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Publication numberUS3822876 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 9, 1974
Filing dateMay 4, 1973
Priority dateMay 4, 1973
Publication numberUS 3822876 A, US 3822876A, US-A-3822876, US3822876 A, US3822876A
InventorsFrain J
Original AssigneeFrain J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process of making ticket packets with the tickets of each packet having consecutive and constant numbering thereon
US 3822876 A
Abstract
Process of making ticket packets wherein the tickets of each packet have consecutive plate numbers and a constant serial number thereon, and wherein the tickets of other packets each respectively have a different serial number with the same progression of plate numbers for the tickets of each packet. A plurality of sheets are printed, each with a number of tickets thereon identified by a different plate number printed successively in series after which sheets of one series are collated with sheets of successive series to form stacks. The tickets on the sheets of each stack are printed with a serial number by perforating said number through the stack. The sheets of each stack are then fastened together along rows of the tickets, after which the stacks are cut into ticket packets. Tear lines may also be provided for the tickets of each packet.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Frain PROCESS OF MAKING TICKET PACKETS WITH THE TICKETS OF EACH PACKET HAVING CONSECUTIVE AND CONSTANT NUMBERING THEREON [76] Inventor: John J. Frain, P.O. Box 94,

Rockaway Beach, NY. U694 [22] Filed: May 4, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 357,377

[1 3,822,876 July 9,1974

Primary ExaminerLawrence Charles Attorney, Agent, or F irm-Watson, Cole, Grindle & Watson 57 ABSTRACT Process of making ticket packets wherein the tickets of each packet have consecutive plate numbers and a constant serial number thereon, and wherein the tickets of other packets each respectively have a different serial number with the same progression of plate numbers for the tickets of each packet. A plurality of CCll. 270/15 Sheets are printed, each with a number of tickets [58] Fie'ld I1 1245 thereon identified by a different plate number printed successively in series after which sheets of one series are collated with sheets of successive series to form stacks. The tickets on the sheets of each stack are [56] References cued printed with a serial number by perforating said num- UNITED STATES PATENTS her through the stack. The sheets of each stack are 1,503,375 7/1924 Pendergast 101 /426 then fa tened together along rows of the tickets, after 1,586,915 6/1926 Pendergast 270/ 1 which the stacks are cut into ticket packets. Tear lines :2??? may also be provided for the tickets of each packet. lll

4 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures M PRlNTlNG PERFOlZAlNG APPLYlNG rem r------- i currma APPLYlNG FASTENERS AIENTEB 3 ,822,876

SHEET 1 [If 3 A f v 11 {P/Z O/E mar) 1 601 1101 10011401 B 4 s luv 16, 101 '101 130119011501 A B ZZZV & k k

A B 222V PAIENTEBJUL 91974 sum 2 or 3 56.2

coLLmNe.

PFZN'UNG SEXUAL NOS AND PLM'E NOS.

19m TO 3000 CUT'HNG W Ci O FREE \00 SPAQE PROCESS OF MAKING TICKET PACKETS WITH THE TICKETS OF EACH PACKET HAVING CONSECUTIVE AND CONSTANT NUNBERING THEREON This invention relates generally to a process of making ticket packets, and more particularly to a process which results in the formation of such packets wherein each ticket of a packet has the same serial number thereon different from the tickets of each other packet although the tickets of each packet have the same progressive plate numbers imprinted thereon.

Normally, ticket packets of this type, especially for Bingo games and the like having game numbers imprinted on each ticket, have the same serial number imprinted on the Bingo specials or tickets of the packets which are used during a specific playing time. Also,

the tickets of each packet of *specials" have different sets of playing numbers thereon with each set being identified by a progressively different plate number. In the process of making these packets, 30 of such tickets, five wide and six deep, are first printed on a single sheet with the sets of game numbers on each ticket varying and being each identified by a progressively changing plate number. Any number of such sheets in varying colors are printed after which second and subsequent stacks of similar sheets are imprinted although the tickets in each stack will be respectively printed with a different serial number. Thereafter, 30 tickets per sheet are printed, this time with different sets of game numbers from the first grouping of sheets with each set being identified on each sheet by a different progressive series of plate numbers. Stacks of such sheets are printed with the tickets of one stack having a different serial number from the other stack, the serial numbers in each stack however being the same as those of the first grouping stacks. Third and subsequent groupings are similarly printed with the sets of game numbers for the tickets in each grouping varying along with their identifying plate numbers so that ultimately, 100 groupings as above described are printed up. This results in the production of 100 groupings each with any number of stacks of sheets, the first stack of each grouping having the same serial number on all the tickets thereof with a series of progressively different plate numbers on each sheet differing progressively from the sets of plate numbers on the other sheets. The same holds true for second and subsequent stacks of each grouping. Sheets with the same serial numbers on their tickets are then collated to form stacks of collated sheets for what is known as the 3000 series. Normally, the collated stacks are cut along horizontal rows after which the sheets thereof are glued together and cut along their vertical rows to produce ticket packets with the tickets of each packet having the same serial number but progressive platenumbers on the tickets of each packet.

Throughout the above-described extensive process, it can be readily seen that, should any one of the collated sheets requiring the same serial numbers on each of the tickets thereof, happen to have an incorrect serial number printed on any one ticket, the entire 3000 series must be discarded. Also, it has been found that the serial number may be easily tampered with by a player simply by altering one of its digits. Another disadvantage in the use of this process is the-large number of printed stacks required for making ticket packets with different serial numbers. The space requirement is costly and expenditures for labor are high.

The principal object of the present invention is therefore to produce ticket packets with the same type serial numbers and plate numbers thereon as before although in a simpler and faster and much more economical manner than heretofore devised.

Another object of this invention is to provide a process of making such ticket packets in which serial numbers for the tickets of each packet are imprinted by perforating through the collated sheet stacks during the process of production thereby substantially economizing on the production process and rendering the tickets substantially, tamper-proof.

A further object of this invention is to provide such ticket packets wherein the serial number perforation step takes place between collating and cutting of the sheets to form individual ticket packets.

A stillfurther object of this invention is to provide such ticket packets wherein the tickets of each sheet along the horizontal rows may be secured together and wherein tear lines may be provided along these rows.

Other objects, advantages and novel features of the invention will become apparent from the following detailed description of the invention when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGS. 1 and 2 are graphic illustrations showing the various steps in carrying out the prior art process;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a single ticket produced in accordance with the prior art process;

FIG. 4 is a graphic illustration showing the steps in carrying out the process in accordance with the present invention; and

FIG. 4A is a plan view of part of a single sheet of tickets'produced in accordance with the present process.

Turning now to the drawings wherein like reference characters refer to like and corresponding parts throughout the several views, the prior art process will first be described with reference to FIGS. 1, 2 and 3. In a rotary or plate press operation, any number of sheets 10 are printed each with 30 game tickets 11 thereon, each ticket having a selected set of different game numbers printed thereon. A typical set of game numbers for a ticket 11 is shown in FIG. 3 as being identified by plate number 100. Of course, the 29 remaining tickets 11 each have different sets of game numbers each identified by a different plate number such as 20l and 301. Normally, five tickets 11 are printed along horizontal rows 12 while six of the tickets are printed along vertical rows 13. Each of these tickets with their various sets of game numbers is identified by a plate number which, in the case of sheet 10, commences with plate No. l and evenly progresses by digits so as to end with plate No. 290l. A typical plate number for a ticket 11 can be seen printed in the free space in FIG. 3 as 101, such plate number also being printed at the lower right hand comer of the ticket. During the printing press operation, a serial number is also printed in ink on each of the 30 tickets of sheet 10. Such serial number is, for the sake of illustration and clarity,- designated by Aalthough it should be pointed out that the serial number is normally a multi-digit number, such as 2426. As can be seen in FIG. 3, this serial number is superimposed over the letter N of the word BINGO printed at the top of each ticket for such game.

Any number of sheets are printed up as described above in any number of color sets. Thereafter, sheets 14 are printed up in a similar manner with 30 tickets 11 each having the same set of game numbers as in sheet 10 with each set identified by the same plate numbers 1 through 2901 as on sheet 10. (Sheets 14 and the remaining sheets in FIG. 1 are shown smaller and with only the first and last plate numbers thereon in the interest of clarity.) However, sheets 14 are ink printed with the next succeeding serial number which is, in this illustration, designated as B to avoid confusion with the plate numbers for this illustration. Again, any number of sheets 14 are printed in an identical manner using any number of colors for the sheets. Thereafter, sheets 15 are printed with identical plate numbers as sheets 10 and 14 except that the serial number again changes and the next succeeding serial number C is used. Any number of further stacks of sheets, similar to 10, 14 and 15, are printed each with succeeding serial numbers so that the last stack of sheets 16 is printed with serial number ZZZV if 100 stacks in the first grouping are intended to be printed. The stacks of sheets 10 through 16 each with the same plate numbers 1 through 2901 and succeeding serial numbers A through ZZZV are designated as the first grouping.

A second grouping of sheets must now be printed up starting with sheets 17 as having 30 tickets thereon, each with different sets of game numbers thereon which also differ from the sets of game numbers of sheet 10 and which are now each identified by plate numbers 2 through 2902 with 100 digits separating each plate number as before. The same serial number A is printed in ink on each ticket of sheet 17 similarly as described for sheet 10. As in the first grouping, sheets such as 18, I9 and through 21 are printed with 30 tickets each having the same sets of game numbers and respective plate numbers as sheet 17 except with serial numbers B, C and through ZZZV for the respective sheets 18, 19 and through 21.

A third grouping of sheets 22 to 25 are printed each with succeeding serial numbers A, B, C, and through ZZZV except with plate numbers 3 through 2903 for still different sets of game numbers for each of the tickets thereon. Fourth and subsequent groupings of sheets are printed up in a similar manner, each with different sets of plate numbers until the 100th grouping of sheets 26 to 29 are printed up, each with succeeding serial numbers A, B, C, and through ZZZV and each with plate numbers 100 through 3000. Any number of sheets 10 through 29 are printed up as above described on sheets of any number of different colors.

Referring now to FIG. 2, the above-described printing step of FIG. 1 is generally illustrated by block 31 as the first series of steps in the production process. The next step requires that a single sheet from each of the 100 groupings having serial No. A be collated together so that a collated stack 32 is formed as having tickets with plate numbers I through 2901 on the top through sheets with the last having tickets of plate numbers 100 through 3000. In the next step of the prior art process, each of the collated stacks of I00 sheets of identical serial numbers is cut along horizontal rows 12 after which the top edges of the collated sheets are applied with an adhesive 33. Rows 12 are thereafter out along vertical rows 13 thereby forming individual packets 34 of tickets. It should be noted that all the necessary serial numbers are not illustrated in FIG. 2 in the interest of clarity.

Because a hundred stacks of sheets for each serial number must be printed up before collating, it can be seen that a large storage or warehouse area is required for such a great number of stacks. Moreover, should any one of the sheets for serial number A, for example, be misprinted with an incorrect serial number, the entire collated stack of sheets for serial number A is wasted. In addition, it has been found that the inkprinted serial number is capable of being easily tampered with by the player since the serial number is normally a four or five digit number. A ticket from a previous game may therefore be very easily tampered with.

To avoid these difficulties and to more economically produce the ticket packets, sheets such as 10, 17, 22, etc. are printed up as in the prior art with 30 tickets each having the same plate numbers 1 through 2901, 2 through 2902, etc. A 100 stacks each with respective plate numbers 1 through 2901 up to 100 through 3000 are therefore printed with any number of sheets in any number of different colors, substantially as before. However, no serial numbers are printed on any of the sheets so that the number of stacks is limited by the invention to 100 for the 3000 series." FIG. 4 graphically illustrates the step by means of a block 35. The next step in the process according to the invention requires that one sheet of each 100 stacks be collated together so that a collated stack 36 of sheets is formed similar to stack 32 as before except that no serial numbers have as yet been imprinted. Thereafter, collated stack 36 is placed in a perforating machine to effect a printing by perforating serial number A through each of the 100 sheets of the collated stack simultaneously on each of the tickets. The serial number is located in the same relative position on each ticket as before except that, as can be clearly seen in FIG. 4A, the serial numbers are each formed by a series of perforations on the sheet 10.

The next step in the process according to the present invention involves the application of tear lines 37 horizontally adjacent the top edges of each row 12 of tickets 11. These tear lines are defined by a series of disconnected slits extending through the 100 collated sheets and applied, if desired, at the same time as the serial numbers are printed by perforating the collated stack. Fasteners, which may be in the form of staples 38, are then applied along each tear line near the tops of each ticket. These fasteners are, however, not applied through the stack of 100 collated sheets. Instead, the 100 sheets are separated into four stacks of 25 sheets each before the fasteners are applied. In the final step of the process according to this invention, the stapled together stacks of 25 collated sheets are cut vertically and horizontally to effect packets such as shown in FIG. 4 as the end product. Each BINGO ticket may accordingly be easily and conveniently torn along its respective tear line 37 by the ushers at the BINGO game at the time these BINGO specials are sold.

As an alternative to the provision of tear lines 37 and staples 38 for each stack of collated sheets, the collated stack may be cut into horizontal rows after the serial numbers are imprinted on each ticket by perforating as earlier described. As in the prior art process, a quantity of adhesive is applied along an edge of rows 41 of tickets which may be then cut vertically to separate the tickets and form packets which differ from packets 34 of the prior art process by having serial numbers imprinted thereon by perforating.

From the foregoing, it can be seen that the present process used in the production of packets of tickets such as BINGO specials avoids the need for a large number of printed stacks of sheets since the serial numbers are not applied to the tickets until after the collating step. Accordingly, it is only necessary to print up 100 stacks of sheets each with 30 tickets thereon of various sets of game numbers, each having a different progression of plate numbers for the sheets in each stack instead of having to print up multiples of the hundred stacks of such sheets as before. This amounts to a tremendous saving in time and labor as well as in warehouse space which, by itself, is quite costly. Moreover, printing of the serial numbers by perforating through the stack of 100 sheets positively assures that each of such sheets of each collated stack is provided with the correct serial number, thereby avoiding any waste in having to discard any collated stack of sheets as before which oftentimes had an incorrect serial number imprinted on one or more of the tickets of one or more sheets. The perforated serial numbers also render the tickets substantially tamper-proof since none of the digits of the serial number can now be altered by the user which has occasionally occurred with those serial numbered digits printed heretofore by inking. Lastly, the use of stapled fasteners and tear lines for each packet of tickets permits the usher to conveniently separate each ticket from the packet without the possibility of the entire packet falling apart at some time during the separation of tickets as before. Moreover, the unsold tickets for each packet can be easily accounted for at the time they are turned in by the ushers.

It should be understood that the invention is not limited to the production of BlNGO specials, but also includes the games of LOTTO, BEANO, and any other form of five-letter words using BINGO as a base. ln each instance, the serial number would be superimposed over the third letter of the game word.

Obviously, many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in the light of the above teachings. lt is therefore to be understood that within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

What is claimed is:

1. Process of making ticket packets wherein each ticket of a packet has the same serial number and successively numbered plate numbers thereon, comprising the steps of:

printing vertical and horizontal rows of first tickets on sheets of a first set of sheets including the printing on said tickets of a first series of identification plate numbers having the same progression of numbers for each said sheet;

printing vertical and horizontal rows of second tickets on sheets of at least a second set of sheets including the printing on said second tickets a second series of identification plate numbers having the same progression of numbers for each said sheet of said second set;

successively collating a sheet of said first set with a sheet of said second set to form a plurality of collated sheet stacks;

successively printing said sheets of said collated sheet stacks with a different serial number by successively perforating a different serial number through said sheets of each stack;

applying securing means along one of said rows adjacent one end of said tickets of each said collated stack; and

cutting said collated stacks along both said rows to form individual packets of tickets secured together.

2. The process according to claim 1 wherein said securing means comprise staple fasteners, and further comprising the step of applying tear lines along one of said rows of said sheet stacks inwardly of said staple fasteners.

3. Process of making ticket packets wherein each ticket of a packet has the same serial number and successively numbered plate numbers thereon, comprising the steps of:

printing vertical and horizontal rows of first tickets on sheets of a first set of sheets, including the printing on said tickets of a first series of identification plate numbers having the same progression of numbers for each said sheet;

printing vertical and horizontal rows of second tickets on sheets of at least a second set of sheets, including the printing on said second sheets a second series of identification plate numbers having the same progression of numbers for each said sheet of said second set;

successively collating a sheet of said first set with a sheet of said second set to form a plurality of sheet stacks;

successively printing said sheets of said sheet stacks with a different serial number by successively perforating a different serial number through said sheets of each said stack;

cutting said sheet stacks along said horizontal rows to form rows of stacked tickets;

applying securing means along a long edge of each said stacked tickets; and

cutting said rows of stacked tickets along said vertical rows to form individual packets of tickets secured together.

4. The process according to claim 3 wherein said securing means comprises a quantity of adhesive applied along said long edges.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1503375 *Aug 17, 1921Jul 29, 1924Pendergast Overton WProcess of printing consecutive numbers
US1586915 *Feb 18, 1926Jun 1, 1926Pendergast Overton WProcess of manufacturing groups of sheets consecutively numbered
US1650535 *Jun 30, 1926Nov 22, 1927Parsons Marion LMethod of printing numbers
US3421752 *Sep 20, 1965Jan 14, 1969Folino Arthur SProcess of printing numbers on forms
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3998446 *Sep 22, 1975Dec 21, 1976Carl Richard DentMethod of making booklets of tombola or bingo tickets
US4287824 *Apr 11, 1979Sep 8, 1981Maryland Cup CorporationMeans for imprinting multiple permutations and combinations of cards on cups
US4368665 *Dec 29, 1980Jan 18, 1983Maryland Cup CorporationMethod for imprinting multiple permutations and combinations of cards and the like on drinking cups and products manufactured thereby
US4448127 *May 28, 1982May 15, 1984Frain John JMethod of producing stacks of ticket stacks
US4541333 *Dec 10, 1984Sep 17, 1985Sillars Ian MalinRotary apparatus for printing quasi random number tables
US4601239 *Oct 2, 1985Jul 22, 1986Sillars Ian MalinApparatus for printing quasi random number tables
US4830380 *Nov 9, 1987May 16, 1989Six Albert JPrinted material bearing identifying coding
US4882688 *Dec 4, 1987Nov 21, 1989Demco Bingo Inc.Computer-controlled method and apparatus for making bingo cards
US4885700 *Mar 7, 1988Dec 5, 1989Demco Bingo Inc.Computer-controlled method and apparatus for making bingo cards
US5085417 *Dec 1, 1991Feb 4, 1992Liberty Share Draft And Check Printers, Inc.Method of encoding stacks of printed material
US5139270 *Jun 3, 1991Aug 18, 1992Gernhofer Margaret AName game bingo
US5160146 *Nov 5, 1991Nov 3, 1992The Reliable Corporation Of AmericaMultiple bingo game apparatus
US5297802 *Jun 5, 1992Mar 29, 1994Terrence PocockTelevised bingo game system
US5489091 *Mar 1, 1995Feb 6, 1996The Reliable Corporation Of AmericaMethod and apparatus for printing and collating packets of nonrepeating images on a base web
US5518253 *Mar 16, 1994May 21, 1996Pocock; TerrenceTelevised bingo game system
US5607145 *Nov 29, 1994Mar 4, 1997Stuart Entertainment IncMethod for printing books of bingo paper
US5890432 *Aug 27, 1997Apr 6, 1999Arrow International, Inc.Method and apparatus for printing bingo booklets
US6155169 *Feb 12, 1999Dec 5, 2000Arrow International, Inc.Method for printing bingo books
US6331900 *Nov 6, 1998Dec 18, 2001Minolta Co., Ltd.Controller for image forming apparatus
USRE34368 *Nov 12, 1991Sep 7, 1993Arrow International, Inc.Method of producing stacks of ticket stacks
WO1996016819A1 *Nov 28, 1995Jun 6, 1996John G LovellMethod for printing books of bingo paper
Classifications
U.S. Classification270/1.2, 270/58.8, 273/269, 101/93.1
International ClassificationB41F17/00, B41F13/54
Cooperative ClassificationB41F13/54, B41F17/00
European ClassificationB41F17/00, B41F13/54