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Publication numberUS3822083 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 2, 1974
Filing dateFeb 8, 1973
Priority dateFeb 8, 1973
Publication numberUS 3822083 A, US 3822083A, US-A-3822083, US3822083 A, US3822083A
InventorsZeamer A
Original AssigneeScm Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Typewriter case
US 3822083 A
Abstract
A double-walled thermoplastic case for a typewriter is provided that prevents damage to the typewriter during transportation and storage. The inner walls of the cover and base are formed to resiliently clamp the typewriter between them. The resilient faces of steps projecting from the inner wall of the base position the typewriter and restrain it against lateral movement and the resilient faces of the inner wall above the steps restrain the typewriter against lateral movement if the steps should be overridden. Resilient feet depending from the inner wall of the cover restrain the keyboard of the typewriter against upward movement and depressions in the inner wall that are nearly in contact with the outer wall resiliently limit the upward movement permitted by the depending feet. In a second embodiment of the invention that is used with a typewriter having a rugged keyboard, the depressions in the inner wall are in contact with the outer wall.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Zeamer [111 3,822,083 1451 July 2,1974

[ TYPEWRITER CASE [75] Inventor: Aaron C. Zeamer, Cortland, NY. [73] Assignee: SCM Corporation, New York, NY. [22] Filed: Feb. 8, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 330,849

[52] US. Cl. 312/208, 312/244 [51] Int. Cl. A47b 21/00, A47b 89/00 [58] Field of Search 312/208; 206/DIG. 27, 1;

[5 6] eferences Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,843,969 7/1958 Nessel 312/208 3,206,265 9/1965 Amos 312/208. 3,327,841 6/1967 Schurmann et al. 220/9 R 3,339,781 9/1967 Schurman et al. 220/9 R 3,441,071 4/1969 Schurman'et a1. 220/9 R X 3,612,233 10/1971 Nagpol 150/05 3,615,006 1 /1971 Freed Sottsass 312/208 Primary Examiner-Paul R. Gilliam Attorney, Agent, or Firm-John A. Taylor 5 7 ABSTRACT A double-walled thermoplastic case for a typewriter is provided that prevents damage to the typewriter during transportation and storage. The inner walls of the cover and base are formed to resiliently clamp the typewriter between them. The resilient faces of steps projecting from the inner wall of the base position the typewriter and restrain it against lateral movement and the resilient faces of the inner wall above the steps restrain the typewriter against lateral movement if the 1 steps should be overridden. Resilient feet depending from the inner wall of the cover restrain the keyboard of the typewriter against upward movement and depressions in the inner wall that are nearly in contact with the outer wall resiliently limit the upward movement permitted by the depending feet. In a second embodiment of the invention that is used with a typewriter having a rugged keyboard, the depressions in the inner wall are in contact with the outer wall.

7 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures l TYPEWRITERCASE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to typewriter cases and more particularly to an improved blow-molded doublewalled thermoplastic carrying case for a typewriter.

2. Description of the Prior Art A molded thermoplastic carrying case in which an article is resiliently held by a single inner wall is known, but it is not for a typewriter. A typewriter which is a very complex and delicately adjusted piece of machinery, requires special packing in order to survive the hazards of transportation and storage. All of the prior thermoplastic carrying cases for typewriters require special packing material inside the carrying caseand a great thickness of packing material inside the shipping container in order for the typewriter to havea reasonable chance of surviving the hazards of shipping and storage. Once received by the consumer, the packing material is usually discarded and the typewriter, unprotected in its carrying case, might be subjected to almost any conceivable hazard. Prior carrying cases have not been noted for their ability to protect typewriters when the carrying cases are dropped. Prior carrying cases have, however, been noted for quickly assuming a beatup appearance. i

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is, therefore, a primary object of the invention to provide a thermoplastic case for a typewriter that will prevent the typewriter from being damaged during shipping, storage, and consumer use.

Another object of the invention is to provide a typewriter case that itself will not be damaged during shipping, storage, and consumer use.

Another object of the invention is to provide a typewriter case that meets the preceding objects without any special packing material or any special holding fixand restrained against lateral movement, the keyboard of the typewriter still tends to move upwardduring an extreme shock. Therefore, resilient feet'are formed depending from the inner wall of the cover to nearly contact the front corners of the keyboard to restrain the keyboard against upward movement. Depressions are formed in the inner wall nearly in contact with the outer wall to limit the upward movement permitted by the depending feet. The depressions act as resilient stops to help absorb shock. The inner walls of the cover and base contact the outer walls at central locations in order to increase the-rigidity of the carrying case and to maintain the exterior contours.

In a second embodiment of the invention that is used with a typewriter having a. rugged keyboard, the depressions in the inner wall of the cover can be in contact with the outer wall to limit the upward movement permitted by the depending feet. In addition, it has been found that the inner wall of the base in the second embodiment does not have to contact the outer wall at a central location in order to provide rigidity and to maintain the exterior contours. Also, in the second embodiment, the faces of the inner wall above the stepsat the rear of the typewriter can be set back farther because the carriage of the typewriter for the second embodiment will still clear the inner wall of the cover when the rear of the typewriter contacts the faces of theinner wall above the steps during an extreme shock.

Other objects and a fuller understanding of the invention can be had by referring to the description and claims taken in conjunction with the accompanying tures inside the case and with only a minimal amount of packing material inside a shipping container which consequently can be very compact.

Another object of the invention is to providea thermoplastic typewriter case that meets the preceding ob jects under extreme conditions of vibration, shock, compression, temperature, and corrosion and is still relatively inexpensive.

In order to accomplish the objects of the invention, the invention includes a blow-molded double-walled thermoplastic carrying case for a typewriter in which the typewriter is resiliently clamped between the inner walls of the cover and base of the carrying case. The typewriter is positioned in the carrying case and restrained against lateralmovement by the resilient faces of steps projecting from theinner wall of the base. If the steps should be overridden as when the carrying case is dropped, the resilient faces of the inner wall above the steps will restrain the typewriter against further lateral movement while helping to absorb the shock. The faces of the inner wall above the steps at the rear of the typewriter are set back only slightly so that the carriage of the typewriter will still clear the inner wall of the cover if the rear of the typewriter should override the rear steps during an extreme shock.

Even with the typewriter firmly clamped between the inner walls of the cover and base of the carrying case drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT With reference to FIG. 1 of the drawings, the invention is shown embodied in a portable carrying case for a typewriter. The carrying case is composed of a thermoplastic material such as polyethylene and is formed by a blow-molding process.

The carrying case includes a base 10 and a cover 12. The cover is'connected to the base by a hinge 14 which can be formed integrally with the cover and base during the blow-molding process or can be a separate hinge which is attached to the cover and base after they are formed. The opening extent of the cover is limited by a strap 16 composed of a fabric which permits it to collapse when the case is closed. The strap has clamps 18 on each end that hook into holes 20 in the base and cover. One orboth of the clamps can be removed from the holes in the base and cover if it is desired to open the carrying case flat. Meshing walls22 and 24are formed around the edges of the base and the cover to prevent dust from entering the carrying case when it is closed.

In order to latch and lock the carrying case, and to make it portable, a bar 26 is connected to the front edge of the cover. The bar contains latches 38 near each end that mate with corresponding hooks 30 connected to the front edge of the base of the carrying case. The latches can be locked and can be of any standard construction. To make the carrying case easily portable, a handle 32 is connected to the top of the bar. The handle is connected to the top of the bar by rings 34 at each end which are pivotally connected to lugs 36 on the top of the bar. The rings slide in slots 38 in the handle so that the handle can lie flat against the top of the carrying case when not in use. The flat-lying handle makes the carrying case more compact in a shipping container.

The typewriter used with the invention, and shown schematically in FIG. 2, is a standard Smith-Corona Electra 220 electric typewriter. The typewriter includes a casing 40, a keyboard 42 at the front of the casing, keys 44 on the keyboard including a tabulator clear key 46, a top deck 48 on the top of the casing, a typebar segment 50 in the casing mounted on a plate 52, shift ball races 54 at the sides of the typebar segment plate, a carriage 56 on the rear of the casing, air vents 58 at the rear of the casing to cool the motor, which is not shown, and a power cord 60 to the motor. Also included are various levers to operate the carriage and to control paper inserted into the carriage. The levers include carriage release levers 62 at each end of the carriage, a carriage lock lever 64 at the right end of the carriage, several levers 66 on the top ofthe carriage near the ends, two margin release tabs 68 at the rear of the carriage, and two paper support levers 70 at the rear of the carriage. Several additional parts of the typewriter are shown only in FIG. 3. The additional parts include feet 72 on thebottom of the casing of which only the left feet are shown, a plug 74 on the bottom of the casing where the power cord enters the casing, and a motor cover 76 with air vents 78 on the bottom of the casing.

Returning to FIG. 1, both the base and the cover of the carrying case are of double-walled construction which is an inherent capability of the blow-molding process. Both have outer walls 80 and 82 and inner walls 84 and 86 which can be thinner than the outer walls. The outer and inner walls are integral with each other which is another inherent feature of the blowmolding process. Besides the integral relationships of the outer and inner walls at the lips of the base and cover, the inner walls contact the outer walls at several intermediate locations. In the base, there is a depression in the form of a small circular well 88 formed in the middle of the inner wall and depressions in the form of small circular wells 90 formedin depressions 92 in the inner wall for the front feet of the typewriter. There are also depressions 94 formed in the inner wall for the rear feet of the typewriter. In the cover, there are depressions in the form of two short trenches 96 formed in the middle of the inner wall and depressions in the form of two long trenches 98 formed toward the sides. All of the three wells in the base and the four trenches in the cover have their bottoms in contact with the inner surfaces of the outer walls. The bottoms of the wells and trenches may just rest against the inner surfaces of the outer walls or may be lightly fused to the outer walls. Full welds are not used because they tend to be visible on the outer surfaces of the outer walls as scars. The wells and trenches provide rigidity for the carrying case and maintain the exterior contours of the outer walls which are slightly convex. The spaces between the outer and inner walls are open to the air through the holes 20 for the strap 16 which limits the opening extent of the cover and holes 100 in the base and the cover formed by air injection needles of the blow-molding process. The air injection hole in the base is in the right front corner of the inner wall and the air injection hole in the cover is in the front of the inner wall.

A number of clearance features for the typewriter are formed in the inner walls of the base and cover. In the base, between the depressions 94 for the rear feet of the typewriter, there is a step down to a further depression 102 to provide clearance for circulation of air to the motor through the air vents 78 in the motor cover on the bottom of the typewriter. A .I-shaped depression 104 is formed at the left front end of the depression 102 for the plug 74 where the power cord enters the typewriter. Behind the depression for the motor cover, a setback 106 is formed in the vertical portion of the inner wall to provide clearance for circulation of air to the motor through the air vents 58 in the rear of the typewriter. It should be noted that the typewriter can be operated while in the carrying case. In order to convenientlyremove the typewriter from the carrying case, setbacks 108 are formed in the inner wall of the base at the sides of the typewriter to provide hand clearances so that the typewriter can be easily lifted out of the carrying case. The left setback 108 also serves as a storage compartment for the power cord of the typewriter when the power cord is rolled up.

In the cover, the front portion 110 of the inner wall is contoured to clear the keys and keyboard of the typewriter and the rear vertical portion 112 of the inner wall is set back far enough so that the carriage of the typewriter will clear it. Depressions 114 are formed above the rear vertical portion of the inner wall to clear the paper support levers and the margin release tabs of the typewriter and other depressions 116 are formed in the inner wall to clear the levers on the top of the carriage near the ends. Finally, setbacks 118 are formed in the vertical side portions of the inner wall to clear the ends of the carriage which is set to ride free during shipment by taping the carriage release levers 62 at the ends of the carriage into release positions with tape 120 as shown in FIG. 2, taping the carriage lock lever 64 at the right end of the carriage into an unlocked position with tape 122 which can be an extension of the tape 120, and taping the tabulator clear key 46 down with a small block 124 and tape 126. Also for shipment, the typebar segment 50 is immobilized in an intermediate position with a wire 128 through holes 130 in the side of the typebar segment plate 52 and holes 132 in the shaft ball races 54.

Returning to FIG. 1, in order to position the typewriter in the carrying case and to restrain it against lateral movement, L-shaped steps 134 and 136 are formed to project from the inner wall of the base at the bottom corners of the typewriter. The steps have two lower faces 134f, 134s, 136s, and l36r corresponding to the two intersecting sides of the typewriter at each corner. The faces of the steps act as resilient shock absorbers to position and protect the typewriter. Upper faces of the steps in the form of faces l34ff, 134ss, l36ss, and 136rr of the inner wall above the steps act as secondary shock absorbers should the typewriter override the steps by deforming the steps or by moving over the steps as during an extreme shock caused if the carrying case is dropped. The bottom edges of the typewriter might deform the steps or pass over the top of the steps during an extreme shock by causing other portions of the carrying case to expand or deform temporarily. Faces 134f and 134ff are shown only in FIG. 3. The faces l36rr of the inner wall above the steps at the rear of the typewriter are set back only slightly so that the carriage of the typewriter will still clear the rear vertical portion 112 of the inner wall of the cover if the steps are overridden during an extreme shock.

In order to clamp the typewriter in place in the carrying case between the inner walls of the cover and base, shoulders 138 are formed depending from the inner wall of the cover. The shoulders are contoured to mate with and press against the top deck 48 of the typewriter when the carrying case is closed. The long trenches 98 that contact the outer wall beside the shoulders provide rigidity. Because the keyboard of the typewriter tends to move upward during an extreme shock to the carrying case, feet 140 are formed depending from the inner wall of the cover to nearly contact the front corners of the keyboard. The depending feet resiliently prevent the keyboard from moving upward. To the rear of the depending feet, depressions in the form of deep trenches 142 are formed in the inner wall. The bottoms of the deep trenches nearly contact the inner surface of the outer wall and act as resilient stops for the resilient movement permitted by the depending feet.

A second embodiment of the invention is shown in H6. 4. The second embodiment of the invention is substantially the same as the first embodiment just described except as hereinafter noted.

As in the first embodiment, the carrying case includes a base 144 and a cover 146. Both the base and the cover are of double-walled construction with outer walls 148 and 150 and inner walls 152 and 154. Shown inside the carrying case is a Smith-Corona Coronamatic 2200 electric typewriter. The typewriter has a carriage 156 and a rugged keyboard 158.

As in the first embodiment of the invention, feet 160 are formed depending from the inner wall of the cover to nearly contact the front corners of the keyboard of the typewriter. The depending feet come to within approximately one-tenth of an inch of the keyboard to resiliently prevent the keyboard from moving upward during a shock to the carrying case. Adjacent to the medial sides of the depending feet 160, depressions in the form of trenches 162 are formed in the inner wall. in contrast to the first embodiment, the trenches have 3 further depressions 164 and 166 that are in contact with or lightly fused to the inner surface of the'outer wall 154'. The trenches can be in contact with the outer wall because of the rugged keyboard of the typewriter. The rugged keyboard does not require a space between the bottom of each trench and the outer wall to protect the keyboard as in the first embodiment.

in addition, it has been found that the inner wall 148 of the base does not have to contact the outer wall at a central location in order to provide rigidity and to maintain the exterior contours in the second embodiment. Also. in the second embodiment, faces l68rr of the inner wall above steps 168 at the rear of the typewriter can be set back farther than in the first embodiment because the carriage of the typewriter for the second embodiment will still clear a rear vertical portion 170 of the inner wall of the cover when the rear of the typewriter contacts the faces l68rr of the inner wall above the steps during an extreme shock.

In operation of the first embodiment, for shipment, the carriage release levers 62 and the carriage lock lever 64 are taped into their inoperative positions and the tabulator clear key 46 is taped down so that the carriage can ride freely between the setbacks 118 in the inner wall of the cover for the ends of the carriage as shown in FIG. 2. There is very little if any space between the ends of the carriage and the inner wall. The right margin release tab 68 can be shifted toward the center of the carriage so that the released carriage will not tend to shift too far to the left: and make the typewriter difficult to place in the carrying case. However, it is the setbacks 118 in the inner wall of the cover that limit the lateral movement of the carriage and not the right margin release tab. The only other special precaution that is necessary for shipment is to place the wire 128 in the holes in the typebar segment plate and the holes 132 in the shift ball races to immobilize the typebar segment in an intermediate position. The typewriter can also be placed in a transparent bag to protect it from dust. The carrying case can be packed in a ship ping container having only a small thickness of packing material making the shipping container more compact.

The typewriter is placed in the base of the carrying case with the comers of the typewriter contacting the steps 134 and 136 projecting from the inner wall of the base. The rolled up power cord is stored in the left setback 108 that provides hand clearance for placing the typewriter in the carrying case. With reference to FIG. 3, when the carrying case is closed, the shoulders 138 depending from the inner wall of the cover press against the top deck 48 of the typewriter to resiliently clamp the typewriter between the inner walls of the cover and base. The feet 140, also depending from the inner wall of the cover, nearly contact the front corners of the keyboard to prevent the keyboard from moving upward.

As can be seen from FIG. 3, the typewriter is very firmly clamped in the carrying case and any part of the typewriter that might move is resiliently restrained in order to absorb shock. The shoulders 138 depending from the inner wall of the cover resiliently clamp the typewriter between the inner walls of the cover and base. The faces l34f, 134s, 136s, and l36r of the steps projecting from the inner wall of the base position the typewriter in the carrying case and absorb any shock to the carrying case, and the feet depending from the inner wall of the cover prevent the keyboard of the typewriter from moving upward. The setbacks 118 in the inner wall of the cover at the ends of the carriage protect the freely riding carriage from damage.

However, the typewriter is a relatively heavy machine and during an extreme shock as might occur if the carrying case is dropped, the corners of the typewriter can override thesteps 134 and 136 projecting from the inner wall of the base by deforming the steps or by causing other portions of the carrying case to expand or deform temporarily. That iswhen the faces 134ff, 134m, 136m, and l36rr of the inner wall above the steps come into action to act as a backup for the steps in absorbing the shock. As mentioned previously, the faces 136rr of the rear inner wall above the steps at the rear of the typewriter are only set back slightly so that the carriage of the typewriter will still clear the rear vertical portion 112 of the inner wall of the cover when the rear of the typewriter contacts the faces l36rr of the rear inner wall above the steps. The deep trenches 142 in the inner wall of the cover to the rear of the depending feet 140 also come into action during an extreme shock to limit the resilient upward movement of the keyboard permitted by the depending feet. During an extreme shock, the bottom of the deep trenches 142, which nearly contact the inner surface of the outer wall, actually do come in contact with the outer wall. The outer wall acts as a secondary shock absorber to limit the resilient movement of the depending feet 140 and thus absorb shock which could harm the keyboard of the typewriter. The small circular wells 88 and 90 in the inner wall of the base and the trenches 96 and 98 in the inner wall of the cover that contact the inner surfaces of the outer walls provide rigidity for the carrying case and maintain the exterior contours of the carrying case which are slightly convex.

The operation of the second embodiment of the invention, as shown in FIG. 4, is substantially the same as the first embodiment just described except that in the second embodiment the trenches 162 beside the depending feet 160 can contact the outer wall 154 because of the rugged keyboard of the typewriter. Also, as previously described, it has been found that the inner wall 148 of the base does not have to contact the outer wall at a central location in order to provide rigidity and to maintain the exterior contours in the second embodiment. In addition, in the second embodiment, the faces l68rr of the inner wall above the steps 168 at the rear of the typewriter can be set back farther than in the first embodiment because the carriage of the type writer for the second embodiment will still clear the vertical portion 170 of the inner wall of the cover when the rear of the typewriter contacts the faces l68rr of the inner wall above the steps during an extreme shock.

Carrying cases embodying the invention have been subjected to all kinds of shocks while containing complex and delicately adjusted typewriters such as the Smith-Corona Electra 220. For example, a carrying case embodying the first embodiment of the invention and a prior steel carrying case, each containing Electra 220 typewriters, were frozen to minus F. for 24 hours. The carrying cases containing the typewriters were then lifted to heights of inches and dropped on a concrete floor. The typewriter in the steel carrying case was damaged while the typewriter in the carrying case embodying the invention was completely unharmed. The carrying case embodying the invention was unharmed as well.

Carrying cases embodying the invention and containing typewriters have been subjected to every condition that might reasonably be encountered during shipment, storage, and consumer use such as vibration, dropping, compression, and extreme temperatures from minus 20 to plus 160 F. Both the typewriters and the carrying cases embodyingthe invention have survived completely unharmed while prior, often more costly, carrying cases have permitted damage to the typewriters and sometimes to their carrying cases as well. In addition,

since the carrying case embodying the invention is composed of polyethylene, it is very resistant to corrosion. Thus, a relatively inexpensive typewriter carrying case is provided that will protect a typewriter and the carrying case against damage during shipment, storage, and consumer use without any packing material or holding fixtures inside the carrying case.

Although the invention has been described in its preferred form with a certain degree of particularity, it is understood that the present disclosure of the preferred form has been made by way of example and that numerous changes in the details of construction and the combination and arrangement of parts can be resorted to without parting from the spirit and the scope of the invention.

Having thus set forth the nature of the invention, what is claimed is:

1. An improved thermoplastic carrying case for a typewriter having four bottom corners and a top deck, the thermoplastic carrying case having a base with an inner wall and an outer wall, a cover with an inner wall and an outer wall, a hinge between the base and the cover, means for latching the cover to the base, and a handle, wherein the improvement comprises:

a. four L-shaped steps integral with and projecting from the inner wall of the base, the four L-shaped steps having lower faces for mating with the four bottom comers of the typewriter when the typewriter is in the thermoplastic carrying case to resiliently restrain the typewriter against lateral movement if the lower faces should be overridden, and

b. at least one shoulder integral with and depending from the inner wall of the cover for pressing against the top deck of the typewriter when the typewriter is in the thermoplastic carrying case and the cover is closed to resiliently clamp the typewriter between the inner wall of the cover and the inner wall of the base.

2. The thermoplastic carrying cae of claim 1, the

typewriter having a keyboard with two front corners, the thermoplastic carrying case further comprising:

c. two feet integral with and depending from the inner wall of the cover for opposing the two front comersof the keyboard of the typewriter when the typewriter is in the thermoplastic carrying case and the cover is closed to resiliently restrain movement of the keyboard toward the cover.

3. The thermoplastic carrying case of claim 2, further comprising:

d. first depressions formed in the inner wall of the cover adjacent to the feet and nearly contacting the outer wall of the cover to resiliently stop movement of the keyboard toward the cover when the typewriter is in the thermoplastic carrying case and the cover is closed by contacting the outer wall of the cover.

4. The thermoplastic carrying case of claim 3, in which the first depressions normally contact the outer wall of the cover.

5. The thermoplastic carrying case of claim 3, further comprising:

e. a second depression formed in the inner wall of the cover adjacent to each shoulder and contacting the outer wall of the cover to increase rigidity of the thermoplastic carrying case.

6. The thermoplastic carrying case of claim 5, further comprising:

faces of the L-shaped steps at the rear of the thermoplastic carrying case are set back less than the other upper faces of the L-shaped steps so that the carriage of the typewriter will clear the inner wall of the cover when the cover is closed and the typewriter comes into contact with the upper faces of the L-shaped steps at the rear of the thermoplastic carrying case.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,822,083 Dated July 2, 1974 Inventor(s) 1 Aaron Zeamer It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent ,and that said Letters Patent arehereby corrected as shown below:

In thespeoification:

Column 3, line 6, "38" should read -28-.

Column 4, line 59, "shaft" should read --shift--.

In the claims:

Column 8, line3l, after "ment" insert and upper faces to resiliently restrain the typewriter against lateral movement-.

Signed and sealed this 19th day of November 197A.

(SEAL) Attest:

MCCOY M. GZIBSON 'JR. C. MARSHALL DANN Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents Q PC4050 (10459) USCOMM-DC 60376-F'69 i .5. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 7 I". 0"35'35,

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5074413 *Jun 26, 1990Dec 24, 1991Canon Kabushiki KaishaCarrying case
US5719612 *Feb 26, 1996Feb 17, 1998Canon Kabushiki KaishaInformation processing apparatus
US7578959Jan 18, 2008Aug 25, 2009Custom-Pak, Inc.Method and apparatus for creating a blow molded case
WO1996031140A1 *Mar 30, 1996Oct 10, 1996Dieter MorszeckSuitcase
Classifications
U.S. Classification312/208.4, 312/244
International ClassificationB41J29/13, A45C5/03, B41J29/12
Cooperative ClassificationA45C5/03, B41J29/13
European ClassificationB41J29/13, A45C5/03
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 20, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: SMITH CORONA CORPORATION, 65 LOCUST AVENUE, NEW CA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:SCM CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004810/0544
Effective date: 19870804