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Publication numberUS3822312 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 2, 1974
Filing dateOct 26, 1972
Priority dateNov 2, 1971
Also published asDE2252669A1
Publication numberUS 3822312 A, US 3822312A, US-A-3822312, US3822312 A, US3822312A
InventorsT Hara, M Katsumi, O Kojima, T Sato
Original AssigneeKao Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Creamy rinsing agent composition
US 3822312 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Office US. Cl. 252--527 4 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An aqueous creamy rinsing agent composition for wig and hair comprising as essential components (I) 1-7% of a quaternary ammonium salt having two long-chain alkyl groups having 16 to 22 carbon atoms; (II) 0.1- of an antistatic agent expressed by the following formula wherein R stands for an alkyl group having 16 to 22 carbon atoms, R and R designate independently an alkyl group having 1 to 3 carbon atoms, and m is a number of from 1 to 4: (III) 05-10% of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of alcohols having up to 3 carbon atoms, glycols having up to 3 carbon atoms, glycerol, sorbitol, non-ionic surfactants containing no ethylene oxide units in the molecule or containing up to moles of ethylene oxide units in the molecule, polyalkylene oxide compounds having a molecular weight of greater than 4000, and lower alkyl esters of higher fatty acids; and (IV) ODS-1% of an inorganic or organic salt having electrolytic property.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the invention This invention relates to a creamy rinsing agent composition having an excellent effect for finishing wigs made from synthetic fibers or human hairs, or hairs. The creamy rinsing agent composition of this invention exhibits a very excellent finishing effect particularly when it is used for finishing treatment of wigs made from synthetic fibers.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART Recent development and propagation of wigs composed of synthetic fibers and human hairs are conspicuous. These wigs, like ordinary hairs, need to be subjected to such treatments as washing and finishing during the manufacture or during everyday usage by customers. However, although wigs are composed of materials similar to materials of clothes and the like, it is not preferred to treat them by dipping them in an aqueous solution of a chemical because wigs have a special form and undesired deformation is easily caused to occur. In other words, conventional rinsing agents and fiber-treating agents are not suitable for the treatment of wigs, because in principle they are used in the form of an aqueous solution into which a material to be treated is dipped. Mainly for the above reason, in the treatment of wigs, a method comprising applying a rinsing agent directly to a wig, namely a direct rinse method, is preferred.

Properties necessary or preferable for rising agents for wigs are as follows:

(1) The direct rinse can be easily applied to a wig.

(2) An antistatic property can be imparted to a wig. Wigs made from synthetic fibers are, in particular, readily statically charged. When the moisture content in air is lowered in winter or the like, or when a wig is treated with a comb or brush, violent static electrification is frequently caused to occur on a wig. When fibers of the wig 3,822,312 Patented July 2, 1974 is statically charged, they are entangled or bristled, resulting in a great damage on the wig. Particularly, it is a great defect of a wig of synthetic fibers that it is readily statically charged in the winter season when the wig is used more frequently.

(3) Too high a surface gloss (luster) is not imparted to wig fibers. Cosmetics commercially available as hair creams have a hair rinsing effect to some extent, but since most of them comprise an aliphatic compound and a mineral oil as base materials, when wigs are treated with such hair creams, a high surface gloss is given throughout the wigs to impart to a wig an undesirable heavy feeling and unnatural impression. Moreover, such hair creams fail to impart on wig fibers various effects which can be attained by the creamy rinsing agent of this invention.

(4) Wigs can be combed smoothly. In other words, it is desired that a good smoothness can be imparted to wig fibers.

In order for a rinsing agent to have the above property (1), it is desired that the rinsing agent is in the form of a stable emulsion having a relatively high viscosity. In this invention, the rinsing agent having such property is called creamy rinsing agent for convenience. It is also desired that the creamy rinsing agent to be used for treatment of wigs has the above properties (2), (3) and (4). Of course, it is naturally required that the creamy rinsing agent should give a suitable softness to wig fibers and decrease unnatural feeling in wigs.

Furthermore, the following matters should be taken into consideration in order that the actual use of a creamy rinsing agent can be facilitated:

(a) The rinsing agent is stable at a relatively high viscosity.

(b) The viscosity of the creamy rinsing agent at a temperature approximating body temperature is relatively low, and it is handled with ease.

(c) In order to make a dipping treatment easy for broader application, it can be dispersed easily in water.

((1) Even when the creamy rinsing agent is applied only to a part of a wig, an undesired phenomenon called flaking, namely a phenomenon that a white powdery substance appears on the surface of the fibre, is not caused to occur.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION We have made extensive research works with a view to developing a rinsing agent composition meeting all of the above-mentioned complicated and delicate requirements, and We have now arrived at this invention.

In accordance with this invention, there is provided an aqueous creamy rinsing agent composition for wig and hair which comprises the following four ingredients (I) to (IV):

(I) 17% of a quaternary ammonium salt having two long-chain alkyl groups having 16 to 22 carbon atoms;

(II) 0.l5% of an antistatic agent expressed by the following formula wherein R stands for an alkyl group having 16 to 22 carbon atoms, R and R designate independently an alkyl group having 1 to 3 carbon atoms, and m is a number of from 1 to 4;

(III) 0.540% of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of alcohols having up to 3 carbon atoms, glycols having up to 3 carbon atoms, glycerol, sorbitol, non-ionic surfactants containing no ethylene oxide units in the molecule or containing up to 10 moles of ethylene oxide uni-ts in the molecule, polyalkylene oxide compounds having molecular weighths of greater than 4000, and lower alkyl esters of higher fatty acids; and

(IV) 0.05-1% of an inorganic or organic salt having electrolytic property.

The balance is water.

Throughout the instant specification and claims, each percent value is on the weight basis.

Preferred examples of the above indispensable ingredients of the creamy rinsing agent composition of this invention will now be illustrated.

As the quaternary ammonium salt (I) there may be exemplified distearyl dimethyl ammonium chloride, dipalmityl dimethyl ammonium chloride, di-hydrogenatedbeef-tallow-alkyl dimethyl ammonium chloride, dibehenyl dihydroxyethyl ammonium chloride, dipalmityl propylethyl ammonium ethylsulfate, etc.

As the antistatic agent (II) there may be mentioned stearyl dimethyl betaine [C H -(CH N+CH COO-] (structural formulae will be omitted below), cetyl dimethyl propiobetaine, cetyl dimethyl betaine, behenyl dipropyl betaine, behenyl dimethyl betaine, behenyl dimethyl propiobetaine, palmityl dimethyl betaine, etc.

As the compound (III), there may be exemplified methanol, ethanol, propanol, ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, glycerol, sorbitol, compounds expressed by the formula RO (C H O) H in which m is to 10, and R is an alkyl or alkenyl group of 12-22 carbon atoms, a lanolin alcohol alkyl residue or an alkylphenyl group having an alkyl group of 8 to 12 carbon atoms, monoglycerides of higher fatty acids, sorbitan esters of higher fatty acids, adducts of 1 to moles of ethylene oxides to sorbitan esters of higher fatty acids, OH(CH CH O) OH,

C -C lower alkyl esters of higher fatty acids having 14 to 22 carbon atoms, etc.

As the inorganic and organic salts (IV having an electrolytic property, there may be mentioned salts of alkali metals, ammonium, halogens, sulfuric acid, boric acid, phosphoric acid and organic acids having up to 6 carbon atoms.

In this invention, each of the above four ingredients is an essential and indispensable component, and the creamy rinsing agent of this invention should comprise all of the above four ingredients. More specifically, a mere blend of the quaternary ammonium salt (I) and the antistatic agent (II) cannot exhibit a stable creamy state, and a blend of any three ingredients of the above four indispensable ingredients cannot possess a stable creamy state or a good combination of properties intended in this invention. In short, only the rinsing agent composition comprising the four indispensable ingredients specified in this invention can possess a stable cream state and a good combination of intended properties.

The creamy rinsing agent composition according to this invention is especially suitable for the treatment of wigs made from synthetic fibers which are readily statically charged, but it may of course be effectively used for the finishing treatment of wigs made from human hairs or human hairs per se. Furthermore, the creamy rinsing agent composition of this invention may further comprise small amounts of known additives such as perfumes, fungicides, pigments, etc.

This invention will now be illustrated in detail by reference to examples.

Example 1 Viscosity, antistatic property and other properties required of a rinsing agent were measured with respect to each of the compositions illustrated below. In the following, the compositions tested are shown first, and then the results of the measurement and evaluation in those compositions are shown. In each of compositions, symbols (I) to (IV) are those used throughout the instant specification to clearly indicate the four ingredients.

4 Composition 1 (comparison): Percent (I) Di-hydrogenated-beef-tallow-alkyl dimethyl ammonium chloride 4 Water Balance Composition 2 (comparison): Percent (I) Di-hydrogenated beef-tallow-alkyl ammonium (I) Dibehenyl dihydroxyethyl ammonium bro- 6 mide 6 (II) C H -(CH 'N+CH COO- 3 (IV) Sodium acetate 0.5 Water Balance Composition 7 (comparison): Percent (I) Di-hydrogenated-beef-tallow alkyl dimethyl ammonium chloride 4 C13H37'(CH3)2'N+CH2COO 1 (III) Ethanol 7 Water Balance Composition 8 (comparison): Percent (I) Dibehenyl dihydroxyethyl ammonium bromide 6 m as'( a)2' 2)2 3 (III) Propylene glycol 7 Water Balance Composition 9 (example): Percent (I) Di-hydrogenated-beef-tallow alkyl dimethyl ammonium chloride 4 C18H37'(CH3)2'N+CH2COO (III) Ethanol 7 (IV) Sodium chloride 0.15 Water Balance Composition 10 (example): Percent (I) Dipalmityl propyl ethyl ammonium ethylsulfate 5 C16H33' a)2 2)2 (III) Propylene glycol 3 (IV) Sodium sulfate 0.3 Water Balance Composition 11 (example): Percent (I) Dibehenyl dihydroxyethyl ammonium bromide 4 C22H45' (C3H7)2N+CH2COO 1 (III) Glycerine 10 (IV) Sodium acetate 0.25 Water Balance Composition 12 (example): Percent (I) Di-hydrogenated-beef-tallow alkyl dimethyl ammonium chloride 2 C H '(CH -N CH COO 3 1a 3'z 2 4' )s 4 (IV) Sodium bromide 0.05

Water Balance Composition 13 (example): Percent (I) Dipalmityl propyl ethyl ammonium ethylsulfate 6 C22H45' 2N+CH2COO 1 (III) C H COO(C H O) H 5 (IV) Sodium phosphate 0.2 Water Balance Composition 14 (example): Percent (I) Dibehenyl dihydroxyethyl ammonium bromide 2 C13H37'(CH3)2'N+CH2COO (III) Oleyl monoglyceride 3 (IV) Potassium chloride 0.5 Water Balance Composition 15 (example): Percent (I) Di-hydrogenated-beef-tallow alkyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (II) C H -(CH -N+CH COO- 1.5 (III) Adduct of 4 moles of ethylene oxide to sorbitan monostearate 5 (IV) Sodium lactate 0.7 Water Balance Composition 16 (example): Percent (I; Dipalmityl propyl ethyl ammonium ethylsulate 5 C1BH37(CH3)2N+CH2COO (III) HO(C H O) H 2 (IV) Sodium borate 0.1 Water Balance Composition 17 (example): Percent (I) Dibehenyl dihydroxyethyl ammonium bromide C16H33'(CH3)2'N+(CH2)2C0O '(III) Butyl stearate 2 (IV) Sodium acetate 0.15 Water Balance Composition 18 (example): Percent (I) Di-hydrog'enated-beef-tallow alkyl dimethyl ammonium chloride 4 (II) C18H37(CH3)2N+CH2COO 0.75 (1H) Ethanol 2 (III) Lanolin alcohol 1 (IV) Sodium chloride 0.25 Water Balance Composition 19 (example): Percent (I) Di-hydrogenated-beef-tallow alkyl dimethyl ammonium chloride 3 C H -(CH -N+CH COO 1.5 (III) Glycerine 7 (III) Oleyl monoglyceride 3 (IV) Sodium bromide 0.15 Water Balance Composition 20 (example): Percent (I) Di-hydrogenated-beef-tallow alkyl dimethyl ammonium chloride 4 (II) C H -(CH -N+(CH C0O 1.5 (III) Sorbitol 4 (HI) Butyl stearate 3 (IV) Ammonium acetate 1 Water Balance Methods of Evaluation and Measurement (1) Viscosity: The viscosity was measured with a viscometer of the Brookfield type, the value being expressed in the cps. unit.

(2) Smoothness: Static and dynamic friction coefficients between fibers were measured, and based on these values, the smoothness was evaluated.

The measurement was carried out according to Rtider method. As the fibers, there were used Kanekalon wig fibers (fibers of a copolymer of acrylonitrile and vinyl chloride manufactured by Kanegafuchi Kagaku Kogyo K.K.). The fibers were dipped for 3 minutes in an aqueos solution containing 5% of the rinsing agent composition and then squeezed so that the aqueous solution was contained in an amount of 50% based on the fibers. Then, the fibers were dried and allowed to stand at a temperature of 25 C. under a relative humidity of 45% for 48 hours. The treated fibers were used as test samples. The fiber running velocities adopted in the measurement according to Roder method were 2 cm./min. (static friction) or cm./min. (dynamic friction).

The smoothness was evaluated based on the friction coeificients according to the following standard:

Static Dynamic Evaluation irletion friction grade coefiieient coetficient A 0. 0. 10 B 0. 12-0. 14 0. 10-0. 12 C 0. 14 0. l2

Grade of Antistatic Insulation Property Resistance (ohm) A 1.0 -10 (4) Solubility: 400 ml. of water maintained at 30 C. was placed in a vessel, and 20 g. of the sample (rinsing agent) was thrown into water. The frequency of hand agitation required for dissolving the sample uniformly in water was counted. Since it is diflicult to otbain accurate results in this measurement, the solubility was approximately evaluated by reckoning 5 times of agitation frequency as one unit of the solubility.

(5) State of Rinsing Agent: The state of the rinsing agent composition was evaluated from the appearance.

(6) Flaking: 10 g. of the sample (rinsing agent) was carefully applied by hand to a wig of synthetic fibers (the total weight being 1'50 g.), followed by drying. Formation or appearance of powdery substance on the wig surface was checked by naked eye.

Results In each sample, formation or appearance of powdery substance was not observed.

(7) Surface Gloss (Luster): A wig treated in the same manner as described with respect to the flaking test was evaluated with respect to the surface gloss by employing as a standard sample a wig treated with a commercially available hair cream (incorporated with a mineral oil).

Results No difference was observed between a wig treated with a rinsing agent of the composition 1 and the standard sample, but in wigs treated with rinsing agents of other compositions the surface gloss was reduced as compared with the standard sample.

All-Round Evaluation Test results of each sample are shown in Table 1. Samples of compositions 1 to 8 are defective in any of the smoothness, the antistatic property and the solubility, and they are fatally defective in that the viscosity is low and they are in the solution form, or that when the viscosity is high, they take a jelly-like form. It is impossible to apply such rinsing agents uniformly to wigs by the direct rinse method.

Rinsing agents of compositions 9 to can fully meet all the necessary requirements and have an excellent creamy appearance.

8 (IV) 0.05 to 1% by weight of an electrolytic inorganic or organic salt having a cation selected from the group consisting of alkali metals and ammonium TABLE 1 Viscosity smoothness Solu- Compositrou Antistatic bility State of rinsing agent number C. C. Static Dynamic property (unit) composition 250 B A C 1 Semi-transparent dispersion. 3, 000 B A C 20 Transparent jelly.

70 C B B 1 Transparent solution. 50 C B B 1 Do. 35 A A A 1 Dispersion. 95 A A A 1 Do. 85 A A A 1 Semi-transparent dispersion. 110 A A A 1 Do. 2, 700 A A A 2 Milky white cream. 4, 700 A A A 2 Do. 3, 800 A A A 2 Do. 2, 700 A A A 2 Do. 4, 200 A A A 2 Do. 780 A A A 1 Do. 7, 600 A A A 2 Do. 1, 150 A A B 1 D0. 3,800 A A A 2 Do. 4,600 A A A 2 D0. 4, 950 A A A 1 Do. 9, 800 A A A 2 Do. Control 1 0. 14 0.12 1. 2X10" l Data of control are those obtained by conducting the measurement on untreated fibers.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. An aqueous creamy rinsing agent composition for wigs consisting essentially of (I) 1 to 7% by weight of a quaternary ammonium salt having two long-chain alkyl groups having 16 to 22 carbon atoms and two short chain alkyl or hydroxyalkyl groups having 1 to 3 carbon atoms;

(II) 0.1 to 5% by weight of an antistatic agent of the formula wherein R is alkyl having 16 to 22 carbon atoms, R and R is alkyl having 1 to 3 carbon atoms, and m is a number of from 1 to 4;

(III) 0.5 to 10% by weight of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of methanol; ethanol; propanol; ethylene glycol; propylene glycol; glycerol; sorbitol; a compound of the formula RO(C H O) H in which m is 0 to 10 and R is an alkyl or alkenyl group of 12-22 carbon atoms, lanolin alcohol alkyl radical or alkylphenyl having an alkyl group of 8 to 12 carbon atoms; monoglyccrides of higher fatty acids; sorbitan esters of higher fatty acids; adducts of '1 to 10 moles of ethylene oxide to sorbitan esters of higher fatty acids;

HO 150OH,

C4Hg0 CH2 45H:

and C -C lower alkyl esters of higher fatty acids having 14 to 22 carbon atoms;

an anion selected from the group consisting of halogens, sulfate, borate, phosphate, acetate and lactate;

and

(V) the balance being water.

2. A composition according to claim 1 in which said two short chain alkyl or hydroxy alkyl groups are selected from the group consisting of dimethyl, dihydroxyethyl and propylethyl.

3. A composition according to claim 1, in which said quaternary ammonium salt *(I) is selected from the group consisting of distearyl dimethyl ammonium chloride, dipalmityl dimethyl ammonium chloride, di-hydrogenatedbeef-tallow-alkyl dimethyl ammonium chloride, dibehenyl dihydroxyethyl ammonium chloride and dipalmityl propylethyl ammonium ethylsulfate.

4. A composition according to claim 1, in which said antistatic agent (II) is selected from the group consisting of stearyl dimethyl betaine, cetyl dimethyl propiobetaine, cetyl dimethyl betaine, "behenyl dipropyl betaine, behenyl dimethyl betaine, behenyl dimethyl propiobetaine and palmityl dimethyl betaine.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,697,452 10/1972 Olson et al. 252--545 3,155,591 11/1964 Hilfer 424 3,156,656 11/1964 Libby 424-70 3,533,955 IO/1970 Pader et al. 252-547 OTHER REFERENCES Surfactant as a Conditioning Agent Cream Hair Rinse, American Perfumer, p. 54, 1958.

MAYER WEINBLATI, Primary Examiner E. L. ROLLINS, Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R.

252139, 153, 528, 541, 546, 547, Dig. 13; 42470 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent no, 3 822'312- Dated July 2, 1974 Toshio Sato, Mamoru Katsumi, Inventor(s) Osamu Kojima and Tadao Hara It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Add to the Heading:

' ----Foreign Application Priority Data Nov. '2, 1971 Japan 46-87388 Signdlahd sealed this 19th 'day of November 1974.

(SEAL) Attest:

McCOY M. GIBSON JR. Attesting Officer C. MARSHALL DANN Commissioner of Patents 93 po'wso ($69) 1 uscoMM-oc 60376-P69 v v U.$. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE l9, 0-365'33.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3975313 *Jun 19, 1974Aug 17, 1976Shelmire Jr Jesse BedfordSolid amphoteric skin cleanser
US4096243 *Feb 9, 1976Jun 20, 1978Clairol IncorporatedComposition for lightening hair containing an oxidizing agent and certain quaternary amines
US4102825 *Sep 9, 1977Jul 25, 1978Kao Soap Co., Ltd.Liquid light-duty detergent composition
US4119399 *May 11, 1977Oct 10, 1978Clairol IncorporatedComposition for coloring hair containing an oxidizing agent and certain quaternary amines
US4144326 *Feb 22, 1977Mar 13, 1979American Cyanamid CompanyOil free, water-soluble, clear creme rinse for hair
US4148762 *Apr 5, 1977Apr 10, 1979Henkel Kommanditgesellschaft Auf AktienShampoo and bathing compositions
US4149551 *Mar 28, 1977Apr 17, 1979The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of conditioning hair using a flexible substrate
US4165369 *Mar 30, 1978Aug 21, 1979Kao Soap Co., Ltd.Liquid hair rinse containing quaternary ammonium salts and a synthetic secondary alcohol
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US4220166 *Jun 5, 1978Sep 2, 1980Helene Curtis Industries, Inc.Method of restoring normal moisture level to hair with severe moisture deficiency
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Classifications
U.S. Classification510/513, 424/70.31, 510/526, 510/524, 424/70.28, 424/70.19, 510/525
International ClassificationA61K8/40, C11D1/94, C11D1/62, A61K8/00, A61K8/37, A61K8/92, A61K8/39, A61Q5/12, C11D3/20, C11D1/90, A61K8/86, A61K8/34
Cooperative ClassificationC11D3/2065, A61K8/44, A61Q5/02, C11D1/74, C11D1/62, C11D3/201, A61K2800/596, A61K8/345, C11D1/667, A61K8/34, A61K8/416, C11D1/94, C11D3/2041, A61K8/19, C11D1/72, C11D1/90
European ClassificationC11D3/20B3, C11D3/20B2, C11D1/74, C11D3/20B1A, C11D1/66E, C11D1/72, C11D1/94, A61K8/19, A61K8/34D, A61K8/41L, A61K8/86, A61K8/34, A61Q5/02, A61K8/44