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Publication numberUS3822054 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 2, 1974
Filing dateOct 13, 1972
Priority dateOct 13, 1972
Also published asCA966701A1, DE2334254A1
Publication numberUS 3822054 A, US 3822054A, US-A-3822054, US3822054 A, US3822054A
InventorsMatson C
Original AssigneeMartin Eng Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary vibrator and mount therefor
US 3822054 A
Abstract
A rotary vibrator interfitted with a mounting structure wherein the vibrator casing and mounting structure have cooperative cam portions adapted to continuously tighten as a result of the migratory rotative movement of the vibrator casing ensuing from the continuing driving force applied to the vibrator rotor, thus providing a simple automatic clamping of the vibrator to the mounting structure.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Matson 1 July '2, 1974 ROTARY VIBRATOR AND MOUNT 954,954 4/1910 Graybi1l 285/394 x THEREFOR 1,224,269 5/ 1917 Broadbent 2,875,988 3/1959 Wysong Inventor: Carl a a 3,318,163 5/1967 Matson 259/1 R 3,476,415 11/1969 Van Note, Jr. et a1. 285/396 [73] Ass'gma k gg g w 3,731,907 5/1973 Lash 259/1210. 43 x [22] Filed: 1972 Primary Examiner-Harvey C. Homsby [21] App]. N0.: 297,381 Assistant Examiner-Alan Cantor [52] US. Cl. 259/1 R, 248/25, 248/361 W, [57] ABSTRACT 259/DIG. 43 511 1111'. c1 B06b 1/18, B28b 1/08 A rotafy f" f' Structure [58] Field of Search 259/1 R DIG 43 DIG wherein the vibrator casing and mounting structure 164/203 206 260 1, 5 5. 248/15 have cooperative cam portions adapted to continu- 20 25 36lw 32102855196 ously tighten as a result of the migratory rotative 403/351 3522/64/71 movement of the vibrator casing ensuing from the i continuing driving force applied to the vibrator rotor, [56] References Cited thus providing a simple automatic clamping of the vi- UNITED STATES PATENTS brator to the mounting structure. 7

7,318 Brown 285/396 2 10 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures 1 ROTARY VIBRATOR AND MOUNT THEREFOR BACKGROUND or THE INVENTION Vibrators are commonly used with materialshandling, such as to expedite the flow, settling, etc. of solids, semisolids and the like. One of the best-known examples is the utilization of vibrators in concrete molds. In cases where the mold is of substantial size, it is necessary to use several vibrators or to provide several mounts so that a smaller number of vibrators may be moved from one mount to the other. The latter alternative has several advantages but presents a number grated with its mount and yet must be easily and quickly removable so as to be used with other mounts.

So far as is presently known, all prior vibrator mounts have reliedupon movable parts; e.g wedges (U.S. Pat. No. 3,003,733); screws (U.S. Pat. No. 3,237,505); self-tightening" screws (U.S. Pat. No. 3,355,957); hydraulic rams (U.S. Pat. No. 3,185,323). One disadvantage of these prior mounting devices is that they add weight to the vibrators. Another is that screws must be kept tight, are subjected to rust, corrosion, etc. Hydraulic rams are precision devices and are costly and are also subject to rust, corrosion, dust etc. When used with concrete molds, such prior devices provide openings and exposed portions that collect concrete. In general, such prior methods are costly, difficult to operate and inefficient. Furthermore, these devices are not automatically tightened as the vibrator operates but, on the contrary, tend to loosen as the vibrator decelerates, causing objectionable noise and destructive forces within the vibrator and its mount.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The typical rotary vibratoroperates on theprinciplc of orbiting a weight about an axis to create a condition of unbalance which is used to impart vibrations to an object to which the vibrator is affixed. The weight is of course eccentric to the axis of the means that confines the weight to follow an orbit. In some vibrators, the weight may be carried by a shaft, as in US. Pat. No. 3,036,658, and in others theweight may be a roller smaller in diameter than and confined .by a circular track, as in US. Pat. No. 3,3l8,l63. Yet other forms of vibrators are known. In all these is this characteristic: The casing or other means that carries the orbiting weight, rotor, etc. is subjected to migratory or precessive rotative movement in the direction of rotation of the orbiting member, from which it follows that the easing must be securely fastened to the object to be vibrated or it will vibrate itself loose from the object.

As explained above, various types of mounts have been provided heretofore. Obviously, the casing can be welded to the object, but this prevents free and easy removal of the vibrator from one location to the other, and, since removal and relocation are desirable, the mount must be temporary but effective and must not require constant attention, must be relatively simple and inexpensive and must be substantially free from environmental problems; e.g., rust, corrosion, accumulation of the material being handled. etc. Stated simply, and without any intention to limit the invention, the problem is solved by constructing the mount as a tubular member within which a substantially circular vibrator casing is initially loosely fitted.

' of problems, mainly because the vibrator must be intevibrator from its mount.

The object to be vibrated may be provided with several tubular mounts sothat one vibrator may be easily and simply moved from one mount to the other. The interior of the mount has one or more cam surfaces and the exterior'of the casing has one or more cooperating cam surfaces. When the casing precesses or migrates as the rotor is orbited by thedriving force applied thereto, the cam surfaces, wedges, ramps etc. interengage and continuously tighten so long as the driving force is applied.

Fundamentally, the principle of the inclined plane, be it straight, helical etc. is exploited to keep the vibrator tight in its mount so long as it is in operation. When it is desired to move the vibrator to another mount, reverse angular movement quickly and easily frees the DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a plan view of an exemplary vibrator in its initial position as related to its mount.

FIG. 2 is an elevation of the same.

FIG. 3 is a section on the line 3-3 of FIG. I.

FIG. 4 is a section on the line 44 of FIG. 1.

FIG. .5 is an enlarged fragmentary view showing the action of the cam, ramp, inclined plane, etc. during operation of the vibrator.

DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT As said above, a typical rotary vibrator forms the subject matter of US. Pat. No. 3,318,163, and such a vibrator has been chosen here for purposes of illustration, it being understood that the vibrator structure by itself constitutes no limitation on the invention. To that end, the selected vibrator includes a casing or carrier structure 10 having an interior circular track 12 within which a rotor 14 is confined by the track and by a pair of side plates l6 retained by snap rings 18. The track I has an annular groove 20 to which fluid under press uree.g., compressed air-is supplied by a tangential port 22 formed in such a way as to be connected to a pressurized inlet 24 which in turn is supplied by a fluid pressure source shown schematically at 26 (FIG. 1). It is only in the area of the external disposition of the inlet 24 that the vibrator shown herein differs from that in U.S. Pat. No.'3,3l8,l63. Further, whether the vibrator is driven by compressed air or otherwise is of little mo ment.

The side plates each have annular grooves 28 provided respectively with exhaust outlets 30. When the interior of the casing is pressurized by means of the pressure source 26, line 24 and port 22, the rotor or weight 14 is caused to orbit about the axis as estab' lished by the axis of the annular track 12, all as explained in the above US. Pat. No. 3,318,163.

An object to be vibratede.g., a concrete mold or the likeis designated at 32, and to this is affixed one or more mounts typified by a mount or mounting structure 34. As is customary, the mount 34 is rigidly affixed to the object 32, as by welding at 36. The mount, by way of example, includes a member 38 of tubular form or configuration, so shaped and dimensioned that the vibrator casing 10 fits intitially relatively loosely therein; i.e., sufficiently so that the'casing may be easily inserted in and withdrawn from the mount when the vibrator is idle and yet not so loosely as to permit the acor cloverleaf", particularly in the area of its interior Assuming further that the casing 10 fits within the tube 38-although the parts could obviously be reversed-,

' there are thus three high spots or areas 40 and likewise. three low spots or areas 42. This results because the tube is non-circular. Considering further that, for purposes of clarity only, the structure is described in terms applicable to circles, the high and low areas are achieved because of the dift'erence in cross-wise or radial dimensions. For example, the basic center of the tube occurs at x (FIG. but the three parts of the tube are formed about three axes y, so that, as measured from the center or axis x, the radius or dimension a is greater than the dimension b, and areas in which the arcs merge provide the cam or ramp areas or surfaces 40.

In essence, the tube 38 is ovalized", and itis clear that fewer or more than three cams, ramps etc. could be provided, and, likewise the surfaces need not be arcuate. The present description is based on a simple construction.

The exterior of the casing is complementarily formed; i.e., it has three cooperating cam or ramp surfaces 44, but here again, as said above, the number of cams is representative only. For the sake of simplicity, the outer surface ofthe casing l0-as where it is a casting or forging-may be essentially circular, and the cams or ramps 44 are the result of lugs or strips 46 welded or otherwise rigidly affixed to the casing. Whether the lugs as described are used or whether the casing is a deformed" tube is immaterial. The point is that the casing has two basic cross-wise or radial dimensions c and (1 wherein a is less than c, is less than a but is greater than b.

Thus. as the casing 10 is initially inserted into the mount or tube 38 (FIG. 2, for example), there is ample clearance, because c is less than a and d is less than 12.

This makes it easy for the user to install and remove the idle vibrator. But, when the vibrator is startedand after the user gives the casing a slight turn (here counterclockwise) by means of handle 48--, the precessive or migratory movement of the casing causes the earns 44 to continuously tighten on or in the mount earns 40, thus resulting in an automatic and constant wedging or tightening action so long as driving force is applied to the vibrator.

It should be observed that the angle of approach of the cam 44 to the cam 40 should be selected on the basis ofa gradual rather than an abrupt basis so that the necessary interlocking action is achieved. The angle shown in the drawings-albeit exaggerated-is preferred. the word angle" being used because of the fact that straight lines rather than curves could be exploited. Likewise, other than strictly circumferential directions-cg. helical-are within the scope of the invention. Other variations will occur to those skilled in the art after having the benefit of the present disclosure.

l claim:

1. A rotary vibrator and mounting structure therefor wherein the vibrator has a casing, a rotor in said casing and means subjecting the rotor to a continuing driving force causing the rotor to orbit about an axis and resulting in a unidirectional migratory rotative movement of the casing about the orbit axis and the mounting structure and easing are interfitted with each other so that the structure carries the vibrator, characterized in that the casing and structure respectively have initially loosely interfitting portions, said rotor and easing being provided with cooperative cam surfaces arranged to engage and to continuously tighten as a result of the aforesaid migratoryrotative movement of the casingso long as the driving force to the rotor is continued.

2. The invention defined in claim 1, further characterized in that the mounting structure is of tubular configuration embracing the casing and the cam surfaces are provided respectively on the interior of the structure and the exterior of the casing.

3. The invention defined in claim 2, further characterized in that the mounting structure has a plurality of cam surfaces and the casing has a like plurality of cooperating cam surfaces. 7

4. The invention defined in claim 2, further characterized in that the tubular configuration of the mounting structure is non-circular so as to provide the interior with cross-wise dimensions of greater and lesser lengths and the exterior of the casing is also noncircular and has cross-wise dimensions of greater and lesser lengths, the greater dimension on the casing being less than that in the structure but greater than the lesser dimension in the structure.

5. The invention defined in claim 1, further characterized in that the mounting structure is of tubular form having an interior surface including at least two circumferentially merging surface portions of different radial lengths whereby the area of the merger of the portion of greater length with that of the lesser length provides an interior cam, and the exterior of the casing is configured to initially fit loosely into the structure and has an exterior cam engaging and tightening with the interior cam upon the aforesaid migratory rotative movement of the casing.

6. The invention defined in claim 5, further characterized in that the interior of the structure has a plurality of interior cams as aforesaid and the exterior of the casing has a like plurality of cooperating exterior earns.

7. The invention defined in claim 6, in which the exterior of the casing is circular and of such diameter as to fit intitially within the casing and the exterior cams are raised portions on the casing engageable respectively with the interior cams.

8.'ln combination, a rotary vibrator having a casing, a rotor in said casing, means for continuously driving said rotor about an axis, mounting structurefor the easing and including a cam portion, a cam portion on the casing engageable with the structure cam portion and adapted to continuously tighten as a result of unidirectional migratory rotative movement of the casing ensuing from continuous driving of the rotor.

9. The invention defined inclaim 8, in which the structure is tubular and embraces the casing and the cam portions are provided respectively on the interior of the structure and the exterior of the casing.

10. The invention defined in claim 8, in which the structure is tubular and a portion thereof is of generally oval configuration and the casing initially loosely fits within the structure and has its exterior cam portion engageable with the cam provided by the decreasing radial dimension of the oval portion of the structure as the casing partakes of the aforesaid migratory rotative movement.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7318 *Apr 30, 1850 Coupling foe pipes and hose
US954954 *May 15, 1907Apr 12, 1910John E GraybillConnection-box for electric conduits.
US1224269 *Jun 11, 1914May 1, 1917David Leslie James BroadbentFitting for electrical-conduit systems.
US2875988 *Sep 3, 1957Mar 3, 1959Price Brothers CoMechanical vibrator
US3318163 *Feb 17, 1964May 9, 1967Vibrator Mfg CompanyVibration mechanism
US3476415 *Oct 6, 1967Nov 4, 1969Servco CoCoupling
US3731907 *Jul 8, 1971May 8, 1973Nat Air Vibrator CoVibrator system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3915436 *Jun 6, 1974Oct 28, 1975Matson C GSelf-clamping automatic air connection vibrator mount
US5314305 *Mar 12, 1993May 24, 1994Findeva AgCompressed air vibrator with turbine drive
US5433523 *Mar 4, 1994Jul 18, 1995International Pipe Machinery Corp.Vibrators
US5711327 *Oct 10, 1995Jan 27, 1998Fields; John T.System for vibration cleaning of articles including radiators
Classifications
U.S. Classification366/114, 366/124
International ClassificationB06B1/18, B06B1/10
Cooperative ClassificationB06B1/186
European ClassificationB06B1/18C
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 21, 1983AS17Release by secured party
Owner name: MARTIN CONCRETE ENGINEERING COMPANY, A TX CORP.
Effective date: 19831017
Owner name: UNION BANK OF HOUSTON
Nov 21, 1983AS01Change of name
Owner name: MARTIN CONCRETE ENGINEERING COMPANY
Effective date: 19790315
Owner name: MARTIN INDUSTRIES, INC.
Nov 21, 1983AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: HAMILTON EQUIPMENT CO., INC., 5900-C EAST BERRY ST
Effective date: 19831018
Owner name: MARTIN INDUSTRIES, INC. A TX CORP.
Nov 21, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: HAMILTON EQUIPMENT CO., INC., 5900-C EAST BERRY ST
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:MARTIN INDUSTRIES, INC. A TX CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004205/0493
Effective date: 19831018
Owner name: MARTIN CONCRETE ENGINEERING COMPANY, A TX CORP.
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:UNION BANK OF HOUSTON;REEL/FRAME:004205/0492
Effective date: 19831017
Owner name: MARTIN INDUSTRIES, INC.
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:MARTIN CONCRETE ENGINEERING COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:004205/0496
Effective date: 19790315