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Publication numberUS3818903 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 25, 1974
Filing dateApr 11, 1973
Priority dateApr 11, 1973
Publication numberUS 3818903 A, US 3818903A, US-A-3818903, US3818903 A, US3818903A
InventorsJ Bleecker
Original AssigneeBard Inc C R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-inflating catheter with deflating means and reservoir
US 3818903 A
Abstract
An inflatable retention catheter having a resilient, valved, reservoir retaining a fluid under pressure, for automatic inflation of a retention balloon, is provided with an auxiliary reservoir enclosing or attached to the resilient reservoir and having in its wall a valve release device adapted to be manipulated to open the reservoir valve and permit emptying of the balloon, the fluid being received in the auxiliary reservoir.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Bleecker June 25, 1974 [54] SELF-INFLATING CATHETER WITH 3,482,576 12/1969 Ericson et a1. 128/349 BV DEFLATING MEANS AND RESERVOIR 3,599,620 8/1971 Balin 128/349 B 3,602,226 8/1971 Ericson 128/349 B [75] Inventor: John A. Bleecker, Summit, NJ.

[73] Assignee: C. R. Bard Inc., Murray Hill, NJ.

[22,] Filed: Apr. 11, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 350,304

[52] US. Cl.... 128/349 BV [51] Int. Cl A61m 25/02 [58] Field of Search 128/349 B, 349 BV [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,275,001 9/1973 Rosecrans 128/349 BV 3,378,011 4/1968 Vitello 128/349 B 3,379,197 4/1968 Hayes 128/349 B Primary Examiner-Channing L. Pace Attorney, Agent,'0r FirmC. E. Martine, Jr.

[57] ABSTRACT voir .valve and permit emptying of the balloon, the

fluid being received in the auxiliary reservoir.

9 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures y 1' SELF-INFLATING CATHETER WITH DEFLATING MEANS AND RESERVOIR This invention relates to Foley (balloon) catheters of the self-inflating type, i.e. provided with a resilient,

with a valve through which the fluid may be passed,

under pressure, from a syringe. When the catheterization is to be terminated the balloon must be allowed to deflate, and this is effected most neatly by using a syringe to withdraw the fluid through the valve. On the other hand it is quite a common practice to merely cut off the reservoir and let the fluid spill out, hopefully but not necessarily into a suitable receptacle. It is an object of this invention to provide an auxiliary reservoir which surrounds at least the valve, which has sufficient capacity to hold the fluid expelled from the balloon (when deflation is desired) and which has conveniently located in its wall a device which can be manipulated.(externally) to open the valve and enable the fluid to escape from the balloon and first reservoir into the auxiliary reservoir, where it is retained without spilling and can be discarded with the used catheter.

A further object of the invention, in one of its aspects, is to enclose the inflation reservoir within the auxiliary reservoir to minimize loss of the inflation fluid through the inflation reservoir wall during storage, thus greatly increasing the shelf life of the catheter. This function is disclosed (without provision of deflation means) in the patents to Vitello, US. Pat. No. 3,378,0l l; Hayes, US. Pat. No. 3,379,197; Balin, US. Pat. No. 3,599,620, and Ericson, US. Pat. No. 3,602,226.

Practical embodiments of the invention are shown in the accompanying drawing, wherein:

FIG. 1 represents an elevation of a complete selfinflating catheter, the auxiliary reservoir being in longitudinal section, the inflated shape of the balloon being in broken lines, and part of the catheter shaft being broken away;

FIG. 2 represents a detail view of the reservoir end of the catheter shown in FIG. 1 looking upward from the bottom of that figure;

' FIG. 3 represents a detail view, corresponding to the reservoir end of FIG. 1, showing in section a modified form of auxiliary reservoir.

FIG.-4 represents a view of the parts shown in FIG. 3, looking upward from the bottom of that figure;

FIG. 5 represents an elevation of one form of valve opening device;

FIG. 6 representsa longitudinal section on the line VI-Vl of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 represents an elevation of an alternative form of valve opening device; and

FIG. 8 represents a longitudinal section on the line VIII-VIII of FIG. 7.

Referring to the drawing, a typical self-inflating Foley catheter has a shaft 10, a distal tip 11, drainage eyes 12, drainage funnel l3, inflatable retention balloon 14, side arm 15 and inflation reservoir 16. The drainage lumen 17 extends from the eyes 12 to the funnel l3 and a small inflation'lumen 18 extends from one or more holes 19, within the balloon, through the side arm 15 to the reservoir 16. The reservoir is designed to be closed by aclamp 20, at a point between the reservoir and the shaft 10, and is filled with an inflation fluid, such as sterile water, through a one-way valve 21 (which may be of the type shown in Garth US. Pat. No. 3,087,492). The elasticity of the reservoir 16 is such that, upon removal of the clamp, a substantial part of the inflation fluid will be forced into the balloon 14, inflating it to perform its intended function of retaining the catheter tip within the body cavity (e.g., bladder).

According to the present invention, as exemplified in FIGS. 1 and 2, the auxiliary reservoir 22 is formed of two flat sheets 23, 24 of flexible heatsealable plastic film having narrow ends 25 and wider ends 26. The narrow ends are sealed into fluid-tight engagement around the valve 21, the seal being perfected, if necessary, by one or more bands of adhesive 27, and the wider ends 26 are similarly sealed into fluid-tight engagement with a valve opening device 28, the side edges of the sheets being sealed together flatwise to form a somewhat flattened bag,- as shown in FIG. 2.

In the modified form, shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, the auxiliary reservoir 30 encloses the inflation reservoir, the narrow ends 31 of the flat sheets 32,33 being sealed into fluid-tight engagement around the side arm 15 between the reservoir 16 and the clamp 20, the tightness of the seal being assured by bands of adhesive 34, if necessary. The wider ends 35 of the sheets 32,33 are similarly sealed around a valve opening device 36 (which may be the same as the device 28) and the side edges of the sheets are sealed together flatwise to form an elongated flattened bag, as shown in FIG. 4.

Each of the auxiliary reservoirs 22 or 30 must, initially, have sufficient free capacity to enable it to receive, without back pressure, a quantity of fluid corresponding to the capacity of the retention balloon. This is normally either 5 cc. or 30 cc. and the invention is particularly applicable to the 5 cc. type, although larger auxiliary reservoirs could be provided, if desired.

The valve opening device 28 (or 36) comprises handle 40, a flat web 41 and a prod portion 42, said portion having an axial bore 43 extending from the distal end of the prod to a transverse passage 44 adjacent to the proximal inlet 37 thereof. The prod may be tapered and must be small enough to be received easily in the end of the valve 21 and to push in the valve stem in order to open the valve.

The alternative form of valve opening device, shown in FIGS. 5 and 6, has a handle 45, a flat web 46 and a prod portion 47, said portion being tapered and provided with longitudinal grooves 48,. extending from the distal tip to points adjacent the proximal end of the prod.

In the manufacture of a self-inflating catheter having 3 (FIGS. 3 and 4) before the fluid is placed in the inflation reservoir, the wider end of the auxiliary reservoir being sealed around the valve opening device thereafter.

A self-inflating catheter provided with the'auxiliary reservoir is inserted into and retained in a patient in the normal manner. When it is desired to remove the catheter, the valve opening device is manipulated to insert the prod into the end of the valve, against the end of the valve stem (which is usually grooved or ridged) to open the valve and permit fluid to escape. As the balloon deflates to an extent permitting removal of the catheter, the fluid is collected in the auxiliary reservoir with no possiblity of spillage.

Since the function of the prod is merely to open the valve and permit escape of the fluid, its cross-sectional form may be varied widely so long as it retains sufficient strength and cannot occlude the valve opening.

It will be understood that various changes may be made in the form, construction and-arrangement of the several parts without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention and hence I do not intend to be limited to the details shown or described herein except as the same are included in the claims or may be required by disclosures of the prior art.

What I claim is:

l. A self-inflatable retention balloon catheter comprising a main shaft having a drainage lumen extending from the proximal end of said shaft to a first lateral opening adjacent the distal end thereof and an inflation lumen extending from a first point spaced from said proximal end to a second point proximal of said first lateral opening, an inflatable-balloon surrounding said shaft at said second point, a second lateral opening connecting the distal end of the inflation lumen with the interior of said balloon, a tubular inflation arm communicating with the proximal end of the inflation lumen at said first point, valve means having an inlet communicating with the interior of said inflation arm, means for selectively closing said inflation arm at a point spaced from said valve to form an inflation reservoir in said arm adapted to contain inflation fluid, an auxiliary reservoir loosely enclosing said valve means inlet, and a valve opening device in said auxiliary reservoir and manually movable to a valve opening position, the capacity of the auxiliary reservoir being at least substantially equal to the inflated volume of the bal- Icon.

2. A catheter according to claim 1 wherein the auxiliary reservoir is constituted by two sheets of plasticfilm edge sealed together, and wherein the valve opening device is held between said sealed edges.

3. A catheter according to claim 1 wherein the auxiliary reservoir loosely encloses the inflation reservoir.

4. A catheter according to claim 2 wherein the valve means is held between said sealed edges.

5. A catheter according to claim 2 wherein the inflation arm is held between said sealed edges and the auxiliary reservoir loosely encloses the inflation reservoir.

6. A catheter according to claim 1 wherein the valve opening device includes a handle and a prod, the prod being adapted for insertion into the valve means inlet to open the valve.

7. A catheter according to claim 6 wherein the prod is longitudinally grooved.

8. A catheter according to claim 6 wherein the prod is traversed by a longitudinal bore.

9. A catheter according to claim 6 wherein the auxiliary reservoir is constituted by two sheets of plastic film edge sealed together and wherein the handle and the prod are connected by a web, the web being held between the sealed edges of the auxiliary reservoir.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3275001 *May 22, 1962Sep 27, 1966Kendall & CoSelf-inflatable catheter
US3378011 *Jun 23, 1965Apr 16, 1968John P. VitelloSelf-inflating catheter with means to prevent leakage of inflation fluid
US3379197 *Aug 10, 1965Apr 23, 1968Goodrich Co B FSelf-inflating catheter with means to prevent leakage of inflation fluid
US3482576 *May 9, 1966Dec 9, 1969Kendall & CoEasy deflatable retention catheter
US3599620 *Aug 18, 1969Aug 17, 1971Kendall & CoResilient reservoir assembly
US3602226 *Nov 19, 1965Aug 31, 1971Kendall & CoSelf-inflating catheter with means to prevent loss of inflation fluid
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4464175 *Aug 25, 1982Aug 7, 1984Altman Alan RMultipurpose tamponade and thrombosclerotherapy tube
US4598707 *Jun 21, 1984Jul 8, 1986Sherwood Medical CompanyMedical tube with inflation cuff
US4856510 *Apr 6, 1988Aug 15, 1989Kowalewski Ryszard JTracheal tube inflator
US5024655 *Sep 5, 1989Jun 18, 1991Freeman Andrew BEpidural catheter apparatus and associated method
US5084016 *Oct 23, 1990Jan 28, 1992Freeman Andrew BEpidural catheter apparatus with an inflation fitting
US5284480 *Jan 22, 1993Feb 8, 1994Medtronic, Inc.Inflation/deflation syringe with threaded plunger
US5545133 *Sep 16, 1994Aug 13, 1996Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Balloon catheter with improved pressure source
US5647847 *Nov 4, 1994Jul 15, 1997Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Balloon catheter with improved pressure source
US5695468 *Jan 16, 1996Dec 9, 1997Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Balloon catheter with improved pressure source
US5728064 *May 21, 1996Mar 17, 1998Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Balloon catheter with improved pressure source
US5817001 *May 27, 1997Oct 6, 1998Datascope Investment Corp.Method and apparatus for driving an intra-aortic balloon pump
US6190354Mar 6, 1997Feb 20, 2001Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Balloon catheter with improved pressure source
US6432081 *Mar 28, 2000Aug 13, 2002Children's Medical Center CorporationSystems and methods for promoting tissue growth
US7824369 *Apr 21, 2005Nov 2, 2010Medtronic Vascular, Inc.Balloon catheter having osmotic inflation system
US8080024 *Apr 28, 2005Dec 20, 2011Ams Research CorporationProtective enclosure for medical device components
US8282597 *Nov 25, 2003Oct 9, 2012Oakington Corp.Single use catheter
EP0209710A2 *Jun 12, 1986Jan 28, 1987Sarcem SaClosed loop for a catheter
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/98.1, 604/920
International ClassificationA61F2/958
Cooperative ClassificationA61M25/1018
European ClassificationA61M25/10E