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Publication numberUS3823516 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 16, 1974
Filing dateDec 19, 1972
Priority dateNov 24, 1970
Publication numberUS 3823516 A, US 3823516A, US-A-3823516, US3823516 A, US3823516A
InventorsChristian W
Original AssigneeNorton Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Motion imparting member incorporating holding means for nonwoven fibrous abrasive pads
US 3823516 A
Abstract
Surface finishing means comprising nonwoven fibrous material is held firmly but removably on a member capable of imparting motion to the finishing means by a plurality of discrete, spaced-apart holding means located in the surface of the motion imparting member comprising a plurality of hook-like members on a base member.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 1111 3,823,516 Christian 1 July 16, 1974 [5 MOTION IMPARTING MEMBER 3,128,514 4/1964 Parker et a1. 24 204 INCORPORATING HOLDING MEANS FOR 3,346,904 /1967 'Armstrong /230.12 3,471,903 10/1969 Northrup et al. 24/204 NONWOVEN FIBROUS ABRASIVE PADS 3,522,681 8/1970 Lambert 51/358 Inventor: Warren E. Christian, Troy, NY. 3,527,001 9/1970 Kleemeier et al 51/358 3,708,833 1 1973 R'b' h 24 204 [73] Assignee: Norton Company, Troy, N.Y. I I

22 F1 d: D 972 1 16 cc 1 Primary Examiner-Othell M. Simpson [21] Appl. No.: 316,447 Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Herbert L. Gatewood Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 92,485, Nov. 24,

1970, abandoned. 57] ABSTRACT U-S. Cl. Surface finishing means comprising nonwoven fibrous [5 material is but removably on a member ca- Fleld sealfill pable of imparting motion to the finishing means by a 15/230412, 2301123019, plurality of discrete, spaced-apart holding means lo- 406; 24/204 cated inthe surface of the motion imparting member comprising a plurality of hook-like members on a base [56] References Cited memben UNITED STATES PATENTS a 407,245 7/1889 Roberts 51/388 25 Claims, 12 Drawing Figures CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION This application is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 92,485filed Nov. 24, 1970, now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to surface finishing apparatus suitable for the cleaning, polishing, and the like of various substrates and in particular floors of various materials. Even more specifically, it relates to the means by which surface finishing means such as nonwoven fibrous pads are held firmly, yet removably, on a motion imparting member.

2. Description of the Prior Art Nonwoven fibrous abrasive material, such as that disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,020,139, has been used now for a number of years in the cleaning, polishing, and the like of floors in homes, office buildings, etc. of materials such as vinyl, asphalt tile, marble, wood and terrazzo. The fibrous abrasive material for these applications is provided, in general, in the form of circular or annular shaped pads, either the so-called convolute pad or those referred to in the trade as flat" pads.

These nonwoven discs or pads, of man-made fibers such as nylon fibers, have been found to have certain desirable features, particularly over those pads manufactured from metal fibers. Quite advantageously, they are rust-free and therefore result in longer life. Moreover, because of their open, porous nature, these nonwoven, fibrous pads can be cleaned easily after use, e.g., by mere flushing with water, for storage.

Of some importance also is the fact that cleaning and scouring pads of nonwoven man-made fibers are nonconductive. Because of this advantageous feature, these pads can be used in applications in which floor pads of metal fibers are unsuitable. One such application involves cleaning and scouring areas in which electronic equipment, e.g., computers, are located.

Notwithstanding the many desirable features of nonwoven fibrous abrasive pads, such as those abovementioned, their use has been attendant with some problems. One problem in particular centers around I the means by which motion is imparted to these nonwoven fibrous pads and the manner in which the pads are held in contact with a motion imparting member.

In the early usage of nonwoven, fibrous, abrasive pads, and in particular floor pads, it readily became evident that it was not enough to merely impart motion to a floor pad, somemeans was desirable to maintain the pad in suitable contact with the motion imparting member. Out of this desideratum evolved the floor pad holder disclosed in US. Pat. No. 2,995,765, assigned to Norton Company, assignee of the present invention. Subsequent to this, other motion imparting members and floor pad holders of various design and structure followed. Exemplary of this latter prior art are those pad holders and motion imparting members disclosed in US. Pat. Nos. 3,302,232; 3,436,876; 3,462,889; 3,464,075; and 3,527,001; Canadian Pat. No. 806,890; and British Pat. No. 914,315.

Although the pad holders and drive members now known in the trade provide, in many instances, reasonably suitable performance, none of them, to my knowledge, has been found totally satisfactory. In particular, some of these devices provide suitable driving motion but do not adequately hold, in fact are not really intended for this purpose, the fibrous pad on the motion imparting member. Others provide a holding function, sometimes less than satisfactory, but impart little, if any, motion to the nonwoven pad during use. A particular fault found with some pad holders, e.g., those used with center-hole floor pads, resides in the fact they provide, particularly with flat pads, inadequate holding of the nonwoven fibrous pad on the motion imparting member, particularly at the periphery or outer edges thereof. This results in, on tilting or lift-off of a floor machine, what is sometimes called peripheral sagging. On occasion, this sagging is followed by folding over of the floor pad on again commencing operation. The consequences of this occurring may be a torn and therefore unusable floor pad.

Of major disadvantage with some pad holders is the inconvenience resulting in the necessary manual manipulation of locking and releasing means whenever a pad need be positioned or replaced on a floor machine. Moreover, the locking or central holding means as now known are particularly a problem with use of convolute pads. In many instances, the center convolution, on tightening of the pad holder is delaminated from the adjacent convolution. Thus, such. a floor pad, before being used at all, may be rendered useless.

A somewhat related problem, i.e., one which can be said to result from inadequate holding of a floor pad, involves slipping, particularly where the motion imparting member is the rotatable type, between the motion imparting member and the floor pad. Where this occurs, the motion imparting member and floor pad rather than acting in unison as desired, act independently of one another. The result, again, may be a torn and therefore unusable floor pad.

While the above-mentioned problems and disadvantages have been at least somewhat alleviated in the provision heretofore of hook-like means or pile-like surfaces on the motion imparting member, the obtaining of desirable, tenacious holding of the surface finishing means on the drive member at all times still remains a problem.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention, in its basic aspects, involves a motion imparting member comprising a novel driving face for nonwoven fibrous abrasive pads in which a plurality of discrete, spaced-apart holding means are lo cated in recesses in the drive face, each holding means comprising a pluralityof spaced-apart hook-like members or elements. These hook-like members, on the fibrous pad being placed in contact with the motion imparting means, engage with the entangled fibers of the nonwoven fibrous pad, and thereby mechanically, yet releasably, secure the fibrous pad to the driving face of the motion imparting member.

Quite advantageously, .in the preferred embodiment of the invention, the discrete holding means are adapted for removable engagement with the motion imparting member whereby, when worn-out or the like, each holding means can be removed and replaced with another holding means. Thus, a motion imparting member can be restored to like new condition with a minimum of expense and effort.

With the motion imparting member of my invention, nonwoven fibrous floor pads are held securely, even during use at relatively high centrifugal speeds, without slippage or peripheral sagging. Floor pads can readily and easily be placed on and removed from the motion imparting member without need for any manipulation of turn-buttons, wing nuts or other mechanical locking or releasing means.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING Understanding of the invention will be facilitated by referring to the accompanying drawing in conjunction with reading of the specification in which like numbers refer to like parts in the various views, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a side view illustrating a floor polishing machine in combination with a motion imparting member in accordance with the invention which drives, in rotary fashion, a circular shaped floor pad for polishing a floor;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the motion imparting member shown in'FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the motion imparting member shown in FIG. 2 looking at the drive face;

FIG. 4 is an exploded view of the motion imparting member shown in FIG. 2 showing its major components and their relationship with one another as well as one means ofjoining them together;

FIG. 5 is a greatly enlarged view of a portion of the driving face of the motion imparting member shown in FIG. 4, in cross-section taken on lines 5-5, showing in detail the removable engagement of a discrete holding means, in accordance with the invention, for a nonwoven fibrous pad;

FIG. 6 is a greatly enlarged view in perspective of the discrete holding means shown in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a greatly enlarged view of another hook-like member which will be found suitable in the practice of the invention;

FIG. 8 is a view in cross-section of a portion of another embodiment of a driving face in accordance with the invention showing the removable engagement of a holding means;

FIG. 9 is a view in cross-section of a portion of a solid plastic driving face similar to that shown in FIG. 8 except that its front surface is rough and irregular;

FIG. 10 is a plan view showing a portion of the irregular surface of the driving face of FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a view in cross-section of a motion imparting member in accordance with the invention showing in unitary construction a body member and driving face; and

FIG. 12 is a view in cross-section of still another embodiment of the invention showing a motion imparting member of unitary construction.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Turning now to the drawing, there is shown in FIG. 1 thereof a motor driven floor machine 10 conventionally used in the cleaning and polishing of floors 11. Attached to the drive means (not shown) of floor machine 10 is a motion imparting member 12 comprising body member 13 and drive face 14 for imparting, in this case, a rotary motion to a nonwoven fibrous abrasive floor pad 15. It will be appreciated that motion imparting member 12 may impart to or drive floor pad 15 in a rotary motion or otherwise, depending upon the particular floor machine 10 being used; however, for purposes of more specifically describing the invention herein, a motion imparting member imparting a rotary motion will be disclosed more particularly hereinafter.

Motion imparting member 12, in the drawing, is seen to be annular shaped, having a central portion 16 thereof cut out; however, the motion imparting member may be either annular or disc-shaped, as desired. In fact, some motion imparting members, depending on the particular floor machine, will not have their center cut out. Similarly, the floor pads used in the invention may or may not, as desired, have a center hole.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention, motion imparting member 12, as seen more clearly in FIG. 4 of the drawing, comprises a drive face 14 incorporated in a driving face 17 which is separate and distinct from drive block or body member 13. Driving face 17, depending on the particular material from which it is manufactured, will optionally include on the back side a backing member 18 which is adhesively or otherwise secured to the driving face. The driving face may be secured to body member 13 by means of, for example, machine screws 19 or the like. A clutch or coupling means 20 is attached to the back side of body member 13 by means of wood screws 21 or the like fastening means for attaching the motion imparting member 12 to the drive means of floor machine 10.

The driving face 17 can be of resilient material or otherwise, as desired. Where of resilient material such as a layer of foam rubber or the like, e.g., polyvinyl chloride or polyurethane foam, or a resilient nonwoven fibrous layer, a cushioning or vibration absorbing effect may be provided. Moreover, a driving face of resilient material may be found to permit greater conformity to irregularities in the floor or the like being cleaned. Such a driving face should be relatively firm, yet readily compressible, and be about three-eighths inches thick. However, it is believed quite obvious, the thickness and firmness of a satisfactory resilient driving face in any particular instance will depend to some extent on the floor machine being used.

The resilient driving face may be entirely of one resilient material or made up of a plurality of layers each of which provides a different function. The driving face comprises, in one embodiment of the invention, and as shown more clearly in FIG. 5 of the drawing, a first or inner, relatively soft, resilient layer 22 and a second or outer layer 23 of the same or similar resilient material, the purpose for which will be hereinafter explained.

In the case of a resilient driving face, a backing member 18 of relatively stiff material is, in general, provided in combination therewith. The backing member can be of various materials such as wood, metal, plastic and the like. A composition hardboard such as Masonite or a high pressure laminated plastic sheet such as that sold under the trademark Formica is preferred.

The resilient driving face is desirably of slightly greater overall diameter, e.g., about one-half inch, than backing member 18 which may or may not, as desired, be of greater diameter than body member 13. This will provide, in effect, a resilient bumper and prevent scratching or otherwise marring of furniture or walls with which backing member 18 might otherwise come in contact. To inhibit tearing of the resilient driving face, particularly where the face is a layer of foam rubher or the like, it has been found desirable to provide such a layer with a peripheral surface having tear resisting characteristics. One way to accomplish this feature is to provide a circular shaped foam layer in which the periphery is of greater density, than its more central portion. However, such a feature can also be obtained, quite simply, by applying to the periphery of the resilient drive face a layer of polyvinyl chloride or the like pressure-sensitive adhesive tape. This tape is easily applied by hand to the peripheral surface of the resilient layer and, on release after being applied, tends to recover or shrink thus readily conforming to the resilient drive face periphery.

As before disclosed, driving face 17 need not be resilient or incorporate a backing member. The driving face can be of a relatively rigid construction such as is provided in a molded layer of plastic material such as polyvinyl chloride, polyamide, polyacetal, polycarbonate,

acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) resins and the as shown in FIG. 9 of the drawing. The bumper can be of any suitable resilient material such as foam rubber or the like and can be adhesively secured or not, as desired, to the driving face periphery. Thus, the marking of furniture, walls and the like will be avoided if, by accident, they are bumped by the driving face.

The front side or surface of driving face 17, i.e., the drive face 14, can be provided, if desired, with a surface exhibiting high frictional characteristics. Such a surface may be more or less desired depending on the material of the driving face and its particular frictional properties. It may be unnecessary where the driving face is of resilient material such as foam rubber or the like. On the other hand, with relatively stiff, hard, resinous material a high friction surface may be found desirable. One such high friction surface 25 is shown in FIG. 9 wherein the drive face surface takes the form of downwardly extending pyramid-shaped projections 26 which are either cut into the molded drive face surface or are provided therein during the molding operation. However, a surface exhibiting somewhat higher frictional characteristics will result from any roughened surface and it need not take this particular configura-- tion. If desired, a high friction coating material can be provided on the drive face.

Regardless of which driving face 17 is used in the practice of the invention, it is, in general, combined with a drive block or body member 13 such as is shown in FIG. 4 of the drawing. The body member can be of various materials such as wood, metal, plastic and resins with or without fillers. One suitable material is a composition of melamine formaldehyde resin and a filler of wood chips. Such a composition is readily and easily molded into any particular shape and is both waterproof and stable under the conditions to which it is subjected in the cleaning and scrubbing of floors. In an alternative embodiment of the invention, body member 13, rather than being of an annular shaped moulded resin composition, can be a metal disc on the back side of which is suitably centered and fastened a conventionally used coupling means. The particular body member, as well as the configuration of the driving face used, will, of course depend somewhat on the specific floor machine used.

The drive face 14 is provided with a plurality of discrete holding means 27 (FIG. 3) located in a spacedapart, radial relationship, as shown in FIG. 3, for holding the fibrous pad 15 on, and in contact with, motion imparting member 12. These holding means, as hereinafter will be made more clear, are, in the most preferred embodiment of the invention, desirably mechanically, removably engaged with driving face 17. This feature is of great advantage in that it will permit cheap, easy replacement of worn-out or otherwise unsuitable holding means with others that are satisfactory. Quite obviously, discrete holding means 27 may be secured, removably or otherwise, to motion imparting member 12 by various mechanical means. These include, for example, friction engaging fasteners of various sorts, screw means, bayonet fasteners and the like. Fastening or engaging means other than mechanical means, making the holding means replaceable, or, for that matter, more permanently engaged in the drive face, as desired, may also be used in the practice of the invention. One can select, for example, a suitable adhesive material to accomplish either objective.

Holding means 27 which I have found meets the requirements of my invention are shown more clearly in FIGS. 5 and 6 of the drawing and will now be described with greater particularity. Each holding means 27 is seen to comprise a base member 28 having extending from the front surface thereof a plurality of relatively stiff, hook-like members 29. These hook-like members,,on closer observation, are seen to be essentially T-shaped in cross-section; however, the cross member of the T, at its extremities, curves somewhat downwardly toward base member 28 to form two opposite facing hooks. The configuration of an alternative hooklike member 30 is shown in FIG. 7. Therein, the hooklike member is, contrary to that shown in FIG. 6, shaped somewhat like an arrow or partially opened umbrella. The barbs 31, of which there are preferably two or more, meet in a sharp point thereby making for, in certain instances, easier penetration into thefibrous pad.

The hook-like members 29 which, as shown in FIG. 5, project prependicularly outwardly from base member 28, are arranged on the base member in essentially parallel rows (FIG. 6). However, other spatial arrangements may also be used so long as the members are uniformly spaced and a hook-like member density of less than about 150 is maintained. A preferred density is from about -l l5 hook-like members per square inch. However, as few as 50 hook-like members per square inch may be found satisfactory in certain instances. Hook-like members 29 must be of sufficient length to allow for entanglement with the fibers of the nonwoven floor pad being used. On the other hand, they should not be overly long. Members which are excessively long compared to their cross-sectional dimension will be found too resilient to accomplish thedesired purposes. In general, where the hook-like members have a generally round cross-section, their length should be at least about 3/ 32 inches and no more than about 3/16 inches. Holding means 27 in which the spacing between hook-like members 29 is on the order of about one-eighth inch center to center will be found suitable. Where the holding means is about 15/16 inches diameter about 69 hook-like members 29 will be provided for entangling with and holding the fibrous floor pad.

While it is not inconceivable that with some surface finishing means and under certain conditions, the nonwoven fibrous abrasive pads may be held on motion imparting member 12 by a relatively small number of holding means 27, it is obviously desirable that the number be sufficient to effectively accomplish the desired result. This number will, of course, depend on many factors including the size motion imparting member involved, the particular fibrous floor pad, and the dimensions of the holding means used. However, one can readily determine, in a few simple experiments, with any particular holding means available, the number and disposition thereof, in accordance with the teachings of this invention, that will give optimum results. In general, however, the expected results will be obtained when holding means are located in radial fashion at least at the outer periphery of the motion imparting member. For more effective results, it may be desirable to provide more than one annular row of holding means.

Merely by way of example, I have found that with a 15 inch diameter member capable of imparting rotary motion to a floor pad, two rows of holding means (15/16 inches diameter, 60 hook-like members spaced one-eighth inch center-to-center), arranged annularly and concentrically on the drive face of the motion imparting member, provided satisfactory results with a variety of nonwoven fibrous floor pads. More specifically, the holding means can be arranged in annular rows having radii of inches and 6% inches, respectively, and in each row the holding means are spaced 30 apart. The holding means in the innermost annular row are, desirably, staggered with respect to those in the outermost row.

The holding means, and this is an important aspect of the invention, are recessed, as shown by reference number 32 e.g., in FIGS. 5 and 9, in drive face 14 so that the nonwoven fibrous abrasive floor pad will be in direct and intimate contact with the entire drive face, particularly during use. Thus, the front surface of base member 28 and driving face 17 are seen to be in the same plane. In this way, maximum contact is provided between drive face 14 and the nonwoven fibrous pad which is being driven. The holding means therefore, while perhaps contributing to the drive motion of the motion imparting member, are not the sole means for accomplishing this function. The entire drive face aids in performing the driving function leaving the holding means primarily for accomplishing holding of the floor pad.

In the most preferred embodiment of the invention holding means 27 is provided on its back surface with split-type fastening means or self-locking clip 33 by means of which the holding means is removably secured to motion imparting member 12, as hereinafter more fully described, by engagement with locking means 34 or the like. Split-type fastening means 33 (FIG. 5) comprises, in its basic aspects, two spacedapart, resilient, prong-like members 35. These members, fora reason to be explained hereinafter are tapered downwardly on their outer surfaces to a recessed shoulder 36. Facing surfaces 37 of prong-like members 35 slant with respect to one another, as seen in the drawing, thereby forming a V. Thus, prong-like members 35 act somewhat like a spring on being squeezed together and then released. The actual mechanics of such a fastening means is believed well known and no detailed explanation is believed required herein. It should suffice to state that on being inserted in a hold of lesser size, e.g., one of only slightly larger dimensions than prong-like members 35 in their compressed condition, these members, on frictionally engaging the periphery of the hole, will be compressed. One further insertion and on reaching the recessed shoulders 36, however, the prong-like members 35 will be no longer engaged by the whole periphery. The result is that these members then spring-back to their uncompressed state. The recessed shoulders then engage the hole periphery as shown, for example in FIG. 5 and provide the locking function.

Although the holding means as above described, can be of unitary construction, e.g., injection molded, it can also be formed of two distinct members or parts, e.g., a split-type fastener and laminated thereto a hook-like member. Such a holding means is available from American Velcro, Inc., of Manchester, NH. The hook-like member comprises a plurality of hook-like members integral with a base. Regardless of the manner of manufacture, however, the holding means is suitably of some plastic material such as nylon, polyethylene, polyacetal resin, poly carbonate and the like.

The manner of removably attaching holding means 27 in drive face 14 will depend, to some extent, on the particular material of which the driving face is formed. Nevertheless, and regardless of the driving face material, an opening 38 must be provided in the driving face extending centrally from the bottom of each recess 32 when using a holding means incorporating a split-type fastener 33. Thus, when holding means 27 is properly recessed, the fastener will intrude into opening 38 and be removably held in drive face 14 as hereinafter explained.

The recesses 32, as well as the openings 38 cooperating therewith can be provided in the driving face 17 during the forming operation or subsequently provided therein by die-cutting, machining or the like. In the case where driving face 17 comprises resilient material, one simple, yet satisfactory, means of providing recesses 32 and holes or openings 38 is to provide a resilient driving face comprising two resilient layers 22, 23 as before-described, adhesively secured together. The first or inner resilient layer 22 is die-cut to provide the desired number of cylindrical holes or openings 38 to accomodate the selected number of fastening means. These holes, which after adhesively securing inner resilient layer 22 to backing member 18 are open at the outermost end, must be of sufficient depth and of large enough diameter to accommodate prong-like members 35.

The second or outer layer 23 of the same or similar resilient material and of the same diameter is die-cut to provide an equal number of cylindrical holes of substantially larger diameter, e.g., large enough to accomodate the base member 28 of holding means 27. The thickness of this layer should correspond to the depth of recess desired, taking into account the locking means used, as hereinafter more fully described.

Each resilient layer is die-cut in the same respective locations so that when adhesively laminated together the centers of the holes in each layer will coincide. Thus, recesses 32 are provided in drive face 14, the bottoms of which, to some extent, are provided by the front surface of inner resilient layer 22 immediately surrounding holes or openings 38.

A lockingmeans 34 is provided, as before disclosed, in each recess 32 for holding means 27. This can be accomplished using a conventional metal washer of suit able annular dimension. Thus, such a locking means comprising an annular surface 39 and a center hole 40 is centered at the open or outer end of each hole or opening 38 and is secured to the surface of inner resilient layer 22. This annular shaped locking means must have an outer diameter greater than the diameter of hole 38 and an inner diameter less than the diameter of hole 38. While the outer diameter of locking means 34, in the case of a washer, is of no consequence, except that it in general forms the actual bottom of recess 32 and is usually of slightly larger diameter than base member 28, the inner diameter must be large enough to accommodate prong-like members 35 in their at least somewhat compressed state. Obviously, the inner diameter of the locking means must be small enough to compress to some degree the prong-like members. Thus, it is seen that annular surface 39 of locking means 34 closes off the outer end of each hole 38 so as to provide an opening of lesser dimension than hole 38 per se.

Alternatively, the locking means may be provided by die-cuttinga suitable number of holes in a metal plate or the like of the same diameter as the driving face. These holes and their immediate peripheral surface, it will be seen, perform the same function as annular surface 39 and center hole 40 in the before-described locking means. Such a locking means can be provided, e.g., as an intermediate layer between inner resilient layer 22 and outer resilient layer 23 and, of course, is adhesively secured to both layers.

In the practice of the invention holding means 27 are snapped into drive face 14 by placing the holding means, with prong-like members 35 inserted in the center hole 40 of the locking means, in contact with the locking means. On pushing inwardly, the tapered surfaces of prong-like members 35 are engaged by the periphery of center'hole 40. This causes the prong-like members to be compressed thereby allowing their further penetration into opening 38. On reaching recessed shoulders 36, the prong-like members pring back to their uncompressed state. This is permitted, moreover, by the larger diameter of hole 38. As a result, recessed shoulders 36 overlap with the inner peripheral surface of the annular locking means and thereby serve to lock holding means 27 in position and prevent their inadvertent removal. However, and this is of great advantage with respect to the invention herein disclosed, holding means 27 can be removed when worn out or the like and replaced with a new one. To do this, one need merely insert a finger nail or a prying tool such as a screw driver or the like under the back surface of base member 28 and pry the holding means loose from the drive face.

Where driving face 17 is molded of relatively hard rigid plastic material, as before-described, the recesses and cooperating opening may be provided during the molding operation or machined therein subsequently.

Each recess should be of sufficient depth to accomodate the thickness of the locking means, e. g., a conventional metal washer, yet provide that the front surface of base member 28 is in the same plane as drive face 14.

In a further embodiment of the invention, motion imparting member 12 may incorporate driving face 17 and body member 13 in a single unitary construction such as shown in FIG. 11 of the drawing. This may be accomplished by suitable conventional plastic molding techniques. The recesses 32 and openings 38 can be provided in the drive face in the molding operation, as can a roughly configured surface such as shown in FIG. 10, or these features can be provided by suitably machining the molded member.

Where light weight is of importance, the motion im* parting member can be provided of a relatively low density material such as a foamed ABS resin.

A still further embodiment of a motion imparting member in accordance with the invention is shown in FIG. 12. Therein is shown such a member similar to that shown in FIG. 11 in which driving face 17 is provided integral with body member 13. In contrast, however, to the moulded body member shown in FIG. 11, the body member in this instance is of more hollow construction. This provides a more economical motion imparting member while at the same time providing one of lesser weight. Optionally, a center disc or closure 41 may be incorporated, if desired, in drive face 14. A closure can be provided which results in a drive face without a center opening and may offer advantage where a floor pad is used having no center hole. The closure being a part of the drive face may be of the same or different material and may or may not, as desired, have holding means recessed in its surface.

The inner drive face portion provided by closure means 41 may be adhesively secured to body member 13 and, in particular, to ribs 42. Thus, the inner and outer portions of the drive face operate in unison.

To utilize a motion imparting member in accordance with my invention, such a member is simply attached by means of a coupling 20 to the drive member of a suitable floor maintenance machine, e.g. the rotatable drive means of a Clarke 15" Floor Scrubbing Machine. The hook-like members located in the drive face, when the drive face is placed in pressing engagement with a nonwoven fibrous floor pad, interengage a plurality of the individual fiber lengths of the nonwoven fibrous pad. Holding means as described herein have been found to hold firmly and tenaciously even after more than 360 hours usage to fibrous floor pads and to do so during use without slippage even though the floor pad is subjected to relatively high centrifugal force, particularly when wet. Of great significance also is the fact that these holding means, when disposed in accordance with my invention, eliminates peripheral sagging on liftoff and thus the disadvantageous fold-over and tearing of pads often experienced heretofore with other motion imparting members and pad holders. Moreover, it has been discovered that convolute floor pads can be used with the motion imparting member disclosed herein without attendant delamination of the innermost convolutions, a problem often experienced with other pad holders.

When desired, the nonwoven fibrous floor pad can be removed from the motion imparting member of my invention with a peeling-like motion much like removing pressure-sensitive adhesive tape from a surface to which it has been applied. On the other hand, the booklike members prevent release of the fibrous pad in a shearing direction, i.e., at the interface formed between the pad and the holding means. This feature is particularly advantageous since a shearing force results from driving the fibrous floor pad, e.g. in a rotary motion.

The motion imparting member of my invention while described with some particularity with respect to rotatable drive means can obviously also be used with other drive means. Some floor machines provide a sort of oscillating motion rather than a rotary motion imparting member. In this event, the motion imparting member, as well as the floor pad, may be square or rectangular shaped rather than annular shaped as disclosed herein. The motion imparting member need not even be attached to a mechanical drive means. Such a member can have a suitable motion imparted thereto manually, i.e., by hand.

As many different embodiments of my invention will occur to those skilled in the art, it is to be understood that the specific embodiments of the invention, as presented herein, are intended by way of illustration only and not limiting on the invention, but that the limitations thereon are to be determined only from the appended claims,

What I claim is:

1. Motion imparting member suitable for imparting a desired motion to and satisfactorily holding a surface finishing means comprising a nonwoven fibrous pad, said motion imparting member comprising a driving face comprising a drive face, a plurality of spaced apart recesses in said drive face, and located in each of said recesses a holding means comprising a base member having projecting outwardly therefrom a plurality of hook-like members, said hook-like members extending sufficiently from each said recess so that means are provided for interlocking engagement with said nonwoven fibrous pad for accomplishing the desired holding action, said holding means further comprising means on said base member providing for removable engagement of said holding means with the drive face of said motion imparting member.

2. Motion imparting member according to claim 1 for combination with the drive member of a floor machine for imparting a desired motion to a fibrous floor pad, said driving face comprising a resilient member.

3. Motion imparting member according to claim 2 wherein said driving face comprises a first resilient layer having a front side and a back side, and adhesively secured to said front side a second resilient layer, said recesses being provided in at least said second resilient layer.

4. Motion imparting member according to claim 2 wherein said driving face includes in combination with said resilient member a relatively rigid backing member.

5. Motion imparting member according to claim 2 wherein said motion imparting member comprises in combination with the driving face a body member adapted to be secured to the drive member of said floor machine.

6. Motion imparting member according to claim 1 wherein said driving face comprises a suitable plastic material.

7. Motion imparting member according to claim 6 wherein said plastic material comprises polyvinyl chloride.

8. Motion imparting member according to claim 1 wherein the driving face is characterized by high frictional characteristics thereby providing for, in combination with the holding means, more positive movement of the nonwoven fibrous finishing means.

9. Motion imparting member for imparting a desired motion to and holding a surface finishing means comprising a nonwoven fibrous pad wherein a driving face is integral with a driven body member so as to provide a motion imparting member of unitary construction and entirely of some suitable plastic material, said driving face being provided with a surface having high frictional characteristics, a plurality of spaced apart recesses extending inwardly in the drive face of said driving face and located in each of said recesses a holding means comprising hook-like members, said hook-like members extending from said recesses whereby means are provided for interlocking engagement with said fibrous pad and where, in combination, the holding means and high frictional surface provide more positive drive of the fibrous pad, said holding means further comprising releasable interengaging means for releasably attaching said holding means to said drive face.

10. Motion imparting member according to claim 9 wherein said plastic material is polyvinyl chloride.

11. Motion imparting member according to claim 10 wherein said high frictional characteristics are provided by a surface having a rough, non-planar configuration.

12. Motion imparting member according to claim 1 wherein said motion imparting member is of circular shape and said recesses are located in at least one annular row located at some desired radial distance from the center of said motion imparting member and concentric with said member.

13. Motion imparting member according to claim 12 wherein said motion imparting member is of annular shape.

14. Motion imparting member according to claim 12 wherein the recesses are arranged in a plurality of concentric annular rows, the openings being so located that the holding means in adjacent rows are'staggered with respect to one another.

15. Motion imparting member according to claim 14 wherein a greater number of holding means are located adjacent the periphery of the circular shaped motion imparting member than at its more central portion.

16. Motion imparting member according to claim 1 wherein the base member of each holding means is circular shaped.

17. Motion imparting member according to claim 16 wherein said circular shaped base member is approximately 1 inch in diameter.

18. Motion imparting member according to claim 17 wherein the hook-like members of the holding means are arranged in parallel rows.

19. Motion imparting member according to claim 18 wherein the hook-like members are spaced from one another about one-eighth inch center-to-center.

20. Motion imparting member according to claim 19 wherein the hook-like members are substantially T- shaped in cross-section.

21. Motion imparting member according to claim 2 wherein said resilient member comprises foam rubber.

means is removably secured in the drive face.

25. Driving face suitable for attachment to a floor machine driven member which imparts a desired motion to a nonwoven fibrous floor pad, said driving face having a drive face, a plurality of spaced apart recesses in said drive face, and located in each of said recesses a removably engaged holding means comprising a plurality of hook-like members extending from the front surface of a base member, each said holding means being recessed in said drive face so that only the hooklike members extend beyond the plane of the driving face, said holding means further comprising means providing removable engagement of the holding means with the motion imparting member.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification451/490, 15/230.17, 15/98
International ClassificationB24D9/08, B24D9/00
Cooperative ClassificationB24D9/085
European ClassificationB24D9/08B