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Publication numberUS3823934 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 16, 1974
Filing dateNov 3, 1971
Priority dateNov 3, 1971
Also published asCA956496A1
Publication numberUS 3823934 A, US 3823934A, US-A-3823934, US3823934 A, US3823934A
InventorsAbney P, Parenti F, Spaleny G
Original AssigneeStandard Register Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Production of multiple-copy business forms
US 3823934 A
Abstract
A plurality of rolls of paper webs and rolls of carbon transfer webs are mounted on corresponding spindles which are cantileverly supported in tandem arrangement by an upright frame. Each paper supply roll is rotated by a constant pressure feed belt, and each paper web is fed upwardly from its supply roll through a corresponding punch unit which forms laterally spaced control holes and U-shaped cuts in the web at longitudinally spaced intervals. Each paper web is then fed upwardly through a corresponding multiple color print unit which successively prints formats on the web. Each carbon web is fed upwardly from its supply roll by a suction drum and passes through a corresponding punch unit which forms longitudinally spaced thumb notches and glue transfer holes in the web in addition to a set of control holes. The carbon webs are then collated with the printed paper webs which are secured together by glue spots projecting through the transfer holes in the carbon webs. The web assembly is then fed through a unit which prints consecutive numbers on the printed forms and then through a device which simultaneously prepunches each form and sizes the form to length. The web assembly then feeds into another device which completely severs each form and feeds it upwardly into the bottom of a stack so that the consecutive numbers increase in a direction from the top of the stack toward the bottom.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Parenti et al.

1 PRODUCTION OF MULTIPLE-COPY BUSINESS FORMS [75] Inventors: Frank V. Parenti, Dayton; Paul C.

Abney, Montgomery County;

George R. Spaleny, Dayton, all of Ohio [73] Assignee: The Standard Register Company,

Dayton, Ohio [22] Filed: Nov. 3, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 195,231

3,196,726 7/1965 Snow 3,531,101 9/1970 Consalvo 3,682,468 8/1972 Schreiber 270/52 Primary Examiner-Lawrence Charles Attorney, Agent, or F irm-Jacox & Meckstroth [111 3,823,934 [451 July 16, 1974 [57] ABSTRACT A plurality of rolls of paper webs and rolls of carbon transfer webs are mounted .on corresponding spindles which are cantileverly supported in tandem arrangement by an upright frame. Each paper supply roll is rotated by a constant pressure feed belt, and each paper web is fed upwardly from its supply roll through a corresponding punch unit which forms laterally spaced control holes and U-shaped cuts in the web at longitudinally spaced intervals. Each paper web is then fed upwardly through a corresponding multiple color print unit which successively prints formats on the web. Each carbon web is fed upwardly from its supply roll by a suction drum and passes through a corresponding punch unit which forms longitudinally spaced thumb notches and glue transfer holes in the web in addition to a set of control holes. The carbon webs are then collated withthe-printed paper webs which are secured together by glue spots projecting through the transfer holes in the carbon webs. The web assembly is then fed through a unit which prints consecutive numbers on the printed forms and then through a device which simultaneously prepunches each form and sizes the form to length. The web assembly then feeds into another device which comthe bottom.

6 Claims, 12 Drawing Figures PATENTEBJULG'QY? 3.823.934 I SHEET 1 0F 6 lNl/E/VTOES (9n FRANK V. PARENTI N PAUL c. ABNEY 0 Y GEORGE R. SPALENY A TTORNEYS PATENTED 3.823834 sum 2 0r 6 ill ' M/VE R3 FRANK V. PAREN L C. ABNEY RGE R. SPALENY w w v Pmumwus 3.823334 INVENTORS FRANK V. PARENTI .PAULC; ABNEY GEORGE R. SPALENY PRODUCTION OF MULTIPLE-COPY BUSINESS FORMS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In the production of multiple copy business forms such as, for example, the multiple copy forms used by service stations, retail stores and other businesses for recording charges to an account represented by a credit card, it is common for the business form to include two or more paper copy sheets and one substantially heavier card copy sheet between which are interleaved carbon transfer sheets. The copy and carbon sheets are usually attached together by a stub end portion which is detachable from the copy sheets by quickly pulling or tearingthe stub portion from the copy sheets and allowing the carbon sheets to remain with the stub portion. The card copy is adapted to receive punched holes representing a coded number or other information which can be automatically read by a sorting machine.

Usually, such business forms are produced from rolls of paper and carbon webs which have a width several times the width of the form, and each copy web is fed through a printing press which prints several copies of the forms across the width of the web. The printed copy webs are then rewound into rolls which are transferred to a collating machine along with rolls of carbon transfer webs. The paper webs are collated with the carbon webs interleaved therebetween', after which the assembled webs are fed through a slitting and cutting machine which separates the multiple copy forms and collects them in a stack. The'stacked forms are then transferred to a machine which prints consecutive numbers on the forms, prepunches the forms with holes corresponding to the consecutive numbers and then restacks the forms with the lowest number at the top of the stack.

The above method for producing prepunched and consecutive numbered business forms has been found suitable for producing a large volume of forms. However, when producing a small volume of forms, the cost of the forms is significantly increased by the time and labor required for operating the separate machines and for transferring the rolls and stack of forms from one to another. That is, after each paper web is printed and rewound, the roll must be transferred to the collating machine where each web is threaded into the machine. In addition, the stacks of formsmust be transferred from the slitting and cutting machine to the prepunch machine where the final operations of prepunching, numbering and restacking are performed.

Multiple copy business forms have also been produced on a machine which combines the operations of printing a web, slitting the web into separate webs, colt lating the separate webs by directing them at right angles to the path ofthe original web, and then cutting the collated webs into forms. However, substantial time is required for threading each web through the machine, and furthermore, all copy webs are made from the same paper web so that a card copy cannot be provided.

In another form of machine which has been proposed, separate rolls of copy webs are fed in laterally spaced relation onto a common print roll. The direction of the webs is then changed 90 and the webs are collated into overlying relation with carbon webs being fed therebetween. The web assembly is severed into separate forms which are stacked. This machine presents a problem of printing copy webs of different thicknesses in addition to a problem of threading each web through the machine. Furthermore, the stacks of forms must then be transferred to another machine for prepunching. Whenever it is necessary to transfer either a roll of paper or a stack of forms to perform another operation on the web or forms, usually storage space is required during the transfer, and such storage space indirectly adds to the cost of'producing the forms. Furthermore, additional labor is required for making the transfer and for operating the separate machines.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is directed to an improved method and apparatus for producing multiple-copy business forms and is especially suited for producing prepunched business forms including one or more card copies adapted to be processed within a card sorting machine. However, the method and apparatus of this invention may also be used for producing business forms having only sheet'material and no card stock material. The apparatus of the invention provides for continuously producing prepunched and consecutively numbered multiple-copy business forms from supply rolls of plain paper webs and unprocessed carbon transfer webs, each preferably having a width corresponding to the desired width of the business form, or a width corresponding substantially to the width of two or more business forms.

The invention also provides for continuously producing multiple-copy forms each including one or more card copies having prepunched holes corresponding to coded information and which are precisely located from one end of the card copy. As a result the card copies may be quickly processed within a card sorting machine without producing rejects which result from poor registration between the punched holes and the ends of the card copy. The invention further provides for producing multiple copy forms having consecutivenumbers and for continuously stacking the forms so that the numbers increase'in a direction from the top of the stack to the bottom of the stack.

In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, a series of rolls of paper copy webs and a corresponding-series of rolls of carbon transfer webs are supported by corresponding spindles which project cantileverly from a wall-like frame and are arranged in tandem relation. Each copy and carbon web is fed through a corresponding punch unit, and each copy web is then fed through a multiple color printing unit. The copy webs are collated with the carbon webs interleaved therebetween, and the webs are secured together by glue spots which are applied at longitudinally spaced intervals corresponding to the locations of detachable stub portions of the multiple-copy forms being produced.

From the combined punching, printing and collating and assembling apparatus, the web assembly of successive forms is fed through a printing unit which prints a series of consecutive numbers on the forms. After the printing operation, the web may be folded or rolled or the like; the individual successive forms may be severed in any suitable manner. However, in this invention as shown, from the printing unit, the web assembly is fed into a prepunching unit or device which simultaneously prepunches holes within each form assembly corresponding to the printed number and sizes each form as- BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a somewhat diagrammatic perspective view of apparatus for producing multiple-copy business forms in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged vertical sectional view, taken generally on the line 2-2 ofFIG. 1 and showing the die set for punching and sizing each business form;

FIG. 3 is a diagrammatic perspective view of the apparatus for prepunching, sizing and stacking business forms, taken from the side opposite that shown in FIG. 1, and drawn on a larger scale than FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a somewhat diagrammatic fragmentary section taken generally on the line 4-4 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a somewhat diagrammatic section taken generally on the line 5-5 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged axial view of the form stacking drive mechanismshown in FIG. 3;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary plan view of a continuous business form assembly, illustrating the operations performed by the prepun'ching and sizing die set;

FIG. 8 is a view similar to FIG. 7 and illustrating the operations of completely severing a form assembly and of indicating a predetermined numbering of form assemblies;

FIG. 9 is a plan view of a business form assembly constructed in accordance with the invention but without a printed format;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary view of the form assembly shown in'FIG. 9 and with portions broken away to show the assembled sheets and the fastening means for the sheets;' I

FIG. 11 is an enlarged elevational view of a paper roll drive mechanism shown in FIG. 1; and

FIG. 12 is a section taken generally on 1212of FIG. 11,.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The apparatus shown generally in FIG. 1 is used, for example, for continuously producing multiple-copy business forms (FIGS. 9 and 10), each of which includes an upper or original paper copy sheet 21, an intermediate paper copy sheet 22 and a relatively heavier card copy sheet 23. However, as stated above, the apparatus may be used for producing business forms of only paper sheet material, or for producing business forms having more than one copy of card material. Interleaved between the copy sheets 21-23 are carbon the line transfer sheets 24. All of the copy sheets 21-23 are procuts 26 and between the outer ends of the cuts 27 and the side edges of the copy sheets. When the copy sheets 21-23 are pulled or snapped from the stub portion 28, the ties are torn to permit the separation, but the carbon transfer sheets 24 remain with the stub portion 28.

In the multiple copy business form, the end portions of the copy sheets 21-23 and carbon transfer sheets 24, forming the stub portion 28, are retained by glue spots 29 which attach adjacent copy sheets through a series of holes 31 and through an arcuate notch or hole 32 within each carbon transfer sheet 24. The stub portion 28 of each form 20 also includes a pair of feed or control holes 34 which extend through all of the copy and transfer sheets 21-24. The forms 20 are also printed with consecutive numbers 35 which correspond to a machine readable number code defined by a group of punched holes 36. The punched holes 36 may be any suitable machine readable punchings, such as, for example, l-Iollerith punchings, or the like. The opposite end of each form 20 has a beveled corner 37 and a rounded corner 38.

Successive forms 20 are continuously produced by the apparatus shown in FIG. 1. This apparatus includes a combined punching, printing and collating unit 40 which has an elongated upright frame 42 constructed of aligned modular sections 44. A pneumatically inflatable spindle 45 is cantileveredly supported by each of the frame sections 44, and the spindles 45 receive corresponding rolls R R R and R of paper copy webs 46, 47, 48', and 49, respectively. Each of the copywebs 46-49 is fed from its corresponding roll around a set of guide rolls 51 and a dancer roll 52 which is supported by a pivotable arm 53 (FIG. 11) connected to a pneumatically actuated brake mechanism 54 for the corresponding spindle 45. Each of the web supply rolls R R is rotated by an endless feed belt 55 (FIG. I l which is directed around a pair of parallel spaced rollers 56 (FIG. 11) supported by a carriage 58 mounted on upper and lower horizontal tracks 59 and 61. Each belt 55 moves radially with respect to the corresponding spindle 45 and is urged against the corresponding supply roll at a constant pressure by a pneumatic cylinder 62 having a piston rod 63 connected to the support carriage 58. Each of the upper rollers 56 is mounted on a shaft 64 which extends through a horizontal slot 66 in the frame 42 and is driven by an endless chain drive 68.

Each of the copy webs 46-49 is fed upwardly from its corresponding dancer roll 52 and guide rolls 51 to a set of punch rolls 72 which are effective to form the U-cuts 26 and the control holes 34 at uniformly spaced intervals along each of the webs 46-49. After passing between each of the punch rolls 72, each of the copy webs 46-49 is directed through a corresponding printing unit 75. Preferably, each printing unit 75 is of the flexographic type and includes an impression cylinder 76 having outwardly projecting end flanges for guiding the web and which is removably mounted on a cantilevered spindle 78.

Each of the printing units 75 is capable of applying three separate colors to the corresponding copy web which it receives, and thus includes three peripherally spaced plate cylinders 80 and three sets of correspondsponding copy web at precise longitudinal spacing between the longitudinally spaced sets of control holes 34 within the web. From each printing unit 75, the corresponding copy web is directed through a glue applicator 85 which is effective to apply the laterally spaced glue spots 29 to a-surface of the paper web at longitudinally spaced intervals adjacent the control holes 34.

A rotatable spindle 88 is cantileveredly supported by each of the frame sections 44 except for the right end section shown in FIG. 1, and the spindles 88 support corresponding roll R of carbon transfer webs 89. Each of the copy webs 46-49 and each of the carbon webs 89 have substantially the same width which corre sponds to the width of the business forms 20. Each of the carbon webs 89 is fed from its corresponding supply rolls R by an endless belt 91 which is directed around parallel spaced driven rollers 92 supported by a pivotable arm (not shown). The weight of the arm, the belt 91 and the rollers 92 is effective to hold the belt 91 in substantially constant pressure contact with the roll R of carbon paper web 89.

Each of the carbon webs 89 is directed from its corresponding roll R around a dancer roll 96 and a series of guide rollers 97. Each dancer roll 96 is supported by a pivotable arm (not shown) which effectively controls a pneumatic brake (not shown) for the corresponding spindle 88 in the same manner as the arm 53 controls the corresponding brake mechanism 54 for the the spindle 45. Each carbon transfer web 89 is then directed upwardly between a set of corresponding punch rolls 98 which are effective to form the holes 31 and thumb notch or hole 32 within the carbon web at longitudinally spaced intervals. From the punch rolls 98, each of the carbon transfer webs 89 is directed around a rotatable feed roll 101 having peripherally spaced holes which are connected to a suitable suction source through a cantilevered spindle 102.

The copy webs 46-49 are directed upwardly from the corresponding glue applicators 85, and the carbon transfer webs 89 are directed upwardly from the corresponding suction feed rollers 101 around a series of guide rollers 104 and into overlying collated relation on top of the upper runs of a series of endless feed belts 105. Each of the feed belts' 105 is directed around a corresponding-set of driven rollers 106 and has longitudinally spaced pairs of outwardly projecting pins which extend through the longitudinally spaced aligned control holes 34 within the overlying webs. The carbon webs 89 are fed between the copy webs 46-49, and all of the assembled or collated webs are fastened or secured together at longitudinally spaced intervals by the ported by a bracket 114 forming part of the main frame I 42. As schematically illustrated in FIG. 1, all of the punch rolls 72 and 98, the printing units 75, the glue applicators 85, the suction feed rollers 101 and the feed belts are driven in precise time relation by a main drive 115. The drive belts 55 and 91 for the rolls R R are driven so that the belts 55 and 91 slip slightly on the rolls as the braking of the roll support spindles 45 and 88 are controlled by the corresponding dancer rolls 52 and 96.

From the feed wheel 112, the assembled web W extends downwardly to form a loop 118 between the printing and collating unit 40 and a printing unit 120 which is positioned in tandem relation with the unit 40. The printing unit 120 includes a frame 122 which supports a pair of feed wheels 123, having outwardly projecting pins for engaging the feed or control holes 34 within the assembled web W. The feed wheels 1223 are driven by a variable speed drive 125 controlled by a set of upper and lower photocells 126 mounted on the frame 122. The photocells 126 are actuated by corresponding light sources 128 and are positioned to sense the upper and lower limits in the length of the web loop 118. Thus the photocells 126 control the speed of the printing unit 120 in response to the speed of the printing and collating unit 40 and assure that there is always a web loop 118 between the unit 40 and the unit 120.

The printing unit 120 also includes a set of impression cylinders 132 and corresponding plate cylinders 134 and inking rollers 136, and is effective to print the consecutive numbers 35 (FIG. 9) on the assembled forms 20 as the forms are fed through the printing unit 120.

After the assembled web W receives the consecutive printed numbers 35 within the printing unit 120, the assembled web W is directed downwardly to form another loop 142 between the printing unit 120 and a combined prepunching and stacking unit 145 (FIGS. 1 and 3). This unit 145 includes a feed roll or wheel 147 which is mounted on a shaft 148 connected to an intermittant drive mechanism 149 having an input shaft driven continuously from a shaft 150 connected to the drive 125. The feed wheel 147 has circumferentially spaced sets of outwardly projecting pins 152 which project into the control holes 34 within the assembled web W. The web W is retained on the feed roll 147 by a set of curved hold-down shoes 154.

From the feed wheel 147, the assembled web W is fed into a die set which includes abottom die member 162 supported for vertical reciprocating movement by eccentric drive mechanisms 164 driven continuously from the shaft 150- connected to the drive 125. As shown in FIG. 2, the bottom die member 162 preferably may be constructed as generally shown in U.S. Pat. No..3,079,07l, which is assigned to the assignee of this invention, and includes a plate member 166 defining a wide slot 167 through which the assembled web W is intermittently fed.

The die set 160 also includes an upper die member 172 (FIG. 2) which is also generally constructed as shown in U.S. Pat. No. 3,079,071 and includes a series of laterally spaced longitudinal rows of punch elements 174 which are retained by a series of longitudinally extending rods 176 and are free for limited vertical movement. The punch elements 174 cooperate with corresponding rectangular holes 178 formed within the bottom die member 162 to punch the holes 36 within each form 20 of the assembled web W when the lower die member 162 is reciprocated. As mentioned above, the holes 36 within each form 20 correspond to the number 35 on the form. As described in detail in the aforementioned patent, the holes 36 are formed by positioning interposer members behind the punch elements 174 before the die members 162 and 172 close. Thus the (FIG. 3) connected to the shaft 150. r Referring to FIGS. .4and 5, an elongated duct 246 is 7 selected punch elements 174'are prevented from retracting upwardly into the'upper die member 172 and are effective to. punch through the assembled web W when the die members close. l

In addition to the punch elements 174, the upper die member 172 supports a set of knife elements'l82 and vanced' into the hopper 196 and the edges of the form r 20 are received within a set of opposing slots 227.

184 which are retained by corresponding retaining plates 186. The knife elements l82are effective'to form the three aligned linear or straight cuts 27 (F IG. 7) withinthe assembled web W, and the knife element 184 forms a laterally extending linear cut 188 (FIG. 7)

As shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, a die member252 is'lo- 'cated directly above the path of the assembled web 20 at theentr ance end of theihopper 196. The die member 252 includes a bevel forming die insert 254 (FIG. 8) and a radius forming die insert 256 which mate with a die insert 258 mounted on the adjacent end of the vertically reciprocating lower die member 162. As illustrated in FIG. 8, when the lower die member 162 moves upwardly after a form 20 has been advanced which defines the end surface of each form 20, opposite the stub portion 28. Thus the die set 160 not only prepunchesthe holes 36 but simultaneously sizes each of the copy sheets21y-24 to length in precise registration with the holes 36.

After the assembled web W is intermittently fed I are also effectiveto form the beveled and rounded cor-v ners 37 and 38 on the form 20'a's shown in FIG. 8.:

by a series of upright side guide members 197 and an end guide member v198. The prepunched andprecut assembled web W is fed into the hopper by a pair of endless feed belts 202.('FIGS. 4 and which are directed around pulleys 203 mounted on corresponding parallel spaced shafts 204. The feed-belts 202 have outmechanism 214 having an input shaft which is continuously driven by'a belt drive 216 connected to the shaft 150 extending from the drive 125. The continuous business forms are successively advanced by the feed belts 202 into the stacking unit l95 where each form '20 is received by a pair of parallelspaced elongated rotary stacking members 220 mounted on corresponding parallel spaced shafts 2221.rotatably supportedby bearing blocks 223.

Each of the stacking members220, includes aplurai- 'ity; of circumferentially spaced and longitudinally ex- 1 tendingL-shaped ribs226 which define therebetween axially extending slots 227 spaceduniformly around the periphery ofthe stacking member. A pair of axially spaced grooves 229 are formed within each stacking member 220 for receiving the corresponding upright guide members 197. The stacking members 220 are indexed in opposite directions, as shown by the arrows in FIG. 5, by an' indexing drive mechanism 232 (FIG.'3). This drive mechanism includes'a set of gears 234 (FIG. 6) mounted on the ends of the shafts 222 and driven through pinions 236 which are intermittently rotated or indexed by at Geneva drive unit 238 including a disc 241 rotated at a constant speed by a V-belt drive 242 positioned between the upper runs of the feed belts202 and is connected -by a tube 247 to a suitable suction source. As-t-he forms 20 are successively advanced into.

the hopper 196, the suction within the duct 246 assures that each form 20 is held in contact with. the upper runs of the feed belts 202 until the formZO is completely ad- After each form 20 within the bottom ofthe hopper 196 issevered' from the leading-end of-the web W, the

rotary stackingmembers 220 are indexed so that the form 20 is elevated'within the hopper 196 as illustrated in F1045, thereby clearing the path for the next form 20-to be fed into the bottom of the hopper by the feed belts 202. Thus the stacking members 220 are effective to produce a stack 260 (FIG. 3) of forms 20 within the hopper l96 by successively adding forms to the bottom ofthestack. V

Referring to FIG.14,'a solenoid 262 is positioned ad jacent the inner end of the hopper196 and is controlled by a mechanism (not shown) which counts the rate at which the forms 20 are advanced into the bottom of the hopper ,196. The solenoid 262 .includes an armature 263. which projects through a slot 264 within the die member 252. When the solenoid 262 is momentarily energized or pulsed, for example, after a count of 100 forms, the armature 263 is extended to shift the aligned form 20 longitudinally by a'fraction of an inch. Thus the end portion of the longitudinally shifted form 20 projects from the corresponding end of the stack 260 and t hereby-provides a visual indication of the number of forms 20 within the hopper 196 and enables the operator to reniove the forms-from the hopper in stacks of predetermined number. Means are provided for eliminating forms 20 which are not properly preparedfor stacking and for use. Re- 7 From the drawings and the above description, it is apparent that the production of multiple copy business forms in accordance with the invention, provides desirable features andladvantages. For example, the apparatus provides for continuously and efficiently producing multiple-copy forms which have. a relatively heavy card 'copysheets and which are'prepunched and printed with successive numbers. The apparatus also provides for continuously stacking the forms as they are prov duced so that the consecutive numbers on the forms increase in a downward direction in the stack.

The apparatus further provides for quick set-up and changeover which is highle desirable for processing relatively small orders of business forms. That is, allof the components which process and feed the copy and carbon transfer webs on the combined printing and collating unit 40 are cantileveredly supported so that each Web can be quickly and easily threaded. In addition, the cylinders of each printing unit 75 may be conveniently and quickly interchanged to accommodate webs of different thicknesses and for changing the format which is successively printed on each web.

It is also apparent that the successive printing, collating and prepunching operations eliminate the requirement of in-process transfer or storage of either paper rolls or partially completed business forms. Furthermore, the apparatus is adapted to use unprocessed carbon transfer webs, i.e., webs which do not have a clean margin. Thus the rolls of carbon paper can be conveniently and efficiently formed by slitting a wide web of carbon paper. The modular and tandem construction of the combined printing and collating unit 40, also provides for conveniently increasing the number of copies in the forms, simply by inserting another modular unit in the apparatus.

The prepunching and stacking unit 145 also provides important features. For example, the die set 160 not only prepunches the desired holes 36 within each form but also simultaneously sizes each form 20 to length by forming the series of aligned transfer cuts 27 and the single transverse cut 188. As a result, the ends of each form 20 are in precise registration with the punched holes 36. This registration is highly desirable when the card copies are being processed through a machine which reads the punched holes 36 to assure that the copy is properly read and processed and is not rejected. As mentioned above, the stacking unit 195 also provides for producing a stack of forms by successively adding the forms to the bottom of the stack.

While the method and form of apparatus herein described constitute a preferred embodiment of the invention, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to the precise method and form of apparatus described, and that changes may be made therein'without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

The invention having been described, the following is claimed:

1. Apparatus for producing continuous multiple-copy business forms, comprising an upright frame member, a first set of parallel spaced spindles supported in a cantilevered manner by said frame member in tandem relation and adapted to receive supply rolls of copy webs, a second set of parallel spaced spindles supported in a cantilevered manner by said frame member in tandem relation and adapted to receive corresponding rollsof carbon transfer webs, a plurality of print cylinders, means supported by said frame member and rotatably supporting said print cylinders, means associated with each said cylinder for successively printing a corresponding copy web, means for punching a set of laterally spaced feed holes within each of the copy and transfer webs at longitudinally spaced intervals, the longitudinal spacing between adjacent sets of said feed holes corresponding to the length of the forms, drive pin means for engaging said feed holes and for feeding the copy webs from at least some of the corresponding supply rolls partially around the corresponding said print cylinders, means for collating the copy and carbon transfer webs into overlying relation with the feed holes and printing on the webs in registration, means for 'fasteningthe collated webs together across the width of the webs adjacent said feed holes, and means for at least partially severing the collated webs along transverse lines at longitudinally spaced intervals adja-' cent the feed holes to define for each business form a removable stub portion having the corresponding feed holes.

2. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 including an endless drive belt for each said spindle of said first set, a

carriage supporting each said belt, linear track means supporting each said carriage for substantially radial horizontal movement in relation to the corresponding said spindle, and means for urging each said carriage toward the corresponding said spindle with a substantially constant force to hold said drive belt in substantially constant pressureengagement with the corremeans to produce a vertical stack of forms in response to the addition of forms to the bottom of the stack by said stacking means. i

4. Apparatus as' defined in claim 3 wherein said stacking means comprise a set of parallel spaced horizontal rotary stacking members each having means defining a plurality of peripherally spaced slots, said stacking members being disposed for said slots to receive opposite edge portions of each form, an endless conveyor having an upper horizontal run extending between said stacking members, and means for rotating said stacking members in opposite directions to elevate each form to produce a stack of forms from the bottom of the stack.

5. Apparatus as defined in claim l-including means for punching a series of machine readable holes within the collated webs at predetermined longitudinally spaced intervals, and knife means movable with said punching means for cutting laterally extending slits within the collated webs at the ends of the forms and simultaneously with the punching of said holes to size each form to length in precise registration with the punched hole.

6. Apparatus for producing continuous multiple-copy business forms each including a card-like copy, comprising an upright frame member, a first set of parallel spaced spindles supported by said frame member in tandem relation and adapted to receive supply rolls of copywebs, a second set of parallel spaced spindles supported by said frame member in tandem relation and adapted to receive corresponding rolls of carbon transfer webs, a plurality of print cylinders, means supported by said frame member and rotatably supporting said print cylinders, means associated with each said print cylinder for successively printing a corresponding copy web, means for punching a set of laterally spaced feed holes within each of the copy and transfer webs at longitudinally spaced intervals, the longitudinal spacing between adjacent sets of said feed holes corresponding to the length of the forms, drive pin means for engaging said feed holes for feeding the copy webs from at least some of the corresponding supply rolls partially around the corresponding said print cylinders, means for punching a set of laterally spaced openings with each of the carbon transfer webs at longitudinally spaced intervals and in generally lateral alignment with the corresponding said feed holes, means for collating the copy and carbon transfer webs into overlying relation with the feed holes and printing the webs in registration, means for fastening the collated webs together through said openings within the adjacent said transfer

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Referenced by
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US4235430 *Apr 26, 1979Nov 25, 1980Fulk James BMethod and apparatus for manufacturing business forms
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US6659442 *Jan 29, 1999Dec 9, 2003Lts Lohamann Therapie-Systeme AgMethod and device for inserting a plurality of individual sheetlike forms of administration in a dispenser by forming a multilayer pile
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US7380743Apr 19, 2005Jun 3, 2008Bobst, S.A.Module for supporting and driving a wound foil matter for a machine processing it
CN100548841CApr 22, 2005Oct 14, 2009鲍勃斯脱股份有限公司Module for supporting and driving a wound foil matter for a machine processing it
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EP1526101A1 *Jan 29, 1999Apr 27, 2005LTS Lohmann Therapie-Systeme AGMethod for inserting a plurality of individual sheetlike dosage forms in a dispenser by forming a multilayer pile
EP1588968A1 *Apr 23, 2004Oct 26, 2005Bobst S.A.Module for supporting and driving a web material wound on a bobbin for a processing machine
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Classifications
U.S. Classification270/18, 270/52.9, 270/52.8
International ClassificationB65H39/16, B65H39/00, B41F17/02, B41F17/00
Cooperative ClassificationB41P2217/15, B65H39/16, B41F17/02
European ClassificationB41F17/02, B65H39/16