Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3821993 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 2, 1974
Filing dateSep 7, 1971
Priority dateSep 7, 1971
Also published asCA953318A, CA953318A1, DE2242724A1, DE2242724B2, DE2242724C3
Publication numberUS 3821993 A, US 3821993A, US-A-3821993, US3821993 A, US3821993A
InventorsKniff T, Mc Kenry R
Original AssigneeKennametal Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Auger arrangement
US 3821993 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 v Kniff et al. [45 July 2, 1974 [54] AUGER ARRANGEMENT 2,912,228 11 1959 Kandle 175/292 4. I151 ThwasJ-Knmedfordme" 532331233 Z1333 lift???:::::;.....:i:::::;...::.. 321532 J. McKenry, Windber, both of Pa. 1 r [73] Assignee: Kennametallne, Latrobe,Pa. Primary Examiner-Marvin A. Champion Q l i Assistant Examiner-Richard E. Favreau Flled? i 7111971 Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Melvin A. Crosby [2!] Appl. No; 178,161

1 [57] ABSTRACT [52] us, (3] 175/292, 175/335, 175/354, The specification discloses an auger arrangement for 5/391, 299/80 boring holes in earth formations :in which the auger [51] Int. Cl Ezlb 9/26 mp s a ody with a central cutter arrangement [53 m r Search 175 292 334, 3 2, 392, 39 including a pilot cutter on the axis and with laterally 299/6], 30, 92 extending wingtportions on the auger, on each of which is pivotally mounted a wing cutter arranged to [56] References Cit d swing outwardly when the auger rotates in cutting di- UNITED STATES PATENTS rection and to swing inwardly when the auger is not 299/80 rotating or when it is rotating-in the reverse direction wilms f so that the auger can readily be withdrawn from a hole 3:5l2:838 5/1970 bored thereby- 2,783,974 3/1957 Veasman l75/39l X 7 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJuL 21974 SHEU 1 OF 4 FIG-I AUGER ARRANGEMENT The present invention relates to augers, particularly to earth augers, and more particularly still to augers capable of being made in a plurality of different sizes and which'are arranged for readily being withdrawn from the hole being bored.

Earth augers are known and usually comprise spiral flights which may have hardened or sharpened leading edges, Such augers are useful in many locations but, where hard formations are encountered, the usual type auger is defective because it is subject to being damaged by the rocks struck thereby and cannot easily v break up rocks or shale. I

The particular object of the present invention is the provision of an auger arrangement in which the foregoing defects of angers according to the prior art are eliminated.

A particular object of the present invention is the provision of an auger arrangement having an improved cutting and penetrating powers and one which will easily break up rocks encountered thereby and easily reduce shale and other hard formations and without damage to the auger.

A further object of the present invention is the provision of an auger arrangement having wing cutters thereon which move outwardly when the cutter is turning in working direction, but which will move inwardly when the auger is reversed or when the cutter is not rotating so that the auger can readily be withdrawn from a hole taken thereby.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of an auger in which the leading end is provided with a plurality of self-sharpening cutter elements which are readily detachable from the auger so that they can be replaced by others when they become worn or damaged, whereby it is a simple matter to maintain the auger in good operating condition at all times.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent upon reference to the following detailed specification taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 shows an end view of a small auger constructed according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the auger of FIG. 1 looking in the direction of the arrow II on FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view through a typical cutting FIG. 4 is an end view of a typical larger size auger according to the present invention; and

FIG. 5 is an end view of an auger having four wing cutters thereon.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION outwardly when the auger is rotating in working directool of the auger and is indicated by line Ill-III on FIG.

tion and to swing inwardly when the anger is rotating in the opposite direction.

The auger body is adapted for mounting on the end of a driving means such as a pipe, or a string of pipe, in case the hole being bored is of extreme length, or the auger according to the present invention can be backed up by spiral flights for carrying away the material taken by the auger.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The auger according to the present invention, and with pariicular reference to FIGS. 1 to 3, comprises a base plate 10 adapted for being mounted on a suitable driving instrumentality, such as the end of a tubular pipe or string of pipe.

The particular manner of connecting base plate 10 to the pipe is not illustrated, but it could be welded on an adaptor for being threaded to the pipe, or base plate 10, or could otherwise be affixed to the pipe, so as to be coaxial therewith whereby it can be driven in rotation and advanced into a formation to be reduced.

The base plate 10 in the center thereof, on the front, has fixed thereto, as by welding, a spacer l2, and secured to the outer end of a spacer 12 is body part 14 of a central cutter structure. Projecting axially outwardly from the center of body part 14 is a pilot cutter 16, which may be threaded to body part 14 or otherwise affixed thereto. Pilot cutter 16 may take any of several forms and, in FIGS. 1 and 2, it will be seen to comprise hard metal carbide blade portions 18 fixed to a steel support 19.

Body part 14 may be formed with tool receiving holes therein or may have welded thereto a plurality of blocks 20, each having a hole for receiving a pick type bit 22. As will be seen in FIG. 1, the blocks 20, secured to body 14, are fixed to the body in such a manner that the pick type bits 22 therein are inclined circumferen tially in the direction of rotation of the auger and are also inclined at different angles to the axis of the auger and are distributed radially and circumferentially of the auger.

The pilot cutter or bit 16, together with the pick type bits 22 mountedin the blocks 20 on body 14, thus efficiently reduce a formation equal to or slightly larger than the distance outwardly from the axis of the auger to the radially outermost one of the pick type bits 22.

Turning for the moment to FIG. 3, which shows a 1 block 20 in section and a pick type bit 22 therein, it will be noted that the pick type bit is generally cylindrical and is concentric about a central longitudinal axis. At the leading end, the bit has mounted therein a hard wear resistant pointed tip 24 consisting, for example, of a cemented hard metal carbide such as tungsten carbide. The block and bit have interengaging thrust transmitting shoulders at 26 which may take the form of a tapering shoulder intermediate the length of the bit and a tapering mouth at the end of bore 28 in block 20.

The bit 22 is releasably retained in the block as by a spring band 30 mounted on the shank 32 of the pick in a groove 34 provided for the spring band and, in re laxed position, having a portion projecting outwardly from the periphery of shank 32 so as to be engageable in an annular recess or notch 36 "provided in bore 28. The spring band keeper retains the pick in the block but does not inhibit free rotation of the pick in the bore in the block. The free rotation of the pick is important because it permits the pick to wear down uniformly around the entire periphery at the point thereof and thus to remain sharp throughout the life thereof.

Returning to FIGS. 1 and 2, the base plate is formed with diametrically opposite wing portions 40 and, on these wing portions, are mounted further blocks 42 having pick type bits 44 therein with each bit and block being constructed as illustrated in FIG. 3. The blocks 42 and the picks therein on the wing portions are so arranged that the pointed ends of the picks are distributed radially and circumferentially of the auger thereby increasing the size of a formation which is taken by the picks mounted on body 14.

In the boring of holes with an auger of the nature illustrated herein, it is a convenience to be able easily to withdraw the auger, for the purpose of replacing worn pick type bits thereon, or to withdraw the auger at the completion of a drilling operation.

The withdrawing of the auger from the hole bored thereby according to the present invention is simplified by mounting on the outer end of each of the wing por tions 40 of the base plate 10, a wing cutter arrangement generally indicated at 50. Each wing cutter arrangement comprises an upper plate 52 and a lower plate 54 with a stop block 56 fixed to both thereof.

Plates 52 and 54 are spaced a distance at least equal to the thickness of plate 10 so that plate 10 can be received therebetween while the wing cutters are freely pivotal on the plate. The plates 52 and 54 of the wing cutter and base plate 10 are bored to receive a nut and bolt 58 for pivotally retaining the respective wing cutter on base plate 10.

As will be seen in FIG. 1, the stop block 56 is arranged to abut base plate 10 when the respective wing cutter is swung outwardly while permitting the wing cutter readily to swing inwardly. Each wing cutter, on its upper plate 52, has further blocks 60 mounted thereon with pick type bits 62 rotatably mounted therein in the manner shown in FIG. 3.

The picks on the wing cutters are distributed circumferentially and radially when the wing cutters are swung to their outermost positions and determine the maximum diameter of the bore cut by the auger. Furthermore, it is preferable for the leading bit on each wing cutter to extend axially forwardly from the remaining bits on the respective wing cutter to promote efficient cutting action.

In operation, the auger of FIGS. 1 and 2 is rotated in g the counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 1, and this will cause the wing cutters to swing outwardly to the position illustrated in FIG. 1, whereby the hole bored by the auger will be that diameter for which the auger is designed. In the case of the auger shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the diameter of the hole bored might, for example, be 13 inches.

When the cutter is to be withdrawn from the hole taken, it can be merely pulled backwardly, or it can be rotated in reverse direction, and in either case, the wing cutters 50 will tend to swing inwardly thus displacing the bits thereon radially inwardly a distance of up to one inch or more, thereby providing adequate clearance between the wall of the holebored and the outermost periphery of the auger.

It has been found that the pick type bits distributed on the auger as illustrated do an extremely efficient job of reducing formations while remaining sharp at all times because of the freedom of the bits to rotate in the bores provided therefor.

Furthermore, since the bits are presented to a formation in such a manner that the load imposed on each pick is generally in the axial direction thereof, the bits constructed as illustrated are extremely strong and the bits do not tend to bend or break. An auger constructed as illustrated will, thus, drill efficiently with a minimum of power and the bits will remain effective and sharp throughout the life thereof.

When a bit becomes defective, or worn out, it is a simple matter to pry the bit out of the bore in which the shank is disposed and to replace it with a new bit which is merely pressed into the hole until the spring band keeper thereon snaps into the receiving recess provided in the bore of the respective support block.

FIG. 4 shows the manner in which the principles of the present invention could be extended to the manufacture of augers of larger diameter. In F IG. 4, the base plate is in the form of a bar-like member and upstanding axially from the center thereof is a spacer member and body combination 72 the same as spacer 12 and body 14 of FIGS. 1 and 2.

Projecting axially from the center of the last mentioned body part is a pilot cutter 74, while the body part is formed with bit receiving bores or has support blocks 76 welded thereto and receiving picks 78 inclined in the direction of rotation of the auger while working and inclined to the axis of the auger so as to be presented to the formation being reduced in radially and circumferentially distributed relation.

The auger shown in FIG. 4 is adapted for boring a hole which might be, for example, 37 inches in diameter, and in order to reduce the entire area during the boring operation, there is distributed along the arms of base plate 10 a plurality of bores for receiving bits, or a plurality of blocks 80 in which bits 82 are rotatably mounted. Two rows of the bits 82 are provided along each arm of plate 10.

As will be seen in FIG. 4, the bits 82 which are in the lead when the auger is rotating in working direction, are radially spaced and are inclined in the direction of rotation of the auger and the axial planes of the axes thereof are substantially tangential to the path of motion of the respective bit.

The trailing row of bits along each arm of base plate 70 are similarly arranged except they are disposed radially in the region between adjacent ones of the leading bits on the respective arm of the base plate. Still further, the bits on each arm of base plate 70 are preferably staggered somewhat with respect to the bits on the other arm thereof and in this manner substantially complete coverage of the area being worked by the auger is obtained.

The outer ends of the arms of base plate 70 advantageously include two or more bits 84 inclined outwardly somewhat so as to engage the region being treated outwardly from the ends of the base plate 70 thereby protecting the edge of the base plate from extreme wear under all conditions of operation.

Similarly to the modification of FIGS. 1 and 2, the leading sides of the outer ends of the two arms of base plate 70 are provided with swingable wing cutters pivoted to base plate 70 by bolts 92 and carrying rotatable bits 94. As in connection with the wing cutters 50 of the first described modification, the leading one of the bits on each of the wing cutters 90 is preferably axially advanced over the others of the bits thereon. The bits on the wing cutters are distributed circumferen- .5 tially in respect to the axis of the auger and may also be distributed radially thereof.

Also, as in connection with the FIGS. land 2 rnodification, the wing cutters 90 are formed of upper and lower plates which receive therebetween the base plate 70 and between which upper and lower plates there are provided the stop blocks 96 that determine the outwardly pivoted portions of the wing cutters while permitting the wing cutters to swing inwardly when the auger is withdrawn from a formation, or when it is rotated therein in the reverse direction.

As an example, the diameter of a hole taken by the auger of FIG. 4 without the wing cutters thereon might be about 35 inches and which diameter is determined by the gauge cutters 84. With the wing cutters on the base plate of the auger, the diameter taken would be 37 inches.

FIG. 5 shows a modification in which the auger consists of a plate 100 with a central pilot cutter 102. Cutters are distributed along the length of plate 100 in the usual manner, and at the forward corners of the plate there are pivoted the wing cutters 106 and at the rear corners thereof there are pivotally supported the wing cutters 108. Each of the aforementioned wing cutters has an inward position and an outward working position the same as the previously described modifications.

In the FIG. 5 modification, the body plate 100 also carries cutters 110 disposed in trailing relation to the leading wing cutters 106.

Modifications may be made within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In an auger for boring holes in earth formations; body means in the form of a base plate adapted for being driven in rotation on an axis perpendicular to the base plate by driving means connected to the back of the base plate, a plurality of first cutting elements distributed radially of said base plate on the front face thereof and adapted to engage and reduce a formation to which the auger is presented in rotation, said base plate having wing portions thereon at the ends and wing cutters pivotally mounted on said wing portions on axes substantially parallel to said axis of rotation of said base plate, said wing cutters having second cutting elements on the front face thereof, each said wing cutter having an outwardly swung position on the respective wing portion wherein at least one of said second cutting elements is disposed radially outwardly from the radially outermost of said first cutting elements on said base plate and an inwardly swung position wherein the said second cutting elements are disposed radially inwardly from the outermost positions thereof, at least one of each said wing cutter and the respective wing portion comprising a pair of plates in axially spaced relation and the other thereof comprising a plate portion adapted to fit between said pair of plates, and cooperating elements of abutment means on each wing cutter and the respective wing portion interengageable to halt and support the respective wing cutter when moved into the outwardly swung position thereof, each of said base plate and wing cutters beingprovided with bores, and each said cutting element being in the form of a generally cylindrical memberv having the leading end pointed and having a shank at the other end receivable in a respective one of said bores, each said bore and the cutting element therein beingso inclined on said auger that the point ends of the cutting; elements are in the lead during rotation of the auger whereby the loadon each cutting element as the auger is rotated and pressed against a formation is substantially axial of the cutting element.

2. An auger according to claim 1 which includes a central pilot cutter means projecting forwardly from the plane of said base plate on the axis of rotation of the base plate and fixed to said base plate, said pilot cutter means projecting forwardly from said base plate a greater distance than any of said cutting elements.

3. An auger according to claim l in which each cutting element and the portion of the auger having the bore therein that receives the shank of the cutting element are provided with cooperating elements of abutment means to sustain axial thrusts imposed on the cut ting element.

4. An auger according to claim 1 in which each said cutter includes a captive spring keeper on the said shank thereof for detachably but rotatably retaining the cutting element in the respective said bore.

5. An auger according to claim 1 in which said first cutting elements are distributed radially along said base plate in both directions from the axis of rotation of the base plate and are arranged in circumferentially spaced rows with the cutting elements in at least two rows being staggered in the radial direction of said base plate relative to each other.

6. In an auger for boring holes in earth formations; body means in the form of a base plate adapted for being driven in rotation on an axis perpendicular to the base plate by driving means connected to the back of the base plate, a plurality of first cutting elements distributed radially of said base plate on the front face thereof and adapted to engage and reduce a formation to which the auger is presented in rotation, said base plate having wing portions thereon at the ends and wing cutters pivotally mounted on said wing portions on axes substantially parallel to said axis of rotation of said base plate, said wing cutters having second cutting elements on the front face thereof, each said wing cutter having an outwardly swung position on the respective win'g portion wherein at least one of said second cutting elements is disposed radially outwardly from the radially outermost of said first cutting elements on said base plate and an inwardly swung position wherein the said second cutting elements are disposed radially inwardly from the outermost positions thereof, at least one of each said wing cutter and the respective wing portion comprising a pair of plates in axially spaced relation and the other thereof comprising a plate portion adapted to fit between said pair of plates, and cooperating elements of abutment means on each wing cutter and the respective wing portion interengageable to halt and support the respective wing cutter when moved into the outwardly swung position thereof, the said second cutting elements being distributed on said wing cutters in the circumferential direction of the auger and the leading cutting element on each wing cutter projecting axially forwardly beyond the others of the cutting elements thereon.

7. In an auger for boring holes in earth formations; body means in the form of a base plate'adapted for being driven in rotation on an axis perpendicular to the base plate by driving means connected to the back of the base plate, a plurality of first cutting elements distributed radially of said base plate on the front face thereof and adapted to engage and reduce a formation to which the auger is presented in rotation, said base plate having wing portions thereon at the ends and wing cutters pivotally mounted on said wing portions on axes substantially parallel to said axis of rotation of said base plate, said wing cutters having second cutting elements on the front face thereof, each said wing cutter having an outwardly swung position on the respective wing portion wherein at least one of said second cutting elements is disposed radially outwardly from the radially outermost of said first cutting elements on said base plate and an inwardly swung position wherein the said second cutting elements are disposed radially inwardly sides thereof at opposite ends.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4813501 *Dec 2, 1987Mar 21, 1989Mills Machine CompanyRotary mining bit
US4917196 *Aug 15, 1989Apr 17, 1990Kennametal Inc.Excavating tooth for an earth auger
US5067262 *Aug 3, 1990Nov 26, 1991Kennametal Inc.Digging tooth
US5143163 *Aug 29, 1991Sep 1, 1992Kennametal Inc.Digging tooth
US5366031 *May 3, 1993Nov 22, 1994Pengo CorporationAuger head assembly and method of drilling hard earth formations
US5417292 *Nov 22, 1993May 23, 1995Polakoff; PaulLarge diameter rock drill
US5427191 *Oct 21, 1994Jun 27, 1995Pengo CorporationAuger head assembly and method of drilling hard earth formations
US5735360 *Nov 12, 1996Apr 7, 1998Engstrom; Robert W.Mining bit
US7357200Sep 29, 2005Apr 15, 2008Harleman Ronald EEarth auger
US7392857Jan 3, 2007Jul 1, 2008Hall David RApparatus and method for vibrating a drill bit
US7419016Mar 1, 2007Sep 2, 2008Hall David RBi-center drill bit
US7419018Nov 1, 2006Sep 2, 2008Hall David RCam assembly in a downhole component
US7424922Mar 15, 2007Sep 16, 2008Hall David RRotary valve for a jack hammer
US7484576Feb 12, 2007Feb 3, 2009Hall David RJack element in communication with an electric motor and or generator
US7497279Jan 29, 2007Mar 3, 2009Hall David RJack element adapted to rotate independent of a drill bit
US7527110Oct 13, 2006May 5, 2009Hall David RPercussive drill bit
US7533737Feb 12, 2007May 19, 2009Hall David RJet arrangement for a downhole drill bit
US7537067May 26, 2006May 26, 2009Quisenberry Quinton QRotary claw bit
US7559379Jul 14, 2009Hall David RDownhole steering
US7571780Sep 25, 2006Aug 11, 2009Hall David RJack element for a drill bit
US7591327Mar 30, 2007Sep 22, 2009Hall David RDrilling at a resonant frequency
US7600586Oct 13, 2009Hall David RSystem for steering a drill string
US7617886Nov 17, 2009Hall David RFluid-actuated hammer bit
US7641002Jan 5, 2010Hall David RDrill bit
US7661487Mar 31, 2009Feb 16, 2010Hall David RDownhole percussive tool with alternating pressure differentials
US7694756Oct 12, 2007Apr 13, 2010Hall David RIndenting member for a drill bit
US7721826Sep 6, 2007May 25, 2010Schlumberger Technology CorporationDownhole jack assembly sensor
US7762353Jul 27, 2010Schlumberger Technology CorporationDownhole valve mechanism
US7845432Dec 7, 2010Vermeer Manufacturing CompanyMicrotunnelling system and apparatus
US7866416Jan 11, 2011Schlumberger Technology CorporationClutch for a jack element
US7886851Feb 15, 2011Schlumberger Technology CorporationDrill bit nozzle
US7900720Mar 8, 2011Schlumberger Technology CorporationDownhole drive shaft connection
US7942217May 17, 2011Vermeer Manufacturing CompanyCutting apparatus for a microtunnelling system
US7954401Jun 7, 2011Schlumberger Technology CorporationMethod of assembling a drill bit with a jack element
US7967082Jun 28, 2011Schlumberger Technology CorporationDownhole mechanism
US7967083Jun 28, 2011Schlumberger Technology CorporationSensor for determining a position of a jack element
US7976242Jul 12, 2011Vermeer Manufacturing CompanyDrill head for a microtunnelling apparatus
US8011457Sep 6, 2011Schlumberger Technology CorporationDownhole hammer assembly
US8020471Feb 27, 2009Sep 20, 2011Schlumberger Technology CorporationMethod for manufacturing a drill bit
US8061457Feb 17, 2009Nov 22, 2011Schlumberger Technology CorporationChamfered pointed enhanced diamond insert
US8122980Jun 22, 2007Feb 28, 2012Schlumberger Technology CorporationRotary drag bit with pointed cutting elements
US8130117Jun 8, 2007Mar 6, 2012Schlumberger Technology CorporationDrill bit with an electrically isolated transmitter
US8151906Aug 8, 2006Apr 10, 2012Vermeer Manufacturing CompanyMicrotunnelling system and apparatus
US8191651Mar 31, 2011Jun 5, 2012Hall David RSensor on a formation engaging member of a drill bit
US8205688Jun 24, 2009Jun 26, 2012Hall David RLead the bit rotary steerable system
US8215420Jul 10, 2012Schlumberger Technology CorporationThermally stable pointed diamond with increased impact resistance
US8225883Jul 24, 2012Schlumberger Technology CorporationDownhole percussive tool with alternating pressure differentials
US8240404Aug 14, 2012Hall David RRoof bolt bit
US8256536Feb 11, 2010Sep 4, 2012Vermeer Manufacturing CompanyBackreamer for a tunneling apparatus
US8267196Sep 18, 2012Schlumberger Technology CorporationFlow guide actuation
US8281882May 29, 2009Oct 9, 2012Schlumberger Technology CorporationJack element for a drill bit
US8292372Oct 23, 2012Hall David RRetention for holder shank
US8297375Oct 30, 2012Schlumberger Technology CorporationDownhole turbine
US8297378Oct 30, 2012Schlumberger Technology CorporationTurbine driven hammer that oscillates at a constant frequency
US8307919Jan 11, 2011Nov 13, 2012Schlumberger Technology CorporationClutch for a jack element
US8316964Jun 11, 2007Nov 27, 2012Schlumberger Technology CorporationDrill bit transducer device
US8333254Oct 1, 2010Dec 18, 2012Hall David RSteering mechanism with a ring disposed about an outer diameter of a drill bit and method for drilling
US8342266Mar 15, 2011Jan 1, 2013Hall David RTimed steering nozzle on a downhole drill bit
US8360174Jan 29, 2013Schlumberger Technology CorporationLead the bit rotary steerable tool
US8408336May 28, 2009Apr 2, 2013Schlumberger Technology CorporationFlow guide actuation
US8418784Apr 16, 2013David R. HallCentral cutting region of a drilling head assembly
US8434573Aug 6, 2009May 7, 2013Schlumberger Technology CorporationDegradation assembly
US8439132May 14, 2013Vermeer Manufacturing CompanyMicrotunnelling system and apparatus
US8439450Feb 11, 2010May 14, 2013Vermeer Manufacturing CompanyTunneling apparatus including vacuum and method of use
US8449040Oct 30, 2007May 28, 2013David R. HallShank for an attack tool
US8454096Jun 26, 2008Jun 4, 2013Schlumberger Technology CorporationHigh-impact resistant tool
US8499857Nov 23, 2009Aug 6, 2013Schlumberger Technology CorporationDownhole jack assembly sensor
US8522897Sep 11, 2009Sep 3, 2013Schlumberger Technology CorporationLead the bit rotary steerable tool
US8528664Jun 28, 2011Sep 10, 2013Schlumberger Technology CorporationDownhole mechanism
US8540037Apr 30, 2008Sep 24, 2013Schlumberger Technology CorporationLayered polycrystalline diamond
US8550190Sep 30, 2010Oct 8, 2013David R. HallInner bit disposed within an outer bit
US8567532Nov 16, 2009Oct 29, 2013Schlumberger Technology CorporationCutting element attached to downhole fixed bladed bit at a positive rake angle
US8573331Oct 29, 2010Nov 5, 2013David R. HallRoof mining drill bit
US8590644Sep 26, 2007Nov 26, 2013Schlumberger Technology CorporationDownhole drill bit
US8596381Mar 31, 2011Dec 3, 2013David R. HallSensor on a formation engaging member of a drill bit
US8616305 *Nov 16, 2009Dec 31, 2013Schlumberger Technology CorporationFixed bladed bit that shifts weight between an indenter and cutting elements
US8622155 *Jul 27, 2007Jan 7, 2014Schlumberger Technology CorporationPointed diamond working ends on a shear bit
US8684470Feb 11, 2010Apr 1, 2014Vermeer Manufacturing CompanyDrill head for a tunneling apparatus
US8701799Apr 29, 2009Apr 22, 2014Schlumberger Technology CorporationDrill bit cutter pocket restitution
US8714285Nov 16, 2009May 6, 2014Schlumberger Technology CorporationMethod for drilling with a fixed bladed bit
US8820440Nov 30, 2010Sep 2, 2014David R. HallDrill bit steering assembly
US8839888Apr 23, 2010Sep 23, 2014Schlumberger Technology CorporationTracking shearing cutters on a fixed bladed drill bit with pointed cutting elements
US8931854Sep 6, 2013Jan 13, 2015Schlumberger Technology CorporationLayered polycrystalline diamond
US8950517Jun 27, 2010Feb 10, 2015Schlumberger Technology CorporationDrill bit with a retained jack element
US9051795Nov 25, 2013Jun 9, 2015Schlumberger Technology CorporationDownhole drill bit
US9068410Jun 26, 2009Jun 30, 2015Schlumberger Technology CorporationDense diamond body
US9290994Dec 26, 2012Mar 22, 2016Charles T. WebbSonde housing and bit body arrangement for horizontal directional drilling
US9316061Aug 11, 2011Apr 19, 2016David R. HallHigh impact resistant degradation element
US20070068706 *Sep 29, 2005Mar 29, 2007Harleman Ronald EEarth auger
US20070119630 *Jan 29, 2007May 31, 2007Hall David RJack Element Adapted to Rotate Independent of a Drill Bit
US20070125580 *Feb 12, 2007Jun 7, 2007Hall David RJet Arrangement for a Downhole Drill Bit
US20070221408 *Mar 30, 2007Sep 27, 2007Hall David RDrilling at a Resonant Frequency
US20070221412 *Mar 15, 2007Sep 27, 2007Hall David RRotary Valve for a Jack Hammer
US20070229304 *Jun 8, 2007Oct 4, 2007Hall David RDrill Bit with an Electrically Isolated Transmitter
US20070272443 *Aug 10, 2007Nov 29, 2007Hall David RDownhole Steering
US20080035380 *Jul 27, 2007Feb 14, 2008Hall David RPointed Diamond Working Ends on a Shear Bit
US20080035388 *Oct 12, 2007Feb 14, 2008Hall David RDrill Bit Nozzle
US20080142263 *Feb 28, 2008Jun 19, 2008Hall David RDownhole Valve Mechanism
US20080156536 *Jan 3, 2007Jul 3, 2008Hall David RApparatus and Method for Vibrating a Drill Bit
US20080156541 *Feb 26, 2008Jul 3, 2008Hall David RDownhole Hammer Assembly
US20080173482 *Mar 28, 2008Jul 24, 2008Hall David RDrill Bit
US20080296015 *Jun 4, 2007Dec 4, 2008Hall David RClutch for a Jack Element
US20080302572 *Jul 23, 2008Dec 11, 2008Hall David RDrill Bit Porting System
US20080314647 *Jun 22, 2007Dec 25, 2008Hall David RRotary Drag Bit with Pointed Cutting Elements
US20090000828 *Sep 10, 2008Jan 1, 2009Hall David RRoof Bolt Bit
US20090057016 *Oct 31, 2008Mar 5, 2009Hall David RDownhole Turbine
US20090065251 *Sep 6, 2007Mar 12, 2009Hall David RDownhole Jack Assembly Sensor
US20090152008 *Dec 15, 2008Jun 18, 2009Vermeer Manufacturing CompanyMicrotunnelling system and apparatus
US20090152012 *Dec 15, 2008Jun 18, 2009Vermer Manufacturing CompanyMicrotunnelling system and apparatus
US20090255733 *Jun 24, 2009Oct 15, 2009Hall David RLead the Bit Rotary Steerable System
US20100059289 *Mar 11, 2010Hall David RCutting Element with Low Metal Concentration
US20100089648 *Nov 16, 2009Apr 15, 2010Hall David RFixed Bladed Bit that Shifts Weight between an Indenter and Cutting Elements
US20100206635 *Feb 11, 2010Aug 19, 2010Harrison StuartTunneling Apparatus Including Vacuum and Method of Use
US20100206636 *Aug 19, 2010Harrison StuartBackreamer for a Tunneling Apparatus
US20100206637 *Feb 11, 2010Aug 19, 2010Harrison StuartCutting Unit for a Tunneling Apparatus
US20100206641 *Aug 19, 2010Hall David RChamfered Pointed Enhanced Diamond Insert
US20100230171 *Sep 16, 2010Harrison StuartDrill Head for a Tunneling Apparatus
US20100237135 *Sep 23, 2010Schlumberger Technology CorporationMethods For Making An Attack Tool
US20110042150 *Oct 29, 2010Feb 24, 2011Hall David RRoof Mining Drill Bit
US20110048811 *Jun 27, 2010Mar 3, 2011Schlumberger Technology CorporationDrill bit with a retained jack element
US20110180324 *Jul 28, 2011Hall David RSensor on a Formation Engaging Member of a Drill Bit
US20110180325 *Jul 28, 2011Hall David RSensor on a Formation Engaging Member of a Drill Bit
USD620510Jul 27, 2010Schlumberger Technology CorporationDrill bit
USD674422Jan 15, 2013Hall David RDrill bit with a pointed cutting element and a shearing cutting element
USD678368Mar 19, 2013David R. HallDrill bit with a pointed cutting element
DE2633779A1 *Jul 28, 1976Feb 2, 1978Richard KarnebogenBohrkrone fuer schlagende gesteinsbohrmaschinen
DE2709030A1 *Mar 2, 1977Sep 7, 1978Leffer Stahl & AppDrehbohrkrone fuer erd- und gesteinsformationen
DE29513325U1 *Aug 19, 1995Oct 19, 1995Boart Hwf Gmbh Co KgBohrkrone
WO1991002882A1 *Mar 9, 1990Mar 7, 1991Kennametal Inc.An excavating tooth for an earth auger
Classifications
U.S. Classification175/292, 299/80.1, 175/335, 175/354, 175/391
International ClassificationE21B10/32, E21B10/44, E21B10/00, E21B10/26
Cooperative ClassificationE21B10/327, E21B10/44
European ClassificationE21B10/32M, E21B10/44