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Publication numberUS3819153 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 25, 1974
Filing dateApr 26, 1972
Priority dateApr 26, 1972
Also published asDE2319276A1, DE2319276B2
Publication numberUS 3819153 A, US 3819153A, US-A-3819153, US3819153 A, US3819153A
InventorsG Hurst, J Hobbins
Original AssigneeHurst Performance
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rescue tool
US 3819153 A
Abstract
A lightweight, fluid powered portable rescue tool for applying high magnitude, push/pull forces comprising a base and a pair of force arms supported for pivotal movement adjacent to inner ends about spaced parallel axes on opposite sides of the longitudinal axis of said base. Fluid actuated force means is movable along the longitudinal axis of the base for pivoting the arms to move the outer ends toward and away from each other to close and open. Handle means is provided for manipulating the rescue tool to position the outer ends of the arms in the desired location and a pair of controls is disposed on opposite sides of the base conveniently adjacent the handles for controlling the fluid actuated force means to pivot the force arms toward or away from one another as desired.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Paten [191 [1:11 3,819,153 Hurst et al. 1 June 25, 1974 RESCUE TOOL 2,797,889 7/1957 Talboys 254/18 Inventors: George H. Hurst, Huntingdon 3,635,440 1/1972 Van Gompel 254/124 X Valley; James F. Hobbins, Philadelphia, both of Pa.

Hurst Performance, lnc., Warminster, Pa.

Filed: Apr. 26, 1972 Appl. No.: 247,553

Assignee:

2/1950 Miller 6/1953 Primary Examiner-Othell M. Simpson Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Coffee and Sweeney 57] ABSTRACT A lightweight, fluid powered portable rescue tool for applying high magnitude, push/pull forces comprising a base and a pair of force arms supported for pivotal movement adjacent to inner ends about spaced parallel axes on opposite sides of the longitudinal axis of said base. Fluid actuated force means is movable along the longitudinal axis of the base for pivoting the arms to move the outer ends toward and away from each other to close and open. Handle means is provided for manipulating the rescue tool to position the outer ends of the arms in the desired location and a pair of controls is disposed on opposite sides of the base conveniently adjacent the handles for controlling the fluid actuated force means to pivot the force arms toward or away from one another as desired.

29 Claims, 13 Drawing Figures PATENTEU JUH251974 SHEEI 2 [IF 3 PATENTEDJUHZSISM SHEET 3 BF 3 RESCUE TOOL The present invention relates to a new and improved lightweight, fluid powered, readily manipulable rescue tool for applying high magnitude, push/pull forces. The portable rescue tool in accordance with the present invention is particularly well adapted for aiding in the rescue of auto accident victims which are trapped in a wreckage. The tool is capable of rapidly raising crushed car roofs, removing and opening crash jammed doors, lifting collapsed steering columns and even overturning or righting cars or separating the wreckages of several cars which have become entangled together.

The rescue implement in accordance with the present invention is portable, lightweight, and is easily manipulated by a single, unskilled operator. The tool is capable of supplying high magnitude, push/pull forces and can be used for jacking and wedging operations as well as for prying open trunk lids, compartments, doors, roofs and the like of automobiles, airplanes, trucks or other structures.

In many instances, especially in automobile accidents, victims may be trapped under or within the car and it is important in saving lives to be able to open up the car wreckage rapidly in one manner or another in order to remove or extricate the victim and provide the necessary medical treatment. Two of the most common means for freeing accident victims from wreckages are acetylene gas cutting torches and rotary grinding wheels or saws. However, these devices present many hazards, often causing fires, excessive heat and flying abrasives. Moreover these devices are considerably slower in operation and in many accidents a matter of a few minutes or seconds may mean the difference between life and death of a victim.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved fluid powered, portable rescue tool for applying high magnitude, push/pull forces.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved rescue tool which is light in weight and is provided with a self contained power source not requiring electricity or other external energy source for operation.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a new andimproved light weight, fluid powered, portable rescue tool of the character described which is capable of supplying push/pull forces up to.l2,000 pounds or more which forces can act through relatively large distances of 2 to 4 feet, yet still providing a tool which is easily manipulated into the desired position.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved light weight, fluid powered, portable rescue tool which is capable of raising crushed automobile roofs, hoods, lids, etc., capable of rapidly opening and removing crash jammed doors, capable of lifting collapsed steering columns away from accident victims'and also capable of righting overturned cars or separating the wreckages of cars or trucks which have become entangled together.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved rescue tool of the character described which is easily handled and positioned by one man alone without requiring aid or help from others.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a newand improved rescue tool of the character described which can be wedged into a relatively small crevice or crack for the purpose of opening or spreading apart the adjacent members.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved rescue tool of the character described which is easily controlled to exert either push or pull forces of high magnitude and which is easily controlled from either or both sides of the tool while supported by one or both hands of the operator.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved rescue tool of the character described employing a unique control system whereby the tool may be turned completely over and yet still is controllable with convenientlylocated control means operable by either the right or the left hand of the operator, which control automatically locks the tool in an open, closed or intermediate position when released by the operator.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved rescue tool of the character described which is extremely reliable in operation and exceptionally suitable for use in emergency situations requiring adherence to exacting safety standards.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved rescue tool of the character described which produces no flames, heat, flying abrasives, sparks or molten material when used.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved rescue tool of the character described which can be used with safety even in the presence of flammable fluids and which is capable of extremely quick and rapid actuation and manipulation for the purpose of rescuing crash victims in automobiles, airplanes, boats, construction, mining, farm, industrial and other emergency accident situations.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved rescue tool of the character de scribed which is compact and light in weight, and which is readily portable by vehicle from place to place.

Another object is to provide a tool of the character described which is capable of being rapidly put into operation upon arrival at a crash or accident site.

The foregoing and other objects and advantages of the present invention are accomplished in an illustrative embodiment comprising a new and improved light weight, compact, fluid powered, portable rescue tool which is capable of applying high magnitude, push/pull forces acting through relatively large distances. The tool comprises a base and a pair of force arms supported for pivotal movement adjacent their inner ends about spaced apart, parallel pivot axes on opposite sides of the longitudinal center axis of the base. Fluid actuated force means is movable along said longitudinal axis for pivoting thearrns to move the outer ends thereof toward and away from each other to close and open. Handle means is provided for ready manipulation and positioning of the tool to position the outer ends of the force arms in any desired location. At least one pair of controls is disposed on opposite sides of the base adjacent the handles for controlling the fluid actuated force means from either side of the tool to actuate the force arms as desired to provide high magnitude push or pull forces.

Fluid under pressureis supplied from a portable, in ternal combustion engine driven by a hydraulic pump unit and is directed into and returned from the tool via flexible hydraulic hoses. a

For a better understanding of the present invention reference should be had to the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the drawings in which FIG. 1 illustrates a rescue tool in accordance with the present invention as the tool in use for applying a high magnitude pushing or jacking force for lifting up one side of an automotive vehicle while the tool is being manipulated and controlled by only one hand of the operator;

FIG. 2 illustrates another common use of the rescue tool wherein tension or pulling forces are applied through a pair of chains to lift the crumpled steering column off the chest of an accident victim. In this illustration the tool is shown as it is manipulated with both hands of the operator;

FIG. 3 illustrates another use of the rescue tool for wedging open and prying apart a crash jammed door of a vehicle in order that a victim inside the vehicle may be aided;

FIG. 4 is an elevational view of the rescue tool with portions broken away and shown in section for clarity;

FIG. 5 is an elevational view of the tool taken substantially at right anles to the view in FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary, cross sectional view taken substantially along line 66 of FIG. 5 and illustrating a portion of the control system of the tool;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary, cross sectional view taken substantially along line 77 of FIG. 5 and illustrating another feature of the control system of the tool;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary, elevational view of a portion of the rescue tool looking in the direction of the arrows 8-8 on FIG. 5;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the main body or base structure of the tool;

FIG. 10 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken substantially along lines 10-10of FIG. 5 and illustrating the control valve of the control system of the tool;

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary, transverse sectional view taken substantially along lines 11-11 of FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially along lines 12-12 of FIG. 6 and illustrating the operator control means of the control system of the tool; and

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary, sectional view taken substantially along lines 13-13 of FIG. 12.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, therein is illustrated a new and improved, lightweight, fluid powered, portable rescue tool which is capable of applying high magnitude, push/pull forces acting through a relatively large distance or spread and constructed in accordance with the features of the present invention. The tool is generally referred to by the reference numeral and as best illustrated in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, is especially well suited for use at the scene of vehicular accidents and the like. The lightweight tool is capable of applying high magnitude, push/pull forces in any desired direction with relative ease of manipulation by a single, unskilled operator 22, using either or both hands for precise control of the tool as shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3. The rescue tool is capable of supplying high magnitude push/pull forces for righting or overturning a vehicle (FIG. 1) or for applying tension or pulling forces to lift a collapsed steering column from the chest of an accident victim as in FIG. 2. In

FIG. 3 the tool is shown as it is used for wedging open a car door by forcing the outer end of the force arms of the tool into a narrow crevice or crack between a crash jammed door and the car body and thereafter applying a spreading or wedging force for opening the crash jammed door so that the victim may be removed from the vehicle for medical treatment.

While the tool 20 may have a primary usage for auto mobile or road vehicular accidents as shown in connection with the crashed automobiles 24 in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, it is especially well adapted for general emergency use by ambulance, fire, police, race track and other rescue teams and personnel in a wide variety of accident or emergency situations which may involve aviation, marine, construction, mining, farm, trains, industrial and any situation wherein a rapid, high magnitude pull or push force application is required.

In accordance with the present invention the tool or implement 20 is fluid powered and for this purpose includes a lightweight, portable self contained fluid power generating unit generally referred to by the nu meral 26 in FIGS. 1 and 3. As best shown in FIG. 1 the generating unit 26 includes an internal combustion engine 28 (preferably an easy starting gasoline engine),

which engine drives a high pressure, hydraulic pump (not shown). The engine is mounted on base 30 which serves as a hydraulic fluid reservoir. The fluid power unit 26 includes a convenient carrying handle 32 and overall is light in weight and compact in size to be conveniently carried in a rescue vehicle, aircraft, helicopter, etc.

Hydraulic fluid is supplied from the reservoir 30 to the hydraulic pump driven by the engine 28 and the pump produces the required volume flow rate of hydraulic fluid under pressure for delivery to the tool 20 through a high pressure, flexible, hydraulic supply line 34. The pump has two stages; the first stage operates up to 500 PSI at high volume flow rate which will open the tool 32 inches from the closed position in approximately 15 seconds under no load or very light load. As the load exceeds the capacity of the output of the first stage, automatic internal valving in the pump will shift to a second stage which operates at 5 ,000 PSI with a reduced volume flow rate. Forty-five seconds are required for a 32 inch opening of the tool under greater loads. Both the first stage and the second stage close the tool at a slower rate than opening due to the reduced effective piston area. The benefit of the first stage is to open the tool at a more rapid rate to quickly move jaws into engagement with the load. A model of such a pump which works well is the Power-Packer pump model PC 9964-12-00. Low pressure exhaust hydraulic fluid is returned from the rescue tool 20 to the fluid reservoir 30 of the fluid power unit 26 via a flexible, hydraulic return line 36. The hydraulic lines 34 and 36 are bound together in a flexible bundle as best shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 and are readily flexible so as not to interfere with the operators manipulation of the rescue tool 20.

In accordance with the present invention, the rescue tool includes an elongated, hollow tubular, main body or housing 40 which is formed of high strength, relatively lightweight material such as 17-4 PI-I cast steel which is properly heat treated and finished in order to withstand relatively high operating pressures of approximately 5,000 psi developed by the fluid power generating unit 26. The housing 40 includes an elongated, cy-

lindrical fluid chamber or cylinder 42 having relatively thin, high strength walls, and closed at the forward end by an annular, integrally formed forward end wall 44 as best shown in FIGS. 4 and 9. A fluid actuated piston 46 is slidably disposed within the cylinder 42 for controlled movement toward and away from opposite ends of the cylinder. The piston 46 is secured to the rearward end of a piston rod 48 by means of a lock nut 50 which is threaded onto a rearward end portion of the piston rod. An internal sealing ring 52 (FIG. 4) is provided to seal between the internal bore of the piston 46 and the adjacent immediate diameter, shouldered portion on the piston rod 48. The outer surface or perimeter of the piston is provided with a high pressure, piston ring 54 adapted to withstand hydraulic pressures up to 7,500 psi and seal between the piston and cylinder walls.

The forward end of the piston rod 48 extends out of the forward end of the cylinder through an enlarged, generally cylindrical boss 56 which is formed in the center of the integral forward end wall 44. The boss is provided with a number of internal annular grooves 58 and 59 (FIG. 4). The high pressure, sealing and pack ing ring 60 is seated in groove 59 to prevent fluid leakage around the rod at the forward end of the cylinder. In groove 58 there is a piston rod sleeve bearing 57 to support and guide the piston rod in its axial movement.

The rearward end of the cylinder 42 is closed by a removable cap or end wall 62 which is provided with a high pressure sealing ring 64 around the outer periphery to seal and prevent fluid leakage from the rear end of the cylinder. The rear end wall 62 is held in place by means of a snap ring 66 which is seated within an internal annular groove provided in the cylinder wall, spaced closely adjacent to the rearward end. The snap ring 66 is retained in place by a radial lug 68 and cap screw 70 which is threaded into the rear end wall or cap of the cylinder. The end of lug 68 opposite screw 70 fits in the space between the ends of snap ring 66 thus preventing movement and disengagement of the snap ring 66.

As best shown in FIG. 4 the piston 46 is formed with concave annular recesses on opposite side faces in order to reduce the piston weight. The longitudinal axis of reciprocation of the piston rod 48 and the cylinder 42 define the general, longitudinal axis of the rescue tool as a whole and by supplying pressurized fluid to either the forward or rearward side of the piston 46, the piston rod 48 is powered to extend or retract along this axis relative to the tool body.

In accordance with the present invention, at the forward end the tool body 40 includes a pair of parallel, spaced apart, laterally extending arm support brackets or flanges 72 (FIG. 9). The brackets are spaced equal distances above and below the longitudinal axis of the tool and cylinder 42 (as viewed in FIGS. 4 and 5) and extend generally transverse thereof and are spaced forwardly of the forward end wall 44 of the cylinder. As best shown in FIG. 4, the outer ends of the arm support brackets are spaced laterally outboard of the outer walls of the cylinder on opposite sides thereof and there is provided a substantially thickened cylindrical boss 74 adjacent the outer ends. The bosses on one flange 72 are in coaxial alignment with those on the opposite flange in order to carry a pair of fixed pivot axles 76 for supporting a pair of substantially triangular shaped high strength, forwardly extending force arms 80 (FIGS. 4 and 5). The arm supporting pivot axles or pins 76 are disposed equidistantly on opposite sides of the longitudinal axis of the cylinder 42 and are generally normal to the direction of the longitudinal axis of the piston rod. The pins form fixed pivot axes for the force arms 80 relative to the tool body 40 and support the arms for pivotal movement about the rearward end adjacent the outside comers of the arms shown in FIG. 4.

The thickened annular bosses 74 adjacent the outer ends of the flanges journal the pair of pivot pins 76 which are held in place or retained in each pair of aligned bosses by means of C-type snap ring washers 82. As best shown in FIG. 9, the arm support flanges 72 are integrally joined with the forward end portion of the fluid cylinder 42 of the tool body 40 by means of forwardly and outwardly tapering gussets 84 of angular cross section. At the outer ends of'each pair of gussets, there is provided a spacing web 87 extending transversely between the spaced apart arm support flanges 72. The webs 87 are perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the tool and project laterally outwardly beyond the outer ends of the arm support flanges 72. Therefore webs 87 protect the tool controls and provide a surface to support the tool squarely when it is set upon that edge. The cast steel tool body 40! as shown in FIG. 9 provides for a relatively open area of ready access to the forward end of the piston rod 48 and the boss 56 on the forward end wall 44 of the cylinder 42 via enlarged, generally trapezoidal shaped side openings 83 formed between opposite extending pairs of outwardly andforwardly tapered gussets 84. Triangularly shaped openings 85 are formed between pairs of gussets 84 on the same side of the tool body thus providing access from all four sides to the forward end portion of the cylinder 42.

In accordance with the present invention the outer end of the piston rod 48 is provided with a pair of spaced apart cross head flanges 86 having aligned apertures therein for accommodating a pair of linkage pins 88. The linkage pins 88 are parallel to the pivot pins 76 and are retained within thecross head flanges by suitable C-type snap rings 82. The linkage pins pivotally support the rearward or inner ends of a pair of short link members 90. The outer ends of the link members 90 are pivotally interconnected to the rearward and inner corners of the triangularly shaped force arms 80 by means of pivot pins 92 which are likewise secured in place by snap rings 82. The inside pivot pins 92 form movable pivot axes for the force arms with respect to the fixed pivot axes formed by the: outer pivot pins 76. Accordingly, when the piston rod 48 and cross head 86 on the outer end are moved outwardly or forwardly away from the position of FIG. 4 the force arms pivot in opposite directions about the pins 76 and are caused to open as the outer ends of the arms move away from each other as shown in FIGS. 1 and 3. When high pressure fluid is introduced into the forward end of the cylinder 42, the piston rod 48 is retracted causing the cross head 86 to move toward the forward end wall 44 causing the force arms 80 to close as the outer ends move toward one another as shown in FIG. 2.

Because each set of linkage interconnecting each force arm 80 with the single cross head structure 86 on the piston rod 48 is identical with the other and of equal mechanical length, the force arms 80 are caused to move in unison at the same angular rate but in opposite directions as the piston 46 moves in either direction under the influence of high pressure hydraulic fluid in the cylinder 42.

As viewed in FIG. 4, with the piston 46 in the rod retracted position, when pressurized fluid is supplied to the rearward end of the cylinder 42 adjacent the rearward end wall 62, the piston rod 48 is forced forwardly. This causes the left hand force arm 80 to pivot in a counterclockwise direction about its fixed support pin 76 and the right hand force arm 80 pivots in a clockwise direction about the right hand, fixed support pivot pin 76. As this occurs, the pair of connecting links 90 between the linkage pins 88 on the cross head 86 and the pivot pins 92 on the inner and rearward corners of the force arms 80 also pivot in opposite directions until the forward face of the piston 46 engages a stop surface 44a on the forward end wall 44 of the cylinder. When the stop surface is engaged, a maximum opening of the force arms 80 has been attained.

In a prototype rescue tool, constructed in accordance with the features of the present invention, the lateral spacing between the fixed pivot axes of the pins '76 is approximately 10 inches and the force arms are approximately 22 inches in length from the outer tips to the inside comers adjacent to pivots pins 92. The cylinder 42 has an inside diameter of approximately inches with a maximum stroke length of approximately 3 inches. With fluid at 5,000 psi, the outer ends of the force arms 80 are moved from the closed position as shown in FIG. 4 to an open position as in FIGS. 1 and 2 with a maximum spread between the outer ends of the force arms at full open measuring approximately 32 inches. Moreover, during the opening of the arms a maximum spreading force in the range of to 12 thousand pounds acting through the outer tips of the force arms 80 is achieved. This high magnitude force acting through a relative distance (2% to 3 feet) is sufficient for righting overturned automobiles or jacking up the same so that a victim may be removed from entrapment beneath a wrecked vehicle. If a greater spread is required the force arms 80 may be fitted with extension members to increase effective length thereof, with some reduction in force resulting.

In accordance with the present invention the force arms 80 are constructed of high strength material such as 6Al-4V titanium steel in a forging process. The forged arms are heat treated after forming and are capable of withstanding tensile stresses of approximately 155,000 psi. As illustrated, the arms are constructed with a cross section somewhat similar to that of an I- beam and have a thickened or widened flange around the entire outer peripheral edge except for the forward end or tip. As illustrated in FIG. 5, the force arms 80 are tapered in both transverse directions toward the outer ends and are substantially thicker at the inner or rearward ends than at the outer ends. The thickened outer rearward corners joumalled on the fixed pivot pins 76 provide increased strength against bending forces exerted adjacent the outer ends of the arms in either transverse direction as for example in the direction of the double headed arrow A of FIG. 5. The peripheral flanges of the arms are integrally joined with cylindrical bosses 94 on the outer rearward corners of the arms, which bosses receive the bushings 81 in which the pivot pins 76 ride. The inside, rear corners of the arms are provided with similar bosses 96 to receive the pivot pins 92 interconnected with the links to the cross head 86.

As before indicated the force arms 80 are extremely stout and substantially triangular shaped in configuration as viewed in FIGS. 4 and 5. As viewed in FIG. 4, the longitudinally extending edge flanges taper toward one another progressively towards the outer ends of the arms, while at the outer end, the web of the arm is increased substantially in thickness as shown in FIG. 5. Thickened web at the outer end of the arms comprises an outwardly projecting tongue portion 98 which is aligned parallel of outer end portions 100 of the edge flanges of the arms. The terminal end portions of the flanges 100 provide guideways on opposite sides of the thickened outer ends of the web of the arms for receiving rearwardly extending, parallel tangs 102 provided on replaceable tip members 104. The tangs 102 of each tip member are spaced apart by distance slightly greater than the thickness T (FIG. 5) of the web of the arms and the outwardly projecting tongues 98. The thickened web at the outer end of the arm and the tangs 102 of each detachable tip member 104 are formed with apertures 106 which are aligned when the tip members are fully inserted on the arms in order that a chain link, S-hook or other suitable hooking device 108 (FIG. 2) on the end of a tension member such as chain 110 or cable may be attached to the arms by means of pins 109 to establish a high magnitude pulling force as for example when pulling a collapsed steering column away from the chest of an accident victim.

Each tip member 104 is provided with a suitably shaped socket 112 defined between the tangs 102 and outwardly thereof for receiving the outwardly projecting tongue portion 98 on the outer end of a force arm 80. The tip replaceable members 104 are sharply pointed at the outer end and are designed so that the pointed outer ends are in close proximity to one another when the force arms 80 are in the fully closed position as shown in FIG. 4. There is a shouldered pin 85 between the outer ends of arms 80. One end of pin 85 is press fitted into one arm 80, the other end is received by a clearance hole 89 in the other arm 80. The outside, rearwardly extending surfaces of the tip members 104 are formed with rachet teeth 114 to grip and hold against adjacent surfaces and prevent inadvertent pullout of the tip members after insertion of the tool arms (for example, between the edge of a car door and the adjacent car frame or body). The pin 85 prevents arms 80 from becoming misaligned with each other when they are closed which is also the position in which they would receive the most exposure to twisting by the operator when making an insertion or engagement of the tip members 104. Shoulder portion 85a of the pin 85 acts like a thick washer between arms 80 limiting their movement toward one another thereby preventing closing forces from damaging the tip members 104 and allowing the tips to be readily removed or installed.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the replaceable, sharply pointed, toothed, hardened steel tip members 104 permit the outer ends of the force arms 80 to be forcefully wedged into small crevices or cracks. Subsequently when the arms are opened or spread apart the teeth 114 help prevent the tool from slipping or being forced out of the crevice or crack as high magnitude force is exerted to spread or open a jammed door or closure.

The tip members 104 are formed of extremely tough, hardened steel material in order to well withstand the wear, abrasion and high stresses concentrated thereon during use. In accordance with the present invention should the tip members 104 be broken, worn excessively, or changed to tips designed for a particular ap plication, they may be readily replaced in rapid fashion on the job at the accident scene. For this purpose one or both of the tang portions 102 on each tip member is provided with a latch receiving aperture 102a, (FIG. adjacent therearward end. In order to positively retain the tip members 104 after full establishment of the tongue and socket connection between the tongue portion 98 of an arm and the recess or socket 112 in a tip member, a latch 116 of spring steel strapping is provided and the spring strap is secured at its read end to one side base of the web of the force arm 80 by means of a cap screw and nut assembly 1 18 best shown in FIG. 5. The cap screw 118 extends through a boss portion 119 on the web of the arm having an outer face which slopes at an angle with respect to the surrounding adjacent surface of the web and accordingly the latch strap 116 tapers outwardly away from the web toward the forward or outward end of the arm. At the outer or forward end of the latch is provided a latching dog or detent member 120 adapted to seat in the aperture 102a on the tang of the tip member 104 and this latching engagement holds the tip member securely on the outer end of the arm. The dog or latch 120 has an outer surface sloped with respect to the web of the force arm and this surface is engageable with a sloped camming surface 102a (FIG. 5) on the inner end of the tangs 102 so that as the tip member 104 is inserted onto the projecting outer tongue 98 of a force arm 80, the latch or dog 120 is cammed inwardly toward the web of the arm by the tang surface 102b, until the latch moves past and is free to snap outwardly and seat within the aperture 102a on the tang to hold the tip member positively in place on the end of the arm 80. Outward travel away from the web of the arm of the dog or latch 120 when not engaging a tang 102 is adjusted and limited by means of a stop bolt 122 extending through the strap 116 and spaced between the cap screw 118 and the latch or dog.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the removable tip members 104 on the force arms 80 can be readily locked in place after insertion onto the outer end of an arm by means of a latch dog 120 and spring strap 116. This latch arrangement can be released for replacement of a tip member or insertion of longer arm extension on the force arm, if desired, by pressing inwardly on the outer end portion of the latch strap 116 thereby deflecting the dog or latch 120 inwardly out of the tang aperture 102a so that the tip member 104 can be withdrawn and removed.

With the force arms 80 in the closed position as shown in FIG. 4, the rescue tool can be rammed or wedged into a narrow crevice or crack even as small as an eighth of an inch wide and then by the application of hydraulic pressure on the piston 46, the arms 80 can be opened or spread apart to apply high magnitude forces on the side of the crevice. Thus almost any door or compartment surface can be opened or ripped away by the wedging and spreading action of rescue tool 20 as described.

Inaccordance with the present invention the rescue tool is easily handled and manipulated by a single, un-

skilled operator 22, either with one hand or both as shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3. The outer tip membersl04 on the arms can be accurately and positively positioned because of the lightweight, and compact nature of the tool which is extremely handy for a variety of jobs that require high magnitude forces (IO-12,000 pounds) acting through a relatively large distance.

As shown in FIG. 1 the tool can be oriented so that the force arms lie in a substantially vertical plane and pivot about horizontal axes as required for a jacking or lifting operation. In addition the tool may be orientated with the arms lying in a generally flat or horizontal plane pivoting about vertical axes as shown in FIGS. 2 or 3 with either side of the tool facing upward. Moeover, a variety of positions intermediate the horizontal and vertical planes are readily attainable with ease.

In accordance with the present invention, support, manipulation and position control of the lightweight, high powered tool is accomplished by hand using one or both of a pair of elongated, generally cylindrical handles which have knurled outer surfaces for tight gripping action and which extend parallel to and spaced on opposite sides of, the longitudinal axis of the cylinder 42, preferably on a common plane. As best shown in FIG. 12 each handle 1.30 is hollow and includes an upper end wall with a hole through which a cap screw 132 apsses said screw going through a bushing 1300 of reduced diameter and the bushing 130a and handle 130 are secured to one of the spacers 87 on the tool body 40 by means of the cap screw 132 threaded into the forward end of the spacer 87 in the threaded bore provided therein. Because the handles and cylinder have longitudinal axes lying on a common plane (P in FIG. 6) the tool can be completely turned over by and operated from either side with ease. The handles are substantially aligned with the fixed pivot axes of the pivot pins 76 on the outer, rearward corners of the force arms 80. The handles extend longitudinally parallel with the longitudinal axis of the tool and serve to aim or guide the arms 80 during manipulation and positioning of the tool. Because a pair of handles are provided on opposite sides of the: cylinder 42 and the central axis of the tool body may be easily rotated on its axis upside down or on its edge, ample clearance is provided between the inside surfaces of the handles and the adjacent outer surface of the cylinder 42 to permit easy extension of the fingers and hands between the handles and cylinder as desired.

In accordance with the present invention, the fluid powered rescue tool 20 is provided with a unique control system for precisely controlling the opening or closing of the force arms 80 in desired degrees. The control system comprises a pair of thumb operators 134 journalled on the bushing 130a for each of the handles 130 as best shown in detail in FIGS. 12 and 13, and FIG. 6. As shown in FIG. 13 the thumb operators 134 are generally annular in shape and each includes a radially outwardly extended operating knob or lever 134a having a roughened outer surface to preclude slippage of the thumb or finger on the knob surface.

Referring momentarily to FIG. 6, it will be seen that each pair of thumb operators 134 mounted on each of the handle spindles 130a is arranged so that the thumb levers 134a project in opposite directions (up and down) relative to a common plane P which extends through the longitudinal axis of the handles 130 and the tool body 40. It is apparent from the foregoing that an operator 22 will have ready control of the tool through any one of four thumb levers or knobs 134a, which knobs project from both directions away from the plane P and on opposite sides of the axis of the tool cylinder 42. Accordingly, manipulation and control of the tool from either side of the cylinder or plane P and with one or both hands is extremely easy. Movement of any one or more of the thumb levers 134a in a rotational direction about the axis of its respective handle 131) in a direction away (thumbs out) from the cylinder 42, is adapted to cause the outer ends of the force arms 81 to move apart or spread while movement of any of the thumb levers 134a in a direction about its respective handle bushing 130a toward the (thumbs in) cylinder 42 results in a movement of the force arms 81) in a closing direction toward the fully closed position of FIG. 4 wherein the tip members 104 are adjacent one another to form a wedge point.

Movement of the thumb operators 134 controls a high pressure, hydraulic valve 136 (FIG. 11)) which is mounted on the tool housing 40, and the operators are linked with the valve through a pair of levers 13% and 140 (FIG. 6). As best shown in FIG. 6, the outer end of each lever 138 and 140 is enlarged as at 142 and the enlargement (substantially circular in shape) is disposed between the annular body portions of the respective pair of thumb operators 134 connected therewith as best shown in FIGS. 8 and 12. Each enlargement 142 is formed with an outwardly opening slot 142 of sufficient width to receive the spindle 130a of a handle as shown in FIGS. 6 and 13 and in addition each enlargement is provided with a pair of relatively small, elongated, radial slots 144 disposed on opposite sides of the longitudinal axis of the larger slot 143.

As best shown in FIG. 12 each thumb operator 1341 is provided with an actuator pin 146 adapted to slide within a small slot 144 of one of the levers 1138 or 1411 and engage the side surfaces thereof for longitudinal lever movement in response to rotation of the thumb operator. Referring to FIG. 6, if any or all of the thumb levers 134a are rotated thumbs out, the levers 138 and 140 are moved longitudinally in an arm opening direction as indicated by the arrows Conversely if any or all of the thumb levers 134a are moved thumbs in, the levers 138 and 140 are moved longitudinally in opposite directions as shown by the arrows C: On each handle, movement of either thumb lever 134a toward a thubs out or a thumbs in position, pivots the operators 134 in opposite directions with respect to each other but this results in unidirectional movement of the levers 138 and 140 either in the direction of the arrows O or the arrows C. As viewed in FIG. 6, when the levers 138 and 140 move in the force arm opening direction as indicated by the arrows O, the valve 136 is moved out of a neutral position to direct high pressure fluid into the rearward end of the cylinder 42 to open or spread the force arms 80. Movement of the levers in the opposite direction as indicated by the arrows C operates the valve 136 in an opposite direction from the neutral position to direct high pressure fluid into the cylinder 42 to cause the force arms 80 to close toward the position of FIG. 4. Movement of any one or more of the four thumb levers 1340 out of a neutral position either inwardly or outwardly with respect to the cylinder body 42 results in opening or closing of the force arms 81) and if one of the levers is moved the other levers will move in response thereto giving the proper feel on all controls.

The inner ends of the linkage levers 138 and 140 are connected to rotate a valve operator 146 in opposite directions from a neutral position by means of pivot pins 148 (FIG. 10) axially aligned with the axis of a rotary valve spindle of the control valve 136. As viewed in FIG. 6, opening movement of the levers causes the valve operator to pivot in a clockwise direction, while movement of the levers in an opposite direction causes 1 the operator 146 to move tion.

In FIG. 6 the valve operator 146 is shown in a neutral position and when all control pressure is released from the thumb operators 134, the valve operator is returned or centered in the neutral position by means of a biasing or valve centering system 220 as best shown in FIGS. 7 and 8. The centering system in addition to centering the valve operator 146 in the neutral position also returns all of the control operators 134 to the neutral position via the levers 138 and 140.

The centering system 220 includes a compressible extensible linkage assembly comprising a pair of longitudinally aligned and relatively movable links 222 and 224. Each link includes a longitudinal slot and a pair of ears extending transversely outward from opposite edges at positions adjacent the middle of the slot. A pair of guide pins 226 are fixedly secured to each link and the pin on one link extends into and is slidable in the slot of the other link. A coil spring 228 is disposed on the links between the ears and the guide pins 226 and the spring normally maintains the pins in a centered or neutral position in the slots on the links.

The link 222 has an outer end pivotally secured to the tool body 40 by a pin 230 and bracket 232, which bracket is adjustably secured on a projection 234 formed on one of the arm support flanges 72 by fasteners 236. The link 224 is pivotally secured to the valve operator 146 by a cap screw 238. Referring to FIG. 7, with the valve operator 146 in a neutral position the spring 228 is under a predetermined compression load when control valve 136 and associated linkage is in the neutral position. This assures that the centering system will return to neutral overcoming any friction in that system. If the thumb operators 1340 are rotated toward thumbs out, the valve operator rotates in a clockwise direction from the neutral and this causes the linkage assembly to lengthen and compress the spring 228. On releasing the thumb operator, the compressed spring 228 causes the linkage to shorten to its neutral length and return the valve operator 146 and thumb levers 1340 to the neutral position. When the thumb operators are moved towards a thumbs in position, the linkage is shortened which also compresses the spring and upon release the spring elongates the linkage back to the neutral or no compression length. Accordingly, the valve centering system 222 provides automatic return to the neutral position upon release of the thumb levers 1340. In addition the centering system provides an identical control feel whether the control force is applied thumbs in or thumbs out.

The valve operator 146 is secured by a cap screw 150 to the outer end of a valve spindle 152 which is journalled for rotation in a bearing 154 contained in a bushing 156, which bushing is threadedly engaged in an upper end of a hollow, cylindrical valve housing 158 (FIG. 10). The bushing 156 includes an upper flange in a counterclockwise direcwhich seats against the upper end of the valve housing and a sealing ring 160 is provided to prevent the loss of fluid. The bearing 154 supports the spindle 152 for rotation in either direction within the bore of the bushing 156 and high pressure sealing and packing rings 162 are provided in an annual groove in the spindle to seal against the loss of hydraulic fluid around the valve stem. A generally cylindrical valve member or disc 164 is provided at the lower end of the valve stem 162 as shown in FIG. and is rotated in a counterclockwise or a clockwise direction from a centered or neutral position in response to movement of one or more of the thumb operators 134a as previously described through the linkage members138 and 140.

The control valve 136 includes a mounting flange 166 at the lower end of the valve housing 158 and the flange is secured in place on a valve sub-base 168 by plurality of cap screws 170. The sub-base 168 is sandwiched between the mounting flange 166 and an integrally formed, outwardly projecting valve support base 172 provided on one side of the cylinder 42 adjacent the forward end as shown in FIGS. 9 and 10. In order to supply and return fluid into and out of the forward and rearward ends of the cylinder 42 for movement of the piston 46 in a desired direction, the cylinder of tool body 40 is formed with a longitudinally extending outer ridge 174 on one side (FIG. 9) in which is defined a fluid passageway 176 for directing fluid into and out of the rearward end of the cylinder as best shown in FIG. 5. When the piston 46 is in the position shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, and high pressure hydraulic fluid is directed from. the passage 176 into the volume or space between the piston 46 and the rear end wall 62, the piston begins to move forward and the fluid ahead of the piston is ex hausted. When high pressure fluid is directed into the forward end of the cylinder via a passage 178 spaced parallel and radially inwardly of the passageway 176, the piston moves rearwardly and fluid is exhausted from the rearward end of the cylinder 42. The passage 176 is thus deemed a tool opening passage and the passage 178 is deemed a tool closing passage. When high pressure fluid is connected to one of these passages, the return or low pressure side of the system is connected to the other and vice versa. When the valve operator 146 is in a neutral position neither passage is connected to high pressure or return and entrapped fluid in the cylinder on both sides of the piston locks the arms 80 in a fixed position. The fluid passages 176 and 178 lie in a common radial plane extending outwardly of the longitudinal axis of the cylinder 42 normal to the plane of the arm supporting brackets 72 as best shown in FIG. 9

In addition to the cylinder passages 176 and 178 the integral valve support base 172 is provied with outward passages 180 and 182 having threaded lower end portions adapted to be connected with fittings 184 on the ends of the hydraulic pressure and retumlines 34 and 36, respectively, as best shown in FIGS. 9 and 10. The valve sub-base 168is formed with a pair of interconnecting passages 184 and 186 which direct fluid between the respective supply, and return passages 180 and 182 to the upper surface of the sub-base terminating in pressure and return ports 184a and 1860 respectively, which ports are equilaterally spaced on opposite sides of the plane of passages 176 and 178, and the extensions thereof formed in the valve sub-base 168. These continuations of the passages 176 and 178 in the sub-base 168 terminate in ports 176a and 178a defined on the upper surface thereof as best shown in FIGS. 10 and 11.

Referring to FIG. 11 it will be seen that the four ports labeled 176a, 178a, 184a and 186a are arranged in equilateral, radially spaced relation around the longitudinal axis of the valve stem 152 so that the valve disc 164 may be rotated to connect the pressure or supply port 184a to the tool opening port 176a or to the tool closing port 178a as desired. Simultaneously, with movement of the valve to supply pressurized fluid to one of the ports 176a or 178a, fluid is returned from the other port which is connected to the return passage 186 through the return port 186a.

FIG. 11 illustrates the valve disc 164 in a neutral position wherein the pressurized fluid supplied to the port 184a is blocked from flowing either into the tool opening port 176a or the tool closing port 178a. The flow of return fluid at the port 186a is likewise blocked so that the piston 46 is locked in its selected position with the cylinder 42 entrapped by hydraulic fluid on opposite sides. Accordingly, the force arms are hydraulically locked against movement in either direction. The valve disc 164 includes a pair of diametrically spaced arcuately shaped connecting passageways 164? and 164R of approximately a arc length. These passages are adapted to connect the pressure and return ports 184a and 186a with the opening and closing ports 176a or 178a when the valve disc 164 is rotated 45 in either direction out of its neutral position. Rotary movement of any one of the thumb operators 134a towards a thumbs out position causes the valve disc 164 to rotate to interconnect the pressure side of the hydraulic system to the rearward end of the cylinder 42 via the supply port 184a, passage 164? in the valve disc and the opening passage 176 in the cylinder 176a. Simultaneously, when this occurs fluid from the opposite or forward side of the cylinder 42 is returned via the passage 178, valve disc passage 164R and return port 186a back to the hydraulic reservoir through the flexible hydraulic line 36. Movement of the thumb levers 134a to a thumbs in position effects a reverse flow of fluids and the force arms 80 are moved towards the closed position.

Upon release of the thumb levers 134a, the valve centering system 220 returns the valve operator 146 and disc 164 to the neutral position and locks the arms 80 against further movement.

As shown in FIG. 10 the lower end of the valve housing is found with a mounting flange 166 which closes off the internal valve chamber below the bushing 156. Fluid is delivered between the respective ports 176a, 178a, 184a, and 186a and the arcuate passages 164P and 164R in the valve disc 164 through four separate and substantially identical passageway systems generally indicated as 188 in FIG. 10. Each of the passageway systems 188 includes a stepped diameter bore 190 having a hollow valve bushing 192 slidably disposed in the upper end of the bore and including an upper flange 192a bearing against the machined underside of the valve disc 164. Suitable sealing rings 194 are provided for sealing in the bores around the outside surface of the depending stem portions of the valve bushings 192. The bushings are biased upwardly against the valve disc 164 by coil springs 196 which are seated within the hollow bore of valve seat members 198 mounted in the larger diameter lower sections of the passage bores 190. The hollow valve members have ported flanges at the lower end for communication with the respective ports in the upper surface of the valve sub-base 168 and suitable sealing rings 200 are provided for sealing between the surfaces of the valve mounting flange 166 and the upper surface of the valve sub-plate 168. A similar number of sealing members 202 are provided to seal between the confronting surfaces of the valve subbase 168 and the integral valve mounting base 172 on the tool body 40.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the rescue tool constructed in accordance with the present invention provides an extremely useful tool for accident situations and is especially adapted for providing high magnitude, push/pull forces in a precisely and readily controlled manner capable of acting between and through relatively large distances. The rescue tool 20 is portable and easily positioned and manipulated with one or both hands and is light enought in weight and compact enough in size to be easily handled by one man. Moreover, the tool can be used to provide high force wedging action to pry open and lift heavy objects or crash damaged doors and the like.

Although the present invention has been described by reference to only a single embodiment thereof, it will be apparent that numerous modifications and embodiments may be devised by those skilled in the art, and it is intended by the appended claims to cover all modifications and embodiments which fall within the true spirit and scope of the present invention.

What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States is:

l. A fluid powered, hand manipulatable rescue tool comprising:

a bod y having a longitudinal axis, said body including a fluid cylinder and a forward end structure;

a pair of force arms mounted on said forward end structure on either side of the longitudinal axis of the body and supported for movement relative to said body about parallel pivot axes which are normal to said longitudinal axis, said arms having outer ends movable between open and closed positions when pivoted about said axes relative to said body;

fluid powered means for pivoting said arms in opposite directions and relative to said body;

a pair of handles parallel of and spaced on opposite sides of the fluid cylinder and extending rearwardly of said forward end structure for supporting and manipulating said tool to position the outer ends of said arms; and

control means adjacent at least one of said handles for controlling said fluid powered means to open and close said arms.

2. A fluid powered, hand manipulatable rescue tool comprising:

a body having a longitudinal axis, said body including a fluid cylinder in a forward end structure;

a pair of force arms mounted on said forward end structure on either side of the longitudinal axis of the body and supported for movement relative to said body about parallel pivot axes which are normal to said longitudinal axis, said arms having outer 6 ends movable between open and closed positions when pivoted about said axes relative to said body;

fluid powered means for pivoting said arms in opposite directions and relative to said body, said fluid powered means including a piston slidable in said cylinder, a piston rod projecting outwardly through an opening in said forward end structure, and linkage means pivotally interconnecting a forward end of said piston rod with each of said force arms about pivot axes inwardly of said first mentioned .pivot axes;

a pair of handles on opposite sides of said body for supporting and manipulating said tool to position the outer ends of said arms; and

control means adjacent at least one of said handles for controlling said fluid powered means to open and close said arms.

3. The tool of claim 2 wherein said force arms are substantially triangular in shape having a pointed outer end, each of said arms including an inner end portion pivotally supported adjacent an outer comer for pivotal movement relative to said body and an inner comer pivotally connected with said linkage means.

4. The tool of claim 1 wherein said handles and said fluid cylinder have longitudinal axes arranged in parallel on a common plane normal to the pivot axes of said arms.

5. The tool of claim 4 wherein said control means includes a first pair of operators adjacent the forward end of said handles, valve means for directing pressurized fluid to opposite sides of said piston to open and close said arms and linkage means interconnecting each of said first pair of operators and said valve means to provide opening of said force arms when either of said operators is moved outwardly away of said cylinder and closing of said force arms when either of said operators is moved inwardly toward said cylinder.

6. The tool of claim 5 including a second pair of said operators adjacent the forward end of said handles interconnected with said linkage means, said first pair of operators projecting outwardly of said common plane in one direction therefrom and said second pair of operators projecting outwardly of said common plane in a generally opposite direction therefrom whereby said tool is readily controllable from opposite sides of said plane.

7. The tool of claim 5 wherein said operators are mounted for pivotal movement about said longitudinal axes of said handles.

8. The tool of claim 6 wherein said operators are mounted for pivotal movement about said longitudinal axes of said handles.

9. The tool of claim 5 wherein said valve means is movable between a neutral, an arm closing and an arm opening control position and including bias means for returning said valve means to said neutral position upon release of pressure from an operator.

10. The tool of claim 6 wherein said valve means is movable between a neutral, an arm closing and an arm opening control position and including bias means for returning said valve means to said neutral position upon release of pressure from an operator.

11. A fluid powered, hand manipulatable rescue tool comprising:

a pair of force arms supported for movement relative to said body about parallel pivot axes, said arms having outer ends movable between open and closed positions when pivoted about said axes relative to said body;

a pair of tip members each detachably mounted adjacent the outer ends of said force arms, said tip members having a pointed outer end and teeth formed along an outer surface, and releaseable detent means for securing said tip members in place on said arms;

fluid powered means for pivoting said arms in opposite directions and relative to said body;

a pair of handles on opposite sides of said body for supporting and manipulating said tool to position the outer ends of said arm; and

control means adjacent at least one of said handles for controlling said fluid powered means to open and close said arms.

12. The tool of claim 11 including pin and socket connector means for securely positioning said tip members on said force arms.

13. The tool of claim 12 wherein said pin and socket connector means comprises a socket formed in the inner end portion of said tip members and pin means adapted to extend into said socket formed on said force arms extending longitudinally thereof, said detent means interconnecting said tip members and said force arms preventing outward movement of said tip members until released.

14. A light weight, fluid powered, portable rescue tool for applying high magnitude push-pull forces comprising:

a base having a longitudinal axis including a fluid cylinder aligned on said axis and arm support means at a forward end of said cylinder extending laterally outward on opposite sides thereof;

a pair of force arms mounted on said arm support means and supported for pivotal movement adjacent their inner ends about spaced parallel axes on opposite sides of said longitudinal axis fixed in relation to and normal of said cylinder axis;

fluid actuated force means movable along said longitudinal axis for pivoting said arms to move their outer ends thereof toward and away from each other, said force means including a piston rod extending outwardly of the forward end of said cylinder between said arm support means, and a pair of pivot links, each having an inner end pivotally connected to said rod and an outer end pivotally con nected to a force arm for relative rotation about a movable pivot axis inside of the fixed pivot axis of said arm;

handle means for manipulating said tool to position the outer ends of said arms in a desired position; and

a pair of controls disposed on opposite sides of said base adjacent to said handle means for controlling said fluid actuated force means to pivot said force arms.

15. The tool of claim 14 wherein said handle means includes a pair of elongated handles disposed on opposite sides of said cylinder and extending rearwardly of said am support means in spaced parallel relation with said cylinder.

16 The tool of claim wherein each handle has a longitudinal axis parallel of said cylinder axis and wherein said controls include operators mounted on a handle axis for (pivotal movement toward and away from said cylinder to close and open said force arms.

17. The tool of claim 16 wherein said controls include a pair of said operators on each handle axis extending in generally opposite directions thereof.

18. The tool of claim 16 wherein said controls comprises valve means for directing pressurized fluid to a selected side of said piston means, and a pair of linkage members interconnecting said valve means and the operator on each handle.

19. The tool of claim 17 wherein said controls include valve means for directing pressurized fluid to a selected side of said piston means and a pair of linkage members for operatively interconnecting said valve means and each pair of operators on each handle.

20. The tool of claim 18 wherein said valve means is operable between a neutral, a force arm closing and a force arm opening position, and biasing means for returning said valve means to said neutral position upon release of control force on said operators.

21. The tool of claim 19 wherein said valve means is operable between a neutral, a force arm closing and a force arm opening position, and biasing means for returning said valve means to said neutral position upon release of control force on said operators.

22. The tool of claim 19 including connector means between an outer end of a linkage member and a pair of operators on an adjacent handle for moving said outer end outwardly of said valve means on manipulation of either of said pair of said operators in opposite rotation directions with respect to the axis of said handle.

23. A fluid powered, hand manipulatable rescue tool comprising:

a body having a longitudinal axis, said body including a fluid cylinder and a mounting structure extending outwardly therefrom;

a pair of elongated force arms mounted on said mounting structure on either side of the longitudinal axis of the body and supported for movement relative to said body about a pivot axis, said arms being substantially triangular in shape, each am having a pointed outer end, a middle portion pivotally supported for movement relative to said body and a comer, the outer ends of said arms being movable between open and closed positions when pivoted, said arms being pivotally mounted adjacent the end opposite from said outer end;

fluid powered means connected to said arms adjacent to their pivotal mounting for pivoting said arms in opposite directions relative to said body, said fluid power means including a pressurized hydraulic oil supply connected to said cylinder, a piston slidable in said cylinder, a piston rod projecting outwardly from said cylinder, and linkage means pivotally interconnecting said piston rod with each of said force arms at the comer thereof;

handle means on said body for supporting and manipulating said tool to position the outer ends of said arms; and

control means adjacent said handle means for controlling said fluid powered means to open and close said arms.

24. The tool of claim 23 wherein said control means includes an operator on said handle, valve means for directing pressurized fluid to opposite sides of said piston to open and close said arms, and linkage means interconnecting said operator and said valve means to provide opening and closing of said force arms when said opertor is moved.

25. The tool of claim 24 wherein said valve means is movable between a neutral control position and an arm closing control position and an arm opening control position, and including bias means for returning said valve means to said neutral position upon release of activating pressure from said operator.

26. The tool of claim 25 wherein said pressurized hydraulic oil supply includes a supply reservoir for providing oil to a pump for pressurizing the oil, said pump being powered by a pump motor, a pair of oil supply lines connected to said pump at their one end and to said valve means at their other end.

27. The tool of claim 26 wherein said pump includes a first stage for supplying oil at a high volume flow rate at moderate oil pressure for quickly opening said force arms in order that said arms may be rapidly brought into engagement with the work load, a second stage for supplying oil at a moderate volume flow rate at high oil pressure for providing the thrust necessary to move the work load, and internal automatic pump valve means for shifting from said first to said second stage.

28. A fluid powered, hand manipulatable rescue tool comprising:

a body;

a pair of elongated force arms each arm being supported for movement relative to said body about a pivotal axis, said arms having outer free ends movable between open and closed positions when pivoted relative to said body, said arms being pivotally mounted adjacent the end opposite from said outer end;

fluid powered means connected to said arms adjacent to their pivotal mounting for pivoting said arms in opposite directions relative to said body, said fluid powered means including a pressurized hydraulic oil supply connected to said cylinder, a piston slidable in said cylinder, a piston rod projecting outwardly from said cylinder, and linkage means pivotally interconnecting said piston rod with each of said force arms, said pressurized oil supply including a reservoir for providing oil to a pump for pressurizing the oil, said pump being powered by a pump motor, a pair of oil supplying return lines connected to said pump at their one end and to said valve means at their other end, said pump including a first stage for supplying oil at high volume flow rate at a moderate oil pressure for quickly opening said force arms in order that said arms may be brought rapidly into engagement with a workload, a second stage for supplying oil at a moderate flow rate at high oil pressure for providing the thrust necessary to move the workload, and internal automatic pump valve means for shifting from said first to said second pump stage; and

control means adjacent said handle means for controlling said fluid powered means to open and close said arms.

29. A fluid powered, hand manipulatable rescue tool comprising:

a body having a longitudinal axis, said body including a fluid cylinder and a forward end structure;

a pair of force arms mounted on said forward end structure on either side of the longitudinal axis of the body and supported for movement relative to said body about parallel pivot axes which are normal to said longitudinal axis, said arms having outer ends movable between open and closed positions when pivoted about said axes relative to said body;

fluid powered means for pivoting said arms in opposite directions and relative to said body;

a pair of handles parallel of and spaced on opposite sides of the fluid cylinder and disposed rearwardly of said forward end structure for supporting and manipulating said tool to position the outer ends of said arms; and

control means adjacent at least one of said handles for controlling said fluid powered means to open and close said arms.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification254/93.00R, 72/705, 29/252, 60/916, 72/392, 60/477, 254/124
International ClassificationB25B1/18, B60S9/00, B60S5/00, B25B1/20, B66F19/00, B25B5/00, B66F3/24, B60S9/10, B21D1/14, B25B25/00, A62B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB66F19/00, B66F3/24, B21D1/14, A62B3/005, Y10S60/916, Y10S72/705
European ClassificationB66F19/00, B21D1/14, A62B3/00B, B66F3/24
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 6, 1986AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: HALE FIRE PUMP COMPANY, 700 SPRING MILL AVENUE, CO
Owner name: HURST PERFORMANCE, INC.
Effective date: 19840706
Jun 6, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: HALE FIRE PUMP COMPANY, 700 SPRING MILL AVENUE, CO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:HURST PERFORMANCE, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004555/0413
Effective date: 19840706
Owner name: HALE FIRE PUMP COMPANY,PENNSYLVANIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HURST PERFORMANCE, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004555/0413