European ClassificationB65B19/18