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Publication numberUS3822385 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 2, 1974
Filing dateSep 14, 1973
Priority dateSep 14, 1973
Publication numberUS 3822385 A, US 3822385A, US-A-3822385, US3822385 A, US3822385A
InventorsKayalioglu I
Original AssigneeBell Northern Research Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Noise pulse rejection circuit
US 3822385 A
Abstract
A circuit for rejecting pulses having a width less than a predetermined amount uses a single amplifier. The pulses are fed to the amplifier through a resistance-capacitance charging circuit. The resistance element is shunted by a pair of switched low impedance circuits which are controlled by the output signal of the amplifier to selectively permit current flow through only one of the circuits.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

lJnited States Patent Kayalioglu July 2, 1974 3,219,838 1l/1965 Hurst 307/234 3,387,221 6/1968 Arberman et a1 3,693,101 9/1972 Trimble 307/234 Primary Examiner-Stanley D. Miller, Jr. Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Frank Turpin 5 7] ABSTRACT A circuit for rejecting pulses having a width less than a predetermined amount uses a single amplifier. The pulses are fed to the amplifier through a resistancecapacitance charging circuit. The resistance element is shunted by a pair of switched low impedance circuits which are controlled by the output signal of the amplifier to selectively permit current flow through only one of the circuits.

7 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures NOISE PULSE REJECTION CIRCUIT [75] Inventor: lnanc Kayalioglu, Ottawa, Ontario,

Canada [73] Assignee: Bell-Northern Research Ltd.,

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada [22] Filed: Sept. 14, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 397,406

[52] US. Cl. 307/234, 328/111 [51] Int. Cl. H03k 5/20 [58] Field of Search 307/234; 328/111, 112

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,666,135 1/1954 Barton 328/111 3,132,263 5/1964 Maass 328/112 PATENFEQJUL 2 i914 Fig.

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NOISE PULSE aEIEcTIoN CIRCUIT This invention relates to a pulse circuit and more particularly to a circuit fo rejecting pulses having a width less than a predetermined amount.

A perpetual problem in data transmission is the occurence of extraneous or noise pulses on the transmission line. These unwanted pulses tend to cause false triggering and erroneous reception at the receiver end of a transmission path. It is therefore desirable that these unwanted pulses be recognized and their effect on the data receiver be cancelled.

This problem was recognized some time ago and a number of circuits have been designed to solve the problem. The most common prior art circuit comprises three discrete stages connected in series. Each stage comprises a unidirectional current device, a charging circuit and an operational amplifier. The first stage cancels the effect of positive going noise pulses and the second stage cancels the effect of negative going noise pulses. However, the cancelling process of the first two stages also results in time distortion of the wanted pulses. Therefore, a third stage is needed to readjust the pulses to their original width.

I have invented a circuit which rejects pulses having a width less than a predetermined amount and which exhibits marked advantages over the prior art circuits. For example, my circuit does not vary the width of the pulses passing through it, thereby obviating the need for a circuit section to compensate therefor. In addition, the total delay of a pulse passing through the circuit is equal to the maximum width of the pulses to be rejected. Also, since the charging circuit portion of the circuit of the invention is common to the rejection of both positive and negative pulses, only one closetolerance component is needed. In view of its simplicity, the circuit of the invention is therefore more economical to manufacture than the prior art circuits.

In accordance with the invention, there is provided an input terminal for connection to a source of pulses. An operational amplifier has its inverting input connected to the input terminal through a resistance element. The inverting input is also connected, through a capacitance element, to the-non-inverting input of the amplifier and to an output port for connection to a source of reference potential. A pair of oppositely poled unidirectional current devices are connected in parallel and across the resistance element. A pair of switch means are each connected in series with a respective one of the unidirectional devices and are responsive to the signal appearing on the output terminal of the amplifier for selectively permitting current flow through the devices.

An example embodiment of the invention will now be described in conjunction with the drawings in which:

FIG. la is a pulse rejection circuit in accordance with the invention;

FIG. lb is a diagram illustrating the waveforms at different points in the circuit of FIG. la;

FIGS. 20, 2b,2c and 2d are circuits illustrating various alternate embodiments of a portion of the circuit of FIG. la.

FIG. la shows an operational amplifier connected as an inverting amplifier and having an inverting input 11, a non-inverting input 12 and an output terminal 13. The inverting input 11 is connected to an input tenninal 14 through a resistance element 15 and to the grounded non-inverting input 12 through a capacitance element 16. The non-inverting input 12 is shown connected to ground; however, it should be understood that ground is in reality only a reference potential which may be a positive or negative value. A diode 117 has its anode connected to the input terminal 14 and its cathode connected to the emitter electrode of a transistor 18 whose collector electrode is connected to the inverting input 11 of amplifier 10. Similarly, a diode l9 has its cathode connected to the input terminal 14 and its anode connected to the emitter electrode of a transistor 20 whose collector electrode is connected to the inverting input 11 of amplifier 10. The base electrodes of transistors 18 and 20 are connected through respective base biasing resistors 21 and 22 to the output terminal 13. It should be noted that diodes I7 and 19 are poled oppositely and in the same direction as the emit- I ter-base junction of their respective transistor. Hence,

it is necessary that the transistors 18 and 20 be of opposite type. In the embodiment illustrated, transistor 18 is of the PNP type and transistor 20 is of the NPN type.

The operation of the circuit of FIG. la will now be described using the waveforms illustrated in FIG. lb. Waveforms A, B and C illustrate the signals appearing at correspondingly identified points in the circuit. Waveform A shows the signal which may be applied to input terminal 14. Waveform B shows the signal appearing at the input 11 of amplifier 10 whereas waveform C shows the signal appearing at the output terminal 13. In the following description, references to positive and negative signals will be with respect to ground since that is the reference potential which is shown connected to the non-inverting input 12 of amplifier 10 in FIG. 1A.

Let us assume that the input signal is positive. Under this condition the output signal of amplifier 10 is negative, thereby biasing transistor 18 into conduction and shunting resistance element 15 with the low impedance series circuit of diode l7 and transistor 18. Also, transistor 20 is biased off.

Let us now assume that the input signal becomes negative as shown in FIG. lb at T1. The diode I7 is now reverse-biased and the capacitor 16 starts to discharge through the resistance element 15. When the voltage at the inverting input 11 of amplifier 10 goes negative, its output signal goes positive, thereby biasing transistor 20 into conduction and shunting the resistance element 15 with the low impedance series circuit of diode l9 and transistor 20. This action is illustrated in waveforms B and C.

When the input signal changes from negative to positive, such as at T2, the reverse procedure takes place. The diode 19 is reverse biased and the resistance element 15 is not shunted by the low impedance series circuit of diode l7 and transistor 18 until the voltage level at the inverting input 11 of amplifier 10 has reached a positive level.

Let us now assume that a noise pulse Pl appears while the input signal is negative. Under this condition, the resistance element 15 is shunted with the low impedance series circuit of diode l9 and transistor 20. When the positive going noise pulse Pl appears, the diode 19 is reverse biased and the capacitor 16 starts to discharge through the resistance element 15. If the time required for the level at the input 11 of amplifier 10 to become positive is longer than the width of the noise pulse, the diode 19 becomes forward biased at the falling edge of the noise pulse and the signal at the output terminal 13 of the amplifier remains positive. Therefore the noise pulse Pl has had no effect on the output signal on terminal 13.

Similarly, if negative going noise pulses such as P2 am. 13 occur while the input signal is positive the signal at the output terminal 13 of amplifier 10 remains negative.

Of course, only pulses having a width less than a predetermined amount are rejected by the circuit. The maximum width of the pulses to be rejected may be varied by varying the values of the components comprising the charging circuit, that is resistance element 15 and capacitance element 16. Since the charging circuit is common to the rejection of negative and positive noise pulses, the transmitted pulses are delayed as in the prior art circuits but their width is not modified. Furthermore, in order to obtain accurate timing, only one of the components of the charging circuit needs to be selected in the manufacture of the circuit. Alternately, adjustable components such as variable resistance may be used. It should also be noted that the total delay of a pulse passing through the circuit is equal to the maximum width of the pulses to be rejected.

FIGS. 20, 2b, 2c and 2d illustrate various embodiments of the resistance element 15 shown in FIG. la. FIGS. 2a and 2b each show the resistance element 15 having a diode 23 connected across a portion thereof. These diodes serve to vary the rise and fall times of the charging circuit. Using these circuits, it is possible to reject negative noise pulses having a width different from that of the positive noise pulses being rejected. The same result may be obtained by varying the reference voltage at the non-inverting input 12 of amplifier l0.

In some cases, it may be desirable to combine the circuits of FIGS. 2a and 2!), such as shown in FIG. 20.

FIG. 2d shows the resistance element 15 of FIG. 1a as being a potentiometer having a pair of oppositely poled diodes 24 connected in parallel therewith. The junction of the diodes is connected to the adjustable terminal of the potentiometer. This embodiment provides for a field adjustment of the charging circuit.

As may be seen from the above description, the invention provides a flexible and easily adjustable circuit which is economical to manufacture.

What is claimed is:

1. A pulse rejection circuit comprising:

an input terminal for connection to a source of pulses;

an operational amplifier having an output terminal,

an inverting input, and a non-inverting input;

a resistance element connected between the input terminal and said inverting input;

a capacitance element having one end connected to said inverting input, and the other end connected 5 to said non-inverting input and to an output port for connection to a source of reference potential;

a pair of oppositely poled unidirectional current devices connected in parallel and across said resistance element;

a pair of switch means, each one connected in series with a respective one of said devices, said switch means being responsive to the signal appearing on said output terminal for selectively permitting current flow through said devices.

2. A circuit as defined in claim 1 wherein said unidirectional current devices are diodes.

3. A circuit as defined in claim 2 wherein said switch means are bipolar transistors.

4. A pulse rejection circuit comprising:

an input terminal for connection to a source of pulses;

an operational amplifier having an output terminal,

an inverting input, and a non-inverting input;

a resistance element connected between the input terminal and said inverting input;

a capacitance element having one end connected to said inverting input, and the other end connected to said non-inverting input and to an output port for connection to a source of reference potential;

5. A circuit as defined in claim 4, further comprising a third diode connected across a first portion of said resistance element.

6. A circuit as defined in claim 5 further comprising a fourth diode connected across a second portion of said resistance element, said third and fourth diodes being poled oppositely.

7. A circuit as defined in claim 4 wherein said resistance element is a potentiometer, and further comprising fifth and sixth diodes connected serially in opposition and across the ends of the potentiometer, the adjustable terminal of the potentiometer being connected to the junction of said diodes.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2666135 *May 28, 1948Jan 12, 1954Rca CorpPulse discriminatory circuit
US3132263 *Dec 20, 1961May 5, 1964Gen Precision IncPulse time selector with minimum delay time
US3219838 *Nov 13, 1961Nov 23, 1965Rca CorpPulse-width discriminator
US3387221 *Feb 9, 1966Jun 4, 1968Navy UsaPulse discriminator with noise suppression
US3693101 *Sep 7, 1971Sep 19, 1972Gen Motors CorpTime delay circuit
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3909730 *Jul 10, 1974Sep 30, 1975Avco CorpPulse width discriminator
US4086538 *Dec 29, 1975Apr 25, 1978Honeywell Inc.Gated pulse generator
US4137504 *Aug 12, 1977Jan 30, 1979Digital Equipment CorporationDigital filter
US4266099 *May 29, 1979May 5, 1981Northern Telecom LimitedPulse rejection and duration correction circuit
US4631683 *Aug 29, 1984Dec 23, 1986General Electric CompanyAcoustic detection of contact between cutting tool and workpiece
US5708375 *Apr 29, 1996Jan 13, 1998Fluke CorporationMinimum pulse width detector for a measurement instrument
US8560588Sep 28, 2006Oct 15, 2013Rockwell Automation Technologies, Inc.Digital pulse reject counter
EP0687065A2 *May 5, 1995Dec 13, 1995Ramtron International CorporationNoise and glitch suppressing filter with feedback
EP0825715A1 *Jul 29, 1997Feb 25, 1998Siemens AktiengesellschaftInput circuit for digital signals
EP1906531A2 *Sep 28, 2007Apr 2, 2008Rockwell Automation Technologies, Inc.Digital pulse reject counter
Classifications
U.S. Classification327/34
International ClassificationG01R29/02, H03K3/00, H03K3/013, G01R29/027, H03K3/0233
Cooperative ClassificationG01R29/0273, H03K3/013, H03K3/02337
European ClassificationG01R29/027C, H03K3/0233F, H03K3/013