Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3824637 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 23, 1974
Filing dateOct 27, 1972
Priority dateOct 27, 1972
Publication numberUS 3824637 A, US 3824637A, US-A-3824637, US3824637 A, US3824637A
InventorsHunnicutt C
Original AssigneeHunnicutt C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ventilating attachment for water closet
US 3824637 A
Abstract
In order to provide very efficient and effective ventilation of a water closet, a collector having an exhaust coupled to suction means is disposed directly beneath the seat at the rear thereof. The collector is held in place by and between the hinge bolts of the seat, and has a downwardly directed inlet opening which extends over the center rear portion of the bowl. A passageway, which is taller than its narrowest portion, extends laterally between the seat and the water reservoir of the water closet to effect a conduit between the inlet and exhaust openings. The exhaust opening is coupled, by means of a flexible hose, to the suction means comprising a motor driven centrifugal air pump. The air pump may discharge to a conduit leading outdoors or to another convenient discharge space, or the air from the bowl may be pulled by the suction pump through filtering means, such as activated charcoal, after which it is discharged into the local environment. With the latter configuration, a self-contained pump/filter unit is provided, and the activated charcoal is disposed within a chamber having a baffle which prevents "tunneling" of the flowing air through the charcoal after a period of use. The collector is provided with upwardly directed lips about both the inlet and exhaust openings to achieve a double trap against any water which might inadvertently enter the collector, thereby preventing any water from entering the flexible tubing to prevent electrical malfunctions of the motor driving the air pump.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 Hunnicutt, Jr.-

[451 July 23, 1974 VENTILATING ATTACHMENT FOR WATER CLOSET 76 Inventor: Clyde J. Hunnicutt, Jr., 3026 E.

Garfield St., Phoenix, Ariz. 85008 22 Filed: Nov. 8, 1972 21 Appl. No; 301,581

52 Us. Cl. 4/213, 4/72 [51] Int. Cl A47k 3/22, E03d 9/04, E03d 13/00 [58] Field of Search 4/209, 217, 213, 72

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,017,590 10/1935 Duffner 4/213 2,728,088 12/1955 Gudish 4/217 2,747,201 5/1956 Hern'ott 4/213 2,988,756 6/1961 Hartley 4/213 3,230,551 1/1966 Kopp 4/213 3,335,431 8/1967 Coates 4/213 3,366,979 2/1968 Johnston 4/213 3,386,109 6/1968 Christian et al. 4/213 3,491,382 1/1970 Primary Examiner-Henry K. Artis Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Cahill, Sutton & Thomas 57 ABSTRACT In order to provide very efficient and effective ventila- Poister .Q 4/217 tion of a water closet, a collector having an exhaust coupled to suction means is disposed directly beneath the seat at the rear thereof. The collector is held in place by and between the hinge bolts of the seat, and has a downwardly directed inlet opening which extends over the center rear portion of the bowl. A passageway, which is taller than its narrowest portion, extends laterally between the seat and the water reservoir of the water closet to effect a conduit between the inlet and exhaust openings. The exhaust opening is coupled, by means of a flexible hose, to the suction means comprising a motor driven centrifugal air pump. The air pump may discharge to a conduit leading outdoors or to another convenient discharge space, or the air from the bowl may be pulled by the suction pump through filtering means, such as activated charcoal, after which his discharged into the local environment. With the latter configuration, a self-contained pump/filter unit is provided, and the activated charcoal is disposed within a chamber having a baffle which prevents tunnelingof the flowing air through the charcoal after a period of use. The collector is provided with upwardly directed lips about both the inlet and exhaust openings to achieve a double trap against any water which might inadvertently enter the collector, thereby preventing any water from entering the flexible tubing to prevent electrical malfunctions of the motor driving the air pump.

4 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures PATENTED JULZ 3 I974 SHEET 1 BF 3 PATENTED JUL 2 31974 SHEEI 2 0f 3 VENTILATING ATTACHMENT FOR WATER CLOSET This invention relates to ventilated water closetsand, more particularly, .to an attachment system for forcibly ventilating water closets. I

Various attachment and integral systems have been proposed in the pastfor ventilating water closets. The prior art in this field is characterized by impractical'and incompletely thought-out systems which require considerable alteration of an existing water closet and which are still ineffective because the aerodynamics of the system were casually treated.

Thus, it is a broad object of my invention to provide an improved ventilating system for water closets.

It is another object of my invention to provide such a system which may readilybe incorporated into an existing water closet.

It is still another object of my invention to provide a collector for such a system which is scientifically placed and configured for maximum efficiency and sanitation.

It is a further object of my invention to provide such a system which is very durable and yet is relatively simple and economical to manufacture.

In yet another aspect, it is an object of my invention to provide such a system in which variant embodiments may either exhaust to another environment or within the same environment after treatment.

The subject matter of the invention is particularly pointed out and distinctly claimed in the concluding portion of the specification. The invention, however, both as to organization and method of operation, may best be understood with reference to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings of which;

FIG. 1 is a pictorial illustrating the broad means by which the apparatus constituting the present invention 'may be integratedwith a conventional water closet;

FIG. 2 is a detail of a collector unit element of the system shown in FIG. 1, FIG. 2 being drawn as if the material used in the upper portion of the collector unit were clear to better illustrate the internal construction thereof;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken along lines 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view taken along lines 44 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a partially cutaway and partially cross-,

eral shape of the chamber containing the impellers and the exhaust area.

Referring now to FIG. 1, a conventional water closet 1 including a base portion 2, reservoir portion 3, and

seat means 4 secured to the base portion 2 by hinge means 5. The hinge means 5 includes downwardly directed bolts (not shown) for securing the seat means 4 to the base portion 2 in the usual manner. However, as will be more fully explained below, a collector unit 6 is interposed generally between the hinge means 5 and is held in position by the aforementioned bolts.

The collector unit 6 is provided with a laterally offset portion 7 having an exhaust aperture on the underneath side thereof, which exhaust aperture couples to a flexible hose8 which leads to the inlet of air recirculating and treating apparatus 9 or, alternatively, to power operated exhaust means 10. The poweroperated exhaust means 10 includes a wall plate 11 for receiving the remote end of the flexible hose 8, a motor driven suction fan 12, and a conduit 13 coupling the exhaust outletof the suction 'fan 12 to an exhaust area such as the outside environment or an attic.

portions- 15 and 16 on either side thereof. The wing portions 15 and 16 are provided, respectively, with apertures 17 and 18 which are spaced apartfrom one another a standard distance for receiving the downwardly directed hinge bolts (not shown) such that the collector unit 6 can be secured in place in the obvious manner. The underside of the central portion 14 is provided with an inlet opening which, it will be observed, is directly centrally disposed between the hinges 5 (FIG. 1). The inlet area beneath the central portion 14 provides direct air communication between the bowl portion of a water closet to which the collector unit 6 is affixed and an elongated aperture 19 which discharges into laterally extending chamber 20. The elongated aperture 19 includes an upwardly extending lip portion 21 about the entire periphery thereof for reasons which will be set forth below. The laterally extending chamber 20 provides a relativelytall and narrow conduit to an outlet 22 to which the flexible hose 8 is attached. The outlet 22 is also provided with a lip portion 23 about the complete periphery thereof.

With simultaneous reference to FIGS. 2, 3, and 4, it will be observed that air can pass from a water closet bowl through the inlet 24 of the collector unit 6, through the elongated aperture 19, through the laterally extending chamber 20, and out the collector unit outlet 22. The lips 21 and 23 encompassing respectively the apertures 19 and the outlet 22, serve to trap any water which might escape into the collector unit 6 from a water closet bowl (as in the case of inadvertent water overflow) in the chamber 20, thereby preventing such water from entering the flexible hose 8, which water could conceivably reach electrically driven suction means.

For installations made in conjunction with fabrication or extensive remodeling of the environment, the

through the exhaust means 10 for discharge to a remote I point. However, for installation with water closets in which no other alteration of the environment is contemplated and for portable use, the utilization of the air recirculating and treating apparatus 9 (FIG. 1) is provided. In both variants, the specific configuration of the collector unit 6 permits incorporation of the system into an existing water closed by virtue of the standardized spacing between the apertures 17 and 18 (FIG. 2)

and the relatively narrow laterally extending chamber 20, the configuration of which achieves adequate volumetric capacity without physicalinterference with the reservoir 3 of the water closet I. The internal construction of the air recirculating and treating apparatus9 is best understood from a consideration of FIGS. 5, 6,and 7. Referring'specifically to FIG. 5, it will be observed that the recirculating and treating apparatus 9 includes an upper portion which fits over a lower portion 26. The upper portion 25 has an inlet aperture 27 centrally disposed at the top thereof and leading to an inner chamber 28. The bottom 29 ofthe inner chamber'28 is provided with a plurality of apertures 30 discharging into a space 31 intermediate the upper and lower portions 25 and 26 of the recirculating and treating apparatus 9. The chamber 28 is partially filled with activated charcoal 32 which is prevented from falling through the apertures 30 by screen means 33.

A deflector 34 extends upwardly from the bottom 29 of the inner chamber 28 directly below the inlet'aperture 27. The function of the deflector 34 is quite important in that it prevents tunneling through the activated charcoal 32 as a result of air flow into the inner chamber 28. Such tunneling is very undesirable because, if permitted, it establishes an air flow path which shunts the activated charcoal whereby the air passing through the apparatus 9 would be partially treated or not treated at all.

Referring nowto FIGS. 5, 6, and 7, an impeller 35 centrally disposed in a chamber positioned in the upper section of the lower portion 26 of the apparatus 9 is driven by an electrical motor 36 which may be energized through conductor 39- from conventional wall plug 37 in accordance with the position of switch 38. A base member 41 provides support for the entire recirculating and treating apparatus 9 such that it may be freestanding in any convenient position proximate the water closet to which it is coupled.

Upon energization of the motor 36, clockwise rotation (FIG. 7) of the impeller 35 commences with an exhaust chamber 42 receiving air pulled through the upper portion 25, including the activated charcoal 32. The pumped air passes through an outlet 43 which is in direct communication with a lower chamber 44 in the lower portion 26 of the apparatus 9. The treated air is then discharged through a series of circumferentially distributed slots.45 back into the immediate environment.

With specific reference to FIG. 7, it will be noted that the exhaust chamber 42 extends only a relatively short angular distance about the circumference of the impeller 35. Quieter and more efficient operation result from keeping this angular distance on the order of 90 or less. Additionally, quiet operation and volumetric effi-v ciency are further enhanced by the provision of a baffle 46 havinga centrally disposed aperture 47 placed over the impeller 35 such that the air flowing through the activated charcoal 32 and the apertures 30 is pulled inwardly to pass through the aperture 47 into the impeller chamber 40.

Attention is redirected to the collector unit 6 which was depicted in FIG. 2 as if the upper portion were made of clear material. In practice, a plastic material is utilized which may be matched in color to the specific water closet to which it is affixed. It may further be noted that the forward end 48 of the central portion 14 has a waterfall shape for sanitary purposes. It will further be noted that the inlet '24 (FIG. 3) is symmetricallydisposed about the fore and aft centerline of the water closet because of the position of the apertures 17 and 18 (FIG. 2) which are utilized to secure the collector unit 6 in position.v This specific position hasbeen foundcritical in achieving flowcharacteristics whereby essentially all air from the bowl is drawn into the flexible hose 8 for exhaust or treatment. Therefore,it will be understood that the placement of the inletto the collector unit 6 at the rear central area of the bowl results in greatly enhanced volumetric efficiency such that relatively low speed and uiet motorscan be utilized in the suction means an the necessity; for very high flow rate across the bowl is obviated.

While'the principles of the invention have now been made clear in an illustrative embodiment, there will be immediately obvious to those skilled in the art many modifications of, structure, arrangement, proportions, the elements, materials, and components, used in the practice of the invention which are particularly adapted for specific environments and operating requlireirnents without departingfrom those principles.

c arm: 1

1. A system for ventilating a water closet bowl comprising:

a. a collector unit having an inlet opening symmetrically disposed about the bowl fore and aft centerline and positioned at the rear thereof, said collector unit also havin an outlet aperture in direct communication witfi said inlet opening, said inlet opening and said outlet aperture of said collector unit being in direct communicationby a laterally extending chamber, a first passage coupling said inlet opening to said laterally extending chamber and-terminatin therein in an'upwardly lipped aperture, said out et aperture being defined by an upwardly extending circumferential lip;

b. an air pump means having an intake and an exhaust;

c. conduit means coupling said outlet aperture of said collector unit to said air pump intake;

(1. an air recirculating and treatment housing having an inlet coupled to said conduit means, said housing including an inner chamber and a quantity of activated charcoal at least partially filling said inner chamber, said housing further including said air pump means for drawing air from said collector unit, through said inner chamber and discharging the air through said air pump exhaust into the water closet environment; and

e. air deflector means disposed in said inner chamber directly in the path of the gaseous mixture to prevent tunneling through the activated charcoal.

2. The system of claim 1 in which said air pump means comprises an impeller,-an electrical motor driving said impeller, an air exhaust chamber radially outboard of said impeller for receiving air moved by said impeller, an exhaust outlet coupling said exhaust chamber to a lower chamber, and at least one discharge aperture in said lower chamber communicating with the water closet environment.

3. The system of claim 2 including a plurality of discharge apertures circumferentially distributed about said housing.

4. The system of claim 3 in which said collector unit further includes first and second wing ortions extending laterally on opposite sides of said in ct opening, first and second fixing apertures through, respectively, said first and second wing portions, said first and second fixing apertures spaced from one another to align with conventially spaced seat securing bolts whereby said collector may be secured in place by passing the bolts through said fixing apertures.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2017590 *Nov 2, 1933Oct 15, 1935Duffner Carl AAir purifier
US2728088 *May 27, 1953Dec 27, 1955William GudishVentilated seat and cover assembly for toilet bowls
US2747201 *Jul 14, 1953May 29, 1956James R HerriottToilet deodorizer
US2988756 *Jan 26, 1959Jun 20, 1961Hartley Ralph PFume removing device for toilet bowls
US3230551 *Mar 25, 1963Jan 25, 1966Kopp Ruben AToilet bowl ventilating apparatus
US3335431 *Jul 15, 1965Aug 15, 1967Walter A Gay JrWater closet ventilating unit
US3366979 *May 6, 1965Feb 6, 1968Melvin I. JohnstonDeodorizing apparatus
US3386109 *Mar 2, 1966Jun 4, 1968Jack L. YoungbloodToilet deodorizing device
US3491382 *May 1, 1967Jan 27, 1970Poister Clarence EToilet stool ventilating means
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4059857 *Dec 20, 1976Nov 29, 1977Poister Clarence EFree standing toilet stool ventilating device
US4175293 *Feb 6, 1978Nov 27, 1979Nielson Juan FToilet bowl odor removing apparatus and hinge
US4263669 *Jun 22, 1979Apr 21, 1981International Business Machines CorporationPattern generation system
US4402091 *Jul 9, 1982Sep 6, 1983Ellis William DToilet evacuation device
US4876748 *Mar 3, 1988Oct 31, 1989Chun Duk KToilet odor filter assembly
US5054130 *May 21, 1990Oct 8, 1991Wilson Thomas RToilet deodorizing device
US5231705 *Mar 24, 1992Aug 3, 1993Peter RagusaMethod and apparatus for eliminating toilet odors
US5259072 *Feb 24, 1992Nov 9, 1993Trombley Ronald WToilet ventilation assembly including fluid extraction device
US5351344 *Aug 20, 1992Oct 4, 1994Phillips Rhudy FFluid evacuation system
US5369812 *Jul 26, 1993Dec 6, 1994Trombley; Ronald W.Toilet ventilation assembly including fluid extraction device
US5488741 *Sep 21, 1993Feb 6, 1996Hunnicutt, Jr.; Clyde J.Toilet bowl ventilating and deodorizing apparatus
US5555572 *Jun 7, 1995Sep 17, 1996Hunnicutt, Jr.; Clyde J.Toilet bowl ventilating and deodorizing apparatus
US5689837 *Jun 11, 1996Nov 25, 1997Katona; Thomas J.Water actuated toilet fan
US6523184Aug 27, 2001Feb 25, 2003Delpriss Management Services, Inc.Toilet ventilation system
US6615410Jul 30, 2002Sep 9, 2003Azael GurrolaToilet-ventilating device
US6629319 *Jun 22, 2001Oct 7, 2003Albert SimpsonAir ventilation system
US8490221 *Feb 28, 2012Jul 23, 2013Kandas CondeToilet flush and odor control system
US20070240250 *Apr 18, 2006Oct 18, 2007Lee FoersterToilet odor removal system, assembly containing the same, and methods for odor removal
US20080040842 *Jun 22, 2007Feb 21, 2008Sanabria James SToilet ventilation system
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/213, 4/348
International ClassificationE03D9/04, E03D9/052
Cooperative ClassificationE03D9/052
European ClassificationE03D9/052
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 22, 1993ASAssignment
Owner name: ALLSTATE FINANCIAL CORPORATION, VIRGINIA
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HOME AND FAMILY, INC. DBA CHEFSTAR DBA ELECTRO-SHIELD DBA NODORE DBA HEATECH;REEL/FRAME:006401/0207
Effective date: 19921106