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Publication numberUS3822706 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 9, 1974
Filing dateAug 17, 1972
Priority dateAug 17, 1972
Also published asDE2341433A1
Publication numberUS 3822706 A, US 3822706A, US-A-3822706, US3822706 A, US3822706A
InventorsSchneider J, Simone P
Original AssigneeMedi Spec Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Medical light and combating of hyperbilirubinemia
US 3822706 A
Abstract
A medical light especially useful in combating hyperbilirubinemia of neonates. The light comprises a neon bulb mounted in a housing of size and construction such that the light can be placed in an incubator.
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United States Patent 1191 Simone et al.

MEDICAL LIGHT AND COMBATING OF HYPERBHJIRUBINEMIA Inventors: Pasquale Simone; Julius S.

I Schneider, both of Whitestone, N.Y.

Assignee: Medi-Spec Corporation, Whitestone,

Filed: Aug. 17, 1972 Appl. No: 281,360

US. Cl. 128/396, 128/1 B Int. Cl A61n 5/00 Field of Search 128/395, 396, 373, l B,

7 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 9/1927 Wentworth 128/373 X BILIRUBIN LIGHT July 9, 1974 1,900,342 3/1933 Hess 128/1 B 2,286,110 6/1942 Running 128/362 2,676,596 4/1954 R6661 1212/37;

OTHER PUBLICATIONS Cremer et al., The Lancet, May 1958, pp. 1094-1097. a

Primary Examiner-Lawrence W. Trapp Attorney, Agent, or FirmBurgess, Dinklage &

Sprung ABSTRACT A medical light especially useful in combating hyperbilirubinemia of neonates. The light comprises a neon bulb mounted in a housing of size and construction such that the light can be placed in an incubator.

29 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures 12o\ -3ooov. TRANSFORMER VOLTAGE REGULATOR PATENTEDJUL W V 3.822.706

SHEU 1 OF 2 l2OV.-3000V. TRANSFORMER REGULATOR PATENIEU JUL 91924 SHEEI 2 [IF 2 MEDICAL LIGHT AND COMBATING OF I-IYPERBILIRUBINEMIA BACKGROUND Radiation in the visible spectrum range has become recognized as a treatment, both therapeutically and prophylactically, for hyperbilirubinemia. Blue light is generally regarded as the most effective.

Floor lamps outfitted with fluorescent bulbs are commonly used. A housing, containing, e.g., 8 to 10, fluorescent bulbs in planoparallel array, is mounted on a floor stand. The height of the housing can be adjustable. In use the-lamps are disposed with the light housing positioned outside and over an incubator, which is outfitted with a transparent top cover,.for radiation through the incubator cover to the infants body. A filter for light of wave length shorter than that of blue can be provided. Thereby ultra-violet radiation, which is generally considered to be undesirable, can be eliminated.

The mentioned prior art practice is accompanied by several disadvantages.

Light spillage or the proportion of the radiation not striking the infants body is high.

It is necessary to mask the infants head to prevent harmful effects accompanying radiation of that part of the body. In practice, masking is done by wrapping the babys head, including the eyes, in bandages.

Another disadvantage is that the light tends to heat up the incubator.

Further, the energy output of the fluorescent bulbs decreases with use. The decrease in radiation of blue light of wavelength 400 to 480 nm (nanometers)is reported to be as high as 44 percent in 200 hours. Treatment periods are, for example, 48 to 144 hours.

Another disadvantage, when the preferred blue light is used, is that in order to periodically check the color of the'infants skin to determine, e.g., the occurrence of cyanosis, it is necessary to temporarily turn the light off. A development of undesirable coloration of the skin may not be observable unless the nurse turns the light ofi, so that even given a procedure whereby color is to be periodically check, injury may occur inthe event checking is inadvertently omitted.

Also, blue light may cause nausea so that the nursing staff may be bothered by the treatment.

Still another disadvantage is that the floor stand, fluorescent lamps are awkward to use. They are bulky and inconvenient to move about. To regulate intensity of radiation, the height of the light housing is-adjusted, or the bulbs are changed.

Numerous other constructions for medical lights have been proposed. Ruiter, U.S. Pat. No. 1,337,798, discloses a housing outfitted with lights for receiving a part of the trunk of a patient. Riess et al., U.S. Pat. No. 2,300,008, disclose a neon light for placement on parts of the body. Bacon, U.S. Pat. No. 2,003,527 discloses I a light adapted to be moved over the body.

Additionally, Hess, U.S. Pat. No. 1,900,342, discloses an incubator for infants outfitted with a therapeutic light.

None of the mentioned prior art lights are suitable for the purposes which are the concern of the instant application.

1 THE INVENTION The invention provides for treatment of hyperbilirubinemia of neonates unaccompanied by the aforementioned disadvantages of the prior art practices. According to the invention, the infant is treated by directing radiation of a neon light onto the infant for a time sufficient to counteract hyperbilirubinemia. It is particularly contemplated that the infant be in an incubator during the'treatment, with the neon light positioned within the incubator.

The light comprises a housing opened at the bottom and at one end thereof for placement of the housing over the infant with the head without the housing and the trunk covered by the housing. A neon light is mounted within the upper part of the housing for directing of emitted light to the trunk of the infant. The light includes a shield mounted on the end adjacent the infants head, for shielding the infants head from the emitted light.

Preferably, the light emits radiation in the blue por-. tion of the visible spectrum, and filter means are provided for absorption of ultra-violet radiation before transmission of the light to the infant.

The housing can have closed sides, which can be transparent, or, if desired, the inner surface of the sides can be reflecting for inward reflection of radiation to the infant.

The end of the housing opposite the head end can be opened for disposition of the infants legs, at least partially, without the housing. Also, the housing can be of such dimensions that the infants arms can be disposed without the housing.

With reference to the foregoing discussion of disadv vantages of the floor stand, fluorescent lights commonly used for hyperbilirubinemia, the lamp of the instant application provides substantial reduction in lght spillage. Also, masking of the infants head is not necessary as the shield provided with the lamp prevents radiation from striking the infants head. By reason of the character of the neon light, undesirable heating up does not occur. Also, reduction in light intensity with use does not occur to an objectionable extent. To avoid.

EMBODIMENT The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a medical light according to the invention, including a schematic illustration of the power supply for the light; and I FIG. 2 is an end view from the head end, taken along 2 2 in FIG. 1.

According to the invention, the medical light 1 includes a housing 2 composed of a closed top 3, closed sides 11, foot end 4 having an opening'6 for projection therefrom of an infants legs, and head end 5 which is open to permit projection of the infants head from the housing. The opening 8 in the head end 5 is an inverted U-shaped opening formed in a plate 9 which is slidably mounted on the head end 5 by way of guides so that the plate can be manually moved up and down.

The overall size of the medical light, in inches, can be 8 8 8to 12X 12X l2,preferably9 9 9to 11 X ll X 11. A height of 9% inches and a length and width of 10 inches has been found to be particularly well suited. The light is sized so that it can fit within an incubator, i.e., within the incubator with the incubator top cover in place. The lamp is light weight and can be easily moved about by members of the nursing staff. A handle 7, (FIG. 2), is provided for the unit. The light, however, is sufficiently heavy so that it resists movement by the infant.

The top 3 and the upper portion 11a of the housing can be and preferably is opaque so that light is not transmitted therethrough. The lower portion 1 lb of the sides can be transparent or opaque. Also, it can have an inner surface which is reflecting so that radiation is reflected toward the infant. Desirably the lower portion of the sides is amber plastic, e.g., Plexiglas which does not transmit radiation in the range of 400 500 nm, i.e., blue light. The head end and the foot end of the housing can be of the same construction as is mentioned for the sides.

The neon light comprising the tubing 12 and electrode caps 14, rest on support bars 13 in the upper portion of the housing. Air vent holes 18 are provided in the upper portion of the housing to prevent any undesirable heat build up.

The tubing 12 can be 9 mm id, 6 feet in length. The tubing can be Corning 6-1 lead glass, non ultra-violet emitting, filled with a noble gas, e.g., argon, and can be coated with fluorescent lamp phosphor, so that the lamp will preferentially emit blue light, e.g., radiation of wave length in the range of 400 500 nm, preferably in the range of 425 475 nm. The ends of the tubing are connected with power leads from the cable 15, via electrode caps 14.

Preferably, the contents of the tubing are non-toxic, and free of mercury. Desirably, a pure noble gas is used, e.g., pure argon. Then breakage would not contaminate the incubator.

Desirably, means are provided in the upper portion of the housing, below the neon light tubing, for absorption of ultraviolet radiation. Thus, Plexiglas plate 17 is positioned between the upper portion 11a and the lower portion 11b of the sidewalls. The plate can be UVA B plexiglass of Rohn and Hass, Vs inch thick.

The power supply is indicated in P16. 1. A neon light transformer, for transforming 120V supply to 3,000 4,000 output is used. Cable 23, including a voltage regulator 22 is provided for connection to the 120V supply. The power unit includes an on-off switch 25, and an indicator light 24. A safety plug 21, which is a four contact CPI-I No. 49,638 plug, is provided for connecting cable to the power supply. The safety plug insures that the high voltage side of the transformer will be closed, before closing of the low voltage power input side. The output of the neon light can be controlled by the voltage regulator 22, so that a selected degree of radiation can be utilized. The current of the output side of the transformer can be about 30 miliamps.

While the invention has been described with respect to particular embodiments thereof, those embodiments are merely representative and do not represent the boundaries of the invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A medical light suitable for placement in an infant incubator with the incubator top cover in place comprising:

a. a housing open at one end thereof for housing the infant with the trunk within the housing and the head without the housing, outside of said opening,

b. a neon light mounted within the upper part of the housing for directing of emitted light to the trunk of the infant with the housing placed as aforesaid,

c. a shield mounted on said one end of the housing for shielding the infants head from the light emitted from the neon light.

2. Medical light according to claim 1, the medical light emitting radiation in the blue portion of the visible spectrum to the tnunk of the infant.

3. Medical light according to claim 2, and a filter means for absorption of ultra-violet radiation before transmission of the light to the infant.

4. Medical light according to claim 3, said shield comprising a plate having an inverted U-shaped opening providing said open end for the infants head, said plate being slidably mounted on the housing for up and down movement.

5. Medical light according to claim 1, and a filter means for absorption of ultra-violet radiation before transmission of the light to the infant.

6. Medical light according to claim '1, having closed sides, the inner surface of the sides being reflecting for inward reflection of radiation to the infant.

7. Medical light according to claim 1, the other end of the housing being open for disposition of the infants legs at least partially without the housing.

8. Medical light according to claim 7, the housing having closed sides, the inner surface of the sides being reflecting for inward reflection of radiation to the infant, the light emitting radiation in the blue portion of the visible spectrum, and a filter means for absorption of ultra-violet radiation before transmission of the light to the infant.

9. Medical light according to claim 8, said shield comprising a plate having an inverted U-shaped opening providing said open end for the infants head, said plate being slidably mounted on the housing for up and down movement.

10. Medical light according to claim 9, and an electrical transformer having the high voltage side thereof connected to the neon light, and a voltage regulator connected to the transformer for controlling the intensity of the light.

11. Medical light according to claim 1, having closed sides, the lower portion of the sides being formed of amber plastic which does not transmit blue light.

12. Medical light according to claim 11, the medical light preferentially emitting blue light to the trunk of the infant.

13. Medical light according to claim 12, the blue light being radiation of wave length in the range of 400-500 nm.

14. Medical light according to claim 3, having closed sides, the lower portion of the sides being formed of amber plastic which does not transmit blue light.

15. Medical light according to claim 14, and a neon light transformer connected to the medical light by an extension cord.

16. Medical light according to claim 15, the overall size of the light being 8 X 8 X 8 to 12 X 12 X 12, the neon light comprising tubing filled with a noble gas and coated with fluorescent lamp phosphor.

17. Medical light according to claim 16, the phosphor preferentially emitting blue light.

18. Medical light according to claim 17, the blue light being radiation of wavelength in the range of 400*500 19. Medical light according to claim 1, and a neon light transformer connected to the medical light by an extension cord.

20. Medical light according to claim 3, the overall size of the light being 8 X 8 X 8 to 12 X12 X12.

21. Medical light according to claim 3, the neon light comprising tubing filled with a noble gas and coated with fluorescent lamp phosphor.

22. Method of combating hyperbilirubinemia of neonates which comprises directing radiation of a medical light onto the infant in an incubator for a time sufficient to counteract hyperbilirubinemia, the medical light being disposd within the incubator with the incubator top cover in place, the medical light comprising:

a. a housing open at one end thereof housing the infant with the trunk within the housing and the head without the housing outside of said opening,

b. a neon light mountedwithin the upper part of the housing directing emitted light to the trunk of the infant with the housing placed as aforesaid,

c. a shield mounted on said one end of the housing shielding the infants head from the light emitted from the neon light.

23. Method according to claim 22, the medical light emitting radiation in the blue portion of the visible spectrum to the trunk of the infant for said combating of hyperbilirubinemia.

24. Medical light according to claim 1, the medical light preferentially emitting blue light to the trunk of the infant.

25. Medical light according to claim 24, the blue light being radiation of wavelength in the range of 400-500 26. Medical light according to claim 3, the medical light preferentially emitting blue light to the trunk of the infant.

27. Medical light according to claim 26, the blue light being radiation of wavelength in the range of 400-500 28. Medical light according to claim 21, the phosphor preferentially emitting blue light 29. Medical light according to claim 28, the blue light being radiation of wavelength in the range of 400-500

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1643399 *Jul 6, 1925Sep 27, 1927 Therapeutic apparatus
US1900342 *Aug 3, 1929Mar 7, 1933Hess Julius HInfant incubator
US2286110 *Jan 18, 1940Jun 9, 1942William RunningDiathermy apparatus
US2676596 *Apr 19, 1950Apr 27, 1954Rouat RogerCabinet for applying light or heat baths
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Cremer et al., The Lancet, May 1958, pp. 1094 1097.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4444190 *Nov 9, 1981Apr 24, 1984Mutzhas Maximilian FDevice for the phototherapeutic treatment of hyperbilirubinemia
US4873446 *Jul 6, 1988Oct 10, 1989Albert KreitmairDevice for irradiating denture parts
US4911160 *Apr 30, 1987Mar 27, 1990Meditec Reinhardt Thyzel GmbhApparatus for laser surgery on a patient lying on an operating table
US5792214 *Jan 31, 1995Aug 11, 1998Medela, Inc.Apparatus and method for treating neonatal hyperbilirubinemia
US6253380Jan 15, 1998Jul 3, 2001Medela Holding AgRestraining garment
US6290713Aug 24, 1999Sep 18, 2001Thomas A. RussellFlexible illuminators for phototherapy
US6402681Mar 7, 2000Jun 11, 2002Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Phototherapy apparatus
US6413205 *Sep 15, 2000Jul 2, 2002Harris County Hospital DistrictInfant warmer with light shield
US7190109Jan 13, 2004Mar 13, 2007Dusa Pharmaceuticals, Inc.Illuminator for photodynamic therapy
US7723910Mar 9, 2007May 25, 2010Dusa Pharmaceuticals, Inc.Method of photodynamically diagnosing or treating a contoured surface
US8030836Nov 19, 2009Oct 4, 2011Dusa Pharmaceuticals, Inc.Illuminator for photodynamic therapy
US8216289Dec 16, 2010Jul 10, 2012Dusa Pharmaceuticals, Inc.Illuminator for photodynamic therapy
US8758418May 31, 2012Jun 24, 2014Dusa Pharmaceuticals, Inc.Illuminator for photodynamic therapy
US20040143308 *Jan 13, 2004Jul 22, 2004Dusa Pharmaceuticals, Inc.Illuminator for photodynamic therapy
US20050119713 *Dec 30, 2004Jun 2, 2005Whitehurst Todd K.Methods for implanting a spinal cord stimulator
US20070156207 *Jan 4, 2006Jul 5, 2007Sridhar KothandaramanExpanding single channel stimulator capability on multi-area stimulation programs
US20070249716 *Mar 9, 2007Oct 25, 2007Dusa Pharmaceuticals, Inc.Illuminator for photodynamic therapy
US20090069873 *Aug 27, 2008Mar 12, 2009Vreman Hendrik JTransparent film for a phototherapy device
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EP1566200A1 *Apr 26, 1999Aug 24, 2005Dusa Pharmaceuticals, Inc.Illuminator for photodynamic therapy
Classifications
U.S. Classification607/91, 600/22
International ClassificationA61N5/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61N5/0621
European ClassificationA61N5/06C9