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Publication numberUS3821048 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 28, 1974
Filing dateMar 2, 1973
Priority dateMar 2, 1973
Also published asDE2410055A1, DE2410055B2, DE2410055C3
Publication numberUS 3821048 A, US 3821048A, US-A-3821048, US3821048 A, US3821048A
InventorsD Acker, D Klein
Original AssigneeScm Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ultrasonic ribbon splicer
US 3821048 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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United States vPatent [191 Acker et al.

`3,821,048 [45l June 28, 1974 [54] ULTRAsoNic RIBBON SPLICER consists of placing the segments of ribbon to be [75] Inventors: Donald F. Acker, Homer; Dietrich J.

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Primary Examiner- Edward G. Whitby [57] ABSTRACT A method for ultrasonically splicing ribbonswhich 22 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures l ULTRAsoNIc RIBBON SPLICER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION l. Field of the Invention This invention relates to a method and apparatus for splicing ribbons, and more particularly, to methods of ultrasonically vibrating segments of ribbons together to heat fuse the ribbons.

2. Description of the Prior Art Many business machines use endless ribbon cartridges in which a band of ribbon is continuously cycled, thereby avoiding the necessity of changing or reversing ribbons during operation of the machine.

Many of the main problems associated with the use of endless belt ribbons relate to the splicing used to form the ribbon into a continuous loop. lf the splice is too large or too thick, the ribbon will not function properly when struck by the type bar and will produce a defective image. However, if the splice is too small or too weak, the ribbon will separate, and the cartridge will fail to function.

Attempts have been made in the past to eliminate the problem of splicing by manufacturing the ribbon in a continuous tubular form which is then sliced to form the individual thin ribbon loops. However, thismethod is relatively expensive and has provided cartridges which are less than satisfactory in many instances. y

Attempts to ultrasonically weld portions of a preinked ribbon have been less than successful because the inks which are not useful for operation of the ribbon cartridges are special, low-friction inks adapted t enhance the functioning of the ribbon when in the cartridge. Therefore, ultrasonic welding which relies on frictional forces between objects being joined has, to date, proved less than successful in providing consistently high quality splices of ribbon segments, free of voids, and uniform in strength and dimensional characteristics.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION ln order to overcome the problems inherent in the prior art, the present invention sets forth a method for ultrasonically splicing ribbons which consists of placing the segments of ribbon to be spliced in a fixture to hold the segments in proper position for maximum splice strength, tensioning at least one of the ribbon segments, then actuating an ultrasonic welding device to produce relative motion between the ribbon segments to fuse the segments.

Welding of the ribbon segments is accomplished by means of apparatus in which the ribbon segments to be spliced are placed. Pressure means bear against the positioned ribbon segments to fix the position of the ribbon segments and tension at least one of the segments by forcing the segment into a cavity in the apparatus, thereby tensioning the ribbon for ultrasonic welding.

Accordingly, in view of the above` the present invention sets forth an apparatus for welding heat fusible ribbons which enables the layers of ribbon'which are to be welded to be positioned with respect to the welding implement and then selectively tensioned to provide optimum welding results.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an apparatus for ultrasonically welding heat fusible ribbons which prevents the holdingfixture from sympathetically vibrating under the influence from the ultrasonic welding implement, to maximize the relative movement between the ultrasonicimplement and the layers of ribbon to be welded.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus for ultrasonically welding heat fusible ribbons, which enables accurate alignment of the layers of ribbon to be welded to assure the optimum splicing angle of the ribbon.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide an apparatus for ultrasonically welding heat fusible ribbons, which produces maximum welding heat by preventing sympathetic movement of the segments of the ribbon to be fused to eachother.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus for ultrasonically welding heat fusible ribbons, which is able to maximize the rubbing motion between the segments of ribbon to be welded.

It is also an object of the present invention to provide an apparatus for ultrasonically welding heat fusible ribbons, which is able to vary the tension of the individual segments of ribbon to be weldedl to allow maximum sliding movement between the ribbon layers to produce optimum weld results.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus for ultrasonically welding heat fusible ribbons, which is of simplified construction, reliable in operation, and inexpensive to fabricate.

An additional object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus for ultrasonically welding `heat fusible ribbons, which provides means for isolating the holding mechanisms for the segments of ribbon to be welded from any vibrations transmitted by the ultrasonic welding implement.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an apparatus for ultrasonically welding heat fusible ribbons, which provides self-aligning means for the apparatus holding the ribbon segments to be welded to properly align the ribbon segments with the ultrasonic welding implement.

It is also an object of the present invention to provide a method for ultrasonically welding ribbon segments which maximizes the relative motion between segments of ribbon to be welded together.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a method for ultrasonically welding ribbon segments,

which increases weld strength.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a method for ultrasonically `welding ribbon segments, which enables maximum contact between the segments of the ribbon to be welded and the ultrasonic welding mechanism..

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a method for ultrasonically welding ribbon segments, which reduces the unfavorable frictional effects between the segments of ribbon to be welded.

It is also an object of the present invention to provide a method for ultrasonically welding ribbon segments, which tensions at least one o f the segments to be welded to maximize relative motion between the ribbon segments produced by ultrasonic agitation.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a method for ultrasonically welding ribbon segments, which is relatively simple, effective, and uncomplicated.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent from the following description of an embodiment of the invention, and the novel features will be particularly pointed out hereinafter in connection with the appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. l is a perspective view showing an ultrasonic ribbon splicer built in accordance with the teachings of the present invention and a coacting ultrasonic unit.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view, partially in section, showing the ultrasonic implement in coacting relationship to the splicing mechanism.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view, showing the relationship of the ultrasonic implement, ribbon tension fixture, and ribbon segments, just prior to splicing.

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the ribbon segments just after splicing.

FIG. 5 is an exploded perspective view, partly in section, of an embodiment of a pressure leg adaptable for use in the ultrasonic ribbon splicer shown in FIG. l.

DESCRIPTION OF TI-IE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS As shown in FIGS. 1 through S, a ribbon splicing apparatus, generally indicated at l0, consists of a locating bed member l2 and an upper plate 14 connected to an ultrasonic welding unit 16 by a bolt 18 which is locked to upper plate I4 by means of one or more locking nuts 20 and is connected to the ultrasonic unit 16 by conventional fastening means (not shown).

The ultrasonic welding unit 16 is a standard, cornmercially available device, such as the Branson 400 Series Ultrasonic Plastic Welder. It includes an acoustical horn 24 having a blade shaped end portion 26 which extends from a movable carriage 22 which can be raised or lowered by appropriate positioning means (not shown).

As is well known in the art, the acoustical horn is caused to vibrate in the range of 20,000 cycles per second. When separate thermoplastic items are placed in contact with each other, and one of these items brought in Contact with the tip of the ultrasonic horn, the vibrations will pass from the horn into the plastic and travel until they meet the abutting surfaces. At this interface, the intense vibration of one surface moving against the other at ultrasonic frequencies causes sufficient buildup of heat through friction to melt the plastic and create a weld.

As shown in FIG. 1, the upper plate 14 of the ribbon tensioning fixture l5 is connected to a locating bed 12 by aligning means consisting of'guides 28 and 30 connected to the upper plate by means of locking nuts 32 and 34. The guides 28 and 30 aligns the ribbon tension fixture with the locating bed and maintains a parallel relationship between the upper plate 14 and the locating bed l2 during the splicing operation. The connection of the upper plate 14 to both the carriage 22 of the ultrasonic unit, by means of connecting bolt 18, and the locating bed 12, by means of guides 28 and 30, insures that the upper plate 14 of the ribbon tension fixture is positioned with relation to the locating bed in accordance with the positioning of the ultrasonic welding horn.

The upper plate 14 vof the ribbon tensioning fixture consists of two shoulder portions 38 and 40 connected by a narrow neck portion 36 which is cut out to allow clearance for the ultrasonic horn 24. Each shoulder portion has a plurality of pressure legs 42 extending downward to coact with appropriate forms in the locating bed which will be explained below.

The locating bed 12 is adapted to be fastened to a fixed immovable surface by means of bolts 44 and 46 and lock washer 48 and 50, or any other standard, convenient fastening means. A pad (not shown) can be placed between the bottom of the locating bed 12 and the fixed immovable surface to which it is fastened to further insure that no sympathetic vibrations from the acoustic horn 24 will be transferred to the locating bed. A plurality of ribbon positioning grooves 52 are formed in the upper surface of locating bed 12. These grooves are in an X-shaped pattern or mirror imaged V patterns which converge on a well or depression 54 in the central portion of the locating bed. An anvil plate 56 is secured in the well 54 by means of screws 58 or any other convenient fastening means.

The anvil plate includes an anvil 60 which bisects the angle of intersection of the ribbon positioning grooves 52. The upper flat surface of the anvil 60 is adapted to coact with the bottom flat surface of the blade portion 26 of acoustic horn 24, as will be described below, during the process of splicing the ribbons.

Each of the ribbon positioning grooves 52 has a depression or enlarged circular area 62 adapted to coact with ribbon positioning pads 64 connected to the outwardmost pressure legs 42 on each shoulder. Further, each ribbon positioning groove 52 has a cavity 66 adapted to coact with the tension foot 68 which is positioned directly above the cavity and connected to each of the inner pressure legs 42 on each of the shoulders.

As seen in FIGS. 2 and 3, when ribbon segment 72 is placed in ribbon positioning grooves 52, the ribbon positioning pads 64 will be pressing downward on the ribbon segments to hold them in the ribbon positioning groove 52 and, at the same time, the ribbon tensioning feet 68 will force a portion of the ribbon down into the tensioning cavities 66, thereby stretching the ribbon segment between the tensioning feet to hold it immobile for proper welding from the acoustical horn 24.

As can be seen from FIGS. l through 3, when it is desired to splice two ribbon segments 70 and 72, the segments are laid out in the ribbon positioning grooves 52 over the anvil 60, and then the ultrasonic carriage is brought down in order to bring the blade portion 26 of the ultrasonic horn 24 into proper operative relation ship with the anvil for fusing the material. As shown in FIG. 1, the relative positions of the positioning pads and tensioning feet to the bottom portion of the ultrasonic horn are such that as the carriage is brought down, first the positioning pad 64 will contact the spaced portions of one ribbon segment, to hold that ribbon segment in relation to the anvil and the ultrasonic horn. As the horn continues downward, the tensioning feet 68 will force a small quantity of the ribbon down into the coacting tensioning feet cavities 66 to tension the ribbon to the predetermined tension. Then, only after the ribbon has been stretched into the tension feet cavities will the horn be brought to its full downward travel to place it in proper relationship to the ribbon and anvil for ultrasonic welding.

As shown in FIG. 5 and in FIG. 1, in order for the device to properly operate, the pressure leg means 42 must have biased movement in the vertical plane in order for proper coaction between the positioning pads, the tensioning feet and the ultrasonic welding horn. As shown in FIG. 5, each of the pressure legs consist of a center post 74 movable vertically within a tubular member 76 and biased downward by means of spring 78. The center post 74 has an enlarged head 76 which seats against an end wall 77 in the tubular member 76. The appropriate pressure pad 64 or tensioning foot 68 will be connected to the movable center post 74 depending upon the function of the particular pressure leg. The pressure pad 64 is connected to the center post 74 by screw threads.

As shown in FIG. 5, the pressure legs are bolted directly to the upper plate 14 and held in position by means of conventional threaded fastening means 80 extending through a collar 82. The pressure leg apparatus 42, shown in FIG. 5, Venables the force exerted by the spring 78 of the pressure leg to be adjusted. This adjustment is provided by means of an adjusting screw 84 threadably engaging the upper portion of the tubular member 76 for compressing the spring 78 between the screw 84 and the enlarged head 75 of the center-post 74 at varying amounts.

The pressure legs 42 for the tensioning feet 68 have a pin 87 extending transversely from the center post 74 through an elongated slot 88 in the tubular member 76. This pin and slot arrangement retains the tensioned foot 68 in a predetermined alignment with the cavities 66.

DEsCRiP'rIoN oF THE METHOD Having discussed the apparatus used for ultrasonically splicing ribbons, the method by which the ribbons themselves are spliced is fairly straightforward and will now be described.

In splicing ribbon segments, the separate segments 70 and 72 are placed in the aligned ribbon positioning grooves 52 of locating bed 12 so that they cross at an angle over the anvil 60. lt has been found through experimentation that the most satisfactory angle for optimum splicing results is approximately 30. However, many other angles can also be used to achieve satisfactory splicing results.

After the ribbon segments are placed in the ribbon positioning grooves 52, the carriage 22 for the acoustical horn 24 is started downward in its pathof travel towards the locating bed. As the carriage 22 moves down, the plate 14 connected to the carriage will move downward so that the pairs of diagonally opposing ribbon positioning pads 64 will coact with their mating enlargements 62 in the ribbon positioning groove directly below them to hold each of the ribbon segments in proper relative position within the ribbon positioning grooves.

As the carriage 22 continues to move downward, the tensioning feet 68 will then force portions of the ribbon into the coacting cavities 66 of the positioning grooves to tension the ribbon segments 70 and 72 in preparation for the welding procedure. It should be pointed out that although FIG. l shows the apparatus set up to use all four tensioning feet, the splicing process can be carried on with less than all of the tensioning feet in use. So, for example, it may be desirable to tension only one of the two ribbon segments, depending upon the characteristics of the ribbon. or possibly to tension one or both of the ribbon segments by use of only one of the diagonally opposed pairs of tensioning feet.

After the tensioning feet have been positioned, the acoustical horn continues downward on its path of travel until it comes to the position in which the tip of blade 26 will press the overlapping ribbon segments 70 and 72 against the top surface of the anvil 60 when the acoustical horn is actuated. The oscillations or highspeed ultrasonic vibrations of the horn are imparted to the tensioned ribbon segments 7l]l and 72 causing frictional heat by the rubbing together of the two segments, which heat is sufficient to :melt the thermoplastic material from which the ribbon segments are made, thereby fusing the segments of the ribbon together. Additionally, the force of the acoustical horn bearing the ribbon segments downward against the anvil is sufficient to sever the fused ribbon segments into two separate symmetrical, V-shaped segments 7() and 72, as shown in FIG. 4. After the spliced ribbon segments are removed from the device, the segments 70, 72 are unfolded, so that the final ribbon will be'perfectly straight, having a splice of approximately il5 from the parallel sides of the ribbon.

It should be pointed out that the fusing or melting of the ribbon segments during the splicing operation occurs only in a very isolated area as, for example, line 86 shown in FIG. 4. The heat produced by the friction between the two ribbon segments is isolated to prevent it from spreading to surrounding areas of the ribbon segments by the anvil 60, which acts as a heat sink to draw off much of the excess heat produced during the splicing operation. j As shown in FIG. 4, when the ribbon segments and 72are spliced, they will form a complete ribbon assembly which is in a folded condition, and which must be unfolded to form a straight or continuously dimensioned spliced or fused ribbon segment with the splice line at a 15 angle to the sides of the ribbon. Since the ribbon is folded when fused, the ribbon segments to be fused must be placed in opposing relationship in the positioning bed, if itis desired to have surface continuity of the fused ribbon. For example, if only one side of each of the ribbon segments is coated with ink, the segments would have to be placed in the locating bed with the coated sides facing each other or away from each other.

As mentioned during the discussion of the splicing apparatus, the method of splicing the ribbons in the most-preferred embodiment calls for the tensioning of each ribbon segment at spaced points with a pair of coacting tensioning feet and tensioning cavities 68 and 66 respectively. It has been found that a predetermined tension of approximately 3-1/2 ounces applied to the ribbon by each tensioning foot and a predetermined ribbon splice angle of 15 produced highly desirable results of 5 to l0 pound weld strength. However, the amount of tension need not be restricted to 31/2 ounces, nor need .each ribbon segment be tensioned at two points. Further, it is possible to obtain improved splicing when only tensioning one of the two ribbon segments to be spliced. For example, the ribbon segments 70 and 72 could still be spliced by tensioning only the lower segment 70 with both of the tensioning feet 68. Although not as satisfactory as tensioning both segments at two points, this would still holdone of the ribbon segments to be spliced secure, so that the movement of the acoustical horn 26 would produce relative movement between the ribbon segments 70 and 72 which would be sufficient to raise the temperature of the ribbon segments above the melting temperature of V the ribbon material to produce the desired splice.

As discussed previously, the tension applied to the ribbon segments can be adjusted by changing the extent of compression required by the pressure legs for travel of the upper plate 14 from the raised position to the lowered position. This adjustment in travel can be achieved by adjusting the connecting bolt 18 between the upper plate 14 and the carriage 22.

The use of the tensioning feet to tension the ribbon prior to and during the welding operation in effect fixes the position of the ribbon segments to prevent any sympathetic movement of the ribbon during the welding operation and, therefore, will insure that the maximum Vrelative movement is imparted to the ribbon segments by the acoustical horn or welding implement to produce optimal welding results.

The coordinated use of coactingatensifoning feet and cavities and ribbon positioning grooves in the locating pad insures that the ribbon segments to be spliced are accurately aligned in the predetermined positions which are considered to produce optimum welding of the ribbon segments.

The connection between the upper ribbon tensioning fixture and the carriage of the ultrasonic welding unit enables the entire welding process to be done on a relatively automated basis. The sequence of the various operations is set bythe relative heights of the ribbon positioning pads, ribbon tensioning feet, and blade portion of the acoustical horn, so that the various steps in the welding process must occur in the proper sequence. Once the pressures exerted by the individual pressure legs have been established and set, the alignment is kept constant, and very little adjustment is necessary.

lt should also be noted that at the completion of the fusing cycle or welding apparatus, not only are the ribbon segments fused. but they are also severed into separate fuse segments, such as those shown in FIG. 4, saving an additional step of separating the material to be saved from that which is to be discarded.

Although the embodiment of the invention has been described in connection with the use of an ultrasonic welding implement, it should be noted that the apparatus and method are also adaptable for other means of splicing ribbon segments, such as heat fusing or pressure welding techniques.

lt will be understood that various changes in the details, material and arrangement of parts which have been herein described and illustrated in order to explain the nature ofthe invention may be made by those skilled in the art within the principle and scope of the invention, as expressed in the appended claims.

What is claimed is: l. Apparatus for splicing ribbon segments, comprising:

bed means for said ribbon segments; means to position said ribbon segments on said bed means in proper relationship for splicing; means to tension said positioned ribbon segments when operatively engaged with said bedmeans; and means to move said ribbon tensioning means into and out of operative engagement with said bed means.

2. The apparatus for splicing ribbonsegments ac- 6 cording to claim l, wherein said means to tension said positioned ribbon segments comprise:

cavity means in said bed means: and

tensioning feet means adapted to extend into said cavity means to force a quantity of ribbon segment into said cavity means to tension said ribbon segments on said bed means.

3. The apparatus for splicing ribbon segments according to claim l, wherein said means to position said ribbon segments on said bed means comprise positioning pad means biased to press said ribbon segments against said bed means.

4. The apparatus for splicing ribbon segments according to claim 3, wherein said means to position said ribbon segments on said bed means further comprise:

ribbon positioning groove means on said bed means;

and

depression means in said bed means adapted to receive said ribbon positioning pad means.

5. The apparatus for splicing ribbon segments according to claim 1, wherein said means to tension said positioned ribbon segments comprise:

ribbon tensioning fixture means;

ribbon tensioning feet means connected to said ribbon tensioning fixture means; and

guide means connected to said bed means and said ribbon tensioning fixture means to guide said ribbon tensioning means into and out of operative engagement with said bed means.

6. The apparatus for splicing ribbon segments according to claim 5, wherein said means to tension said positioned ribbon segments further comprise cavity means positioned in said bed means to coact with said ribbon tensioning feet means to receive a quantity of ribbon urged into said cavity means by said ribbon tensioning feet means.

"7. The apparatus for splicing ribbon segments according to claim 6, wherein said means to position said ribbon segments comprise:

positioning pad means connected to said ribbon tensioning fixture means and biased to press said ribbon segments against said bed means;

ribbon positioning groove'means in said bed means;

and

depressions in said bed means adapted to receive said ribbon positioning pad means.

8. The apparatus for splicing ribbon segments according to claim 7, wherein said cavity means in said bed means adapted to coact with said ribbon tensioning feet and said depressions in the said bed means adapted to receive said ribbon positioning pad means are each disposed in said ribbon positioning groove means.

9. The apparatus for splicing ribbon segments according to claim 1, wherein said means to tension said positioned ribbon segments comprise:

ribbon tensioning fixture means;

ribbon tensioning feet means connected to said ribbon tensioning fixture means;

said means to position said ribbon segments on said bed comprise positioning pad means connected to said ribbon tensioning fixture means; and

resilient means biasing said ribbon tensioning feet and ribbon positioning pads to urge said ribbon segments against said bed means.

l0. The apparatus for splicing ribbon segments according to claim 9, further comprising means to adjust the biasing force of each of said .ribbon tensioning feet and said ribbon positioning pad.

11. The apparatus for splicing ribbon segments according to claim 10 further comprising:

guide means connected to said bed means and said ribbon tensioning fixture means to guide said ribbon tensioning means into and out of operative engagement with said bed means;

means connected to said ribbon tensioning fixture means adapted to connect to a welding implement to move said ribbon tensioning fixture means in association with movement of said welding implement means; and

wherein said means to position said ribbon segments comprise:

a plurality of ribbon positioning grooves intersecting on said bed means; and

anvil means disposed on said bed means at the intersection of said plurality of ribbon positioning grooves, said anvil means adapted to coact with a welding implement means to fuse ribbon segments placed in said ribbon positioning groove means.

12. A method for splicing ribbon segments comprising the steps of:

placing a first and a second ribbon segment on a bed in proper relationship for splicing;

fixing the position of said first and second ribbon segments; j

tensioning at least one of said ribbon segments; and

contacting said ribbon segments together to cause joining of said first and second ribbon segments.

13. The method for splicing ribbon segments according to claim l2, wherein each of said first and second ribbon segments are tensioned prior to contacting said ribbon segments together to cause joining.

14. The method for splicing ribbon segments accord ing to claim l2, wherein at least one of said first and second ribbon segments are tensioned by deforming said ribbon segment at spaced locations on said ribbon segment.

15. The method for splicing ribbon segments according to claim 12, wherein the step of contacting said ribbon segments together to cause joining includes the step of ultrasonically vibrating said ribbon segments to produce frictional forces between said ribbon segments.

16. The method for splicing ribbon segments according to claim 15, wherein said frictional forces produced by ultrasonically vibrating said ribbon segments are sufficient to raise the temperature of said ribbon segments above the melting point of said ribbon material to cause fusion of said ribbon segments.

17. The method for splicing ribbon segments according to claim 15, wherein portions of said first and second ribbon segments are placed on said bed in overlapping relationship to each other.

18. The method for splicing ribbon segments according to claim 17, wherein the step of contacting said ribbon segments together includes pressing said first and second ribbon segments together in said overlapping portions of said ribbon segments.

19. The method for splicing ribbon segments according to claim 12 which, after the step of contacting said ribbon segments together to cause joining of' said first and second segments, further comprises the step of separating said joined first and second ribbon segments to form at least one spliced ribbon assembly.

20. The method for splicing ribbon segments according to claim 119 wherein said joined first and second ribbon segments are separated into two separate spliced ribbon assemblies.

2l. The method for splicing ribbon segments according to claim 19 which, after the step of separating the joined first and second ribbon segments to form at least one spliced ribbon assembly, further comprises the step of' unfolding said spliced ribbon assembly to form a continuously dimensioned ribbon portion having a splice thereon.

22. The method for splicing ribbon segments according to claim 12, wherein:

said first and second ribbon segmentstare placed in overlapping, criss-cross relationship on said bed;

prior to the step of contacting said ribbon segments together to cause joining, each of said first and sec ond ribbon segments are tensioned by deforming said ribbon segments at spaced locations on each of said ribbon segments;

the step of contacting said ribbon segments together to cause joining includes the step of ultrasonically vibrating said ribbon segments to produce frictional forces between said ribbon segments which will raise the temperature of said ribbon segments above the melting point of said ribbon material to cause fusion of said ribbon segments; and, which,

after the step of contacting said ribbon segments together to cause joining of said first and second ribbon segments, further comprises the steps of:

separating said joined first and second ribbon segments to form at least one spliced ribbon assembly; and

unfolding said spliced ribbon assembly to form a continuously dimensioned ribbon portion having a splice thereon.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3981387 *Dec 24, 1974Sep 21, 1976Ncr CorporationMethod for inking preassembled ribbon cartridges
US4377427 *Oct 30, 1980Mar 22, 1983R. George S.A.Process for the manufacture of locks of hair from synthetic fibers, device for putting this process into operation and locks of hair thus obtained
US4491491 *Nov 2, 1983Jan 1, 1985Simmons U.S.A. CorporationUltrasonic separation apparatus
US4582239 *Feb 23, 1984Apr 15, 1986MecasonicUltrasonic welding tools
US4609422 *Feb 3, 1984Sep 2, 1986Becking Paul EStuffing pre-inked ribbon from spool to cartridge
US4629530 *Aug 30, 1984Dec 16, 1986Becking Paul EImpact printer ribbon for use in computers and word processors
US4935081 *Oct 15, 1985Jun 19, 1990Becking Paul EMethod for welding of continuous loop ribbon
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US5207854 *Oct 9, 1990May 4, 1993Becking Paul EContinuous loop ribbon welding system
US5223070 *Oct 28, 1991Jun 29, 1993Seidensha Electronics Co., Ltd.Apparatus for manufacturing an endless ribbon
US5238521 *Oct 30, 1991Aug 24, 1993Signode CorporationApparatus for engaging thermoplastic strap in a friction-fusion welding system
US5304266 *Nov 4, 1992Apr 19, 1994Becking Paul EContinuous loop ribbon welding system
US5356498 *Jun 2, 1992Oct 18, 1994Eastman Chemical CompanyMethod and apparatus for forming splices in flexible, fusible material and material spliced accordingly
US5523139 *Sep 21, 1993Jun 4, 1996Eastman Chemical CompanyMethod and apparatus for forming splices in flexible, fusible material and material spliced accordingly
US5632831 *Aug 4, 1994May 27, 1997Superpac, Inc.System and method for cutting and splicing polymeric webs
US5656114 *May 18, 1995Aug 12, 1997Becking; Paul EdwardRibbon overlap welding system
US8511536 *Mar 30, 2011Aug 20, 2013Orthodyne Electronics CorporationUltrasonic bonding systems and methods of using the same
US8584922Jul 22, 2013Nov 19, 2013Orthodyne Electronics CorporationUltrasonic bonding systems and methods of using the same
US8746537Oct 22, 2013Jun 10, 2014Orthodyne Electronics CorporationUltrasonic bonding systems and methods of using the same
US20130140346 *Mar 30, 2011Jun 6, 2013Orthodyne Electronics CorporationUltrasonic bonding systems and methods of using the same
US20130146644 *Aug 17, 2011Jun 13, 2013Sebastian RuhlMethod and arrangement for welding electrical conductors
EP0120568A1 *Feb 2, 1984Oct 3, 1984Paul E. BeckingApparatus for welding of continuous loop ribbon
EP0480612A2 *Oct 1, 1991Apr 15, 1992Paul E. BeckingContinuous loop ribbon welding system
EP1354693A2Mar 21, 2003Oct 22, 2003Herrmann Ultraschalltechnik GmbH & Co. KGProcess for ultrasonic welding of thin walled parts
EP2647463A1 *Apr 5, 2012Oct 9, 2013Eurocopter Deutschland GmbHUltrasonic welding device with a pick member and/or a press pad, and method of operating said device
WO1992002356A1 *Jul 31, 1991Feb 7, 1992Eastman Kodak CoMethod and apparatus for forming splices in flexible, fusible material and material spliced accordingly
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/73.4, 156/164, 156/502, 400/194, 156/157, 156/580.1
International ClassificationB41J32/02, B29C65/08, B29C65/78, B29C65/00, B29C65/74, B29C53/00
Cooperative ClassificationB29C66/43, B29C65/7841, B29C66/1122, B41J32/02, B29C65/7443, B29C65/78, B29C65/08, B29C66/344, B29L2031/709
European ClassificationB29C65/78F, B29C66/344, B29C65/08, B29C66/43, B29C66/1122, B29C65/7443, B41J32/02, B29C65/78
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 20, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: SMITH CORONA CORPORATION, 65 LOCUST AVENUE, NEW CA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:SCM CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004810/0544
Effective date: 19870804