Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3818794 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 25, 1974
Filing dateMar 12, 1973
Priority dateMar 16, 1972
Also published asDE2307028A1, DE2307028B2, DE2307028C3
Publication numberUS 3818794 A, US 3818794A, US-A-3818794, US3818794 A, US3818794A
InventorsBurkhart R, Mayer C
Original AssigneeOerlikon Buehrle Ag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Armored vehicle with a laterally alignable mortar
US 3818794 A
Abstract
An armored vehicle with a laterally alignable mortar which can be operated by a gunner or firing personnel and encompassing launching barrels each possessing a propellant charge chamber for shells loaded at the muzzles. The launching barrels are rigidly mounted at a laterally alignable turret housing which houses the firing personnel or gunner of the armored vehicle. The muzzles of the launching barrels are located at the wall of the turret. An annular compartment concentric to the axis of rotation of the turret and accommodating an infeed or delivery mechanism for the shells stored in magazines is arranged about the turret and protected by a hood. The magazines are movable relative to the turret by means of the infeed mechanism into a position in alignment with the launching barrels.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[4 June 25, 1974 ARMORED VEHICLE WITH A LATERALLY ALIGNABLE MORTAR [75] Inventors: Cornelius Mayer, Fallanden; Rolf Burkhart, Bulach, both of Switzerland [73] Assignee: Werkzeugmaschinenfabrik Oerlikon-Buhrle AG, Zurich, Switzerland [22] Filed: Mar. 12, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 340,467

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Mar. 16, 1972 Switzerland 3916/72 [52] US. Cl. 89/40 A, 89/1 F, 89/45 [51] Int. Cl. F411! 7/06 [58] Field of Search 89/1 F, l I, 36 C, 36 H, 89/36 K, 37 C, 40 A, 40 B, 40 C, 45, 46, 47

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 653,071 7/1900 Dawson et al. 89/46 1,445,126 2/1923 Bergman 89/1 F 3,566,742 3/1971 Bemiss 89/40 B FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 380,109 11/1907 France 89/47 329,878 10/1918 Germany 89/45 Primary ExaminerStephen C. Bentley Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Werner W. Kleeman [5 7] ABSTRACT An armored vehicle with a laterally alignable mortar which can be operated by a gunner or firing personnel and encompassing launching barrels each possessing a propellant charge chamber for shells loaded at the muzzles. The launching barrels are rigidly mounted at a laterally alignable turret housing which houses the firing personnel or gunner of the armored vehicle. The muzzles of the launching barrels are located at the wall of the turret. An annular compartment concentric to the axis of rotation of the turret and accommodating an infeed or delivery mechanism for the shells stored in magazines is arranged about the turret and protected by a hood. The magazines are movable relative to the turret by means of the infeed mechanism into a position in alignment with the launching barrels.

17 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures PATENTEUJIJNZSW 3,818.794

SHEET 1 UF 5 BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to an armored vehicle having a laterally alignable mortar which is operated by a gunner or firing personnel and incorporating at least one launching barrel with a propellant charge chamber, the launching barrel having a muzzle for the shells loaded thereat.

With a known construction of armored vehicle of this type, a mortar is arranged to be elevationally adjustable upon a platform rotatably mounted at the body of the armored vehicle. For elevational adjustment purposes holes are arranged in a grid at the floor of the platform and the launcher barrel is supported at the holes through the agency of struts. The elevational position of the launcher barrel or tube determines the range of the fired shell. Loading of the mortar occurs manually by means of an operator through the barrel muzzle. It has been found to be disadvantageous with this known construction of armored vehicle that the personnel tending the mortar are not protected against enemy fire, shell fragments, and chemical gases. Furthermore, the firing cadence or rhythm which can be realized with the hand-loaded mortars is relatively low.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Hence, it is a primary object of the present invention to provide an improved construction of armored vehicle having a laterally alignable mortar which is not associated with the aforementioned drawbacks and limitations of the prior art constructions.

It is another and more specific object of the present invention to provide an improved construction of armored vehicle of the previously mentioned type equipped with a mortar and wherein the construction of such armored vehicle is such that it better protects the operating personnel and improves upon the firing rhythm.

Now in order to implement these and still further objects of the invention, which will become more readily apparent as the description proceeds, the mortar as contemplated by this development possesses a number of launching barrels or tubes which are rigidly mounted at a laterally alignable turret of the armored vehicle and which turret is capable of accommodating the firing personnel. The muzzles of the launching barrels are located at the wall of the turret and an annular compartment which is concentrically arranged with respect to the axis of rotation of the turret is arranged about the turret and protected by an armored hood, this annular compartment serving to receive or house an infeed mechanism for shells located in magazines. The magazines can be moved by the infeed mechanism relative to the turret into a position in alignment with the launching barrels.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The invention will be better understood and objects other than those set forth above, will become apparent when consideration is given to the following detailed description thereof. Such description makes reference to the annexed drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a longitudinal sectional view through the turret of an armored vehicle, taken substantially along the line I--I of FIG. 2;

FIG. 1a is a sectional view on an enlarged scale of a portion of the showing of FIG. ll;

FIG. 1b is a further sectional view of an enlarged scale of a portion of the showing of FIG. 1;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the turret of the armored vehicle depicted in FIG. ll;

FIG. 3 is a view looking in the direction of the arrow A of FIG. 1, on an enlarged scale, depicting the breechor charging chamberadjustment mechanism according to a first exemplary embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of the arrangement of FIG. 3, taken substantially along the line IVIV thereof, with the apparatus depicted in a position corresponding to the maximum firing range;

FIG. 5 is an illustration corresponding to the showing of FIG. 4, depicting a further position of the apparatus;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of the apparatus depicted in FIG. 4, taken substantially along the line Vl-VI thereof;

FIG. 7 is an illustration corresponding to the showing of FIG. 3 of a further exemplary embodiment of breechor charging chamber-adjustment mechanism;

FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view of the arrangement depicted in FIG. 7, taken substantially along the line VIIIVIIl thereof, depicting a position of the adjustment mechanism corresponding to the smallest breech or charging chamber; and

FIG. 9 is an illustration corresponding to the showing of FIG. 8, with the apparatus in a position for the minimum firing range.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Describing now the drawings, according to the showing of FIG. 1 a toothed rim 2 is operatively connected with the body 1 of an armored vehicle. A truncated conical-shaped turret 3 is rotatably mounted through the agency of a suitable roller bearing arrangement 4 upon a body cover member 5. The downwardly opening turret 3 is reinforced by radially inwardly protruding ribs 6. A jacket 7 of a substantially circular-shaped housing 8 arranged about the turret 3 is aligned perpendicular thereto and fixedly connected therewith. A downwardly opening truncated conical-shaped hood member 9 is mounted upon the jacket or outer surface 7 and forms the cover of the housing 8. The opening angle of the hood 9 and the turret 3 are of the same size. As best seen by referring to FIG. la, a wall 10 of the housing 8 bears upon an inwardly directed flange ll of the turret 3 and is secured to the ceiling or cover 12 of the hood member 9. The wall 10 is arranged parallel to the jacket or outer surface 7. A roller bearing arrangement 13 is connected with the flange II.

In the housing 8, which forms an annular compartment concentrically arranged about the axis of rotation of the turret, there are contained a large number of magazines 14 which, according to the showing of FIG. 2, possess the same angular spacing from one another. The magazines l4 consist of light metal cast components in which there are grouped in a honeycomb configuration hexagonal continuous sleeves 15. Each magazine 14 consists of three parallel rows, each row having four sleeves 15, wherein the axes of the center rows together with the rotational axis of the turret 3 and the axis of the roller bearing arrangement 13 coinciding therewith lie in a common plane.

The magazines 14 are secured by means of a shell infeed support or holder 17 at a rotatable feed ring 16 of the roller bearing arrangement 13. The support 17 essentially possesses the shape of the outer surface of a cone, the cone or opening angle of which is equal to that of the turret 3. The support 17 only has a very small spacing from the turret 3, in the direction of which the magazine sleeves are open. In the magazine sleeves 15 there are stacked shells or grenades 18 which are retained therein by suitable and therefore not particularly illustrated extendable devices.

A firing mechanism 19 is composed of three tandemly arranged aligned components 19', 19" and 19" which are detachably connected with one another in non-illustrated manner. The firing mechanism 19 which is cast from steel or a light metal is secured by a support or carrier 20 at the turret 3 and contains three parallel rows of bores 21, each of which now in turn has four bores 21 which are parallel to one another and which form launching barrels or tubes. The diameter of the bores 21 is equal to the diameter of the circumscribed circle of the hexagonal magazine sleeves 15. The spacing of the bores 21 within a row and the bore rows with respect to one another are of the same size as the corresponding spacing of the sleeves 15 of the magazine 14. The bores 21 of the middle row are offset with respect to the bores 21 of the outer two rows by an amount which corresponds to one-half of the bore spacing within a row. The axes of the bores 21 of the center row are located in a plane which contains the axis of rotation of the turret 3. Furthermore, the axes of the bores 21 of such center row intersect the turret axis at an angle of 45.

Now at the turret 3 there is cut-out an opening 22, the shape of which as viewed in the direction of the arrow B of FIG. 1, corresponds to the cross-section of the firing mechanism 19. This firing mechanism 19 protrudes through this opening 22 and the launching barrels or tubes 21 possess muzzles 23 which are located at that cone surface which contains the outer surface of the turret 3. According to the showing of FIG. 1, a magazine 14 is located over the opening 22 and the axes of the sleeves 15 coincide with the axes of the barrels 21 of the firing mechanism 19. The hood member 9 possesses an opening 24 which is essentially arranged at its conical portion and the symmetry plane of which coincides with the plane of symmetry of the firing mechanism 19. The opening 24 is closed by a closable cover 25. Two circular-shaped bent or curved slots 26, the center of which is located at the axis of the turret 3, and arranged at the hood cover 25, as best seen by referring to FIG. 2. Two bolts 27 are connected with the cover 25 and extend through the slots 26 into the turret 3. The bolts 27 are secured at the ends ofa chain 28 which is trained about two wheels or gears 29 arranged at the inside of the ceiling or cover 12 of the hood 9 (FIG. 2). The housing jacket 7 possesses at a portion thereof located at the region of the opening 24 a larger radius than at the remaining circumference. The cover 25 engages into a groove 30 cut or otherwise formed at the end face of such jacket portion.

A firing crewman or gunner can reach a seat 32 in the turret 3 by means of a hatch 31 arranged at the hood cover 12, and which seat is supported at the firing mechanism 19. A sighting telescope 33 and two handwheels 34- and 35 are arranged in front of the gunner. The manual or handwheels 34 and 35 engage with two further non-illustrated transmission or drives which mesh with a toothed rim or gear 36 connected with the rotary or rotatable ring 16 and also meshes with the toothed rim 2.

The boundaries of a cross-section of the firing mechanism 19 has been illustrated in phantom or broken lines in FIG. 3. A plate 37 extending perpendicular to the plane of symmetry of the firing mechanism 19 forms a rear closure. According to the showing of FIG. 4, this plate 37 possesses bores 38 which are coaxially arranged with respect to the bores 21 of the firing mechanism 19 but have a smaller diameter than such. The bores 21 are closed by closure elements 39. The closure elements 39 which are stepped in diameter extend through the plate bores 38 into the bores 21 and bear by means of a shoulder 40 towards the rear against the plate 37. The closure elements 39 are secured in their position by means of a ring 41 which bears at the rear against the plate 37.

Now within each bore 21 there is arranged an adjustment or setting sleeve 42. The adjustment sleeve 42 possesses four forwardly depending arms 43, as best seen by referring to FIG. 6. A sleeve 44 coaxially arranged with respect to the adjustment sleeve 42 is connected with the latter by radially directed holders or supports 45. Two oppositely situated arms 43' are pro vided at the outside with a toothed arrangement 46 which continues up to the rear end of the adjustment sleeve 42. Both of the other arms 43" are somewhat longer and terminate at a tip 47. End surfaces 84 of the adjustment sleeve 42 which are located between the arms 43 form a stop for the shells or grenades 18 or the like which are loaded into the firing mechanism 19 Two grooves 48 are milled from the end faces of both rearmost portions 19' and 19" of the firing mechanism 19 at each bore 21, as best seen by referring to FIGS. 4 and 6. The grooves 48 open into the bores 21 and are situated diametrically opposite to one another. The planes of symmetry of all grooves 48 associated with a bore 21 of the firing mechanism 19 coincide. These symmetry planes enclose an acute angle with that plane which is formed by the axes of the bores 21 of that row which is associated with the corresponding bore.

Each bore 21 has associated therewith two diametrically opposed auxiliary bores 49 which are located in parallelism with each bore 21 and the axes of the auxiliary bore 49 possess the same spacing from the axis of the bore 21 and are located at the aforementioned plane of symmetry of the grooves 48. Shafts 50 are arranged in the bores 49, these shafts having a smaller diameter than such bores. The rear ends of the shafts 50 are rotatably mounted at screws 51 which piercingly extend through the plate 37 and are attached at a widened portion of the bore 49. Further bearing or mounting locations are formed by bushings or sleeves 52 which are connected with the shafts 50 at the center of the components or parts 19' and 19", and the external diameter of such sleeves 52 is equal to the diameter of the bore 49.

According to the showing of FIGS. 4 and 6, bearing or mounting pieces 53 are displaceably arranged at the grooves 48. The bearing pieces 53 are essentially prismatic bodies with two grooves 54 and 55 which are disposed perpendicular to one another and spatially connected by a slot. A helical or spiral gear 56 is arranged in the groove 54 and this gear 56 is keyed with the shaft 50 which is mounted on the side walls 57 of the bearing piece 53. A further helical gear 58 is arranged in the groove 55 and rotatably mounted at the walls 59 of the mounting or bearing piece 53. The helical gear 58 extends into the bore 21 and meshes with the helical gear 56 while extending through the slot. Each bearing body 53 consists of two identical components which contact one another at the symmetry plane of the groove 48 in order to facilitate assembly.

Blindhole bore 60 is arranged parallel to the bore 49 and opens into the groove 48. A pin or needle 61 is secured in the firing mechanism 19 and extends through the bore 60 into the groove 48. This pin or needle 61 bears by means of a projection or shoulder 61a via a plate 62 upon the mounting or bearing piece 53.

As best seen by referring to FIG. 4, the closure elements 39 of the bores 21 of the outer rows of the firing mechanism 19 possess cylindrical projections or shoulders 63. Spur gears 64 are keyed to the ends of the shafts 50 extending towards the rear out of the screws or threaded sleeves 51. The spur gears 64 mesh with intermediate gears 65 which are rotatably mounted upon the shoulders or projections 63 of the closure elements 39. According to the showing of FIG. 3, a pinion 66 meshes with a spur gear 64" mounted at shaft 50" associated with the bore 21". The spur gear 64" is in driving connection with the two intermediate gears 65' and 65" which are located behind the bores 21" and 21'. The intermediate gear 65" meshes with the spur gear 64" which drives the shaft 50" and through the agency of a spur gear 64' seated upon a shaft 50, and via the intermediate gear 65' meshing therewith, drives the other spur gear 64' keyed to the shaft 50. The intermediate gear 65" meshes with the spur gear 64" of the shaft 50". The spur gear 64" meshes with the intermediate gear 65", which is in driving connection with the two spur gears 64" keyed with the shafts 50". The intermediate gears 65' 65", and 65" are furthermore in driving connection with the respective spur gears 64", 64 64 64, driving the respective ones of the shafts 50", 50", 50 50".

A transmission or drive, driven by a pinion 67, is constructed in similar manner as the previously described transmission for driving the shaft pairs 50', 50", 50", 50", and a respective shaft 50", 50 50"", and 50. This transmission consists of the intermediate gears 65"", 65-, 65 65''", and spur gears 64, 64", 64"", 64", 64, 64-, 64-, 64 for the drive of the other shafts 50", 50", 50"", 50, and the shaft pairs 50", 50 50-", 50"". The intermediate gears 65 are of the same size; this is also the case for the spur gears 64.

Now as best seen by referring to FIG. 4, a shell or grenade l8 possesses a body 69 which rearwardly tapers from its largest diameter which essentially corresponds to the diameter of the associated bore 21. A tail pipe 70 connected with the shell body 69 carries eight stabilizer vanes 71 arranged at the same angular spacing, and the outer edges of which possess a spacing from the axis of the shell which is equal to the radius of the bore 21. The shells 18 loaded into the firing mechanism 19 possess the same size propellant charges 72 which are arranged about tail pipe 70 in conventional manner. At the height of the propellant charge 72 there are provided bores 85 at the tail pipe 70. At the end of the tail pipe 70 there is inserted a firing cap 73 contained a detonator or primer composition and equipped with a hot or incandescent bridge and a detonating charge 74. The cap 73 is connected to ground, that is to say, with the stabilizer vanes 71, and via such electrically conductively connected with the firing mechanism 19. The tip of a firing pin 75, which is insulated with respect to the sleeve 44, extends forwardly out of sleeve 44.

The firing or ignition pin 75 is conductively connected in suitable and therefore not particularly illustrated manner with the outermost portion of a telescopic tubular member or pipe 76, which component is insulated from the sleeve 44 and displaceably mounted therein. The innermost part 77 of the telescopic pipe 76 is threaded into an insulating piece 78 secured to the associated closure element 39. This part 77 is connected by a conductor or line 79, at which there is arranged a switch 80, with the positive pole of a voltage source 81. The negative pole of the voltage source 81 in connected via a conductor 82 with the firing mechanism 19, as shown in FIG. 4.

The mode of operation of the aforedescribed construction will now be considered and is as follows:

According to the showing of FIG. 1, shells 18 or the like are loaded into the bores 21 of the firing mechanism 19. All of the adjustment sleeves 42 are supported in their bores 21, in the manner depicted in FIG. 4, upon the end faces or surfaces of the closure elements 39, and the firing pins 75 contact the firing or ignition caps 73 of the shells 18. The gears 58 engage, at the front end of the arm 43 of the adjustment sleeves 42, into the teeth 46 thereof. The stabilization vanes 71 of the shells 18 bear against the end surface 84 of the adjustment sleeves 42, which surfaces are located between the arms 43. In this position of the adjustment sleeves 42, the initial combustion chamber of the propellant charge 72 and which hereinafter is referred to as the propellant charge chamber or compartment 68, in other words that compartment which is located in the bore 21 behind the largest cross-section of the shell 18, is the smallest.

By closing the switch at the conductor 79 the incandescent bridge of the cap 73 has voltage applied thereto and the detonator composition is ignited. Consequently, the detonator or primer charge 74 is ignited, and by means of such and via the bores 85 in the tail pipe 70, also the propellant charge 72. The shell 18 which now moves forwardly under the action of the propellant charge gases in the bore 21 impacts, by means of its shell part or portion possessing the largest diameter, against the gears 58 located in front of such and which thereby, together with the bearing pieces 53, are moved into the grooves 48. This movement of the mounting or bearing pieces 53 occurs while overcoming the restoring force of the shafts 50 which are elastically bent-through between the two bearing locations 52 and the pins or needles 61 which are deformed along therewith. The bearing pieces 53 together with the gears 56 and 58, following passage of the shell 18, are again moved back into the original position by the shafts 50 and the pins or needles 61. After departing from the bore 21, the shell 18 further moves through the sleeve 15 of the magazine 14 and which sleeve is coaxially arranged with respect to the bore 21. The shells 18 are still present in the remaining bores 21 of the firing mechanism 19 are fired in the same manner, preferably in succession at very short intervals as a salvo.

When the firing mechanism 19 is depleted of shells 18 then the shell delivery or infeed support 17 is rocked or pivoted about the axis of the turret 3 by the firing crewmen rotating the handwheel 34, this rocking action occurring until all of the sleeves 15 of a magazine 14 filled with the shells 18 are located coaxially with respect to the bores 21. Thereafter the apparatus which fixedly retains the shells 18 and the magazine 14 is disengaged so that the shells 18 can drop clown into the bores 21 of the firing mechanism 19. During the dropping of the shells 18 the latter move the gears 58 with the bearing or mounting pieces 53 into the grooves 48 in the same manner as occurred during the firing operation, whereby not only the shell body 69 but also, if desired, it stabilizing vanes 71 can act in a driving fashion. In the event two of the stabilizing vanes 71 impact against the tips 47 of the two arms 43" of the adjustment sleeve 42, then such are deflected thereby so that they carry out together with the shell a small rotation about its axis and slide downwardly along the arms 43. At the end of the fall of the shell 18, the stabilizing vane 71 thereof bears against the end surface 84 of the adjustment sleeve 42 (FIG. 4).

For attaining a smaller firing range, an adjustment of the size of the propellant charge chamber 68 is undertaken in the following manner: by driving both of the pinions 66 and 67 in the same rotational sense, there is initiated a movement at the transmission, so that all of the spur gears 64' to 64, and therefore also the shafts S to 50", rotate in the same sense. By means of the helical gears 56 connected with the shafts 50, the helical gears 58 are driven and thus the arms 43 together with the adjustment sleeves 42 are moved into the bores 21 towards the respective mouths thereof. The adjustment sleeves 42 entrainably displace the shells or grenades 18, as a result of which the propellant charge chambers 68 are enlarged. The largest propellant charge chambers 68 are formed when the rear ends of the tooth arrangement 46 of the adjustment sleeves 42 are still in engagement with the helical gears 58 mounted at the component 19" of the firing mechanism 19, as best seen by referring to FIG. 5.

In the embodiment of adjustment mechanism to be described hereinafter, it is to be understood that the same components have been designated with the same reference characters whereas additional components have been designated with new reference characters.

Turning attention therefore more particularly to the embodiment of FIGS. 7 to 9, here the bores 21 of the firing mechanism 19 are closed at the rear by a floor or bottom 86. At the floor 86 there is inserted a bushing or sleeve 88 into a bore 87 which is coaxially arranged with respect to the bore 21. In the bushing or sleeve 88 there is displaceably mounted a sleeve 89. At the front end of the sleeve 89 there is fittably connected a hub 91 of a supporting body 90. For radially directed arms 92 are connected with the hub 91 and with a ring member 93, the diameter of which corresponds to the diameter of the bore 21. A linear groove 94 is cut into or otherwise suitably formed at the sleeve 89 at the inside thereof. A sleeve 95 is displaceably mounted in the sleeve 89, and at its front end which protrudes therefrom, is equipped with arms 92 which bear at the wall of the bore 21 and are connected with one another by a ring member 93'. The sleeve 95 possesses at its rear end internal threading 96, and furthermore there is arranged at the outside thereof a groove 94 having a resilient or spring wedge 97 inserted therein. The resilient wedge 97 engages with the groove 94 of the sleeve 89. The sleeve 89 is connected by means of a flange 98 arranged at its rear end with a plate member 100 which is in parallelism with the rear end surface 99 of the firing mechanism 19. A threaded spindle 101 is arranged in the sleeve 95 and engages with the internal threading 96. The spindle 101 bears through the agency of a collar 102 towards the rear at the plate 100. A projection or shoulder 103 of the spindle 101 is mounted in a bore 104 of plate 100. A spur gear 105 is keyed to the shoulder or projection 103 which projects towards the rear out of the plate member 100 and bears by means of its hub against the plate member 100. The spindle 101 possesses a continuous bore 106.

According to the showing of FIGS. 7 and 8, four threaded spindles 107 are secured to the bottom or floor 86 of the firing mechanism 19. These four threaded spindles 107 protrude towards the rear and are parallel to the sleeve 89. The hubs 108 of spur gears 109 arranged behind the plate member 100 are threaded onto the spindles 107 and rotatably mounted in bores 110 of the plate member 100. The spindles 107, 107", 107" and 107" are arranged between three respective bores 21, and the spur gears 109', 109", 109" and 109" which are seated at these spindles mesh with the gears arranged behind the corresponding bores 21. The spur gear 109' is in driving connection or meshes with the spur gears 105, 105" and 105. The spur gear 109" meshes with the spur gears 105", 105 and 105*, and the spur gears 109", 109" mesh with the spur gears 105", 105 105"" and with the spur gears 105 105 and 105*" respectively. The spur gear 105" is in driving connection through the agency of an intermediate gear 111, mounted at the plate member 100, with the spur gear 105" associated with the bore 21. Further, the spur gear 105"" drives, through the agency of an intermediate gear 112, the spur gears P and 105"" associated with the bores 21 and 21 respectively. Two drive pinions 113 and 114 mesh with the spur gears 10S" and 105" and the spur gears 105 and 105 respectively. The spur gears 109', 109", 109", 109", and 105' to 105 as well as the intermediate gears 111 and 112 have the same diameter, and furthermore, the threading of the spindles 107, 107", 107" 107" and the spindles 101 to 101 possess the same pitch.

Two respective sheet metal guide members 115 are secured at the rear face of the plate member 100 adjacent a bore 116 arranged therein. The symmetry planes of the sheet metal guides 115 contain the axis of the bore 116 and one of the axes of two bores 21 of the firing mechanism 19 which are arranged in a row adjacent one another. At the floor 86 of the firing mechanism 19 there are secured pairs of cables 117 which are guided towards the rear, parallel to the sleeve 89, through one of the bores 116, over two of the sheet metal guides 115, and towards the front through the bores 106 of two threaded spindles 101. The cables 117 are appropriately connected with the positive terminal of a voltage source. The front ends of the cables 117 are connected to a firing pin 118 which is inserted into the front end of the sleeve 89 and insulated therefrom. in each bore 21 of the firing mechanism 19 there bears towards the rear a shell 18 or the like via the stabilizing vanes 71 against the ring member 93 of the arms 92 of the sleeve 95, and wherein the firing caps 73 bear against the firing pins 118.

The mode of operation of this embodiment of the invention will be briefly considered and is as follows:

With the position of the shells 18 in the bores 21 of the firing mechanism 19 as depicted in FIG. 8, the propellant charge chambers 68 possess the smallest size, so that during firing the largest muzzle velocity is attained for the shells. For the purpose of increasing the propellant charge chamber 68 and reducing the muzzle velocities, the gears 105 and therewith also the spindles 101 are driven via the pinions 1 13 and 114 in one rotational direction or sense and the gears 109 in the opposite rotational direction. The gears 1119 are threadably screwed towards the front along the spindles 107, with the result that the plate member 100 and the sleeves 89 and 95 are entrainably moved along in the same direction. At the same time, the sleeves 95, the spring wedges 97 of which are guided in the grooves 94 of the sleeve 89, are forwardly moved under the drive of the spindle 101 in the sleeves 89 by an amount which corresponds to the displacement of the plate member 100. In so doing, the firing pins 118 can entrainably draw on the cable 117 owing to their special arrangement and attachment at the floor 86 of the firing mechanism 19. The shells 18 are pushed forwardly in the bores 21 by the sleeves 95 through a path corresponding to twice the displacement distance of the plate member 100. The propellant charge chambers 68 are then at a maximum size when the components of the adjustment mechanism assume the position depicted in FIG. 9.

For refilling the magazine 14 the cover member 25 is moved away from the opening 24 of the hook 9 by sprocket wheel 29, according to the showing of FIG. 2. In so doing, the bolts 27 slide in the slot 26 and the cover member or cover 25 is guided in the groove 30 of the housing jacket 7 (FIG. 1). The empty magazines 14 are thereafter successively moved beneath the opening 24 and charged with shells or grenades 18.

While there is shown and described present preferred embodiments of the invention it is to be distinctly understood that the invention is not limited thereto, but may be otherwise variously embodied and practiced within the scope of the following claims. Accordingly,

What is claimed is:

1. An armored vehicle comprising a laterally alignable mortar operated by a firing crewman, the armored vehicle incorporating a turret for housing the firing crewman, said mortar incorporating a number of launching barrels which are rigidly connected with the laterally alignable turret of the armored vehicle, the launching barrels having muzzles which are located at the wall of the turret, an annular compartment concentrically arranged with respect to the axis of rotation of the turret arranged about the turret, an armored vehicle hood member for protecting the annular compartment, an infeed mechanism for the shells and magazines arranged in the annular compartment, said magazines being movable relative to the turret by means of said infeed mechanism into a position in alignment with the mortar, the turret possessing a substantially truncated conical configuration, and wherein the launching barrels are directed perpendicular to the wall of the turret, said infeed mechanism comprising to support for the shells, and said shells being arranged at the support perpendicular to the wall of the turret with their shell tips pointing towards the outside.

2. The armored vehicle as defined in claim 1, further including means for infinitely varying the propellant charge chamber at the launching barrels for the purpose of altering the firing range of the shells.

3. The armored vehicle as defined in claim 1, said infeed mechanism further including a roller bearing arrangement for pivoting the support about the turret, sleeve means for receiving the shells arranged at the support, said sleeve means in cross-section having a honeycomb configuration, said sleeve means insuring for firing of the shells in a position which is in alignment with the launching barrels.

4. The armored vehicle as defined in claim 1, wherein said armored vehicle hood member is provided with an opening at the region of the muzzles of the launching barrels, and a cover for closing said opening.

5. The armored vehicle as defined in claim 2, wherein said means for varying the propellant charge chamber comprises a sleeve member displaceable within each launching barrel and serving as a stop for the shells.

6. The armored vehicle as defined in claim 5, wherein the sleeve member is equipped with external teeth, and further including helical gears and a shaft, said sleeve member being in driving connection with the shaft via the external teeth and the helical gears.

7. An armored vehicle comprising a laterally alignable mortar operated by a firing crewman, the armored vehicle incorporating a turret for housing the firing crewman, said mortar incorporating a number of launching barrels which are rigidly connected with the laterally alignable turret of the armored vehicle, the launching barrels having muzzles which are located at the wall of the turret, an annular compartment concentrically arranged with respect to the axis of rotation of the turret arranged about the turret, an armored vehicle hood member for protecting the annular compartment, an infeed mechanism for the shells and magazines arranged in the annular compartment, said magazines being movable relative to the turret by means of said infeed mechanism into a position in alignment with the mortar, means for infinitely varying the propellant charge chamber at the launching barrels for the purpose of altering the firing range of the shells, said means for varying the propellant charge chambers comprising a sleeve member displaceable within each lauching barrel and serving as a stop for the shells, said sleeve member being equipped with external teeth, and further including helical gears and a shaft, said sleeve member being in driving connection with the shaft via the external teeth and the helical gears, said sleeve member possessing four forwardly extending arms which are uniformly divided about the periphery thereof, two of said arms being situated diagonally opposite one another and carrying said external teeth, and both of the other anns protruding somewhat past the arms equippped with the external teeth and having a point.

8. An armored vehicle comprising a laterally alignable mortar operated by a firing crewman, the armored vehicle incorporating a turret for housing the firing crewman, said mortar incorporating a number of launching barrels which are rigidly connected with the laterally alignable turret of the armored vehicle, the launching barrels having muzzles which are located at the wall of the turret, an annular compartment concentrically arranged with respect to the axis of rotation of the turret arranged about the turret, an armored vehilll cle hood member for protecting the annular compartment, an infeed mechanism for the shells and magazines arranged in the annular compartment, said magazines being movable relative to the turret by means of said infeed mechanism into a position in alignment with the mortar, means for infinitely varying the propellant charge chamber at the launching barrels for the purpose of altering the firing range of the shells, said means for varying the propellant charge chamber comprises a sleeve member displaceable within each launching barrel and serving as a stop for the shells, the sleeve member possessing internal threading, a threaded spindle, the internal threading of said sleeve member being in driving connection with the threaded spindle, an external sleeve, the sleeve member being displaceable within the external sleeve, said external sleeve being sealingly guided at the floor of the firing mechanism and together with the threaded spindle being mounted to be axially non-displaceable at a plate member, a further threaded spindle mounted at the firing mechanism, said plate member being displaceable at said further threaded spindle.

9. The armored vehicle as desired in claim 8, wherein the external sleeve is secured against rotation at the plate member, and wherein the inner sleeve member is secured against rotation via a groove and a resilient wedge at the external sleeve.

10. A mortar comprising a launching barrel having a lengthwise axis and equipped with a muzzle, means for the infeed of shells in front of the muzzle of the launching barrel, said infeed means incorporating a rotatable support, a plurality of shells arranged upon said rotatable support, the axes of said shells forming with one another an imaginary cone surface, the axis of the cone coinciding with the axis of rotation of the rotatable support and the axis of the launching barrel being located at said cone surface.

11. The mortar as defined in claim 10, said mortar being rigidly mounted in a rotatable turret of an armored vehicle and being laterally alignable by means of said rotatable turret, said launching barrel being provided with a propellant charge chamber, and means for infinitely varying the size of the propellant charge chamber of the launching barrel for the purpose of altering the firing range of the shells.

12. The mortar as defined in claim 10, further including additional launching barrels arranged parallel to said launching barrel, said additional launching barrels having muzzles, said shells being deliverable to said muzzles by means of said rotatable support 13. The mortar as defined in claim 10, wherein said rotatable support possesses the shape of an outer surface of a cone at which there are perpendicularly arranged the shells.

14. The mortar as defined in claim 10, further including magazines in which said shells are arranged at the rotatable support, said magazines possessing honeycomb-like sleeves by means of which firing of the shells occurs in a position in alignment with the launching barrel.

15. The mortar as defined in claim 10, further including a sleeve member displaceable in the launching barrel and serving as stop means for the shells, said sleeve member possessing four forwardly extending arms which are uniformly distributed about the periphery thereof, two of said arms being situated diagonally opposite one another, teeth means carried by said diagonally opposite situated arms, and both of the other arms extending past the toothed arms by a predetermined amount and exhibiting a tip.

16. The mortar as defined in claim 15, wherein the sleeve member possesses internal threading, a threaded spindle, said internal threading of the sleeve member being in driving connection with the threaded spindle, an external sleeve, said sleeve member being displaceable in said external sleeve, a firing mechanism having a floor, said external sleeve being sealingly guided at the floor of said firing mechanism, a plate member, said external sleeve being axially non-displaceably mounted together with the threaded spindle at said plate member, 21 further threaded spindle mounted at the firing mechanism, said plate member being displaceable at said further threaded spindle.

17. The mortar as defined in claim 16, further including means for securing the external sleeve at the plate member against rotation, and wherein the inner sleeve member is secured against rotation via a groove and a resilient wedge at the external sleeve.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US653071 *Oct 24, 1899Jul 3, 1900Vickers Sons & Maxim LtdApparatus for supplying ammunition to turret or barbette guns.
US1445126 *Jun 8, 1916Feb 13, 1923Elmer Ordnance CorpGrenade gun
US3566742 *Aug 27, 1969Mar 2, 1971Cadillac Gage CoArmored vehicle having means for interchangeability top mounted weaponry
DE329878C *Oct 8, 1918Dec 1, 1920Rheinische Metallw & MaschfLadevorrichtung fuer Geschuetze
FR380109A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3916794 *Sep 17, 1973Nov 4, 1975Oerlikon Buehrle AgProjectile with secondary projectiles and firing apparatus for such projectile
US3992995 *Sep 4, 1975Nov 23, 1976The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Air ForceSpeed controlled second event launcher
US4580482 *Dec 9, 1983Apr 8, 1986Wegmann & Co. GmbhAmmunition-stowage system in an ammunition bunker with side walls that taper upward
US4669357 *Oct 9, 1985Jun 2, 1987Diehl Gmbh & Co.Weapon system with barreled weapon in an armored vehicle
US4860633 *May 7, 1987Aug 29, 1989Fmc CorporationAutoloader for military vehicle
US4974491 *Nov 28, 1989Dec 4, 1990Diehl Gmbh & Co.Automatic muzzle loader weapon
US6095026 *Jul 8, 1998Aug 1, 2000Tda Armements S.A.S.System for the loading of a mortar
US8534180 *Apr 18, 2011Sep 17, 2013Rheinmetall Landsysteme GmbhWeapon system with a carrier vehicle and a preferably vehicle dependent mortar
US8707846May 5, 2011Apr 29, 2014Rheinmetall Waffe Munition GmbhWeapon with recoil and braking device, damping this recoil
US8794120May 6, 2011Aug 5, 2014Rheinmetall Waffe Munition GmbhMortar
US20120024141 *Apr 18, 2011Feb 2, 2012Rheinmetall Landsysteme GmbhWeapon system with a carrier vehicle and a preferably vehicle dependent mortar
EP0890817A1 *Jul 7, 1998Jan 13, 1999Tda Armements S.A.S.Loading system for a mortar
Classifications
U.S. Classification89/40.3, 89/45, 89/40.2, 89/1.3
International ClassificationF41F1/00, F41F1/06, F41A1/00, F41A9/00, F41A9/26, F41A23/42, F41A23/00, F41A1/06
Cooperative ClassificationF41F1/06, F41A1/06, F41A9/26, F41A23/42
European ClassificationF41A23/42, F41A9/26, F41A1/06, F41F1/06