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Publication numberUS3825196 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 23, 1974
Filing dateJan 11, 1973
Priority dateJan 15, 1972
Publication numberUS 3825196 A, US 3825196A, US-A-3825196, US3825196 A, US3825196A
InventorsS Yamazaki
Original AssigneeSankin Eng Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hank reeling machine
US 3825196 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Yamazaki July 23, 1974 HANK REELING MACHINE Prima Examiner-Stanle N. Gilreath l t Y [75] men or sakum Yuma Klryu City Japan Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Waters. Roditi, Schwartz & [73] Assignee: Sankln Engineering Company Nissen Limited, Kiryu City, Japan [22] Filed: Jan. 11, 1973 211 Appl. No.: 322,871 [57] ABSTRACT A improved hank reeling machine having a swift struc- [30] Foreign Application Pri rit D t ture which is adapted to collapse around its axis as a Jan. 15 1972 Japan 47-6462 Spindle waxiany extending through the swift structure Jan. 1972 Japan 474380 is axially moved in response to movement of a hank doffing unit which is incorporated in the reeling ma- 52] 0.5. CI. 242/53 28/21 242/110.1 chine, wherein an arrangement is Pmvided 51 Int. Cl ..i1ss11 54/56 axial disp'acemem the spindle depending a 58 Field of Search 242/53 110 110.1 127 selected Perimetfica length f the 1 that the axial movement of the spindle is effected at an increased efficiency in accordance with the se- [56] Reerences Cmd lected perimetrical length of the swift structure.

UNITED STATES PATENTS Claims 8 Drawing Figures 3,456,890 7/1969 Lucke 242/53 1 L 74 lOb I I4 T L-- I I I 1 A4 -60, 6}, 3Q '56 I A '02 .9? E= QJ I -r EE T| 4 I8 \VK Q I l 54 134 5 I I PAYENIEB ll 2 3 I974 NEH-3N4 Pmminuzsmn 3.8255196 MS! RN 4 Fig. 5

1 HANK REELING MACHINE The present invention relates to a hank reeling machine cbnsisting of collapsible frames on which yarn from cops, bobbins or yarn packages of any other forms is wound in skeins or hanks. More specifically, the invention is concerned with a mechanism for driving the collapsible frames of the hank reeling mechanism to collapse to desired diameters to doff or take off the hanks from the frames.

For the purpose of doffing the hanks from the collapsible frames of the hank reeling machine, three different methods have thus far been in use in the art of textile fabric production. One method is to use the collapsible frames from the support structure of the reeling machine. Upon completion of the hank reeling operation, the collapsible frames are released from the support structure of the machine together with the hanks on the frames. Each of the hanks is then tied with use of a tie-band while it is being carried on the frame, whereupon the frames are partly folded to permit the hanks to be removed therefrom one by one all at a time. To facilitate disassembling and reassembling of the frames, the collapsible frames of the reeling machine of this type usually have relatively light-weight constructions and it is conventional to have six or twelve hanks wound on each of the frames. The reeling machine finds typical application for the hank reeling of relatively long filaments such as silk yarn. To proceed with the hank reeling operation while the hanks previously wound on the frames are being removed from the frames, it is necessary to provide for a set of spare frames to be mounted on the reeling machine for the next reeling operation. Thus, not only are disproportionately large amounts of time and labor required for the taking-off of the hanks from the reeling machine but a considerable space requirement will result from the provision of the spare frames in the hank reeling machine using the collapsible frames of the releasable type.

Another typical method of doffing the hanks from the reeling machine is one which is used for the bank reeling of spun yarn and finished synthetic fiber. The reeling machine of this type uses a collapsible frame which is rotatably supported at both ends on a support structure of the reeling machine. The collapsible frame has a great axial length and is thus capable of carrying an increased number of hanks thereon, e.g. about 20 to 40 hanks at one time. The hanks wound on the frame are tied while they are carried on the frame and, thereafter, the frame is manipulated to collapse so that the hanks are loosely received on the frame. The individual hanks are then moved to an axial end of the frame opposite to a drive and control unit of the reeling machine and are removed one by one from the frame through a recess formed in a bearing which supports the spindle of the frame. Since the hanks are thus removed from the frame which is held in situ on the reeling machine, the extra time and labor that are required in releasing the frame from the reeling machine of the previously described nature can be dispensed with so that simplicity of operation will be achieved in removing the hanks from the reeling machine. Considerably skilled and time consuming techniques are, however, required in releasing the tied hanks from the bearing at the end of the frame, resulting in limitation in feasibility and performance efficiency of the hank removal operation.

The hank removal operation in the reeling machine of the above described character will be amplified, to some extent, if the frame is made releasable from the support structure of the reeling machine so that the hanks are removed from the frame in a released condition, as is practiced in limited quarters of the industry. For the purpose of minimizing the down time of the hank reeling operation, the reeling machine of this type should be equipped with two collapsible frames which are to be used alternately to each other while the other frame is released from the reeling machine. This apparently results in requirement for the extra time and labor to disassemble and reassemble the frames and for the extra space for the installation of the additional frame.

A third known method of hank take-off operation is typically utilized in a heavy-duty hank reeling machine for relatively thick yarn. The reeling machine uses a collapsible frame which is supported on a spindle of the cantilever type. The spindle is thus supported at one end on a casing accommodating a drive and control unit of the machine and held free at the other end. Up to six hanks are wound on the frame and are tied while the frame is maintained in an expanded condition. The tied hanks are removed from the hanks either in a manner that the frame is caused to collapse and subsequently the hanks are released all together from the frame through an open end of thereof or in manner that a wheeled hank carrier having a suitable number of take-off rods is moved to insert the take-off rods into the frame through the open end thereof and thereafter the frame is driven to collapse for thereby permitting the hanks to be transferred on to the take-out rods. Laborious and time consuming steps are thus invariably required in the bank doffing operation in the reeling machine of the above described character.

The collapsible frame is usually built with a so-called umbrella linkage which is radially foldable around its axis as the spindle carrying the linkage is axially moved in either direction. The collapsible frame of such a construction features an outer perimeter which is adjustable in a relatively broad range so that a satisfactorily wide selection can be offered of the sizes of the hanks. Since, however, the relation between the length of the perimeter of the frame and the amount of axial displacement of the spindle which is predominant over the former varies remarkably depending upon the angular positions of the umbrella linkage, the frame tends to collapse to ineffectually reduced sizes which are responsible for the reduction of the performance efficiency of the hank removal operation.

The present invention comtemplates provision of an improved hank reeling machine which is free from all the above described drawbacks that are inherent in the prior art hank reeling machines of various types.

it is, therefore, a principal object of the present invention to provide a hank reeling machine which is adapted to permit the hanks to be doffed or taken off therefrom at an increased efficiency and without resort to skilled, time consuming and laborious procedures.

It is another principal object of the invention to provide a hank reeling machine having collapsible frames or swifts which can be accurately and efficiently expanded or contracted to achieve a desired outer perimeter.

The hank reeling machine to accomplish these and other objects of the present invention comprises a 3 bored cylinder which is rotatable about its axis, a swift structure having an open axial end and substantially coaxially supported on and around the cylinder, a spindle extending through the cylinder and axially movable relative to the cylinder in line with the axis of the cylinder, the swift structure being connected to the spindle and radially collapsible about the axis of the cylinder in response to the axial movement of the spindle relative to the cylinder, a movable hank dofflng unit which has an inoperative position remote from the open axial end of the swift structure and an operative position in proximity to the open axial end of the structure, and a displacement carrying mechanism drivingly connecting the hank doffing unit to the spindle for carrying the displacement of the doffing unit between the inoperative and operative positions thereof to the spindle so that the spindle is axially moved to drive the swift structure to radially collapse toward and around the axis of the cylinder. The displacement carrying mechanism may comprise displacement proportioning means for carrying the displacement of the doffing unit to the spindle in a predetermined proportion depending upon a selected perimetric length of the swift structure so that the smaller the selected perimetric length of the swift structure the smaller the ratio of the amount of axial displacement of the spindle to the amount of displacement of the hank doffing unit between the inoperative and operative positions of the unit. The hank reeling machine may further comprise positioning means for controlling the axial position of the spindle relative to the cylinder and accordingly the perimetric length of the swift structure.

Other features and advantages of the hank reeling machine according to the present invention, especially of the displacement carrying mechanism and hank doffing unit of the general character above mentioned will be more clearly understood from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a partly exploded top plan view showing a preferred embodiment of the hank reeling machine according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view, partly in side elevation, of the hank reeling machine shown in FIG.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing the displacement carrying mechanism forming part of the hank reeling machine shown in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view showing, on an enlarged scale, the hank doffing unit schematically shown as part of the hank reeling machine in FIG. 1, the doffing unit being herein illustrated as held in the inoperative position;

FIG. 5 is also a perspective view showing the hank doffing unit which is moved to the operative position close to the swift structure of the reeling machine;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view showing a preferred example of stop means to form part of the hank doffing unit illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5.

FIG. 7 is a preferred embodiment of a template which forms part of the proportioning means of the displacement mechanism shown in FIG. 3; and

FIG. 8 is a graph of the link motions of a two-bar linkage forming part of the swift structure of the hank reeling machine according to the present invention.

Reference will now be made to the accompanying drawings, first to FIGS. 1 and 2. The hank reeling machine according to the present invention has, as shown, a drive and control unit which is accommodated within a stationary casing 10 having front and rear walls 10a and 10b, respectively, and a side wall which is transverse to the front and rear walls. A flanged stationary cylinder 12 extends transversely through the side wall 100 of the casing 10 and is securely connected thereto with its flange 12a bolted or otherwise rigidly fastened to the side wall 100, as seen in FIG. 2. This stationary cylinder 12 has an axial bore which is substantially perpendicular to the side wall 10c of the casing 10 and carries through the bore a rotary cylinder 14 by means of axially spaced bearings 16 and 16'. The rotary cylinder 14 is herein shown as being made up of cylinder halves 14a and 14b which are bolted to each other at flanges which are formed at the meeting ends of the cylinder halves. Where preferred, however, the cylinder 14 may be constructed as a unitary structure in its entirety. The rotary cylinder 14 extends substantially in line with an axis of the bore in the stationary cylinder 12 with the first cylinder half 14a projecting into the casing 10 and the second cylinder half 14b projecting outwardly of the stationary cylinder 12. The rotary cylinder 14 has an axial bore which is formed throughout the length of the cylinder and a spindle 18 extends through this axial bore. The spindle 18 is axially movably supported by the rotary cylinder I4 through axially spaced bearings 20 and 20'. These bearings 20 and 20 are adapted to permit the rotary cylinder to rotate thereon about its axis and to prevent the spindle 18 from being rotated by and relative to the cylinder 14. For this purpose, the spindle 18 is keyed or splined to the bearings 20 and 20' so as to be axially slidable thereon relative to the rotary cylinder 14. The bearings 20 and 20' are shown as being located at both ends of the cylinder half 14b but they may be located otherwise where desired. The spindle 18 has a portion projecting into the casing 10 through the inner end of the cylinder half 14a and another portion projecting outwardly from a leading end of the other cylinder half 14b, viz., opposite to the casing 10.

The rotary cylinder 14 has a pair of axially spaced flanges or annular projections 22 and 22 which are formed on an outer peripheral surface of the cylinder 14. Likewise, an annular member 24 is rotatably mounted through a bearing 26 on a free end of the spindle 18 projecting out of the rotary cylinder 14. This bearing 26 is adapted to be fast on the spindle l8 and to permit the annular member 24 to revolve on the bearing about and relative to the spindle 18. Another annular member 24' is axially slidably carried on the outer peripheral surface of the rotary cylinder 14. This annular member 24' is positioned between the spaced annular projections 22 and 22' on the rotary cylinder and is securely connected to the annular member 24 by means of connecting rods 28 and 28'. These connecting rods 28 and 28' extend substantially in parallel to the rotary cylinder 14 and are axially movable relative to the rotary cylinder through apertures which are formed in the annular projection 22. The connecting rods 28 and 28' have a length which is substantially equal to the distance between the annular projections 22 and 22 so that the annular members 24 and 24' connected together by the rods are spaced apart from each other a distance which is substantially equal to the spacing between the annular projections 22 and 22'. The annular projections 22 and 22 and annular members 24 and 24' all have substantially equal outside diameters and are substantially concentric with the rotary cylinder 14 and spindle 18.

These annular projections and members are adapted to carry a radially collapsible swift structure which is designated as a whole by reference numeral 30. The collapsible swift structure includes a suitable member (usually four or eight) swift bars 32 which are substantially equidistantly spaced apart from each other around the rotary cylinder 14 and which are symmetrically positioned radially with respect to the axis of the spindle 18 as will be better seen in FIG. 5. The swift bars 32 are supported on the rotary cylinder 14 and the spindle 18 by means a link mechanism which consists of a pair of umbrella linkages 34 and 34' (FIG. 1). As clearly seen in FIG. 2, the umbrella linkages 34 and 34' are constructed substantially identically with each other and respectively comprise link arms 36 and 36' and link bars 38 and 38'. Each of the link arms 36 of the first umbrella linkage 34 is pivotally connected at one end to the annular member 24 on the spindle l8 and at the other end to the associated swift bar 32 through a fitting 40. The link bars 38 of the umbrella linkage 34 are pivotally connected each at one end to the annular projection 22 on the rotary cylinder 14 and at the other end to an intermediate portion of the associated link arm 36. Likewise, each of the link arms 36' of the second umbrella linkage 34' is pivotally connected at one end to the annular member 24' slidable on the rotary cylinder 14 between the spaced annular projections 22 and 22 and at the other end to the associated swift bar 32 through a fitting 40'. The link bars 38' of the umbrella linkage 34 are pivotally connected, each at one end, to the annular projection 22 close to the stationary cylinder 12, and at the other end to an intermediate portion of the associated link arm 36'. The spacings between the fittings 40 and 40' are substantially equal to the spacings between the annular projections 22 and 22' and between the annular members 24 and 24 and, furthermore, the link arms 36 and 36 and the link bars 38 and 38' making up the umbrella linkages 34 and 34', respectively, are so sized and interconnected that the umbrella linkages 34 and 34 are proportioned extend identically with each other. The individual link arms 36 and 36 and link bars 38 and 38' exte,ubstantially radially outwardly from the annular projections 22 and 22' and annular members 24 and 24', respectively, so that the swift bars 32 are positioned substantially parallel to the rotary cylinder l4 and spindle 18 irrespective of the annular positions of the elements making up the umbrella linkages 34 and 34'. The swift structure 30 which is thus built in a generally cage form, as will be better seen in FIG. 5, is radially collapsible and accordingly the swift bars 32 are radially moved toward or away from the spindle 18 as the spindle is axially moved relative to the rotary cylinder 14. If, in this instance, the spindle 18 is axially moved away from the casing 10, viz., leftwardly of FIG.

2, then the individual link arms 36 and 36 and accord- 6 30 from the positions indicated by full lines to the posi- 6s tions indicated by phantom lines in FIG. 2. As a result of the radial collapse of the swift structure 30. the

outside radius of the swift structure is reduced by length I which is dictated by the amount of axial displacement of the spindle 18 as will be discussed in o etait M W s s The rotary cylinder 14 and accordingly the shift structure 30 are driven in rotation about the axis of the spindle 18 by suitable driving means, such as, an electric motor (not shown) through, for example, a gear 42 which is fast on the cylinder half 14a and which is driven to rotate about the axis of the spindle 18 during operation.

Within the casing 10, the spindle 18 is keyed as at 44 or otherwise axially, movably received in a rest block 46 mounted on a cross member 48 which is held stationary relative to the casing 10 and which extends substantially transverse to the spindle 18 as will be seen in FIG. 3. The spindle 18 is screw threaded on its portion 50 intervening between the rest block 46 and the axial end of the rotary cylinder 14 projecting into the casing 10. A worm wheel 52 has an internally threaded bore (not seen in the drawings) through which the worm wheel is axially movable mounted on the threaded portion 50 of the spindle 18. This worm wheel 52 is in constant mesh with a worm gear 54 which is rotatable with a shaft 56 pivotally supported on the front and rear wall 100 and 10b, respectively, of the casing 10 (see FIG. 1). The shaft 56 extends transversely to the spindle and projects outwardly from the front wall 10a of the casing 10, carrying at its leading end a manipulating wheel 58 which is rotatable with the shaft 56. When, thus, the manipulating wheel 58 is manually turned by an operator, the worm gear 54 will bedriven through the shaft 56 for rotation about the axis of the shaft so that the worm wheel 52 meshing with the worm gear 54 is driven to rotate on and about the threaded portion 50 of the spindle 18. Since, in this instance, the worm gear 54 is held stationary relative to the casing 10 through pivotal connection between the shaft 56 and t l 1efr o nt "and rear walls 10a and 101;, respectively, of the casing 10, the rotation of the worm wheel 52 on the threaded portion 50 of the spindle 18 will cause the spindle 18 to axially move in either direction through engagement between the threaded portion 50 and the internally threaded bore in the worm wheel 52. The worm wheel 52 is so arranged as to have a relatively large tooth width and thus has adequate allowance for being moved in the axial direction of the spindle 18 while maintaining its engagement with the worm gear 54 when the worm wheel 52 is driven from the manipulating wheel 58. The threaded portion 50 of the spindle 18, the worm wheel 52, the worm gear 54, the shaft 56 and the manipulating wheel 58 thus constitute the positioning means for the shaft structure 32.

The worm wheel 52 has a boss 60 which is positioned opposite to the rest block 46 on the cross member 48. The boss 60 has an internally threaded bore (not shown in the drawings) which is in constant mesh with the threaded portion 50 of the spindle l8, similarly to the worm wheel 52. The boss 60 is grooved at its entire periphery and receives in the groove at least one spindle shift lever 62 through a roller or rollers (not shown) which are carried by the shift lever 62. The spindle shift lever 62 is securely connected at one end to a cross shaft 64 extending substantially parallel to the shift 56 of the positioning means, viz., transversely to the spindle 18. Similarly to the shaft 56, this cross shaft 64 is pivotally connected to the front and rear walls 10a and 10b of the casing 10 as seen in FIG. 1. The spindle shift lever 62 is thus rotatable about the axis of cross shaft 64. Suitable mechanical biasing means, such as, for example a tension spring 66 is anchored at one end thereof to the other end of the spindle shift lever 62 and at the other end to the stationary cross member 48, thereby urging the spindle shift lever 62 to turn about the shaft 64 counter clockwise in the drawings. The worm wheel 52 is, in this manner, biased rearward, viz., toward the rest block 46 through engagement between the spindle shift lever 62 and the circumferentially grooved boss 60 on the worm wheel.

A crank 68 is securely connected at one end to the cross shaft 64 and pivotally connected at the other end to a first longitudinal member 70. The longitudinal member 70 extends substantially parallel to the spindle l8 and longitudinally slidably received at its rear end portion on a rest block 72 which is fast on the stationary cross member 48. Adjacent to this longitudinal member 70 is juxtaposed a second longitudinal member 74 which extends substantially parallel to the first longitudinal member 70. Similarly to the first longitudinal member 70, the second longitudinal member 74 is longitudinally slidably received on the rest block 72. The first and second longitudinal members 70 and 74, respectively, are formed with elongated slots extending longitudinally of the members and located substantially in registry with each other. In FIG. 3, only the slot in the first longitudinal member 70 is seen as designated by reference numeral 70a. The second longitudinal member 74 is operatively connected at its leading end to a control lever 76 through a crank pin 78 and a crank arm 80. More specifically, the crank pin 78 is pivotally connected at one end to a rear end portion of the control lever 76 and securely connected at the other end to one end of the crank arm 80 which, in turn, is pivotally connected at the other end to the leading end of the second longitudinal member 74. The crank pin 78 is pivotally supported in the rear wall 10b of the casing 10.

The control lever 76 is connected to and driven by a suitable control mechanism to be described later and turns about the crank pin 78 in either direction as indicated by arrowheads A1 and B so as to cause the second longitudinal member 74 to move forewardly or rearwardly as indicated by arrowheads A, and 8,, respectively, by means of the crank action of the crank pin 78 and the crank arm 80. This longitudinal movement of the second longitudinal member 74 is transmitted to the first longitudinal member 70 by means of a mechanism to be described later so that the motion of the control mechanism driving the control lever 76 is transmitted to the spindle 18 which is consequently caused to axially move as indicated by arrowheads A; and B, when the control mechanism is initiated into action. The whole arrangement starting, in effect, with this control mechanism and ending with the boss 60 on the worm wheel 52 thus consitutes the displacement carrying means which plays a vital role in the hank reeling machine according to the present invention.

The angular displacement of the control lever 76 may preferably be translated into an axial displacement of the spindle 18 in a proportion which is controlled in a manner to be described. For this purpose, the embodiment of the hank reeling machine herein illustrated is provided with displacement proportioning means ineluding a mechanical translatory unit which uses a twobar linkage. As seen in FIG. 3, the translatory unit comprises a support member 82 which is fast on the spindle 18 and which intervenes between the screw threaded portion 50 of the spindle 18 and the rest block 46 on the cross member 48. The translatory unit further comprises a link arm 84 which is pivotally connected at one end to the support member 82 and a link bar 86 which is pivotally connected at one end to the rest block 46 and at the other end to an intermediate portion of the link arm 84. The link arm 84 is securely connected to a connecting plate 92 at its end opposite to the support member. The connected ends of the link arm 84 and the connecting plate are movable along a guide rail 88 which is connected to and extends parallel to the cross member 48. For the reasons to be given later, the link arm 84 and the link bar 86 are dimensionally proportioned in agreement with the link arms 36 and 36' and link bars 38 and 38' of the umbrella linkages 34 34 of the swift structure 30 (FIGS. 1 and 2). The slider 88 is rigidly connected to a connecting plate 90 which in turn is pivotally connected to a cam lever or template 92. The template 92 extends through the elongated slots in the first and second longitudinal members and 74, respectively, in a direction substantially transverse to the longitudinal members. The template 92 has a width which is reduced toward its end and thus has a narrow portion 92a terminating at a leading end of the template and a wide intermediate portion 92b merging with the narrow portion. When, thus, the template 92 is in engagement at its wide portion 92b with the first and second longitudinal members 70 and 74, respectively, through the elongated slots in the longitudinal members, the longitudinal displacement of the second longitudinal member 74 is totally carried to the first longitudinal member 70 because substantially no allowance is provided for the template 92 to move in the slots in the longitudinal members. When, however, the template 92 engages at its narrow portion 92a with the first and second longitudinal members 70 and 74, respectively, so that the template is allowed to move in the elongated slots in the longitudinal members, the longitudinal displacement of the second longitudinal member 74 is not totally carried to the first longitudinal member 70 which is consequently moved a distance smaller than the amount of displacement of the second longitudinal member 74.

The control mechanism to bring about the rotational motions of the control lever 76 may be driven in any desired manner insofar as the control lever is turned about the crank pin 78 through angles in accordance with predetermined schedules when the swift structure 30 (FIGS. 1 and 2) is being contracted for the hank removal operation or expanded for re-starting the hank reeling operation. The present invention proposes to have the control mechanism driven by a doffing unit which is operative to receive the hanks on the swift structure when the swift structure is caused to collapse by the action of the previously described displacement carrying means. A preferred construction of the dofiing unit to achieve this end is illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5. The doffing unit herein shown is adapted to eliminate the drawbacks inherent in the prior art doffing devices typically using wheeled carriers which are provided independently of the hank reeling machines and which are moved by human effort to the operative position prior to the individual hank removal operations. Thus,

the doffing unit herein proposed is incorporated in the hank reeling machine and supported by a frame structure having upper and lower cross members 94 and 94' and front and rear members 96 and 96' (FIG. 1).

Referring to FIGS. 4 and 5, the doffing unit is designated in its entirety by reference numeral 98. The doffing unit 98 comprises a vertical pivotal shaft 100 which is secured to the upper cross member 94 and a hank carrier 102 which is rotatable about the pivotal shaft 100 in directions indicated by arrowheads A and B in FIG. 1. The hank carrier 102 includes spaced parallel horizontal members 104 and 104' with which a pair of rings or sleeves 106 and 106', respectively, are integral. The rings or sleeves 106 and 106 are fixed to the shaft 100 so that the hank carrier 102 in its entirety is rotatable with the pivotal shaft 100 about the axis of shaft 100. As seen in FIG. 5, the hank carrier 102 is vertically so positioned as to be substantially on a lever with the swift structure 30. The hank carrier 102 further includes horizontal members 108 and 108' extending from the horizontal members 104 and 104, respectively. The horizontal members 108 and 108 are directed at angles to the horizontal members 104 and 104' and are held at right angles to the cross member 94 when the hank carrier 102 is maintained in an inoperative position shown in FIG. 4 and indicated in full lines in FIG. 1. The horizontal member 108 and 108' are connected together by means of rod support members 110 and 110' which are disposed approximately in a V-shaped configuration. These connecting members 110 and 110' are formed with pairs of spaced apertures 112 and 112', respectively. These apertures 112 and 112' are adapted to removably receive therein a pair of hank take-off rods 114 and 114' projecting substantially perpendicularly from the rod support members 110 and 110' through releasable fittings 116 and 116'. The levels of the hank take-off rods 114 and 114' are thus adjustable depending upon the selected outer perimeter of the swift structure 30 through selection of the apertures 112 and 112' to receive the take-off rods 114 and 114', respectively. The hank carrier 102 is urged by suitable mechanical biasing means for turning about the shaft 100 to its inoperative position which is shown in FIG. 4. For this purpose, a torsion spring 118 is mounted on the pivotal shaft 100, having one end anchored to the cross member 94 of the frame structure and the other end anchored to the horizontal member 104 of the hank carrier 102.

The dofting unit 98 constructed in this manner is drivingly connected to the control mechanism which is adapted to drive the control lever 76 of the displace ment carrying means previously described. The control mechanism thus coacting with the doffing unit 98 includes a horizontal member 120 extending from the horizontal member 104 of the hank carrier 102. The horizontal member 120 extends substantially parallel to the horizontal member 108 and 108 and is accordingly held parallel to the rear member 96 of the frame structure when the hank carrier 102 is maintained in its inoperative position as seen in FIG. 1. The horizontal member 120 is connected at its leading end to one end of a curved guide rail 122 which in turn is connected through a reinforcement member 126 to the horizontal member 104' which is located below the horizontal member 104 to which the guide rail 122 is connected at the other end through the horizontal member 120. This guide rail 122 is curved substantially circularly 10 7 about an axis of the pivotal shaft 100 and vertical] from the level of the upper horizontal member 104 to the lower horizontal member 104' as seen in FIGS. 4 and 5. The control lever 76 carries at its leading end circumferentially grooved roller 124 which is in rolling engagement with the guide rail 122.

When the hank carrier 102 is held in the inoperative position which is illustrated in FIG. 4 and indicated by full lines in FIG. 1, the hank take-off rods 114 extend substantially at right angles to the spindle l8 and are thus located remote from the open end of the swift structure 30. To bring the hank carrier 102 into the operative position, the hank carrier should be turned approximately degress in the direction of arrowhead A (FIG. 1) about the shaft against the action of the torsion spring 118 so that the hank carrier is in proximity to the open end of the swift structure 30 and has its hank take-off rods 114 and 114 extending into the swift structure and substantially parallel to the swift bars 32 and to the spindle 18 as seen in FIG. 5 and indicated by phantom lines in FIG. 1. The rotation of the hank carrier 102 may be effected or assisted by suitable power driving means or may be carried out manually by an operator. To facilitate the manual control of the hank carrier 102, a suitable handle or knob 128 may by mounted at a leading end of the horizontal member 108 as seen in FIGS. 4 and 5. The bank carrier 102 thus moved to the operative position close to and aligned with the swift structure 30 is urged toward its inoperative position by the action of the torsion spring 118. To enable the hank carrier 102 to retain its operative position during the dofiing operation, suitable stop means are provided in the doffing unit 98, an example of the stop means being illustrated in FIG. 6.

As seen in FIG. 6, the stop means includes a sector plate 130 which is securely connected at its apex portion to a lower end portion of the shaft pivotal 100. The sector plate 130 is formed at its arculate edge with a pair of notches or recesses 130a and 13012 which are angularly spaced apart approximately 90 degrees from each other around the pivotal shaft 100, wherein one recess 130a is directed substantially parallel to the horizontal members 108 and 108' and the other 13Gb is directed substantially in parallel to the hank take-off rods 114 and 114', as seen in FIG. 1. These recesses 130a and 13% are adapted to releasably receive therein a retaining member 132 which is carried at one end of a shaft 134. The shaft 134 extends substantially parallel to the cross shaft 94 of the frame structure and projects outwardly from the front member 96 of the frame structure. The shaft 134 carries at its end opposite to the sector plate 130 a control pedal 136 which is adapted to be depressed for causing the retaining member 132 to disengage from the recess 130a or 13012. The retaining member 132 is constantly urged forward and thus against the sector plate 130 by means of a sleeve 138 axially slidably received on the shaft 134 and a preload compression spring 140 urging the sleeve 138 toward the sector plate 130. When the hank carrier 102 is held in its inoperative position remote from the open end of the swift structure 32 as seen in FIG. 4, the sector plate 130 is maintained in a position to have its recess 1311b aligned with the retaining member 132 so that the hank carrier 102 is prevented from rotating out of the inoperative position.

The operations of the hank reeling machine having the construction thus far set forth will now be described with concurrent reference to FIGS. 1 to 6.

Prior to starting the hank reeling operation, the collapsible swift structure 30 is expanded to a desired outer perimeter through manipulation of the positioning means including the screw threaded portion 50 of the spindle 18, the worm wheel 52 engaging with the threaded portion 50 through its internally screw threaded bore, and the worm gear 54 meshing with the worm wheel. For this purpose, the manipulating wheel 58 should be turned by the operator so that the worm gear 54 is driven through the shaft 56 to rotate on the worm wheel 52. The worm wheel 52 is consequently driven to rotate on and about the threaded portion 50 of the spindle 18 so that the spindle 18 is axially moved relative to casing in the direction of arrowhead B (FIG. 3). As the spindle 18 is moved rearwardly through the bearings 20 and 20' and the rest block 46 to which the spindle is keyed or splined, the annular members 24 and 24 are axially moved toward the stationary cylinder 12 with the result that the link arms 36 and 36' and the link bars 38 and 38' are all radially raised outwardly around the rotary cylinder 14 until the swift bars 32 achieve a desired outer perimeter.

Upon completion of the positioning of the swift structure 30, the swift structure is driven through the gear 42 for rotation with the rotary cylinder 14 about the axis of the spindle l8 and concurrently the yarns are supplied from the cops or bobbins (not shown) or the yarn packages of any other form and are wound on the swift structure in skeins or hanks. When the hanks are in this manner wound to predetermined lengths as designated by reference numeral 142 in FIG. 5 (indicated by phantom lines), then the machine should be shut down so that the swift structure 30 is brought to a standstill carrying thereon the hanks 142. Each of the hanks 144 is then tied with use of suitable number of tie bands 144 as seen in FIG. 5.

Under this condition, the doffing unit 98 is held in the inoperative position with the hank carrier 102 angularly spaced apart from the open end of the swift struc ture 30 as indicated by the full lines in FIG. 1 and with the sector plate 130 caught at its recess 1301) by the retaining member 132 on the shaft 134. When, now, the operator depresses the pedal 136 at the front of the ma chine, the retaining member 132 disengages from the sector plate 130, allowing the hank carrier 102 to be moved out of the inoperative position. when, then, the operator pulls the knob 128 toward the front side of the machine, the hank carrier 102 turns in its entirety in the direction of arrowhead A, (FIG. 1) about the axis of the shaft 100 through the rings or sleeves 106 and 106 against the action of the torsion spring 118. The hank carrier 102 instantaneously turns through a central angle of about 90 degrees, the recess 1300 in the sector plate 130 being brought into alignment with the retaining member 132 which is consequently received in the recess 1300 by the action of the preload compression spring 140 whereby the hank carrier 102 is locked in the operative position. As the hank carrier 102 is thus turned to the operative position, the torsion spring 118 contracts so that the spring force thereof is accumulated when the hank carrier is held in the operative position.

The hank carrier 102 thus brought to the operative position has its hank take'off rods 114 and 114 projecting into the swift structure 30 through the open end thereof and directed substantially parallel to the swift bars 32 and spindle 18 as seen in FIG. 5 and indicated by phantom lines in FIG. 1.

The rotational movement of the hank carrier 102 above described brings about various motions in the displacement carrying and proportioning means through the control mechanism concluding the curved guide rail 122. When, thus, the hank carrier 102 turns about the axis of the pivotal shaft 100 from the inoperative position shown in FIG. 4, the roller 124 on the control lever 76 of the displacement carrying means is gradually raised along the upper edge of the curved guide rail 122 as the guide rail travels in a substantially circular path around the pivotal shaft 100. The rotational movement of the hank carrier 102 in the direction of arrow A (FIG. 1) therefore causes the control lever 76 to pivotally turn about the crank pin 78 upwardly or in the direction of arrowhead B, (FIG. 3) so that the second longitudinal member 74 is longitudinally moved away from the rest block 72 on the cross member 48 or in the direction of arrowhead A by the crank action of the crank pin 78 and crank arm 80. The longitudinal movement of the second longitudinal member 74 is carried through the narrow or wide portion 920 or 92b, respectively, of the template 92 to the first longitudinal member in a certain proportion which is dictated by the position of the template 92 relative to the longitudinal members 70 and 74. The first longitudinal member 70 is thus also longitudinally moved away from the rest block 72 or in the direction of arrowhead A, and causes the spindle shift lever 62 to turn clockwise of FIG. 3 through the crank lever 68 and cross shaft 64. The spindle shift lever 62 then forces the worm wheel 52 away from the cross member 48 through the boss 60 on the worm wheel so that the spindle 18 is driven to axially move together with the worm wheel 52 forwardly or in the direction of arrowhead A;, against the action of the tension spring 66.

Referring to FIG. 2, the forward displacement of the spindle 18 causes the link arms 36 and 36' to radially fall toward the outer peripheral surface of the rotary cylinder 14 so that the swift structure 30 in its entirety radially collapses with the resultant decrease of its outer perimeter. The swift bars 32 of the swift structure 30 are now moved closer to the rotary cylinder 14 and allow the hanks 144 (FIG. 5) to be released from the swift bars.

The hanks 144 on the swift structure 30 thus held in the collapsed condition may then be transferred from the swift bars 32 to the hank take-off rods 1 14 and l 14' of the hank carrier 102 (FIG. 5). Upon completion of the delivery of the hanks to the hank carrier 102, the operator should depress the control pedal 136 so as to release the retaining member 132 from the recess 13% whereupon the hank carrier 102 is forced to rotate in the direction of arrowhead B about the axis of the pivotal shaft by the action of the torsion spring 118 until the carrier restores the inoperative position with the retaining member 132 caught in the other recess a in the sector plate 130. As the hank carrier 102 is thus turned in the direction of arrowhead 3,, the roller 124 on the control lever 76 lowers along the upper edge of the curved guide rail 122 revolving about the shaft 100 so that the control lever 76 is now downwardly turned about the crank pin 78. The second, and accordingly first longitudinal members 74 and 70, re-

spectively, are therefore moved rearwardly toward the rest block 72 on the crosss member 78 or in the direction of arrowhead B whereby the worm wheel 52 and accordingly the spindle 18 are moved rearwardly in the direction of arrowhead B (FIG. 3).

When the longitudinal movement of the second longitudinal member 74 is carried to the first longitudinal member 70 through the template 92 which is received in the elongated slots formed in the longitudinal members, the proportion between the amounts of displacement of the two members varies with the width of the template 92 at which the template engages with the members. If, thus, the spindle 18 has been rearwardly moved through manipulation of the wheel 58 so as to achieve a relatively large working radius of the swift structure 30, then the pivot of the link arm 84 on the support member 82 of the previously described translatory unit will move closer to the pivot of the link bar 86 on the rest block 46 on the cross member 48 and, as a consequence, the connected ends of the link arm 84 and the connecting plate 90 are moved along the guide rail 88 toward the longitudinal members 70 and 74. This causes the template 92 to extend deeper through the elongated slots in the longitudinal members 70 and 74 so that the template 92 engages at its wide portion 92b with the edges defining the elongated slots. The template 92 is in this manner snugly received in the elongated slots in the longitudinal members 70 and 74 with the result that the longitudinal displacement of the second longitudinal member 74 is carried substantially as it is to the first longitudinal member 70 through the wide portion 92b of the template 92. The spindle 18 is thus axially moved a distance which is substantially equal to the amount of displacement of the second longitudinal member 74 and accordingly substantially proportional to the angular displacement of the control lever 76. This will mean that the spindle 18 is axially moved a relatively great distance for causing the swift structure 30 to collapse to a desired radius if the swift structure has been expanded to a relatively large working radius.

If, on the contrary, the swift structure 30 has been expanded to a relatively small working radius with the spindle l8 axially moved in the direction of arrowhead A; through manipulation of the wheel 58, the two-bar linkage of the translatory unit will assume a relatively collapsed condition so that the template 92 engages at its forward reduced portion 920 with the edges defining the elongated slots in the first and second longitudinal members 70 and 74, respectively. The template 92 is now allowed to move within these elongated slots in the longitudinal members 70 and 74 and remains idle when the second longitudinal member 74 is incipiently driven by the control lever 76 to longitudinally move in the direction of arrowhead A The displacement of the longitudinal member 74 will be transmitted to the first longitudinal member 70 once the former has moved a distance overcoming the allowance of the template 92 to move relative thereto with the result that the spindle l8 is moved in the direction of arrowhead A, a distance which is smaller than the amount of displacement of the second longitudinal member 74. When, thus, the swift structure 30 set to a relatively small working radius is to be driven to collapse for the hank dotting operation, the spindle l8 suffices to axially move a reduced distance.

The proportion between the amounts of displacement of the second and first longitudinal members 74 and 70, respectively, is dictated by the width of the template 92 as previously noted and, to enable the template to continuously vary such proportion depending upon the relative axial position of the spindle, the template may be preferably contoured to have a width which is gradually reduced toward its leading end as illustrated in FIG. 7. As illustrated in FIG. 7, the template 92 has a minimum width 0 at its narrow portion 92a and a maximum width b at its wide portion 92b which merges in a streamlined configuration into the narrow portion 920. The contour or varying width of the template 92 thus shaped may preferably be determined in accordance with schedules which are prescribed on the basis of the link motions of the umbrella linkages of the swift structure and accordingly of the two-bar linkage of the translatory unit which is dimensionally proportioned to the umbrella linkages as previously noted.

The link motions of the umbrella linkages of the swift structure and the two-bar linkage of the translatory unit are graphically illustrated on an x-y coordinate system in FIG. 8. In FIG. 8, the x-axis represents the axial displacement of the spindle l8 and the y-axis represents the radius of the swift structure 30 or the displacement of the slider 88 forming part of the translatory unit. Analysis of the link motions herein demonstrated will reveal that the smaller the prescribed working radii of the swift structure, the smaller the amounts of axial displacement required of the spindle to yield changes of the radii at a fixed rate. if, for example, the radius of the swift structure is to be varied between y and y,; y and y and y and y then the spindle should be axially moved distances between x, and x x and x and X3 and x respectively, wherein such distances are re duced in the sequence herein named. For designing the template 92 having the contour illustrated FIG. 7, the graduation y,-y,-y,-y on the axis of ordinate of the x-y system of FIG. 8 may be applied or simulated on a working length (which may be in agreement with the lengthwise coverage of the narrow and wide portions 920 and 92b, respectively) of the template 92 and the graduation x -x -x -Jo on the axis of abscissa applied or simulated as the widths of the particular portions of the template which carries the modified graduation on the axis of ordinate.

The configuration of the template above described will result in considerable saving of the amounts of displacement of the various operational elements of the hank reeling machine during the hank doffing operation, and will therefore contribute to reducing the time and labor required in the course of the doffing operation substantially irrespective of the selected radius of the swift structure and to minimizing the wear and abrasion of the parts and elements which are subject to sliding motions when the swift structure is being contracted or expanded. If, for instance, the swift structure has an outer perimeter which is variable between 1,400mm and 2,000mm and if the swift structure should be caused to collapse with a resultant decrease of about mm in the outer perimeter, then the spindle should be axially moved a distance of about 45mm for achieving the collapse of the swift structure from 2,000mm to 1,900mm in the outer perimeter but sufflees to be axially moved a distance of only about l3mm for achieving the reduction of the outer perimeter of the swift structure from 1,400mm to 1,300mm.

It will now be appreciated from the foregoing description that the hank reeling machine herein disclosed is adapted to provide an increased performance efficiency in hank doffing operations and to dispense with the skilled, time-consuming and laborious procedures during the doffing operations. While a single preferred embodiment of the hank reeling machine according to the present invention has thus far been described, such is not limitative of the scope of the present invention and, thus, the embodiment herein described and shown may be modified in any desired manner without departing from the scope of the invention. For example, the translatory unit using the twobar linkage of the displacement proportioning means may be utilized to visually indicate the ratio of collapse or the selected diameter of the swift structure because the two-bar linkage of the translatory unit is proportioned substantially in agreement with the umbrella linkages making up the swift structure.

What is claimed is:

l. A hank doffing machine comprising, in combination, a stationary support structure, a bored cylinder which is rotatable about its axis on said stationary structure, a swift structure having an open axial end and substantially coaxially supported on and around said cylinder, a spindle extending through said cylinder and axially movable relative to the cylinder substantially in line with said axis, said swift structure being connected to said spindle and radially collapsible about said axis in response to an axial movement of said spindle relative to the cylinder, a movable hank doffing unit having an inoperative position remote from said open axial end of the swift structure and an operative position aligned with and in proximity to said open axial end, positioning means for controlling the axial position of said spindle relative to said cylinder for varying the perimetric length of said swift structure, a control lever which is movable with said hank doffing unit as the dofi'mg unit is moved between the inoperative and operative positions, first and second longitudinal members which are movable substantially parallel to said spindle relative to said stationary structure and which are provided with elongated slots aligned with each other, said control lever being drivingly connected to said second longitudinal member for driving the member substantially parallel to said spindle when driven from said hank doffing unit, said first longitudinal member being drivingly connected to said spindle for driving the spindle to axially move when driven from said second longitudinal member, a template extending substantially transversely through said elongated slots in said first and second longitudinal members and having a forwardly reduced portion movable within said slots in longitudinal directions of the longitudinal members and a relatively wide portion which gradually merges with said reduced portion, and a translatory unit connected to said spindle and collapsible substantially in proportion to the perimetric length of said swift structure as said spindle is axially moved by said positioning means, said translatory unit being connected to said template for moving the template to be received at said wide portion in said elongated slots in said first and second longitudinal members as said spindle is axially moved by said positioning means toward a position providing an increased perimetric length of said swift structure and at said reduced portion in said slots as said spindle is axially moved by said positioning means toward a position providing a reduced perimetric length of said swift structure.

2. A hank reeling machine as set forth in claim 1, in which said swift structure comprises a plurality of substantially identical two-bar linkages substantially equidistantly spaced apart from each other and symmetrically positioned radially with respect to said axis of the cylinder and swift bars respectively supported on said two-bar linkages and extending substantially parallel to said axis.

3. A hank reeling machine as set forth in claim 2, in which said translatory unit comprises a two-bar linkage which is dimensionally proportioned substantially equally to each of said two-bar linkages of said swift structure.

4. A bank reeling machine as set forth in claim 2, in which said template has a contour which is determined in accordance with schedules depending upon link motions of said two-bar linkages.

5. A hank reeling machine as set forth in claim 1, in which said positioning means comprises a screw threaded portion which is formed on said spindle, a wonn wheel having an internally screw threaded bore and engaging with said screw threaded portion of the spindle, and worm wheel thus being rotatable on the threaded portion for causing said spindle to axially move relative to said stationary structure, a worm which is in constant mesh with said worm wheel and rotatable on the worm wheel with and about a shaft rotatably supported on said stationary structure and extending substantially transversely of said spindle, and drive means for rotating said worm gear on said worm wheel.

6. A hank reeling machine as set forth in claim 5, further comprising a boss formed on said worm wheel and movable on said threaded portion of said spindle together with the worm wheel, a spindle shift lever in driving engagement with said boss and a cross shaft rotatably supported by said stationary structure substantially transversely of said spindle, the cross shaft being pivotally connected to said first longitudinal member for being rotated about its axis when the first longitudinal member is moved in its longitudinal direction and securely connected to said spindle shift lever for turning the spindle shift lever to rotate about the cross shaft to drive the spindle to axially move a distance substantially equal to the longitudinal displacement of the first longitudinal member.

7. A hank reeling machine as set forth in claim 6, further comprising mechanical biasing means for urging said spindle toward said position providing said increased perimetric length of said swift structure.

8. A hank reeling machine as set forth in claim 1, in which said bank doffing unit comprises a hank carrier which is rotatable between said inoperative and operative positions about an axis through a pivotal shaft supported on said stationary structure and hank take-off rods adjustably mounted on said hank carrier and projecting from the carrier in directions which are adapted to be substantially parallel to said spindle when the hank doffing unit is moved to said operative position, said hank carrier being drivingly connected to said control lever for driving the control lever to move concurrently as the hank carrier is moved between said inoperative and operative positions.

9. A hank reeling machine as set forth in claim 8, further comprising a curved guide rail which is rigidly supported on said hank carrier and which is curved substantially circularly about said pivotal shaft and armately in a vertical direction and a roller carried on said control lever and in rolling engagement with said guide rail so that the roller is vertically moved as the guide rail is turned about said pivotal shaft when said hank carier is turned about the shaft between said inoperative and operative positions.

10. A hank reeling machine as set forth in claim 9, further comprising a crank arm which is securely connected at one end thereof to said control lever through a pin pivotally supported on said stationary structure and which is pivotally connected at the other end thereof to said second longitudinal member, said control lever being pivotally rotatable about said pin as said roller is vertically moved on said curved guide rail so that said second longitudinal member is moved in its longitudinal direction as said hank doffing unit is moved between said inoperative and operative positions.

11. A hank reeling machine as set forth in claim 8, in which said hank doffing unit further comprises mechanical biasing means for urging said hank carrier toward said inoperative position.

12. A hank reeling machine as set forth in claim 8, in which said hank doffing unit further comprises stop means for locking said hank carrier in said inoperative and operative positions when the carrier is moved respectively to these positions.

13. A hank reeling machine as set forth in claim 12, in which said stop means comprises a sector plate which is rotatable about the axis of said pivotal shaft and which is provided at its peripheral edge with a pair of angularly spaced recesses located in correspondence with said inoperative and operative positions of said hank doffmg unit, and a retaining member which is movable relative to said sector plate and releasably engageable with the sector plate selectively through said recesses for locking the sector plate in an annular position in which either of said recesses is aligned with said retaining member.

14. A hank reeling machine as set forth in claim 13, in which said stop means further comprises a shaft connected to said retaining member and movably supported on said stationary structure, and drive means associated with the last named shaft for releasing said retaining member from either of said recesses in said sector plate.

15. A hank reeling machine as set forth in claim 13, in which said stop means further comprises mechanical biasing means operative to urge said retaining member against said peripheral edge of said sector plate.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3918659 *Apr 1, 1974Nov 11, 1975Jr John PadgettFluid operated expandable skein holder
US4110149 *Jul 7, 1977Aug 29, 1978Owens-Corning Fiberglas CorporationRotatably driven mandrel having outer wall formed by continuously circulating endless helical band and radially adjustable support members for the band
US4124171 *Sep 6, 1977Nov 7, 1978Croon & Lucke Maschinenfabrik Gmbh & Co., KgContractable winding mandrel
US4349309 *Mar 13, 1980Sep 14, 1982Officine Minnetti Di Ornella Raveggi & C.S.A.S.Device for the transfer of yarn hanks
US4865261 *Nov 3, 1987Sep 12, 1989United Technologies Automotive, Inc.Spooler system with temporary, larger diameter spooling surface
US6105479 *Jan 30, 1996Aug 22, 2000Windmoller & HolscherVariable diameter cutter roller or glue spreading roller
EP0026256A1 *Mar 10, 1980Apr 8, 1981OFFICINE MINNETTI di Federico Minnetti & C. S.A.S.A device for the transfer of yarn hanks
EP1371595A2 *Apr 7, 2003Dec 17, 2003Motocono, S.A.Procedure and machine for winding and tying skeins
WO1996024471A2 *Jan 30, 1996Aug 15, 1996Feld Karl HeinzVariable diameter cutter roller or glue spreading roller
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/472.5, 242/574.4, 242/574, 28/291
International ClassificationB65H75/24, B65H54/58
Cooperative ClassificationB65H2701/31, B65H75/248, B65H54/58
European ClassificationB65H54/58, B65H75/24B8