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Publication numberUS3819107 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 25, 1974
Filing dateOct 8, 1970
Priority dateOct 8, 1970
Publication numberUS 3819107 A, US 3819107A, US-A-3819107, US3819107 A, US3819107A
InventorsR Ryder
Original AssigneeR Ryder
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Packaging apparatus and method
US 3819107 A
Abstract
Packaging apparatus and method for dust-free storage, shipping, mixing and dispensing dust-laden cement mixtures. Included is a waterproof bag having a neck portion provided with a dust check valve, a storage, shipping and dispensing box, and a water measuring bag. The bag is partially filled with cement; the dust valve is spaced substantially from the open end of the neck of the bag, and a storage and shipping seal is secured around the gathered neck of the bag. In the method of using the apparatus, water is measured in the water bag and dispensed through the neck of the cement bag through the dust valve into the cement in the bag. The water and cement are mixed in the bag, the bag is placed in the box, and the neck of the bag is spread over the edges of the box. The opened box-supported bag serves as a mud pail or bucket for the mixture.
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United States Patent 1191 Ryder, Jr.

[54] PACKAGING APPARATUS AND METHOD [76] Inventor: Richard E. Ryder, Jr., 901

Pinecrest, Richardson, Tex. 75080 [22] Filed: Oct. 8, 1970 [21] App]. No.: 79,018

52 us. 01 229/62.s, 150/9, 206/47 A 511 161. ct B65d 31/14 581 Field 61 Search... 150/9, 10; 206/47 A, DIG. 6;

France 229/63 [111 3,819,107 1 June 25, 1974 Primary Examiner-Herbert F. Ross Assistant Examiner-Steven E. Lipman Attorney, Agent, or Firm-H. Mathews Garland 5 7 ABSTRACT Packaging apparatus and method for dust-free storage, shipping, mixing and dispensing dust-laden cement mixtures. Included is a waterproof bag having a neck portion provided with a dust check valve, a storage, shipping and dispensing box, and a water measuring bag. The bag is partially filled with cement; the dust valve is spaced substantially from the open end of the neck of the bag, and a storage and shipping seal is secured around the gathered neck of the bag. In the method of using the apparatus, water is measured in the water bag and dispensed through the neck of the cement bag through the dust valve into the cement in the bag. The water and cement are mixed in the bag, the bag is placed in the box, and the neck of the bag is spread over the edges of the box. The opened boxsupported bag serves as a mud pail or bucket for the mixture.

5 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJUNZSIHH R ichord E. Ryder, Jr.

Fig.4

ATTORNEY PACKAGING APPARATUS AND METHOD This invention relates to packaging apparatus, and more particularly related to apparatus for packaging dust-laden cement for dust-free storage, shipping, mixing, and dispensing.

Cements used in the construction of buildings and other structures, and for such functions as insulating pipe and the like, have traditionally been sold in conventional bags from which the cements are emptied for mixing, or, if mixed within the bag, liquids are added with the neck of the bag fully open. Those cements sold and used for insulating purposes often require small quantities to be removed from large containers into mixing containers where water and other liquids as are needed are added. In most all of the steps involved in handling cements with the presently available packaging apparatus dust is a serious problem. Workers actually handling the cement and in the vicinity of where it is being handled are exposed to the dust which settles on the skin of the workers and, particularly, often is inhaled by them. Some workers are allergic to the various components of cement mixtures, resulting in skin eruptions, ane often lung irritations and diseases are believed to have their origin in the presence of dust particles in the lungs of those who have worked with dustladen cements. Recently, legal actions have become common based on illness and death allegedly due to dust-affected lungs. Thus, it is a principal and most important object of the invention to provide apparatus and a method for handling, mixing, and using cement mixtures with a minimum of exposure to dust included in the mixtures.

In accordance with the invention there is provided an outer storage, shipping, and dispensing container comprising a box, a cement bag containable in the box having a dust seal or valve and a removable bag closure for use during storage and shipping and other handling preliminary to mixing and dispensing cement from the bag. Additionally, included in the packaging apparatus is a water measuring bag marked to indicate certain predetermined volume measurements for particular specified cement compositions. The method of using the packaging apparatus includes removing the storage and shipping seal, filling the water bag to a predetermined level, coupling the outlet of the water bag to the filling neck of the cement bag, dumping the water from the water bag through the dust valve in the neck of the cement bag without expulsion of dust from the bag, and kneading the cement in the cement bag to thoroughly mix the water and the cement composition. The bag is placed in the box, the dust valve is removed, and the neck of the bag is opened and folded back over the box edges for ready access to the cement water mixture. The entire operation is accomplished without manual contact with the cement and without expelling dust from the cement through the neck of the cement bag.

The objects and advantages of the invention will be better understood from the following detailed description of packaging apparatus embodying the invention taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein: I

FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective of the components of cement packaging, mixing, and dispensing apparatus embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the packaging appara tus illustrating an initial step in the cement mixing stage;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing the opened cement bag in the shipping carton with the cement mixed and ready for use;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged plan view of one form of dust seal or valve employed in the invention; and

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of another form of cement bag in accordance with the invention.

Referring to the drawings, FIG. 1 illustrates one embodiment of packaging apparatus embodying the invention. The packaging apparatus includes a cement storage, shipping, mixing, and dispensing bag 11, a water measuring and filling bag 12, and a shipping carton and mud bucket 13.

The cement bag 11 is a bag of conventional shape formed of a waterproof material, such as many of the currently available plastics. The bag is of sufficient length to provide a neck portion 14 which may comprise 30 to 50 percent of the overall length of the bag when filled to a suitable level by cement 15. When the bag has been filled to the desired level with the cement 15, it is closed by double seal arrangement, which includes a dust seal and valve 20 and a storage and shipping seal 21. At each of the seals the neck of the bag is gathered together sufficiently tightly that under normal conditions of storage, shipping, handling, and the like no dust or other material is expelled from the bag. The dust valve is secured around the gathered bagneck spaced a substantial distance fromthe open end 22 of the bag to facilitate dumping water into the bag, as will be explained in detail hereinafter. The particular dust seal and valve illustrated is formed by an elastic, arrowshaped member 23 wrapped in tight sea ing relationship around the bag neck 14 as shown in FIG. 1. The arrow member 23, as shown in enlarged detail in FIG. 4, includes a shaft portion24, a tall 25, and a head 30. The tail is provided with a hole 311 to receive the head 30 when the seal is in encircling relationship as in FIG. 1 around the bag neck. The head 30 has opposing, backwardly sloping slots 22 between which is defined a narrow head portion 33 so that when the dust valve is secured around the bag neck, the head is inserted through the hole 31 of the tail 25. The reduced portion 33 of the head between the slots 32 is received in the hole 31 with the outward pointed end portion of the head being disposed on one side of the base 25 and the remaining base of the head and the shaft of the arrow member encircling the bag neck 14. Engagement of the head through the tail of the arrow member locks the dust valve in tight, encircling yieldable relationship around the bag neck. The nature of the elastic material forming the arrow member, such as rubber or any other suitable form of elastic material, and the length of the arrow member, particularly between the opening 31 and the slots 32, determine the character of the dust seal and valve formed with the bag neck. Preferably, the valve is sufficiently tight that normal handlingof the bag with cement contained therein, even in the ab sence of the storage and shipping seal 21, will not cause expulsion of dust from the bag past the valve, while the valve will yield to water introduced through the neck portion for mixing with the cement in the bag. It will be recognized that other forms of dust seals and valves may be employed in the bag neck so long as such seal and valve precludes dust expulsion while admitting water for mixing. Such other forms of valves may include other shapes of rubber members or suitable internal or integral valves which would permit filling of the bag with the cement 15 while subsequently performing the dust seal function and admitting water to the bag.

The storage and shipping seal 21 is any suitable form of wire or plastic ribbon or tape which may tightly encircle the bag neck for sealing the bag under all normal handling conditions while being readily removable when use of the cement in the bag is desired.

The mixing water bag 12 is any suitable form of waterproof bag which may be made of similar or the same material as the bag 11 and is provided with a discharge opening 34 at one corner and a somewhat centrally located air opening 35 at the same end of the bag as the corner opening 34 to facilitate the discharge of the water from the bag so that it will flow smoothly into the cement bag. The water bag is provided with two pair of spaced gauge or water level marks 4t) and 41 inscribed around the bag at distances from the closed end of the bag to provide an accurate gauge of predetermined quantities of water in the bag during the process of mixing the cement. Obviously, any number of gauge lines may be provided on the bag, only two sets being shown by way of example, indicating that one quantity of water may be required for one particular cement mix while still another quantity is needed for a mix of a different character.

The shipping carton mud pail 13 is a conventional, rectangular box having a bottom 42, sides 43, and top flaps 44 which may be folded in sealed relationship over the filled cement bag 11 during storage and shipping, may be tumed outwardly, as shown in FIG. I, after removal of the cement bag and preparatory to mixing, and may be turned inwardly to provide a mud pail as shown in FIG. 3. One opposite pair of the sides 43 have hand holds or slots 45 to facilitate manual handling of the carton during storage and shipping, and subsequently when it is converted to mud pail use.

After the bag 11 has been filled with the desired volume of cement l5 and the dust seal and valve 26 and storage and shipping seal 21 placed around the gathered bag neck 14, the bag is placed in the shipping carton 13. The water bag 12 is folded and placed within the shipping carton beside or on top of the filled cement bag. The flaps 44 are turned upwardly and inwardly from the position of FIG. 1 into mutually overlapping relationship over the cement bag and suitably sealed for shipping and storing. When the time arrives for mixing and use of the cement, the carton is opened, and the flaps 44 are folded outwardly to the positions shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 or all the way inwardly to the positions represented in FIG. 3. The dust seal and valve 20 is checked to determine if it is tight prior to removal of the storage and shipping seal 21. The seal 21 is then removed, and the neck 14 is spread and smoothed and slightly flared to the shape shown in FIG. 2. The water bag 12 is filled with water to the desired level for the particular cement in the bag 11 as gauged by the markings 40 and 41. The neck portion 12a of the bag 12 is introduced with the corner including the opening 34 being inserted first into the neck 14 of the cement bag. The neck 12a of the bag 12 is preferably of sufficient length that it may be gathered and inserted into the bag neck 14 prior to lifting the water-filled bottom portion of the bag 12 to minimize a possibility of spillage of the water. With the water bag neck 12a inserted inside the cement bag neck 14, as shown in FIG. 2, an inner and outer sleeve relationship is established between the bags, which may be manually held intact while water is poured from the water bag into the cement bag. The open end of the water bag is inserted to a depth into the cement bag which is just above the dust seal and valve 20 so that the valve is not opened or expanded to cause any dust expulsion until the water is poured into the bag. Manually holding the bag inner and outer sleeve arrangement together in the relationship of FIG. 2, the water filled lower portion of the bag 12 is lifted carefully to pour the water from the water bag through the bag neck 12a and the cement bag neck I4 past the dust valve into the cement in the bag 11. As the water flows from the bag 12 through the dust valve, the valve is expanded by the mass of the water admitting the water through the neck 14 into the cement body 115 without permitting escape of the dust from the cement through the neck outwardly from the bag. The elastic character of the dust seal and valve, coacting with the flowing water mass within the bag neck, provides an opening only of a size sufficient to admit the water with no space available for dust escape.

All of the water in the water bag is emptied into the body of cement into the bag 11 to provide a cement mix of the desired consistency. The dust seal is left on the neck 14 of the cement bag while the cement and water are kneaded thoroughly to mix them. The seal prevents escape of the dust from the bag while mixing water and cement in the bag. It will be evident that if desired, the storage and shipping seal 21 could be reattached around the gathered neck 14 of the cement bag after the water is poured into the bag, though generally it is not necessary.

When the cement and water have been thoroughly mixed, the flaps 44 of the shipping carton are turned fully inwardly against the inside surfaces of the sides 43, and the bag 11 with the mixed cement is placed back in the carton. The dust seal and valve is removed, and the neck 14 is expanded and folded downwardly over the top and upper side portions of the carton 13 is somewhat overlapping relationship as at 15 in FIG. 3. The mixture of cement l5 and water 46 is now available for use, and it may be readily dipped from the mud pail formed by the converted carton 13.

The entire process of admitting water to the cement bag, mixing the cement and water in the bag, and opening the bag and preparing it and the shipping carton for use of the mixed cement is carried out without the necessity of physically contacting or inhaling the cement which might damage the skin and lungs of the user. In addition to avoidance of health hazards by containment of the dust particles of the cement mix and prevention of the users contact with the cement, the physical cleanliness of the work area is enhanced because there is no spillage of either the cement before mixing with water, during, or after. Additionally, since the bag 11 serves as a mixing container, and the bag I1 and the carton 13 function together as a mud pail or bucket upon completion of the cement mixture, the necessity for additional containers is eliminated. A worker may go on a job with only the kit of components illustrated in FIG. 1 and thus have everything necessary except tools for applying the mixed cement to the desired surface. He needs neither a bucket nor a mixing implement due to the capability of carrying out the mixing manually completely within the cement bag. Additionally, the packaging apparatus and mixing method more readily adapts itself than presently available approaches to the handling of small quantities of cement. In many instances smaller quantities are desired, such as for smaller jobs and when work areas are at some what inaccessible locations or require the holding of materials during working, so that the work may be accomplished much more efficiently by having a small quantity available.

Another form of cement storage, shipping, and mixing bag which may be used in accordance with the invention is illustrated in FIG. 5. The bag 60 is more readily adaptable to large cement volumes than the bag 11. The bag has a closed upper end portion M with a sidewardly extending neck or fill sleeve 62. The neck 62 is secured through the side 63 of the bag, extending laterally along the inside top portion of the bag opening into the bag at 64. Fluids admitted to the open end 65 of the neck 62 flow through the sleeve into the bag, discharging from the sleeve at 64 into the bag to mix with the cement 70 contained in the bag. The neck 62 has a dust seal and valve 20, as previously described, spaced substantially inwardly from the open end 62 of the neck adjacent to the bag side 63. During storage and shipping, the outer end portion of the neck 62 is closed by the seal band 21. The bag 60 may be shipped in cartons, such as 13, or may be handled more as conventional cement bags are, being stacked and moved about without the benefit of outer containers. If handled within a container, such as 113, the mixing procedure is generally about the same as that described with respect to FIGS. 2 and 3, though it will be recognized that some slight different bag positions may be required to admit the water from the water bag through the neck 62 into the bag 60. Also, the bag 60 may be turned on its back side, opposite the side 63, with the fill neck 62 then extending upwardly. The seal 21 is removed from the bag, and water is introduced into the bag through the neck and the dust seal and valve 2t]! from a water bag, such as 12, as described with respect to FIG. 2. When a sufficient amount of water is added to the cement 70 in the bag, the cement and water are kneaded manually until complete mixing is achieved. The side 63 may then be split to provide access to the cement in the bag. The net result of the use of the bag 66 is the same as that previously discussed with the complete handling and mixing of the cement accomplished without the necessity for physical contact with the cement or exposure to cement dust expelled from the bag.

What is claimed and desired to be obtained by Letters Patent is:

1. Packaging apparatus for containing, mixing, and dispensing functions comprising: a flexible water-proof bag containing a predetermined quantity of powdered cement for storage, mixing, and dispensing said cement, said bag having a filling and dispensing neck for filling said bag, admission of liquids to said bag for mixing said cement, and dispensing the mixed materials; and a dust seal and valve comprising an elongated flexible longitudinally elastic member connected with said filling neck tightly gathering said neck together in folded closed relationship during; normal storage and handling of said bag with said powdered cement enclosed therein, said member being sufficiently yieldable under the pressure of liquid introduced into an open end of said filling neck to perform a valve function for admitting said liquid to said bag into said powdered cement and any dust included therewith without expulsion of said dust therefrom and to permit mixing of said liquid and said cement while confining said dust within said bag.

2. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein said dust seal and valve is spaced from the open end of said neck of said bag a substantial distance to permit insertion of a discharge portion of a liquid container into said neck between said dust seal and valve and said open end of said neck.

3. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein said bag is sealed at opposite ends and. said neck comprises a sleeve-like member extending through one side of said bag at one end thereof substantially perpendicular to said side of said bag, the inward end of said member extending into said bag along the adjacent end thereof.

4. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 including a storage and shipping seal around said neck between said dust seal and valve and the open end of said neck of said bag.

5. Apparatus in accordance with. claim 1 wherein said dust seal and valve is removably secured around said neck of said bag, tightly gathering said neck and yieldable to admit liquid through said neck to the powdered cement in said bag while precluding expulsion of said cement from said bag through said neck.

=k =l= =l=

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4506783 *Dec 17, 1979Mar 26, 1985Shila MorganrothHair bleaching art
US5390553 *Dec 22, 1992Feb 21, 1995Lynn; Lewis G.Liquid sampling apparatus and method
US5632554 *Feb 1, 1995May 27, 1997Duracell Inc.Slurry forming process using an inflatable/collapsible bag within a mixing device
US5938016 *Sep 2, 1994Aug 17, 1999Erdtmann; Stefan L.Cosmetics receptacle
US6364105 *Nov 6, 2000Apr 2, 2002Canberra CorporationSystem for dispensing premeasured quantities of concentrated materials
US7195394Jul 19, 2004Mar 27, 2007Vijay SinghMethod for resonant wave mixing in closed containers
US7270233Nov 26, 2005Sep 18, 2007Kindt John HPackage for separate compounds to be mixed
US7607819 *Dec 31, 2004Oct 27, 2009Mark GaetaDisposable coupling and liner for containers
US7837089May 29, 2008Nov 23, 2010International PaperBulk material box
US8668087Dec 22, 2011Mar 11, 2014United States Gypsum CompanyTwo-phase packaging of ready mix joint compound
US8708003 *Feb 11, 2008Apr 29, 2014Grant MorrisSystem for transferring fill material
US20100006177 *Feb 11, 2008Jan 14, 2010Grant MorrisSystem for Transferring Fill Material
US20120269966 *Apr 20, 2011Oct 25, 2012Hector Ureta-MoralesCementitious adhesive delivery and application system
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WO2002012080A1 *Aug 4, 2000Feb 14, 2002Einstone IncPackaging and method for mixing deactivated cement
WO2012143768A1 *Apr 4, 2012Oct 26, 2012Innovative Mortar Solutions, S.A.P.I. De C.V.Cementitious adhesive delivery and application system
WO2014055029A1 *Oct 4, 2013Apr 10, 2014Fagerdala CapitalMethod for avoiding dust during mixture of dry substances and blending components
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/219, 383/904
International ClassificationB65D77/06, B65D63/10
Cooperative ClassificationB65D63/1027, B65D77/062, Y10S383/904
European ClassificationB65D77/06B, B65D63/10B3