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Publication numberUS3822069 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 2, 1974
Filing dateMar 12, 1973
Priority dateMar 12, 1973
Publication numberUS 3822069 A, US 3822069A, US-A-3822069, US3822069 A, US3822069A
InventorsHoff J
Original AssigneeHoff J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Compactly storable combination wagon, sled and chair device
US 3822069 A
Abstract
A compactly storable wagon, sled and chair device comprising three foldably related planer members with means for rigidly supporting two of said members in a common plane and the third member disposed angularly generally perpendicularly to said plane, the underside of said co-planar members carrying wheel means facilitating wagon use of the device, axially stressed tubular means connecting remote ends of said co-planar members and angularly disposed member providing side supports for seating means provided therebetween, and supplemental axially stressed tubular means projecting from the underside of said co-planar members in alignment with said first named tubular means and beyond the wheel means forming both runners for sled use of the device and supplemental support in chair use of the device, and said axially stressed means being formed of a plurality of axially detachable members, the longest of which is shorter than the width of said planar members, thereby permitting storage of all components of the disassembled device within the boundaries of the folded planar members.
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United States Patent Hoff [451 July 2, 1974' COMPACTLY STORABLE COMBINATION WAGON, SLED AND CHAIR DEVICE [76] Inventor: Jeffrey Alan Hoff, 234 W. 10th St.,

New York, NY. 10014 [22] Filed: Mar. 12, 1973 [2]] Appl. No.: 340,476

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,066,034 7/1913 Nauts 280/36 B 1,098,262 5/1914 8/1882 Crandall 280/41 A FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 57,509 8/1967 Germany. 280/8 Primary Examiner-Leo Friaglia Assistant ExaminerRandall A. Schrecengost Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Howard E. Thompson, Jr.

[5 1 ABSTRACT A compactly storable wagon, sled and chair device comprising three foldably related planer members with means for rigidly supporting two of said members in a common plane and the third member disposed angularly generally perpendicularly to said plane, the underside of said co-planar members carrying wheel means facilitating wagon use of the device, axially stressed tubular means connecting remote ends of said co-planar members and angularly disposed member providing side supports for seating means provided therebetween, and supplemental axially stressed tubular means projecting from the underside of said coplanar members in alignment with said first named tubular means and beyond the wheel means forming both runners for sled use of the device and supplemental support in chair use of the device, and said axially stressed means being formed of a plurality of axially detachable members, the longest of which is shorter than the width of said planar members, thereby permitting storage of all components of the disassembled device within the boundaries of the folded planar members.

support said planer members in folded relation to each other when the device is disassembled.

12 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures COMPACTLY STORABLE COMBINATION WAGON, SLED AND CHAIR DEVICE This invention relates to a combination wagon, sled and chair device which is practical in all three of its in tended uses and which at the same time can be quickly and easily disassembled for compact storage when not in use or when it is desired to transport the device from place to place.

Basically, the device comprises three hingedly joined planar members with means for rigidly supporting two of said members in a common place while the other member is operatively disposed in an angular position generally perpendicular to said plane. The extended planar members are. supported in operative position by axially stressed built-up tubular members extending between remote ends of the co-planar assemblage and the angularly disposed planar member forming side supports for seating means provided therebetween. The underside of the co-planar assemblage carries wheel means preferably in the form of caster type assemblages with 360 rotation about axes extending perpendicularly to the co-planar assemblage which are operative in wagon use of the device. For sled and chair use of the device, additional built-up and axially stressed tubular means are attached at the underside of the coplanar assemblage, in alignment with said first named tubular means, and protruding beyond said wheel means to form runners in sled use of the device and supplemental support in the upended chair use of the device.

The angularly disposable planar member and the planar member directly pivoted thereto have side cutouts to accommodate the wheel means of the third planar member as the planar members'are folded one upon the other when the device is disassembled, and the positioning of said wheel means with respect to said cutouts is such as to provide an interlock supporting the planar members in folded position. The tubular mem bers are preferably built up of axially joined members the maximum length of which is less than the width of the planar members so that when disassembled, all components of the device can be stored within the boundaries of the folded planar members, suitably within a pouch attached to the outer side of the angularly disposable planar member.

This versatile and easily assembled and disassembled device has been developed primarily to meet the needs of infants and small children in the present day way of life involving much moving from place to place and exposure to unfamiliar surroundings. Frequently the ability to have along articles familiar to the child can materially aid the child in adjusting to new surroundings. Yet the problem has been that items such as wagons, sleds and chairs are so bulky as to be difficult to transport if travel is by automobile and virtually impossible to transport if travel is by air.

A primary object of the present invention is to provide a convertible or knock-down assemblage which is practical when assembled for wagon, sled or chair use and which at the same time will be so compact in the collapsed or disassembled condition as to be readily packed or stored with other items in a conventional suitcase or the like so that there is no problem in taking the device along in motor travel, or even in travel by air where the amount of luggage is inherently restricted.

It should be understood, however, that the structural features of the. device lead themselves to practical adaptation to substantially larger versions intended for adult use where, in wagon or sled configuration, the de vice could be used to transport heavy or bulky articles, and in the chair orientation of the device there would be provided practical supplemental seating. Thus a larger version of the device could be extremely practical as a unit of camping equipment easily stored in collapsed condition in a car trunk, trailer or the like and having varied uses at campsites or other stopovers.

The compactly storable combination device of the present invention will be readily understood from a consideration of the following description taken to gether with the accompanying drawing, in which preferred adaptations of the invention have been illustrated, with the various parts thereof identified by suitable reference characters in the several views, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a side view of the device as assembled in wagon orientation;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the assemblage shown in FIG.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken substantially on the line 3.3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken substantially on the line 44 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 1 showing the arm forming means in partially assembled position and also showing the runner formingmeans in partially assembled position;

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG.- 5 with the arm and runner forming means in fully assembled position and with the device oriented as it would be for use as a chair. In this view, the dot-dash line along the runner forming portion can be visualized as the ground level when the device is used as a sled and;

FIG. 7 is a view similar to FIG. l in general orientation but showing the components in fully disassembled and collapsed position.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the combination wagon, sled and chair device comprises basically three hingedly coupled planar members including an outer planer member 10 joined to an inner planar member II by a hinge 12 at the undersurface thereof and adapted to be rigidly supported in co-planar orientation by clamp means 13. The third angularly disposable planar member 14 is secured by hinge 15 to the inner planar member 11 at a distance somewhat spaced from inner end 11a thereof. As the panel 14 is secured to hinge .15, it will be noted that the lower end 14a as seen in FIG. 1 is spaced from inner planar member 11 sufficiently to permit swinging movement of the planar member 14 to an angular position substantially beyond the vertical as shown.

Front corners of the outer planer member 10 are provided with apertures 16 to loosely accommodate angle couplings 17 of an ell or elbow configuration exposing socket portions 1741 and 17b disposed at angles to each other. The sockets 17a receive ends of axially yieldable tubular members 18 comprising a plurality of tubular members 18a and 18b axially joined by socketed coupling 19 and having the other extremities 18c thereof protruding through apertures 20 in the upper corners of panel member 14.

Having reference to FIG. 5 of the drawing where the tubular members 18a and 18b are shown in their straight or unflexed orientation, note that each tubular member 18a, with the elbow 17 and coupling 19 secured thereto is first engaged with an aperture 16 in the forward panel member, and each tubular member 18b is passed through the appropriate aperture 20. By then forceably bending or flexing the tubular members 18a and 18b, the free end of member 18b can readily be inserted into socketed coupling 19 to provide the stressed configuration shown in FIG. 1. v

The outer end 180 of the tubular assemblage is pref erably provided with an end cap 21, which acts as a foot in the chair orientation of the device as hereinafter described, and a rubber grommet or O-ring 22 is movably mounted on the end portion 18c to assist in supporting the planar member in predetermined positions of angular orientation with respect to the coplanar members 10 and 11.

Secured to the undersurface of the co-planar assemblage 10, 11, at the corner portions thereof are four wheel means 23 facilitating use of the assemblage as a wagon. The wheel means 23 preferably comprise conventional casters having mounting plates 24 pivotally supporting frames 25 which carry wheels 26, the frames 25 being rotatable 360 about axes perpendicular to the planar members 10, 11.

As shown in the drawing, the wheel means 23 at the forward end of the assemblage are in general alignment with and spaced from the apertures 16, while at the rear end of the assemblage they are disposed between the end 11a and the hinge 15.

It will be noted that opposed sides of planar member 11 have aligned cutouts or recesses 27, and opposed edges of planar member 14 have aligned cutouts or recesses 28; and it will be seen from FIG. 7, showing the assemblage in collapsed position, that the cutouts or side recesses 27 and 28 at each side of the device align to receive the forward wheel means 23. In this connection, it will be understood that the positioning of the wheel means 23 is preferably such that the wheels 26 thereof will clampingly engage planar member 14 at the cutouts or recesses 28 thereof to support the folded planar members in the collapsed position shown in FIG. 7. Similarly, the positioning of the rear wheel means 23 is preferably such that the wheels 26 thereof will ride over the end of planar member 10, as shown in FIG. 7 thereby assisting in retention of the planar member in the folded position shown in FIG. 7.

For purpose of illustration, the clamp means 13,'two of which are employed at opposed sides of the assemblage as shown in FIG. 2 can suitably take the form of conventional luggage clamps in which a stud member 29 mounted on oneof the parts 10, 11 is engaged by a tensioning loop 30 actuated by a toggle lever 31 pivotally mounted in housing 32 on the other of said planar members. While this type of clamp means works very well in that it is easily operated and draws the planar member 10, 11 into close abutting engagement, it will be understood that various other available clamping devices could be substituted for the particular clamp means 13 illustrated in the drawing.

When it is desired to use the assemblage as a chair or sled, short tubular members 33 are inserted in sockets 34 at corners of the planar member 11 adjacent the rear end 11a thereof, and an elbow coupling 35 is disposed at the lower end of tubular member 33. The elbow 35 and previously mentioned elbow 17 are joined by a flexed tubular member 36 as shown in FIG.

6 which is preferably made up of a plurality of short tubular members 36a, 36b, axially joined by coupling 37. Prior to flexing in assemblage, the members 36a and 36b will be substantially straight as shown in FIG. 5, but manual bending of the tubular members easily permits assembly to the bowed configuration shown in FIG. 6.

The bowed tubular members 36 provide sled runners; and if FIG. 6 is rotated to the left to horizontally dispose the dot-dash line 38, this line becomes the ground .level when viewing the device in use as a sled.

In the upright or chair configuration illustrated in FIG. 6, it will be noted that the bowed tubular member 36 adds substantial support to the co-planar members 10, 11 which become the backrest of a seat in which planer member 14 provides the seating surface or seat proper. The angular orientation of the seat forming panel member 14 can be varied as indicated in dot-dash lines by repositioning of the grommet or O-rings 22.

At the lower portion of FIG. 6, the line 39 represents a horizontal surface on which the device in seat orientation can be rested and it will be noted that the orientation of the short tubular member 33 and elbows 35 is such that the elbows 35 function as stabilizing rear feet cooperating with the feet 21 earlier described at the ends of tubular members 180.

While the axially flexible members 18a and 18b and 36a and 36b have been described as tubular members it will be understood that these members can be fashioned from hickory or other flexible wooden dowels or solid flexible plastic rods as well as from plastic or metal tubing of suitable axial resilience. Furthermore, while the coupling members 17, 19, 35 and 37 can be fashioned for the purpose, it is practical by selecting tubular members or rods of appropriate diameter, to employ standard plumbing fixtures of the smooth cavity type intended for sweated or soldered pipeline assemblage. The flexing of the tubular members provides ample frictional engagement with such recesses, particularly in the small, child size adaptation of the device. If desired, however, engagement of the tubular members and couplings can include conventional threaded engagement, bayonet interlocking engagement, or other conventional means more positively securing the parts together, particularly in larger, adult size adaptations of the device.

In a small version of the device, when it is used as a small childs seat, it can be rested on various surfaces such as the floor, the ground when outdoors, automobile seat or on a conventional chair to provide animprovised highchair for table sitting and eating.

In wagon configuration, the device provides a practical toy for infants from the time of their earliest walking efforts since ease of movement on the caster wheels, and the convenient elevation of the upper edge of panel 14 when the device is resting on a floor or the ground, encourages the early walker to stand up and push the unit around. Note in this connection that grasping either of the side rails formed by the stressed tubular members 18 can work as well since the casters permit the unit to move in any direction.

The applicants infant son has used the initial model of this device during a several month transition between the crawling stage and unassisted walking stage, and this practical exposure has clearly highlighted the practicality of the device not only as a source of continuing occupation and amusement of the child but also as a distinct aid and convenience to the parents in providing the versatile seating facility as above described.

During this period, applicant and his family have had occasion to travel extensively from place to place both by automobile and by air, and during these travels the ease of disassembling and packing the device has demonstrated itself to be a particular advantage. Note in this connection that a pouch 40 secured to the backside of planar member 14 can accommodate all of the tubular members 18a, l8b, 33, 36a and 36b as well as the elbows and coupling associated therewith so that as the device is disassembled and collapsed as shown in FIG. 7, all of the components become part of a unitary compact package. Incidentally, the overall length and width of the collapsed device as shown in FIG. 7 is approximately 9 by 11 inches, which will be recognized as a size easily insertable in many types of conventional luggage along with other items of apparel and equipment.

The reader can easily visualize from the foregoing discussion how larger versions of the device can be practical for older children and adults; and it is contemplated that at least two larger size units may find considerable acceptance particularly as supplemental camping equipment. An adult size version of the unit in either wagon or sled configuration could function as a versatile rescue unit in the event of injury while camping, skiing, etc.

Various changes and modifications in the combination wagon, sled and chair device as herein disclosed may occur to those skilled in the art, and to the extent that such changes and modifications are embraced by the appended claims, it is to be understood that they constitute part of the present invention.

I claim;

1. A compactly storable wagon, sled and chair device comprising three foldably related rigid planar members, clamp means for rigidly supporting two of said members in a common plane, the third planar member adjustably and angularly protruding from said plane adjacent one end thereof, elongated and axially flexed members connecting remote end portions of said coplanar assemblage and angularly disposed planar member providing sides to a sitting area disposed therebetween, the underside of said co-planar assemblage carrying wheel means adjacent the four corners thereof, means for detachably securing elongated axially flexed members at the underside of said co-planar assemblage extending longitudinally of said assemblage and protruding beyond said wheel means to provide sled runners, and the ends of said first and second named axially flexed members adjacent said third planar member providing supporting legs in the upended, chair orientation of said device.

2. A device as defined in claim 1 wherein each of said axially flexed members comprises a plurality of similar members having coupling means axially joining the same in end to end relation, thereby facilitating compact storage when disassembled.

3. A device as defined in claim 2 wherein said axially flexed members are of tubular construction.

4. A device as defined in claim 2 wherein said axially flexed members comprise extruded plastic tubing.

5. A device as defined in claim. 1 wherein said first named axially flexed members have angle couplings at the forward ends thereof engaging apertures in said coplanar assemblage and the rear ends thereof passing through apertures adjacent the upper, free edge of said third planar member.

6. A device as defined in claim 5 wherein the elongated axially flexed members forming said sled runners have forward ends thereof in engagement with said first named angle couplings and the rearward ends thereotl in engagement with other angle couplings which in turn are connected to the rear end portion of said co-planar assemblage by spacer means disposed perpendicularly thereto.

7. A device as defined in claim 6 wherein said elongated axially flexed members each comprise a plurality of similar members having coupling means axially joining the same in end to end relation, thereby facilitating compact storage when disassembled. I

8. A device as defined in claim 7 wherein said angle and axial coupling means comprise smooth socketed plumbing fixtures providing close slidable engagement with axially flexed members of circular external cross section.

9. A device as defined in claim 1 wherein side cutouts in the angularly disposable planar member and the adjacent panel member align in the folded position thereof to lockingly receive the wheel means of said third planar member.

10. A device as defined in claim 1 wherein said wheel means comprise caster units each having 360 rotation about axes disposed perpendicularly to said co-planar assemblage.

11. A device as defined in claim 1 wherein a storage pouch is secured to the outer surface of said angularly disposable planar member, and said elongated axially flexed members each comprise a plurality of axially joined components of a length to be stored within said pouch, whereby all components of the disassembled device can be stored within the boundaries of the folded planar members.

12. A device as defined in claim 1 wherein said elongated axially flexed members are of circular external cross section and portions thereof passing through apertures in said angularly disposed planar member carry adjustable means for supporting said planar member in different positions of angular adjustment. i l =l l

Patent Citations
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US263026 *Dec 14, 1881Aug 22, 1882 crandall
US1066034 *Sep 17, 1912Jul 1, 1913 Perambulator.
US1098262 *Sep 13, 1911May 26, 1914Arthur William HollingsheadTruck for automobiles.
US1639801 *May 9, 1925Aug 23, 1927William H HeiseStretcher
DD57509A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5039123 *Nov 13, 1989Aug 13, 1991Quickwheel Holdings, B.V.Wheel trolley
US6357824Jul 14, 2000Mar 19, 2002Bruce E. WhitacreBeach/field recliner
US6413002 *Dec 4, 1998Jul 2, 2002Phillip Delaine, Jr.Aqua broom
US6776427 *May 22, 2001Aug 17, 2004The Prophet Corp.Toy vehicle having removable scooter wheels, and methods
US7419167Aug 23, 2007Sep 2, 2008Nguyen Thien VSled device
US8899604Jul 1, 2011Dec 2, 2014The Prophet CorporationWheeled scooter
EP0250009A1 *May 1, 1987Dec 23, 1987S.A.W. Holdings B.V.Wheel trolley (Wielkarretje)
WO2010112706A1 *Mar 31, 2010Oct 7, 2010Claude Fournier"three-in-one" multipurpose folding bag equipped with a four-wheel minitrolley
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/8, 280/87.5
International ClassificationA47C13/00, B62B3/02
Cooperative ClassificationB62B3/02, A47C13/00
European ClassificationA47C13/00, B62B3/02