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Publication numberUS3819460 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 25, 1974
Filing dateJul 21, 1971
Priority dateSep 3, 1969
Publication numberUS 3819460 A, US 3819460A, US-A-3819460, US3819460 A, US3819460A
InventorsDukess J
Original AssigneeDukess J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Material for cap liner
US 3819460 A
Abstract
Material for cap liners in the form of a sandwich and so arranged that a compressible intermediate layer of relatively great thickness is disposed between two relatively thin non-resilient layers. The intermediate layer can be squeezed beyond the periphery of the material for making a better seal.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Dukess 1 June 25, 1974 MATERlAL FOR CAP LINER 2,238,681 4/1941 Dorough 1111/42 11 2,601,318 6 1952 N 'k'.' [76] Inventorl JsePh Dukess 931 Greace" P 9" 2,620,939 12/1952 w e isgzrber 161/42 x Mamaroneck, 3,183,144 5/1965 Caviglia.....-.

21 3,493,453 Ceresa [21] Appl. No.: 164,658

Related Application Data Primary Examinerl\/Iari0n E. McCamish [60] Continuatioh-iri-part and Di isien of ser. 1911955,- Gddfarb 155, Sept. 3, 1969, Pat. No. 3,595,419.

[52] US. Cl 161/42, 161/43, 161/211,

161/242, 161/252, 161/253, 161/401, [57] ABSTRACT [51 Int. Cl B32b 31/20 Material for p liners the form of a Sandwich and 53 Field f Search u 1 1/42 43 211 242 252 so arranged that a compressible intermediate layer of 1 1/253 401; 215 40 43 R relatively great thickness is disposed between two .relatively thin non-resilient layers. The intermediate layer 5 References Cited can be squeezed beyond the periphery of the material for makmg a better Sal.

1,431,871 10/1922 Burnet 161/42X 1 (1131M Drawing Figures PAIENTEDJHNZBIBY! 3.819.460

' INVENTOR. flag/2v ATTORNEY MATERIAL FOR CAP LINER This invention relates to material for cap liners and is a continuation in part and is a division of application Ser. No. 855,155, filed Sept. 3, 1969, now US. Pat. No. 3,595,419 for Closure and Seal.

Various types of cap constructions utilizing liners have been devised in the past. These liners are employed to seal the contents of the container preventing leaking between the threaded portions of a container neck and the cap by providing for a positive seal at the mouth of the container. Such previous cap constructions and liners and material used for liners therefor have been a compromise between the requirement that the liner material be stress and crack resistant while also being moisture impervious and impervious to chemicals and acids, yet being bendable and compressible enough to provide for an effective seal. The present invention oversomes the difficulties of the prior art liner material and has all of the advantages of these prior materials without the corresponding disadvantages. A further advantage of the liner according to the present invention is that liners are capable of being stamped out of stock liner material without freezing.

One of the features of the invention resides in liner material capable of forming a liner that is freely rotatable within the cap until such time as the mouth of the container is firmly against the liner compressing the liner so that an intermediate layer of the liner is compressed and expands outwardly thereby abutting against the side walls of the cap for making a most effective seal.

A further object of the invention resides in the production of a liner material that is capable of being extruded as a multi-layer sandwich.

Still further, objects and features of this invention resides in the provision of a cap and liner therefor that is capable of being extruded by conventional machinery and which can be conveniently stamped to shape with out requiring freezing thereby permitting manufacture at a relatively low cost, and which is highly effective in use,

These, together with the various ancillary objects and features of this invention, which will become apparent as the following description proceeds, are attained by this liner material, a preferred embodiment of which is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, by way of'example only, wherein:

FIG. 1 is an exploded sectional detail view illustrating the cap and liner therefor made from liner material according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional detail view showing the cap liner therefor in a stage of being secured on the neck of a container:

FIG. 3 is an enlarged vertical detail view illustrating a portion of the cap and liner therefor as firmly secured on a container;

FIG. 4 is a partial sectional view of the linermaterial;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4 but showing the shape of the liner after it has been compressed when the cap has been tightly closed on the container;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view of a modification; and

FIG. 7 is a sectional detail view of a modified form of liner material.

With continuing reference to the accompanying drawing, wherein like reference numerals designate similar parts throughout the various views, reference numeral 10 is used to generally designate a conventional container such as a bottle, tube, or can having a neck 12 which is threaded at 14. In order to provide a closure for the container 10 a cap 16 is employed which includes cylindrical side walls 18 which are internally threaded at 20 and atop 22. A cylindrical groove 24 is formed as the uppermost of the threads 20 and is for the purpose of receiving therein a liner 26. The cap 16 is preferably molded out of any suitable synthetic plastic material and is adapted to be threadedly secured on the neck 12 with the threads 20 engaging the threads 14.

The liner 26, see FIG. 4, is from a liner material in accordance with the invention formed of a sandwich of outer layers 28, and 30, and an innerlayer 32, the liner 26 preferably being stamped in the shape of a disc. The outer layers 28 and 30 are formed of a low density polyethylene, such as that sold under the trademark Alathion 20. This material is stress resistant, crack resistant, relatively non-resilient, impervious and is extruded in a very thin layer in the order of approximately 1 /2 one-thousandths of an inch. The intermediate layer 32 is a thermoplastic rubber like material such as butylene in polyethylene known as pliothene, or other resilient material such as ethylene vinyl acetate or the material sold under the trademark Karton, which is'a thermoplastic rubber. Particularly, this material is resilient though not necessarily as resistant to stress and cracks- /or as impervious to foreign substances as the material of the outer layers 28 and 30. When the sandwich is manufactured by way of simultaneous multiple extrusion, the outer layers 28 and 30 are extruded at a temperature approximately 300 to 400 F while the intermediate layer 32 is extruded at approximately 220 F to 320 F. The various layers are brought together within a combination dye and at about 300 F for bonding within the combination dye. The resultant sheet material has a much increased resistance to distortion or stress, can be stamped without freezing and is impervious to chemicals and acids as well as moisture.

When the disc 26 is inserted in the groove 24 in a normal state it will freely rotate therein permitting for effective setting of the disc 26 within the groove 24 and effective engagement of the mouth 15 of the container 10 against the under surface 34 of the layer 30. Continued closure of the cap 16 will cause the resilient intermediate layer 32 to be compressed exuding a tongue 36 beyond the peripheral edges of the outer layers 28 and 30 and as shown in FIG. 3 against the inner wall of the groove 24 frictionally sealing the liner 26 with the cap 16. Thus, there is achieved an inner effective seal and closure for the contents of the container 10 than heretofore possible to achieve while retaining all of the desirable features of the non-resilient low density polyethylene which is used for the outerlayers, and which are relatively thin so as to permit for an effectively resilient liner.

It has been found that for the liner material according to the invention it is desirable that the intermediate layer 32 be between 12 to 30 times the normal width of each of the outer layers 28 and 30.

In FIGS. 6 and 7 there is shown a modified form of the invention wherein a two-ply liner is used. The cap has its top 122 serve as the upper outer liner, there being only an intermediate liner 132 and a lower outer liner 130.

outer layers being relatively thin and non-resilient, said intermediate layer being resilient, compressible, and relatively thick, said outer layers being of low density polyethylene, said intermediate layer being of an ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, said intermediate layer being from 12 to 30 times the thickness of said outer layers.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1431871 *Feb 6, 1922Oct 10, 1922Burnet EdwardBottle and like closing device
US2238681 *Mar 16, 1939Apr 15, 1941Du PontContainer closure
US2601318 *Jun 11, 1946Jun 24, 1952Armstrong Cork CoMethod of laminating articles
US2620939 *Sep 9, 1948Dec 9, 1952Johnson & JohnsonSealing closure for containers
US3183144 *May 3, 1961May 11, 1965Hoosier Crown CorpMethod of making polyethylene seals
US3493453 *Sep 14, 1966Feb 3, 1970Grace W R & CoProcess for making lined metallic container closures
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4457440 *Jul 6, 1982Jul 3, 1984Joseph DukessCap liner having an intermediate layer of discrete strips
US4558794 *Oct 19, 1983Dec 17, 1985Tbl Development CorporationContainer with vessel for retention of telltales
US4789074 *Jul 10, 1987Dec 6, 1988Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyCap liner
US4818577 *Aug 20, 1987Apr 4, 1989Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanySynthetic liner capable of resisting chemical attack and high temperature
US4858758 *Dec 12, 1988Aug 22, 1989The Clorox CompanyOxidant bleach, container and fragrancing means therefor
US5000992 *Jun 1, 1989Mar 19, 1991The Dow Chemical CompanyCoextruded multilayer foamed film for plastic container closures and process for manufacture
US5477972 *Jun 2, 1994Dec 26, 1995Lester; William M.Tamper evident closure device for bottles and the like
US5579944 *Nov 17, 1994Dec 3, 1996Precision Valve CorporationMulti-layer gasket for an aerosol container
US5598940 *May 16, 1995Feb 4, 1997Tri-Seal International, Inc.Cap liner for hot filled container and method of making
US5601200 *Sep 6, 1991Feb 11, 1997Tri-Seal International, Inc.Cap liner for hot filled container and method
US5615789 *Mar 16, 1994Apr 1, 1997Tri-Seal International, Inc.Cap liner for hot filled container and method of making
US6602309 *May 25, 2001Aug 5, 2003Performance Systematix, Inc.Vented, grooved back, heat induction foil
US8113367 *Feb 20, 2007Feb 14, 2012Con Agra Foods RDM, Inc.Non-removable closure having a dispensing aperture extending therethrough
US8173233Jun 18, 2009May 8, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyFoamed film package
US9493288 *Nov 7, 2007Nov 15, 2016Charm Sciences, Inc.Resealable moisture tight containers
US20080197099 *Feb 20, 2007Aug 21, 2008Adam PawlickNon-removable closure
US20090317578 *Jun 18, 2009Dec 24, 2009Neil John RogersFoamed film package
US20090317605 *Jun 18, 2009Dec 24, 2009Neil John RogersPrinted foamed film package
US20100043359 *Nov 7, 2007Feb 25, 2010Skiffington Richard TResealable Moisture Tight Containers
WO1990014945A1 *May 31, 1990Dec 13, 1990The Dow Chemical CompanyCoextruded multilayer foamed film for plastic container closures and process for manufacture
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/66.4, 428/213, 428/516
International ClassificationB65D41/04, B32B27/00
Cooperative ClassificationB32B27/00, B65D41/045
European ClassificationB32B27/00, B65D41/04D2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 18, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: TRI-SEAL EXTRUSION, INC., A NEW YORK CORP.
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:TRI-SEAL INTERNATIONAL INC., A CORP. OF DE.;REEL/FRAME:005432/0237
Owner name: TRI-SEAL INTERNATIONAL INC., A CORP. OF NY.
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:TRI-SEAL EXTRUSION INC., A CORP. OF NY.;REEL/FRAME:005432/0244
Effective date: 19891221
Jun 18, 1990AS03Merger
Owner name: TRI-SEAL EXTRUSION, INC., A NEW YORK CORP.
Owner name: TRI-SEAL INTERNATIONAL INC., A CORP. OF DE.
Effective date: 19891221
Jun 18, 1990AS01Change of name
Owner name: TRI-SEAL EXTRUSION INC., A CORP. OF NY.
Owner name: TRI-SEAL INTERNATIONAL INC., A CORP. OF NY.
Effective date: 19891221
Jun 5, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: TRI-SEAL INTERNATIONAL, INC., A CORP. OF DE, NEW Y
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:ATLANTIC RESEARCH CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:005321/0319
Effective date: 19900509
Jun 5, 1990AS17Release by secured party
Owner name: ATLANTIC RESEARCH CORPORATION
Effective date: 19900509
Owner name: TRI-SEAL INTERNATIONAL, INC., 217 BRADLEY HILL ROA
Feb 28, 1985AS06Security interest
Owner name: PRIVATBANKEN A/S, 450 PARK AVENUE, NEW YORK, NY 10
Owner name: TRI-SEAL INTERNATIONAL, INC.
Effective date: 19850111
Feb 28, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: PRIVATBANKEN A/S, 450 PARK AVENUE, NEW YORK, NY 1
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:TRI-SEAL INTERNATIONAL, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004367/0398
Effective date: 19850111
Jan 23, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: ATLANTIC RESEARCH CORPORATION, 5390 CHEROKEE AVENU
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:TRI-SEAL INTERNATIONAL, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004357/0858
Effective date: 19850102
Jan 23, 1985AS06Security interest
Owner name: ATLANTIC RESEARCH CORPORATION, 5390 CHEROKEE AVENU
Effective date: 19850102
Owner name: TRI-SEAL INTERNATIONAL, INC.