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Publication numberUS3818993 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 25, 1974
Filing dateJan 3, 1972
Priority dateJan 3, 1972
Also published asCA983696A1
Publication numberUS 3818993 A, US 3818993A, US-A-3818993, US3818993 A, US3818993A
InventorsW Gogarty, G Haws
Original AssigneeMarathon Oil Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lpg micellar solutions as fracturing fluids
US 3818993 A
Abstract
A fracturing fluid successfully useful for stimulating gas producing wells is obtained by mixing 60-95 percent by volume of a hydrocarbon containing an average of C-3 to about C-10 carbon atoms, up to 20 percent by volume of water, 2.5 to about 25 percent of a surfactant obtained by condensing about 1 mole of an alcohol containing about 4 to about 20 carbon atoms with about 1 to about 20 moles of an alkene oxide to obtain a surfactant having a HLB (hydrophil-lipophil balance) of about 3 to about 15, and optionally containing 0.1 to about 10 percent by volume of a cosurfactant which can be an alcohol containing 1 to about 10 carbon atoms and/or about 0.001 to about 5 percent by weight (based on aqueous medium) of an electrolyte. In addition, the fracturing fluid can contain propping agents, fluid loss control agents, corrosion inhibitors, diverting agents, and other additives desired for a particular fracturing process.
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United States Patent Gogarty et a1.

[ June 25, 1974 LPG MICELLAR SOLUTIONS AS FRACTURING FLUIDS [73] Assignee: Marathon Oil Company, Findlay,

Ohio

[22] Filed: Jan. 3, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 214,848

[52] U.S. Cl. 166/308, 252/855 R [51] Int. Cl E2lb 43/26 [58] Field of Search 166/305 R, 308, 271, 281, 166/283; 252/855 R [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,828,265 3/1958 Van Strien 252/855 R 3,335,794 8/1967 Bond 166/271 3,500,932 3/1970 Webb 166/308 3,545,546 12/1970 Son, .11. et a1 166/305 R 3,557,874 1/1971 Glass et a1. 166/281 3,603,400 9/1971 Son, .lr 166/308 3,747,681 7/1973 Davis et a1. 166/308 OTHER PUBLICATIONS Frick, Petroleum Production Handbook", 1963, p.

' vlscosl Y Vs TEMPERATURE Primary Examiner-*Stephen J. Novosad Assistant Examiner.lack E. Ebel Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Joseph C. Herring; Richard C. Willson, Jr.; Jack L. Hummel [5 7] ABSTRACT A fracturing fluid successfully useful for stimulating gas producing wells is obtained by mixing 60-95 percent by volume of a hydrocarbon containing an average of O3 to about C-lO carbon atoms, up to 20 percent by volume of water, 2.5 to about 25 percent of a surfactant obtained by condensing about 1 mole of an alcohol containing about 4 to about 20 carbon atoms with about 1 to about 20 moles of an alkene oxide to obtain a surfactant having a HLB (hydrophil-lipophil balance) of about 3 to about 15, and optionally containing 0.1 to about 10 percent by volume of a cosurfactant which can be an alcohol containing 1 to about 10 carbon atoms and/or about 0.001 to about 5 percent by .weight (based on aqueous medium) of an electrolyte. In addition, the fracturing fluid can contain propping agents, fluid loss control agents, corrosion inhibitors, diverting agents, and other additives desired for a particular fracturing process.

13 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures TEMPERATURE (F.)

PAIENTEDJUNI974 3318.993

SHEET 1OE2 VISCOSITY vs TEMPERATURE 00 140 I30 I50 I60 I10 TEMPERATURE(F.)

VISCOSITY (0p) AT IOO PPM ON FANN VISCOMETER AT 74 F.

0 2 4 6 8 I0 I2 I4 I6 I8 20 CONCENTRATION OF WATER BY VOLUME) PAINTED- FIG. 3

APPARENT VISCOSITY (cp) AT 74 F SHEET 2 0F 2 VISCOSITY VS SHEAR RATE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to fracturing fluids containing low molecular weight hydrocarbons with correspondingly high vapor pressure and with minimum water concentrations which are particularly useful for fracturing gas producing wells. A particular surfactant which is obtained by condensing an alcohol with an alkylene oxide permits high viscosities of a fracturing fluid. The fracturing fluid is injected in a gas'producing well at a sufficient rate to obtain fracturing pressures at the rock face.

2. Description of the Prior Art Fracturing of gas producing wells with conventional fracturing fluids have generally proved to be inefl'ective. The main problem is that residual materials from the fracturing fluid remain in the well after treatment and reduce the productivity of the reservoir. For example, when a water-based fracturing fluid is used, the water within the fracturing fluid can form emulsion blocks within the reservoir or the water saturation within the reservoir rock can adversely influence the relativepermeability to the flow of the gas. Also, the water can interact with clay in a reservoir and cause formation damage.

It is desired that the fracturing fluid contain components which are capable of being easily removed from the well once the well has been fractured and returned to production. That is, the blow-down of the fractured well desirably removes the components of the fracturing fluid from the reservoir rock without adversely influencing flow characteristics in the reservoir rock.

Of course, the fracturing fluid must have a viscosity sufficient to obtain efficient fracturing of the reservoir and also should have properties sufficient to keep in suspension'propping agents. Other desirable properties of the fracturing fluid include low fluid loss characteristics, the fluid being capable of maintaining its viscosity at relatively high temperatures, low fluid loss characteristics to permit efficient pump rates at minimum pressure drops, etc. In the Oil and Gas Journal, July 5, 1971, page 60, there is described a gelled liquid gas useful for fracturing gas wells. The gelled gas contains carbon dioxide, liquid petroleum gases, a gelling material, and a proppant. Viscosities of the gelled liquid gas are about to about 50 cp. at ambient temperature. The gelled gas is useful at bottom hole temperatures of 80-225F.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Applicants have discovered a novel composition useful for fracturing gas wells. This fluid exhibits viscosities up to about 1,000 at ambient temperature and can exhibit viscosities of about 100 at 200F. The fracturing fluid is composed of a low molecular weight hydrocarbon, up to percent water, but preferably less than 10 percent water, a surfactant which is a condensation ties are desired, the water concentration is at a minimum. 7

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 represents the relationship between viscosity and temperature. As is evident from this Figure, relatively high viscosities can be obtained at relatively high temperatures. The fracturing fluids represented by these particular curves were prepared by mixing a stock solution containing 42 percent by weight of an ethoxylated secondary alcohol obtained by reacting one mole of an alcohol containing 12 to about 14 carbon atoms with about 3 moles of ethylene oxide, 24 percent propylene glycol, and 34 percent water with varyingamounts of water and hexane. The curves in this Figure are composed of the following composition:

Curve a: 10 percent of the stock solution plus percent hexane,

Curve b: 9.85 percent of the stock solution, 88.75 percent hexane, and 1.4 percent distilled water.

Curve 0: 9.72 percent of the stock solution, 87.51 percent hexane, 2.77 percent distilled water,

Curve d: 9.65 percent of stock solution, 86.91 percent hexane, and 3.44 percent distilled water,

Curve 2: 9.58 percent stock solution, 86.32 percent hexane, and 4.10 percent distilled water,

Curve f: 9.52 percent stock solution, 85.72 percent hexane, and 4.76 percent distilled water,

Curve e: 9.45 percent stock solution, 85.15 percent hexane, and 5.4 percent distilled water. From this curve, it is evident that an increased concentration of water lowers the overall viscosity. All of these curves were obtained by using a Fann Viscometer at rpm.

FIG. 2: This curve represents the relationship of viscosity vs. water concentration for a particular fracturing fluid. Data for this curve were obtained using a Fann Viscometer at 100 rpm and operated at 74F. Water concentrations in FIG. 2 represent the volume percent of water added to a fluid mixture containing 10 percent of the stock solution defined in FIG. 1 and 90 percent hexane. The amounts of distilled water indicate on the curve vary from 1 percent to about 17 percent. This curve again illustrates that very high viscosities are realized at lower water concentrations.

FIG. 3 represents the relationship of viscosity vs.

shear rate at 74F for two different fracturing fluids.

Data for these curves were obtained using a cone and plate viscometer operated at varying rpms to give different shear rates. The shear rates were increased to a certain level and thereafter decreased to the original shear ratethe fracturing fluids are very stable over these shear rates. The curve defined as h represents a fluid composed of 10 percent of the stock solution defined in FIG. 1, and 90 percent hexane. Curve designated i represents a fluid composed of 9.45 percent of the stock solution defined in FIG. 1, 5.42 percent of distilled water and 85.13 percent hexane. The curves show the non-Newtonian character of these particular fluid mixtures; that is, there does not exist a linear relationship between the shear rate and shear stress. Because of this, the apparent viscosity of the liquid decreases with increasing shear rate which is desirable for a fracturing fluid. The high shear rate in the pipe causes a low apparent viscosity and more fluid flows at a given pressure drop than would occur with a corresponding Newtonian fluid. As the fluid enters the formation, the shear rate decreases and the viscosity increases. This condition causes more effective fracturing.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The fracturing fluids are composed basically of hydrocarbon and surfactant and optionally water and/or cosurfactant and/or electrolyte. In addition, propping agents, fluid loss control agents, and other desired additives can be incorporated into the fracturing fluid. Depending upon the viscosity desired, and the properties of the fracturing fluid for a particular reservoir to be fractured, the fracturing fluid can be designed to be compatible with particular properties of a particular reservoir. Unless otherwise specified, all percentages are based on volume.

The fracturing fluids are generally composed of from 60 to about 95 percent and preferably about 70 to about 95 percent of a hydrocarbon; about 2.5 percent to about 25 percent, preferably about 3 to about 15 and more preferably about 5 to about percent of a surfactant; optionally up to about percent of water and preferably less than 10 percent water; optionally about 0.01 to about 10 percent and preferably 0.1 to about 5 percent of a cosurfactant and/or about 0.001 to about 5 percent by weight of an electrolyte. The hydrocarbon is preferably a low molecular weight hydrocarbon, for example, having about 3 to about 10 carbon atoms in the molecule. Preferably, the hydrocarbon is volatile at temperatures under 170F.; however, this will be dependent upon the particular reservoir being fractured but it is desired that the hydrocarbon be volatile at the temperature of the reservoir being fractured so that when the well is returned to production, the hydrocarbon will be easily removed from the well by blowingdown the .well. Examples of preferred hydrocarbon include liquefied petroleum gases, methane, propane, butane, pentane, hexane, heptane, and decane. Partially refined fractions of crude oil such as straight-run gasoline and other cuts from the crude oil column are useful as the hydrocarbon.

The surfactant is a condensation product of an alco- 7 more, and preferably about 2 to about 4 carbon atoms hol containing an average of about 4 to about 20, preferably about 8 to about 16 and more preferably about 10 to about 14 carbon atoms. The alcohol can be a primary, secondary, or tertiary alcohol and can be aliphatic or aromatic. In addition, the alcohol can be branch-chained, and can have aryl groupings on the molecule. The alcohol is condensed with about 1 to about 20, preferably 2 to about 10, more preferably 3 to about 5 moles of an alkene oxide. The condensation product of the alcohol and the alkene oxide preferably contain about 20 to about 75 percent, more preferably about to about 60 percent and most preferably about to about percent by weight of the alkene oxides. The alkene oxide is preferably a low molecular weight oxide, e.g., ethylene. oxide, propylene oxide, and

butylene oxide. An example of a commercially avail able surfactant especially useful with Applicants fracturing fluids includes Plurafac A-24--this is a. trademark of Wyandotte Chemical Corp., Wyandotte, Mich, and identifies a condensation product obtained by reaction an alcohol containing about 10 to about 18 carbon atoms with ethylene oxide to give an average of about 40 percent by weight of ethylene oxy groups in the condensate product. The surfactant preferably has a hydrophil-lipophil balance, hereinafter referred to as in the molecule. More preferably, the cosurfactant is a polyhydroxy compound such as propylene glycol.

Electrolyte can be present in the aqueous phase of the fracturing fluid if water is desired. Concentrations of about 0.001 to about 5 percent and preferably about 0.01 to about 3 percent by weight, based on the aqueous medium in the fracturing fluid, are desired. Also, the electrolyte must be compatible with the components of the fracturing fluid as well as with the salt within the intersititial water. If relatively high viscosities of the fracturing fluid are desired, it is preferred that the electrolyte concentration be minimum. The electrolyte can be an inorganic acid, inorganic base, or inorganic salt.

Preferably, the fracturing fluid contains propping agents. Concentrations of about 0.1 to about 5 lb. and preferably about 0.5 to about 3 lb. per gallon of fracturing fluid are desired with this invention. However, the concentration of the propping agent will necessarily depend upon the property of the fracturing fluid to keep in suspension the propping agent and also the desired concentration of propping agent for a particular reservoir to be fractured. Thus, the concentration of propping agent can be lower or higher than the above figures. Examples of useful propping agents include glass beads, metallic particles, preferably sand having a mesh size of 2040.

In addition, fluid loss control agents which are preferably compatible with the hydrocarbon phase can be added to the fracturing fluid. Examples of such agents compatible with the hydrocarbon phase include oilsoluble, high molecular weight polymers such as polyisobutylene. Where water is present in the fracturing fluid, the fluid loss control agent can be silica flour (,200 mesh silica sand), Atomite M-2 (ground calcium carbonate having diameters less than 15 micron, manufactured and marketed by Thompson, Weinman and Co., .Cartersville, Georgia, and like materials. Silica flour is preferred.

Applicants fracturing fluids generally exhibit viscoelastic properties which result in the drag reduction phenomena. Such permits a larger volume of liquid to be pumped down a well bore in a given time with the available pressure. This condition causes more effective fracturing at the rock face. Where the reservoir to be fractured is susceptible to water damage, it is preferred that the fracturing fluid contain minimum water concentration or zero water concentration. Also, where the reservoir is at a relatively lower temperature, then the molecular weight of the hydrocarbon is desirably low to permit vaporization of the hydrocarbon at the particular reservoir temperature. Such permits components of the fracturing fluid to be easily removed from the well wherein the production well is turned back into production. Also, the components of the fracturing fluid desirably have properties which permit them to change into a gaseous state when conditions equalize at the formation temperature and pressure.

If desired, diverting agents such as coal tar derivatives, naphthenic compounds, steel balls encased in wells, etc., can be used intermittently during the fracturing process to obtain a more uniform fracturing profile in a heterogeneous formation. For example, in a cased well, sealer balls can be intermittently injected into the fracturing fluid to seal off fractures previously created. By this method, a more uniform fracturing profile can be effected. Where the formation is characteristics of a homogeneous strata, then the diverting agents may not be desired.

As mentioned earlier, other additives such as corrosion inhibitors, bactericides, etc., can be incorporated into the fracturing fluid. Of course, it is desired that such additives are compatible with the components of the fracturing fluid and not adversely influence the properties of the fracturing fluid. a

WORKING EXAMPLES The following examples are presented to specifically teach working embodiments of the invention. These examples are presented in addition to those illustrated in the attached figures.

EXAMPLE I A fracturing fluid is obtained by mixing percent by EXAMPLE II To show the criticality of the surfactant, the above composition is duplicated except the Plurafac A-24 is substituted with a condensation product obtained by reacting about 1 mole of an alcohol containing an average of about 24 carbon atoms with sufficient ethylene oxide to obtain a condensation product containing about 80 percent by weight of ethylene oxy groups in the condensation productsthe condensation product has an HLB of 20. This particular composition did not produce a viscous system, i.e., the viscosity was less than about 1 cp at 72F. This example also illustrates the criticality 0f the I-ILB, i.e., Example I contains a surfactant having an I-ILB of about 6 whereas the HLB of Example IIs surfactant is about 20.

EXAMPLE III The fracturing fluid is obtained by mixing 9.45 percent by volume of the stock solution identified in FIG. 1 with 85.13 percent hexane, and 5.42 percent distilled water. Thereafter there is added 3 lb/gal of silica flour 'filter paper.

EXAMPLE lV To test the characteristics of these systems to keep in suspension propping agents, the drop rate" was determined for a fracturing fluid containing 10- percent of the stock solution of FIG. l, and percent hexane, and for a second fluid which contains 5.42 percent distilled water, 9.45 percent of the stock solution of FIG. l,-and 85.13 percent hexane. Following the procedure of observing the time required for a 10 mesh glass bead to drop through the fluid contained in a 200 ml. graduated cylinder, the drop rate for both fluids was essentially zero over a time period of 1 hour.

EXAMPLE V The fluid loss properties of Fluid No. l in Example IV were determined. To this was added 3 lb of silica flour per gallon of Fluid 1. Following the previously described fluid loss procedure, the fluid loss properties of this fluid are 480 ml per l/2 hour. In addition, the fluid remains stable. That is, no phase separation was indicated.

EXAMPLE VI the invention. Rather, all equivalents obvious to, those skilled in the art are intended to be incorporated within the scope of the invention as defined inthe specification and appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A process of fracturing a gas producing well wherein substantially all of the components of a fracturing fluid are removed from the well bore after the well is returned to production, the process comprising injecting into the reservoir at a pressure sufficient to fracture the reservoir, a composition obtained by mixmg:

I. about 60 to about percent by volume of a hydrocarbon containing an average of about 3 to about 10 carbon atoms per molecule,

2. up to about 20 percent by volume of water, and

3. about 2.5 to about 25 percent by volume of a surfactant obtained by condensing an alcohol containing an average of about 4 to about 20 carbon atoms per molecule with about 1 to about 20 moles of an alkene oxide, 4

and thereafter injecting the fracturing fluid into the reservoir at a sufficient rate to effect fracturing of the reservoir.

2. The process of claim 1 wherein the hydrocarbon of the fracturing fluid contains an average of about 4 to about 7 carbon atoms per molecule.

3. The process of claim 1 wherein the fracturing fluid contains less than 10 percent by volume of water.

4. The process of claim 1 wherein the fracturing fluid contains a surfactant obtained by condensing an alcohol containing an average of about 10 to about'l4 carbon atoms with about 1 to about 20 moles of ethylene oxide.

5. The process of claim i wherein the alkene oxide contains about 2 to about 4 carbon atoms.

a. The process of claim 1 wherein the fracturing fluid contains about 0.01 to about it) percent by volume of a cosurfacta nt which is selected from the group consisting of alcohols, ketones, aldehydes, esters, amines, which contain about 1 to about carbon atoms per molecule.

7. The process of claim 1 wherein the water phase of the fracturing fluid contains about 0.001 to about 5 percent. by weight of electrolyte.

8. The process of claim 1 wherein the fracturing fluid contains about 0.1 to about 5 lbs of a propping agent lar weight oil-soluble polymer is a polyisobutylene.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2828265 *Feb 5, 1952Mar 25, 1958Standard Oil CoComplex of polyoxyalkylene compounds with metal salts and organic liquids thickened with same
US3335794 *Aug 19, 1965Aug 15, 1967Union Oil CoSecondary recovery method with surfactant in fracturing fluid
US3500932 *Sep 24, 1968Mar 17, 1970Marathon Oil CoUse of micellar solution to precede sandfrac treatments
US3545546 *Apr 1, 1969Dec 8, 1970Marathon Oil CoFluid design for well stimulation applications
US3557874 *Sep 30, 1969Jan 26, 1971Cities Service Oil CoMethod of drilling and completing a gas well
US3603400 *Mar 16, 1970Sep 7, 1971Marathon Oil CoFracturing subterranean formations using micellar dispersions
US3747681 *May 26, 1972Jul 24, 1973Marathon Oil CoHydraulic fracturing process using polyethylene oxide based fracturing fluid
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Frick, Petroleum Production Handbook , 1963, p. 47 19
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3977472 *Oct 16, 1975Aug 31, 1976Exxon Production Research CompanyMethod of fracturing subterranean formations using oil-in-water emulsions
US6260621 *Sep 28, 2000Jul 17, 2001Nor Industries, Inc.Process for fracing an oil or gas formation
US7722759Nov 2, 2006May 25, 2010Pariette Ridge Development Company Llc.Apparatus, system, and method for separating minerals from mineral feedstock
US8025099Dec 1, 2008Sep 27, 2011Gasfrac Energy Services Inc.Water transfer system
US8727004Jun 1, 2009May 20, 2014Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Methods of treating subterranean formations utilizing servicing fluids comprising liquefied petroleum gas and apparatus thereof
WO2010025540A1 *Sep 1, 2009Mar 11, 2010Gasfrac Energy Services Inc.Liquified petroleum gas fracturing methods
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/308.4, 507/261, 507/922
International ClassificationC09K8/64
Cooperative ClassificationY10S507/922, C09K8/64
European ClassificationC09K8/64
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 13, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: MARATHON OIL COMPANY, AN OH CORP
Free format text: ASSIGNS THE ENTIRE INTEREST IN ALL PATENTS AS OF JULY 10,1982 EXCEPT PATENT NOS. 3,783,944 AND 4,260,291. ASSIGNOR ASSIGNS A FIFTY PERCENT INTEREST IN SAID TWO PATENTS AS OF JULY 10,1982;ASSIGNOR:MARATHON PETROLEUM COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:004172/0421
Effective date: 19830420