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Publication numberUS3819395 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 25, 1974
Filing dateAug 23, 1971
Priority dateAug 23, 1971
Publication numberUS 3819395 A, US 3819395A, US-A-3819395, US3819395 A, US3819395A
InventorsT Yocum
Original AssigneeT Yocum
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Simulated masonry wall
US 3819395 A
Abstract
Simulated masonry wall panels are made by first coating a base panel structure with a base coat to simulate mortar and then coating the base coat with a finish coat layer. Both layers may be cementitious. Simulated mortar joints are provided by simultaneously cutting each of several sets of grooves extending to, into or through the base layer with a plurality of knife members having their knife edges guided above the surface of the base panel structure. All grooves in each set are cut by a single translatory movement of the knife members with respect to the base panel structure.
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Unite States Patent Yocum June 25, 1974 SIMULATED MASONRY WALL Primary ExaminerWilliam D. Martin [76] Inventor' gfi n giggs a g gg Assistant Examiner-Theodore G. Davis Attorney, Agent, or Firm-John M. Diehl [22] Filed: Aug. 23, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 174,098 ABSTRACT Simulated masonry wall panels are made by first coating a base panel structure with a base coat to simulate [52] us Cl avg 6 mortar and then coating the base coat with a finish [51] Int Cl B44c 1/22 coat layer. Both layers may be cementitious. Simu- [58] Fie'ld A H5 4 lated mortar joints are provided by simultaneously cutting each of several sets of grooves extending to, 1 17/8 70 70 83/5 425/130 306 into or through the base layer with a plurality of knife [56] Reierences Cited members having their knife edges guided above the surface of the base panel structure. All grooves in UNITED STATES PATENTS each set are cut by a single translatory movement of {3 ,222 wi il 1 /1 77; the knife members with respect to the base panel l, l itta t t 2,095,642 10/]937 Knight 117/10 ruc'ure 2,307,732: 1/1943 De Vault 117/10 x 22 Clalms, 29 Drawing Flgures PAIENIEUJUNZSIQII 3.819.395

SHEET 1 0f 7 I AIR l MIXTURE OF WATER, CEMENT, SAND AND I5 '3 BINDER APPLY BASE :OR II L' I j I APPLY BASE COAT I I, I fi Io 2' '6 H9. 2

l l" APPLY ADDITIONAL I. BASE COAT IF DESIRED I0 AIR I &- MIXTURE OF WATER,

CEMENT, SAND, COLORING I MATERIAL AND BINDER APPLY FINISH 7 9 COAT APPLY FINISH H COAT 22 23 'FINAL FINISH TREATMENT I? fifi IF DESIRED I II 0R1 TOMMY E.YOCUM js ff- I X Mf -'31 .1 ';f-. INVENTOR ----v. I -,.v Ib Fig. 6

, AT TORNEY PATENTEDJUN251QT4 3.819395 SHEET 2 [IF 7 53" I f vgn 3 29 IO TOMMYE-Y UM INV TOR ATTORNEY Pmmenmz ww 3.819.395

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ATTORNE Y PAIENTEUJUNZSW I 3.819.395

SHEET [1F 7 TOMMY YOCUM TORNE PATENTEDJUN2519T4 3.819.395

' SHEEI-Bllf? x mamamm us u? TOMMY E. YOCUM INVENTOR ATTORNEY PAINTED-118251974 3.819.395

sum 7 0F 7 TOMMY E. YOCUM INVENTOR ATTORNEY 1 SIMULATED MASONRY WALL CROSS-REFERENCES Wall now U.S. Pat. No. 3,712,825 issued Jan. 23, 1973.

FIELD This invention relates to a method or process for providing simulated masonry walls and, more particularly, to a combination of process steps and to apparatus for providing panels which simulate the front portions of brick walls.

PRIOR ART The invention described and claimed herein is an improvement on previously known processes wherein simulated masonry panel articles comprising several sets of grooves to simulate mortar joints, similar to the panels provided in the instant invention, were provided by cutting each groove individually by hand, grooves in each set being cut sequentially.

SUMMARY In contradistinction to methods of the prior art, all grooves in each set are, at least during a portion of the cutting of a set, out simultaneously. Also in contradistinction to the prior art, knife blades of the cutting apparatus are guided with respect to the surface of the base of panel structure underlying the base and finish coats, rather than, as inthe prior art, being unguided or being guided with respect to a member lying against the surface of the finish coat.

The base coat is first applied as by troweling, brushing or spraying on a base panel structure which may be, for example, a pre-fabricated concrete block wall or a panel of cement-asbestos board, gypsum board, wood, plywood, pressed wood or hardboard, synthetic resin foam or the like. In some embodiments, the base coat may be omitted if the underlying base panel structure is cementitious itself, for example if it is a prefabricated concrete. block wall or cement-asbestos board. The base coat is preferably made relatively thick as, for example, one-eighth to one-fourth inch thick and is preferably a cementitious material which comprises water, fine particulate aggregate and portland cement. It may comprise an organic synthetic resinous binder.

lnsome embodiments, an additional base coat may be applied underlying the just described base coat. The additional base coat may, preferably, be relatively thin and may also be cementitious, preferably comprising water, fine particulate aggregate and portland cement.

A finish coat is then applied over the base coat or in some instances, if desired, directly on the underlying base panel structure if the base panel structure is cementitious, for example if it is a pre-fabricated concrete block wall or cementasbestos board. The finish coat may be applied by troweling, spraying or the like. It is preferably made relatively thick as, for example, one-eighth to one-fourth inch thick, but may operably be somewhat thinner. The finish coat may also be cementitious, preferably comprising water, fine particulate aggregate and portland cement. It also may comprise, if desired, an organic synthetic resinous binder.

The base coat is preferably applied by spraying or troweling or by some other method suitable for providing a relatively thick coating such as one-eighth to onefourth inch thick although the base coating may be thinner. The additional base coat, if applied, (which, if applied, is applied in the base coat) is, preferably, relatively thin, being on the order of the thickness of a coat of paint and may be applied by troweling, brushing, spraying or any suitable method for applying such a coating. The base coat and also the finish coat, when applied, are initially soft, plastic and impressionable.

While the finish coat is soft, plastic and impressionable, it may be treated if desired to provide it with any of a number of suitable finishes. Such treatment may consist of brushing it with a brush having soft bristles or stiff bristles or brushing it with a wire brush or by troweling it or by spattering it with colored materials.

While the finish coat is soft, plastic and impressionable, grooves are provided in the surface of the structure to provide simulated mortar joints. The grooves are provided by cutting strips from the surface with raking or knife-edge members, so that where each strip is removed, a groove remains.

Each panel comprises at least two sets of grooves: one set of grooves representing horizontal mortar joints and the other set of grooves representing vertical mortar joints in the case wherein a panel is provided to simulate the surface of a stack bonded brick wall.

More often, two or more subsets of grooves are provided to simulate vertical joints as in the case of common bond, quarter bond, third bond and the like.

The process of the invention is characterized by cutting each set or subset of grooves in a single translatory motion of the cutting apparatus with respect to the base panel structure. To cut each set of grooves, the base panel structure may be moved with respect to the cutting apparatus or the cutting apparatus may be moved with respect to the base panel structure, but only one such movement is made to cut each set or subset of grooves.

Each strip cut from the surface to provide a groove to simulate a mortar joint, comprises all or substantially all of the finish coat in the groove area and all or none or a portion of the base coat or additional base coat in the groove area depending upon the embodiment. In embodiments wherein the finish coat is applied directly or underlying cementitious base panel structure such as a pre-fabricated block wall or a cement asbestos board, the knife members which cut the bottoms of the grooves ride directly against the surface of the underlying base panel structure, substantially all of the finish coat in the groove area overlying the base panel structure is removed and no base coat is removed, no base coat being present.

In embodiments wherein a base coat has been applied to the underlying panel structure prior to application of the finish coat, the base coat may be thin and may be allowed to harden by drying or curing, prior to carrying out the cutting in which case the knife edges which cut the bottoms of the grooves ride against the upper surface of the base coat which is hard while the finish coat remains soft and plastic and impressionable during cutting.

In other embodiments, the base coat is relatively thick and is soft and plastic and impressionable during cutting as is the finish coat and the knife-edge members cut the bottoms of the grooves pass through the base coat at a predetermined distance above the bottom of the base coat, thus at a predetermined distance above the surface of the base panel structure, and the strip re moved in each groove area comprises all the finish coat in the groove area and a portion of the base coat in the groove area, the raking members which carries the knife-edge member which cuts the bottom of the groove extending into but not through the base coat during cutting.

In other embodiments, wherein an additional base layer is utilized, the additional base member is allowed to become hard by curing and/or drying prior to cutting, but the overlying base base coat and the overlying finish coat are both caused to remain soft, plastic and impressionable during cutting. The knife edges which cut the bottoms of the grooves in such instances ride against the upper surface of the additional base layer and thus are guided by the upper surface of the additional base layer at a predetermined distance above the surface of the base panel structure which underlies the additional base layer, said predetermined distance being the thickness of the additional base layer. In such embodiments, the strip cut to provide each groove comprises all of the finish layer in the groove area and substantially all of the base layer in the groove area but substantially none of the additional base layer in the groove area.

OBJ ECTS It is an object of the invention to provide an improved method for providing panels which may be assembled to provide a simulated masonry wall.

Other objects will become apparent from the drawings and from the following detailed description in which it is intended to illustrate the applicability of the invention without thereby limiting its scope to less than that of all equivalents which will be apparent to one skilled in the art.

DRAWINGS In the drawings, like reference numerals refer to like parts and:

FIG. I is a schematic elevation of the step of applying the base coat;

FIG. 2 is a schematic elevation of applying the base coat in and alternate embodiment;

FIG. 3 is a schematic elevation of the step of applying an additional base coat, if desired;

FIG. 4 is a schematic elevation of the step of applying the finish coat;

FIG. 5 is a schematic elevation of the step of applying the finish coat in an alternate embodiment;

FIG. 6 is a schematic elevation of the step of treating to provide a desired finish;

FIG. 7 is a schematic cross-sectional elevation of cutting one groove in a set of grooves in one embodiment;

FIG. 8 is a schematic elevation of a modification of the embodiment of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a schematic elevation of the panel produced in accordance with FIG. 6, the panel being inverted;

FIG. 10 is a schematic cross-sectional elevation of the application of a modification of the step of FIG. 7 to the panel of FIG. 9;

FIG. 1 1 is a schematic perspective view, partially cutaway, partially cross-sectional, of the embodiment of FIG. 7;

FIG. 12 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional elevation of a modification of the embodiment of FIGS. 7 and 8;

FIG. 13 is an enlarged cross-sectional fragmentary elevation of a modification of the embodiment of FIGS. 7, 8 and 12;

FIG. 14 is an enlarged cross-sectional fragmentary schematic elevation of a modification of the embodiment of FIGS. 7, 8, 12 and 13;

FIG. 15 is a schematic plan view of a modification of the embodiment of FIGS. 7 and 11;

FIG. 16 is an elevation of the embodiment of FIG. 15;

FIG. 17 is a schematic plan view of a modification of the embodiment of FIG. 15;

FIG. 18 is a schematic partially cross-sectional, partially cut-away view of the application of the embodiment of FIG. 7 to producing simulated vertical mortar joints;

FIG. 19 is a schematic cross-sectional view of the apparatus utilized in the embodiment of FIG. 18 to apply the embodiment of FIG. 7;

FIG. 20 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional elevation of a portion of a panel provided in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 21 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional elevation of a portion of a panel provided in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 22 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional elevation of a portion of a panel provided in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 23 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional elevation of a portion of a panel provided in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 24 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional elevation of a portion of a panel provided in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 25 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional elevation of a portion of a panel provided in accordance with the embodiments of FIGS. 7, 8 or 10, showing the cutting of a groove after the groove has partially been cut;

FIG. 26 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectioal elevation of a portion of a panel provided in accordance with the modification of the embodiment of FIGS. 7, 8 or 10, showing the cutting of a groove after the groove has partially been cut;

FIG. 27 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional elevation of a portion of a panel provided in accordance with the modification of the embodiment of FIGS. 7, 8 or 10, showing the cutting of a groove after the groove has partially been cut;

FIG. 28 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional elevation of a portion of a panel provided in accordance with the embodiment of FIGS. 7, 8 or 10, showing the cutting of a groove after the groove has partially been cut;

FIG. 29 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional elevation of a portion of a panel provided in accordance with the embodiment of FIGS. 7, 8 or 10, showing the cutting of a groove after the groove has partially been cut;

DESCRIPTION Referring 'to FIG. 1, a base panel sheet or structure is first provided and a base coat or under coat or base layer 11 is applied thereto; for example, as a spray 12 applied from spraying device 13. The panel may be moved with respect to the spraying device as indicated by arrow 14 or the spraying device may be moved with respect to the panel as indicated by arrow 15.

Base panel sheet or structure 10 may be wood, plywood, pressed wood (such as a panel of wood cellulose fibers bonded, at least in part with lignin, for example, such as sold under the trademark Masonite by the Masonite Corporation), a pre-fabricated concrete block wall, cement-asbestos board, gypsum board, or formed plastic, such as formed polystyrene or the like. The thickness of the base coat is not critical. It may be as small as 0.005 or 0.010 inch as described hereinafter in connection with certain embodiments or in connection with certain other embodiments may preferably be on theorder of one-eighth to one-fourth inch, but may be thinner.

In certain embodiments which are described hereinafter, the base coat is allowed to harden or caused to harden by drying or curing prior to conducting certain subsequent critical steps and, in such instances, the base coat ispreferably provided as a coating having a thickness on the order of the thickness of a coat of paint such as, for example, on the order of 0.005 or 0.010 inch. Generally, in-such instances, a relatively thin coating is desired in accordance with the demands of economy, but a somewhat thicker coating may be provided, if desired, to provide a desired texture. For such embodiments, the base coat may be applied by any suitable method, such as by spraying as shown or by troweling as described hereinafter in conjunction with FIG. 2 or by brushing on with a paint brush or the like. For such embodiments, the base coat is preferably caused to have a texture which simulates mortar. This may be accomplished by spraying, by brushing or troweling after spraying or by simply applying the coating originally by brushing or troweling. The invention is not at all limited to the manner in which the base coat is applied.

The base coat preferably consists of any suitable mixture of water and fine particulate aggregate and portland cement. Suitable materials which may be utilized as aggregate include sand, silica sand and the like and with sand or sand-like aggregates there may be provided, as a portion of said aggregate, a suitable quantity of any such material as lime, clay, asbestos fibers, perlite, silica powder or the like.

An organic synthetic resinous material may also be included as a bonding agent. Preferred bonding agents include acrylic latex, rubber latex, and vinyl latex. A bonding agent generally is preferred when the coating is applied to a noncementitious underlying base panel structure, but is often optionally omitted when the base coating is applied to a cementitious underlying base panel structure, such as a pre-fabricated concrete block wall.

Latex paint containing sand may be used to provide a base coat, but has the disadvantage that the paint weathers out; i.e., is degraded and removed by the action of ultraviolet light and hail, snow and the like, whereas the composition described above is relatively highly resistant to weathering.

As shown in FIG. 2, the base coat 11 may be applied to base panel structure 10 with a trowel or screed rather than being applied by spraying as shown in FIG. 1. This base coat may be made relatively thin as hereinbefore mentioned rather than being made relatively thick as shown. It may also be applied by brushing or the like.

If desired, base coat II, as shown for coat 11 or coat 11' in FIG. l or FIG. 2, may serve as an additional base coat (FIG. 3), and the base coat 21 itself may be applied in any suitable manner such as by trowel or screed 16 as shown in FIG. 3.

Before carrying out the step of FIG. 3, coating or layer 11 is preferably allowed or caused to become hard by curing and/or drying which may be accomplished by allowing the coating to stand unmolested at temperate ambient weather conditions such as from 40 to 110F. at a relatively humidity of from 20 to on the order of ten minutes to 30 minutes.

Drying and/or curing to harden the base coat may be accelerated by several means, such as by raising the temperature or the like.

Coating 21 is then preferably applied after coating 11" has become hard, non-plastic and unimpressionable. By unimpressionable it is meant that no impression may be made on layer 11" by pressing an article thereagainst without making a corresponding impression on base panel structure 10. However, coating or layer 21 is preferably applied while 11 remains moist and if 11" is not moist it is preferably moistened prior to application of layer 21. While base layer 11 is moist, finish coat 17, (FIG. 4), or 17 (FIG. 5) is applied. Layer 11 maybe moist by reason of the presence of a portion of the water originally present in the composition or may be moist by reason of being at least slightly remoistened. Finish coat 17 may be applied in the form of a spray 18 from spraying device 19, which may travel with respect to the panel as indicated by arrow 20. Alternatively, the panel may travel with respect to the spraying device as indicated by arrow 22. Spraying device 19 may be similar or even identical to spraying device l3. Spraying device for spraying mixtures of the general nature described herein for the base coat and the finish coat are well known and available commercially and therefore are not described herein. Finish coat 17 may be similar or identical in composition to finish coat l7 and may be applied with a screed or a trowel 16 as shown in FIG. 5, rather than being applied by spraying.

Hereinafter, reference to finish coat 17 is to be understood to refer equally to coating 17 unless otherwise stated.

Finish coat 17 may be applied to a depth of as little as 0.005 or 0.010 inch, in some instances, but is preferably applied to a thickness of at least one thirtysecondth of an inch or three-fourths millimeter and it may be applied to a thickness of one-fourth or one-half inch. Generally, more suitable thicknesses are on the order of one-sixteenth to one-fourth inch; the thickness selected being that which will provide suitable relief; that is, which provides a depth of the simulated mortar joint sufficient to provide the desired effect. Surprisingly, relatively small relief such as may be provided by a thickness of one thirty-secondth or one-sixteenth inch for coating 17 provides remarkably effective simulation of brick wall, but generally greater relief such as provided by a thickness of one-sixteenth inch or greater and, in many cases, preferably one-eighth, threesixteenths, or one-fourth inch, is preferred.

The composition which is applied to provide the finish coat is preferably a mixture of water, fine particulate aggregate and portland cement in proportion suitable to provide sufficient water for the portland cement reaction and to provide the desired degree of softness, plasticity and impressionability. The aggregate may be sand or. sand together with other materials or other particulate aggregate as discussed above in connection with the aggregate for the base coat. The portland cement for the finish coat and also for the base coat may be quick setting cement or early-strength cement, common grey cement or any other suitable commercially or experimentally available suitable portland cement or mixture of such cements. A small quantity of synthetic resin latex bonding agent may be added if desired.

The composition of the finish coat and the base coat may, if desired, be identical if both coating are to remain soft, plastic and impressionable during subsequent steps. Generally, it is preferred to provide a greater proportion of bonding agent in the base coat. Coloring material which is generally preferably a pigment, may be added in suitable quantity in manner well known in the prior art to provide a suitable color for the finish coat. Colors generally preferred are red, white, yellow, brown and grey, and by suitable selection of the amount and type of coloring material, the chroma, hue and tone of the color may be varied greatly to provide any variations of these colors.

As a next step in the process, a finish treatment may be carried out if desired, as shown in FIG. 6 to provide a suitable texture on the outer surface of the finish coat 17. Thus a brush may be applied to provide a brushed finish as indicated by brush 22 which may be moved with respect to the panel as indicated by arrow 23. The panel may also be moved with respect to the brush as indicated by arrow 24. The brush may, for example, have soft bristles, stiff bristles or may even have wire bristles and may be moved laterally or transversely or with a circular or eliptical motion to provide any one of a large number of finishes, any one of which may be desired. In place of, or in addition to such brushing, the surface may be troweled lightly or heavily and additionally or alternatively the surface may be spattered with materials of slight or great contrast in color to provide any one of a large number of finishes.

In accordance with a preferred embodiment, as shown in FIGS. 7 and 11, a first set of grooves 26 is created in the panel while layers 17 and 11 remain soft, plastic and impressionable. Grooves 26 extend entirely through the finish layer and partly through the base layer. The grooves are created as shown by cutting the sides and the bottom of the grooves with knife-edge members to provide a strip 27 corresponding to each groove. Strips 27 which are produced comprises a finish layer portion 17a and a base layer portion 11a. Removal of each of strips 27 exposes a side wall portion of groove 26 comprising a portion 17b of layer 17 and a portion of 11b of layer 11. As shown in FIG. 7, the knife-edge member 28 comprises knife portion 29 which cuts the bottom of the groove and knife-edge members 28 are attached to cutting apparatus 30.

The number of grooves 26 in a set, is preferably equal in number to the number of horizontal simulated mortar joints to be provided on the panel.

All the grooves in the set consisting of grooves 26 are preferably cut in a single translatory pass of cutting apparatus 30 with respect to panel 10 which may be accomplished by translatory movement of apparatus 30, as indicated by arrow 35, while panel 10 remains stationary or alternatively by movement of panel 10 as indicated by arrow 36 while apparatus 30 remains stationary. Each of strips 27 may be removed from the vicinity of the panel and from the vicinity of devices 28 by applying suction to provide an air flow as indicated by arrow 37. The desired suction and corresponding air flow may be provided by providing reduced pressure, that is, air pressure below the ambient atmospheric air pressure, in tubes 38. Strips 27 may thus be transported through tubes 38 and thence through header tube 39, with which tubes 38 may communicate, in the direction indicated by arrow 40 to a receptacle or depository which is indicated schematically as 40. Reduced pressure may be applied to receptacle 40, header 39 and tubes 38 by a blower or vacuum pump means indicated schematically as 42.

In FIG. 8, there is shown a modification of the embodiment of FIGS. 7 and 11 wherein members 28 and 38 are combined into a combination cutting and evacuating device to which suction may be applied to provide an airflow indicated by arrow 37 so that strips 27 are conveyed in the manner hereinbefore described in conjunction with FIG. 7 and cutting edge 29, which corresponds to cutting knife-portion 29, is provided as a portion of member 48 as shown.

Referring now to FIG. 9, there is shown an additional step which may be carried out in the process, following the step of FIG. 6 according to which the panel, after the completion of the step of FIG. 6, is inverted into the position shown. A rake member corresponding to 28 and having cutting edge knife portion 29" corresponding to portion 29 may then applied as shown in FIG. 10 in the same manner as discussed in conjunction with FIGS. 7 and 11, except for the omission of means to provide reduced pressure; that is, omission of the apparatus comprising members 38, 39, 40, 41 and 42 since, as shown, strip 27' which may correspond to strip 27 falls away by gravity as member 48 moves in the direction indicated by arrow 49 .with respect to panel 10.

Referring now to FIG. 12, there is shown modification of the embodiment of FIG. 8, wherein member 58 which corresponds to member 48 is provided with a knife-edge portion 49, which extends slightly downwardly just at the rear ofknife-edge portion 49 to provide ramp portion 50 which engages the bottom 51 of groove 26' which corresponds to groove 26. The action of portion 50 against the bottom 51 may serve to guide member 58 with respect to the upper surface of 10 of panel 10 to provide for knife portion 49 to travel at a predetermined distance 52 above surface 10' so that layer 11 is cut into two portions: one portion 11a of which constitutes a portion of strip 27", the other portion of which remains behind as indicated at 53, just as comparable portions 53', 53" and 53' remain behind in the embodiments of FIGS. 7, 8 and 10.

In the modification of the embodiment of portion 60 (FIG. 13), which may correspond to portion 50 may be provided as being parallel or substantially parallel to surface 10 of base panel structure 10 so that member 68 which may correspond to member 48 or 58 may be suitably guided so that knife portion 59 thereof is guided at a predetermined distance 63 above surface 10' to provide the remaining portion 53"" of layer 11.

Likewise, in FIG. 14 there is shown another embodiment of FIGS. 12 and 13 wherein wheel member 70 is provided attached to member 78 by bracket 77. Wheel member 70 is disposed to engage the bottom of surface 71 of groove 26" to suitable guide knifeedge portion 69 of member 78 at a predetermined distance 72 above surface 10' of panel 10 to provide remaining portion 53"' of layer 11 underlying groove 26".

Referring now to the embodiment of FIGS. and 16, guidance of knife-edge portions 29 of members 28 may be provided by providing rails 80 alongside panel 10 and providing wheels 81 which may travel on rails 80 and may be rotatably supported from carriage members 82 which may be attached to supporting apparatus 30 by any suitable adjustable means 83 which may provide for apparatus 30 to support members 28 and 38 in disengaged position as shown in FIG. 16 or in engaged position as shown in FIGS. 15 and 7. Apparatus of FIGS. 15 and 16 may be preferably utilized in conjunction with the embodiments of FIGS. 7, 8 and 10 and may suitably, if desired, be utilized in conjunction with the embodiments of 12, 13 and 14 to assist in providing predetermined distances 52, 62 and 72, augmenting the means providing such distances described in conjunction with the embodiments of those Figures. The apparatus of FIGS. 15 and 16 is disposed to provide predetermined distances in the embodiments of FIGS. 7, 8 and 10 corresponding to predetermined distances indicated at 52, 62 and 72 in FIGS. 12, 13 and 14.

In FIG. 17 there is shown a modification of the embodiment of FIGS. 15 and 16 wherein members 28', 38' and 39' correspond to members 28, 38 and 39 but are supported from apparatus 30' so that in the embodiments of FIG. 17 the cutting of grooves 26 is not initiated simultaneously nor completed simultaneously, although during a portion of the step of cutting of grooves 26 all of members 28 are operating simultaneously. In contradistinction, in the embodiments of FIGS. 15, 16 and 11 the cutting of each set of grooves begins simultaneously and ends simultaneously.

After grooves are cut to simulate horizontal mortar joints as described hereinabove in conjunction with FIGS. 7 to 17, grooves may be cut to simulate vertical mortar joints. This may be accomplished with a modification of the apparatus-of FIGS. 7 and 11 as indicated in FIGS. 18 and 19, wherein a shaft 30' may be disposed to travel in a direction parallel to the surface of panel 10 or layer 17 as indicated by arrow 86 by reason of being attached to carriages such as carriages 82 or other suitable or equivalent means. Alternatively, means may be provided to maintain shaft 30 stationary and cause panel 10 and layers 11 and 17 to travel translatorily with respect to the shaft as indicated by arrow 85. Members 88 which may correspond to members 28 may be attached rotatably to shaft 30 by hinged portions 91 and may be spaced on shaft 30' by spaces 92 provided thereon.

Each of members 88 may be provided with knifeedge portion 89 which may correspond to knife-edge portion 29, 29 or 29".

Supported from each of members 88 there may be provided tube or ductmeans 98 which may correspond to member 38. Each of tubes 98 may be connected to a vacuum header 99, which may correspond to header 39, by a flexible coupling 94, so that by the application of suction, i.e., source of reduced pressure, airflow may be provided as indicated by arrows 87 and 90.

Each of members 88 may be connected by a link 101 to armature 102 of solenoid coil 103 contained in housing 105 supported on solenoid supporting bar 104. Each of links 101 may be connected to members 188 and 102 respectively with pins 106 and 107. Solenoid coils 103 may be activated to act on armatures 102 to lift members 88 and cutting edges 89 out of engagement with layers 17 and 11 as indicated for members 88 or may be deactivated to lower members 88 so that portions 89 engage the layers to provide grooves as indicated at 88". When in the lowered position and engaged as indicated at 88", portions 89 may be guided to provide predetermined distances such as 52, 62 and 72 in the manner before discussed in conjunction with the embodiments of FIGS. 7 to 17. The first set of vertical grooves, 126', which are in line with each other, may thus be cut by alternately activating and deactivating the solenoids for members 88" so that a plurality of short grooves 126 which are in line with one another are provided extending between alternate pairs of horizontal grooves 26 and likewise, a second set of vertical grooves 126 in line with each other may be provided by alternately activating and deactivating solenoids for member 88, as shown, solenoids for 88 being deactivated upon those for members 88 being activated and solenoids for members 88 being deactivated when those for 88" are activated.

Header 99 and solenoid support member 104 may be supported in the same manner as shaft 30 to be stationary with respect to one another but to provide for movement in accordance with arrow 86 or arrow 85.

There may thus be provided a panel indicated as 109 if layers 11 and 17 are applied to base sheet panel 110 of plywood as shown in FIG. 20 and there may be thus provided a panel indicated as 119 if layers 11 and 17 are applied to a base sheet panel 120 of gypsum board which may consist of a layer of paper 118 covering gypsum core 117.

As shown in FIG. 22, a panel 129 in accordance with the invention may be provided by application of layers 11 and 17 to a pressed wood fiber base panel sheet 130 generally known as a hardboard base'panel sheet and likewise, a panel 139 may be provided in accordance with the method of the invention by application of layers 11 and 17 to a foamed polystyrene base sheet panel 140 as shown in FIG. 23.

Furthermore, a panel 149 in accordance with the invention may thus be provided as shown in FIG. 24 by application of layers 11 and 17 to pre-fabricated concrete block wall 150.

Referring now to FIG. 25, the step of cutting the grooves is indicated schematically therein for all of the embodiments hereinbefore described in conjunction with FIGS. 4 through 24. A base coat layer and finish coat layer each being of cementitious material comprising water, fine particulate aggregate and portland cement is applied to either a cementitious or noncementitious base panel structure 10 and while each of layers 11 and 17 is soft, plastic and impressionable. grooves are cut to provide strips 27 containing a finish layer portion (all of the finish layer in the groove area) and a base coat portion as discussed in detail in connection with FIG. 7, leaving a portion 53' of layer 11 remaining. underlying the groove.

In accordance with the embodiment of FIG. 3, a first base coat 11" may be provided on base panel which may be cementitious or non-cementitious and layer 11" may be allowed to become hard by drying or by curing to carry the portland cement reaction partially to completion before applying a second base layer 21. After applying base layer 21, finish layer 17 may be applied and cutting apparatus may be operated in accordance with the embodiments of FIGS. 7 through 17, except for the modifications thereof that the predetermined distance above surface 10' of panel 10 at which knife-edge portions are to travel is determined as being the thickness of layer 11", the knife-edge members, as indicated, being operated so that they bear against or ride upon the upper surface of layer 11" which, as hereinbefore mention, has been allowed to become hardened so that strips 127 comprise substantially all of layer 21 and substantially none of layer 11" in the areas where the grooves are cut.

In the embodiment of FIG. 27, layers 11 and 17 are applied to a cementitious underlying base panel structure 150 which may be a cement asbestos board or may be a pre-fabricated concrete block wall as shown in FIG. 24 and knife-edge members 89 are operated, as shown, with the edge riding against the upper surface 150" of panel 150 in the same manner as the operation of the embodiment of FIG. 26 so that strips 127' comprise all oflayer 17 and substantially all of layer 11 as in the embodiment of of FIG. 26 due to the fact that layer 11 corresponds to layer 21 in FIG. 26 and the predetermined distance hereinbefore described as desirable is made substantially nil.

In accordance with the modification of FIG. 28, base coat 17 is provided directly on layer 11" which is applied to panel 10 which may be cementitious or noncementitious as hereinbefore described and knife-edge member 89" is operated as in the embodiment of FIG. 26 with the edge riding on the bearing against the upper surface of layer 11" which has been hardened prior to the operation of FIG. 28, so that strip 157 comprises substantially all of finish layer 17, but substantially none of layer 11".

There is shown in FIG. 29 a modification of the embodiments of FIGS. 27 and 28 wherein finish layer 17 is applied directly on a cementitious base panel structure 150, which as hereinbefore mentioned may be cement-asbestos panel or prefabricated concrete block wall as in the embodiment of FIG. 24 or the like and cutting edge 29 or any corresponding cutting edges is operated to provide strip 157 consisting ofsubstantially all offinish coat 17 but substantially none of underlying base panel structure 150' as hereinbefore described, the predetermined distance being made nil as in the embodiment of FIG. 27.

The preferred embodiment of FIG. represents the cutting step of the embodiments of FIGS. 7 through 17. The surface which simulates the mortar at the simulated mortar joints is, immediately after cutting the grooves. a soft, impressionable surface, located below the top surface and above the bottom surface of the cementitious base layer.

In contradistinction, in the embodiments of FIGS. 26, 27, 28 and 29, the surface which simulates mortar at the simulated motar joints, immediately after cutting the grooves is primarily the surface of an underlying hard cementitious material which in the embodiments of FIGS. 26 and 28 is the upper surface of the previously applied and previously hardened cementitious base coat and in the embodiments of FIGS. 27 and 29 is the surface of a cementitious base panel structure such as cement-asbestos board or concrete.

Referring now to FIG. 25, the step of cutting the grooves is indicated schematically for all of the embodiments hereinbefore described in conjunction with FIGS. 4 through 24. A base coat layer 11 and finish coat layer 17, each being of cementitious material comprising water, fine particulate aggregate and portland cement is applied to either a cementitious or noncementitious base panel structure 10 and, while each of layers 11 and 17 is soft, plastic and impressionable. grooves are cut to provide strips 27 containing a finish layer portion (all of the finish layer in the groove area) and a base coat portion as discussed in detail in connection with FIG. 7, leaving a remaining portion of layer 11 underlying the groove at 53.

Referring now to FIG. 26, in accordance with the embodiment of FIG. 3 a first base coat 11" may be provided on base panel 10 which may be cementitious or non-cementitious and layer 11" may be allowed to become hard by drying or by curing to carry the portland cement reaction partially to completion before applying a second base layer 21. After applying base layer 21, finish layer 17 may be applied and cutting apparatus may be operated in accordance with the embodiments of FIGS. 7 through 17, except for the modification thereof that the predetermined distance above surface 10 of panel 10 at which knife-edge portions are to travel is determined as being the thickness of layer 11", the knife-edge members, as indicated, being operated so that they bear against or ride upon the upper surface of layer 11" which has, as hereinbefore mentioned, been allowed to become hardened so that strips 127 comprise substantially all of layer 21 and substantially none of layer 11 in the areas where the grooves were cut (FIG. 26).

In the embodiment of FIG. 27, layers 11 and 17 are applied to a cementitious underlying base panel structure which may be a cement-asbestos board or may be pre-fabricated concrete block wall as shown in FIG. 24 and knife-edge members 89 are operated, as shown, with the edge riding against the upper surface of 150 of panel 150 in the same manner as in the operation of the embodiment of FIG. 26 so that strips 127 comprise all of layer 17 and substantially all of layer 11 as in the embodiment of FIG. 26 due to the fact that layer 11 corresponds to layer 21 in FIG. 26 and the predetermined distance hereinbefore described as desirable is made substantially nil.

In accordance with the modification of FIG. 28, base coat 17 is provided directly on layer 11 which is applied to panel 10 which may be cementitious or noncementitious as hereinbefore described and knife-edge member 89 is operated as in the embodiment of FIG. 26 with the edge riding on or bearing against the upper surface of layer 11" which has been hardened prior to the operation of FIG. 28, so that strip 157 comprises substantially all of finish layer 17, but substantially none of layer 11".

There is shown in FIG. 29 a modification of the embodiments of FIGS. 27 and 28 wherein finish layer 17 is applied directly on a cementitious base panel structure 150, which as hereinbefore mentioned may be a cement-asbestos panel. pre-fabricated concrete block wall as in the embodiment of FIG. 24 or the like and 13 cutting edge 29"or any corresponding cutting edge is operated to'provide strip 157 consisting of substantially all of finish coat 17 but substantially none of underlying base panel structure 150 as hereinbefore described, the predetermined distance being made nil as in the embodiment of FIG. 27.

The preferred embodiment of FIG. represents the cutting step of the embodiments of FIGS. 7 through 17. The surface which simulates the mortar at the simulated mortar joints is, immediately after cutting the grooves, a soft, impressionable surface, below the top surface and above the bottom surface of a cementitious base layer.

In contradistinction, in the embodiments of FIGS. 26, 27, 28 and 29, the surface which simulates mortar at the simulated mortar joints, immediately after cutting the grooves is primarily the surface of an under-lying hard cementitious material which in the embodiments of FIGS. 26 and 28 is the upper surface of the previously applied and previously hardened cementitious base coat and in the embodiments of FIGS. .27 and 29 is the surface of a cementitious base panel structure such as cement asbestos board or concrete.

It may thus be seen that the invention is broad in scope and includes such modifications as will be apparent to those skilled in the art and is to be limited only by the claims. I

Having thus described our invention, we claim:

1. In the process of providing a simulated masonry wall, the combination of the steps of:

providing a base panel structure having four edges and having a cementitious surface which simulates mortar,

applying on said surface a finish layer,

said finish layer being a cementitious material comprising water, fine particulate aggregate and portland cement, and, said finish layer being initially soft and plastic and impressionable, when while said layer remains at least somewhat soft and plastic and impressionable, creating grooves which extend through said layer, said grooves divided into at least two sets, the grooves of said first set extending substantially parallel to each other, and,

the grooves of said second set extending substantially parallel to each other and substantially normal to the grooves of said first set.

said process particularly characterized by the further steps in said combination comprising the steps of:

creating said grooves by cutting the sides and bottom of the grooves with knife-edge members to provide a strip corresponding to each groove, said knife edges attached to cutting apparatus,

each of said strips comprising a finish layer portron, removing said strips as they are cut, cutting the grooves in each set in a single translatory pass of the cutting apparatus with respect to the base panel structure, and, guiding said knife-edge members which cut the bottoms of said grooves at a predetermined spacing from the upper surface of said base panel structure underlying said base layer. 2. The method of claim 1 characterized by starting and ending the cutting of each set of grooves simultaneously.

3. Themethod of claim 1 wherein only two sets of grooves are provided and wherein the grooves in each set extend from an edge of the base panel structure to an opposite edge of the base panel structure to provide a panel which simulates the surface of a stack bonded brick wall.

4. The method of claim 3 characterized by starting and ending the cutting of each set of grooves simultaneously.

5. The method of claim 1 wherein the grooves in the first of said sets of grooves extend from an edge of the base panelstructure to an opposite edge of the base panel structure, and wherein the second of said sets of grooves is divided into at least two sub-sets of grooves, and,

wherein the grooves in the sub-sets are intermittent so that each groove in each sub-set comprises a I plurality of groove portions,

each of said groove portions extending from one of said first grooves in said first set to another of said grooves in said first set to provide a panel which simulates the surface of an alternate bonded brick wall, and,

cutting each sub-set in a single translatory pass of the cutting apparatus with respect to the base panel structure, while,

alternately engaging and disengaging said knife-edge members with said base and finish layers to provide said groove portions.

6. The method of claim 5 characterized by starting and ending the cutting of each set of grooves simultaneously.

7. The method of claim 1 characterized by the step of removing said strips by vacuum.

8. The method of claim 7 wherein only two sets of grooves are provided and wherein the grooves in each set extend from an edge of the base panel structure to an opposite edge of the base panel structure to provide a panel which simulates the surface of a stack bonded brick wall.

9. The method of claim 7 wherein the grooves in the first of said sets of grooves extend from an edge of the base panel structure to an opposite edge of the base panel structure, and the second of said sets of grooves is divided into at least two sub-sets of grooves, and,

wherein the grooves in the sub-sets are intermittent so that each groove in each sub-set comprises a plurality of groove portions,

each of said groove portions extending from one of said first grooves in said first set to another of said grooves in said first set to provide a panel which simulates the surface of an alternate-bonded brick wall, and,

cutting each sub-set in ansingle translatory pass of the cutting apparatus with respect to the base panel structure, while alternately engaging and disengaging said knife-edge members with said base and finish layers to provide said groove portions.

10. The method of claim 7 characterized by starting and ending the cutting of each set of grooves simultaneously.

11. The method of claim 1 characterized by the step of inverting said base panel structure with said layers therein while cutting said grooves to thereby remove said strips by gravity.

12. The method of claim 1 further characterized by the additional steps of:

providing a base panal structure having four edges,

coating said base panel structure with a base layer,

said base layer being a cementitious material comprising water, fine particulate aggregate and portland cement, and,

said base layer being initially soft and plastic and impressionable,

to provide said base panel structure having a cementitious surface which simulates mortar wherein said cementitious surface is the surface of said base layer,

creating said grooves while said base layer remains at least somewhat soft and plastic and impressionable,

guiding said knife-edge members to provide each of said strips with a finish layer portion and a base layer portion so that each of said grooves extends entirely through said finish layer and partly through said base layer.

13. The method of claim 12 further characterized by the additional steps of:

providing an additional base layer between said base panel structure and said base layer by first coating said base panel structure with said additional base layer before applying said base layer said additional base layer being a cementitious material comprising water, fine particulate aggregate and portland cement,

causing said additional base layer to become hard, non-plastic and substantially nonimpressionable before cutting said grooves, and,

causing said predetermined distance to be determined as the thickness of the additional base layer by cutting said grooves with the knife-edge members which cut the bottoms of the grooves bearing against the surface of said additional base layer to provide said strips,

said strips comprising all of the finish layer and substantially all of the base layer between the edges of the grooves.

14. The method of claim 1 characterized by:

said base panel structure on which said base layer is applied being cementitious material,

said predetermined distance being made substantially nil by cutting said grooves with the knife-edge members which cut the bottoms of the grooves bearing against the surface of said base panel structure to provide said strips,

each of said strips comprising only substantially all of the finish layer between the edges of the grooves.

15. The method of claim 1 further characterized by the additional steps of:

providing a base panel structure having four edges,

coating said base panel structure with a base layer,

said base layer being a cementitious material comprising water, fine particulate aggregate and portland cement, and,

causing said base layer to become hard, non-plastic and substantially non-impressionable before cutting said grooves, and,

causing said predetermined distance to be determined as the thickness of the base layer by cutting said grooves with the knife-edge members which cut the bottoms of the grooves bearing against the base layer to provide said strips,

each of said strips comprising substantially all of the finish layer and substantially none of the base layer between the edges of the grooves.

16. The method of claim 1 wherein said base panel structure is a pre-fabricated concrete block wall and said predetermined distance is made substantially nil by cutting said grooves with the knife-edge members which cut the bottoms of the grooves bearing against the surface of said wall to provide said strips,

said strips comprising all of the finish layer and substantially all of the base layer between the edges of the grooves.

17. The method of claim 12 characterized by the step of removing said strips by vacuum.

18. The method of claim 13 characterized by the step of removing said strips by vacuum.

19. The method of claim 14 characterized by the step of removing said strips by vacuum.

20. The method of claim 15 characterized by the step of removing said strips by vacuum.

21. The method ofclaim 16 characterized by the step of removing said strips by vacuum.

22. The method of claim 17 characterized by the step of removing said strips by vacuum. l

. Patent No. 3,819,395.

' Column 7', line 31, change "any" to many STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CQRRECTIUN Dated June 25, 1974 Inventofls) T mY E. Yocum It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 2, line 49, cancel "or" and substitute'-- on Column 3, line,2, before "cut" insert which Column 5, line 16, change "formed" to foamed both occurrences.

Column 8,

Column 9, line 7, Column'll, line 38,

Column 13, line 39,

line 37, after "may" insert be change "suitable" to suitably change "the bearing" to or bearing change "when" to. then Signed [and sealed this 37:11 day of December 1974.

(SEAL) Attest:

c. MARSHALL DANN Commissione'rof ,Patents McoY M. GIBSON JR. Attesting Officer

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Referenced by
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US4670315 *Dec 13, 1985Jun 2, 1987Hochtief Aktiengesellschaft Vorm, Gebr. HelfmannProcess for providing a synthetic resin coating on a concrete structure
US5167991 *May 13, 1991Dec 1, 1992Michael LoweCoating with curable polymer mortar, texturing, forming stone and grout line pattern
US5328730 *Sep 1, 1992Jul 12, 1994Michael LoweReplicated stone surface
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US7208225Dec 3, 2002Apr 24, 2007Lafarge PlatresPrefabricated plaster board
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US7258897 *Mar 6, 2006Aug 21, 2007Schindler Anthony JProviding a substrate;placing markings on surface of the substrate to form a design;applying a colorant over the markings;applying a removable tape over the colorant to mark off the design;preparing a polymer cement;applying thin coat of polymer cement , drying, applying a colorant, removing tape
US7337587Jun 1, 2004Mar 4, 2008Lafarge PlatresConstruction assembly of plaster boards and a method of assembling a plurality of plaster boards
US7414085Apr 14, 2004Aug 19, 2008Lafarge PlatresCoating for wall construction
US7469510Apr 14, 2004Dec 30, 2008Lafarge PlatresSystem using a drywall board and a jointing compound
US7594963Nov 7, 2003Sep 29, 2009Lafarge PlatresJoint compound composition for building elements and method of producing a structure
US7842218May 26, 2009Nov 30, 2010Lafarge Platresbuilding elements are juxtaposed to define a space, a joint composition is mixed with water, space is filled with composition without using a tape, and joint compound is left to harden; joint compound includes calcium sulphate hemihydrate, binder, oleic acid, stearic acid
US8151532Jul 7, 2004Apr 10, 2012Lafarge PlatresConstruction assembly of skim coated prefabricated elements and jointing material, a kit therefor, and method of assembling the same
EP0645506A1 *Sep 23, 1994Mar 29, 1995Ulrich M÷lleMethod of constructing a building-fašade
EP1088683A1 *Sep 30, 1999Apr 4, 2001Dall'Aglio, Jean-PierreProcess and apparatus for production of manufacturing reproducibly mosaic constructs and the produced tesserae
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Classifications
U.S. Classification427/264, 427/277, 427/403
International ClassificationB29C39/16, B29B13/00, B29B7/00, B28B19/00, B29C33/00, B29C39/00, B44F9/04, E04F13/14, B29C33/36, B28B11/08
Cooperative ClassificationB28B11/0863, B44F9/04, B28B19/00, E04F13/147, B28B13/0295
European ClassificationB28B13/02H, B28B11/08E, E04F13/14J, B28B19/00, B44F9/04