Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3825379 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 23, 1974
Filing dateApr 10, 1972
Priority dateApr 10, 1972
Publication numberUS 3825379 A, US 3825379A, US-A-3825379, US3825379 A, US3825379A
InventorsD Lohkamp, J Keller
Original AssigneeExxon Research Engineering Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Melt-blowing die using capillary tubes
US 3825379 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Lohkamp et al.

[ MELT-BLOWING DIE USING CAPILLARY TUBES [75] Inventors: Dwight T. Lohkamp; James P. Keller, both of Baytown, Tex.

[73] Assignee: Exxon Research and Engineering Company, Linden, NJ.

[22] Filed: Apr. 10, 1972 21 Appl. No.: 242,504

[52] US. Cl. 425/72, 425/464 [51] Int. Cl. D0ld 3/00, D01d 7/00 [58] Field of Search 425/464, 72; 264/176 F,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,310,509 7/1919 Specht ..425/464 [111- 3,825,379 [451 July 23,1974

Ladisch 264/176 F Hartmann et al 425/464 X Primary Examiner-Robert D. Baldwin Attorney, Agent, or Firm-David A. Roth [5 7] ABSTRACT A melt-blowing die which has capillary tubes rather than drilled orifices is more easily fabricated and operates more effectually. Preferably, one end of each capillary tube is machined so as to terminate in an apex having an included angle within the range of 30 to- 90. Or the tubes can have conical ends with the same angle. The inside diameter of these tubes range from 0.010 to 0.025 inch and they connect with a chamber in the die. Preferably the die is a two-piece assembly and is fabricated by bolting the two pieces and including the capillary tubes in a solder layer.

16 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures SHEET 2 BF 2 gain FIG. 4.

1 MELT-BLOWING DIE USING CAPILLARY TUBES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS During the course of the research project leading to this invention, it was found that dies for use in a meltblowing process require very close tolerances. This has ent invention relates to a die having a plurality of capill lary tubes to produce a line of die openings having internal diameters which are uniform and are precisely aligned as required for the melt-blowing process. 2. Prior Art Melt-blowing and suitable dies therefor are disclosed in the following publications and patents:

l. Naval Research Laboratory Report 4364, Manufacture of Superfine Organic Fibers, Apr. '15, 1954.

2. Wente, Van A., Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, 48, No. 8 (1956, PP. 1342-1346).

3. Naval Research Laboratory Report 5265, An Im- I proved Device for the Formation of Superfine, Thermoplastic Fibers, Feb. 11, 1959.

4. British Pat. No. 1,055,187.

5. US. Pat. No. 3,379,811.

6. Japanese Pat. 25871/69, published Oct. 30, 1969.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A die apparatus for melt-blowing thermoplastic materials having a plurality of capillary tubes as the die openings. The die is a two piece assembly and the capillary tubes are included in the solder layer between the two pieces to form the die apparatus.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken across 5-5 of FIG. 4 showing a top view of one portion of the die with the capillary tubes in position before soldering;

FIG. 6 is a cross sectional view taken across 66 of FIG. 4 showing one capillary tube in position before soldering on one piece of the die;

FIG. 7 is a view in cross section similar to FIG. 6 wherein the two pieces making up the die are bolted together and packed in preparation for heating the solder;

FIG. 8 is a view in cross section of the die as the die would be positioned in the oven or being heated, with a reservoir for the solder attached;

FIG. 9 is a top view of the die with the reservoir for the solder attached before machining;

FIG. 10 is a cross sectional view of thedie after machining whereby a preferred embodiment of the present invention is produced; and

FIG. 11 is a cross sectional view of another embodiment of a die of the present invention.

made their fabrication very difficult and costly. One requirement which is responsible for the high cost is the large number of very small holes which must be drilled. A second requirement which was'found, that fabricators have difficulty adhering to, is that all holes must emerge on a sharp (chisel) edge and that this line of holes must be accurately in line over long distances. The center of each tube must not be offset from a straight line by more than 3 mils.

A method has been found of fabricating this type of die which overcomes some of the above difficulties and reduces the cost of the die. This method uses capillary tubes to replace drilled holes in the die. By using capillary tubes, the problems associated with precise drilling or electrical discharge machining of very small holes are avoided. Of greater importance, it is possible to align the row of capillary tubes very precisely so that the holes follow a straight line accurately.

In general the method used to demonstrate the principles of using capillary tubes follows. Two metal blocks which will each form one-half of the die are machined with the desired melt cavity. The melt cavity distributes the flow of thermoplastic fluid to. the inlets of the orifices. Slots are then milled accurately in the areas where the capillaries are to be packaged. Each block has an identical slot with a depth equal to or slightly less than the radius of a capillary tube. Channels are then milled in the end blocks (outside of the area which will contain holes) and along the slots at the mid-point of the tube location. These channels are filled with solder and then the solder is machined smooth. The capillary tubes are then packed into one slot and the two halves are matched and carefully aligned. The clamped halves are placed in a nitrogen oven where the soldering is completed. The soldered die is then finally machined.

Other methods of soldering can also be used. The advantages of using a capillary die include the following:

1. Holes can be longer since they do not have to be drilled.

2. Hole diameters are very uniform.

3. Holes do not have burrs or jagged interiors.

4. It is easier to achieve the precise alignment required to make superior webs by the melt-blowing process.

5. Machining of a melt channel is easier since this can be done on split halves, as compared to a single piece assembly.

6. Fabrication costs are greatly reduced.

A 2-inch die has been made using the capillary tube method. This die has performed satisfactorily on the melt-blowing process.

Since melt-blowing in general and dies therefore have been described as indicated above this specification will be devoted to the details of the novel die apparatus of the invention. 9

This can be best accomplished with the aid of the drawings.

Referring to FIG. 1 of the drawings, a melt-blowing process is carried out by introducing into hopper l pellets of one or more thermoplastic materials, i.e. resins, and which may include dyes, additives or other modifiers with the thennoplastic resins. These are conveyed into extruder 2.

With some thermoplastic resins it is necessary to degrade them to a considerably lower viscosity by either thermally treating the resin before introducing the resin into the extruder 2, or thermally treating the resin in the extruder 2 and/or die assembly 3.

For example, if polypropylene is to be melt-blown, the polypropylene is added into hopper 1 and heated in extruder 2 at temperatures in excess of 550 F., and preferably within the range of 620 to 800 F. The degree of thermal treatment necessary varies with the molecular weight of the polypropylene.

Resin is forced through extruder 2 into die head 3 by drive 4 which turns the extruder screw (not shown). Die head 3 usually contains heating plate 5 which may also be used in the thermal treatment of the thermoplastic resin before it is melt-blown.

The fluid resin is then forced out of a row of capillary tubes 6 rigidly mounted within die assembly 3, where it is impinged by a gas stream which attenuates the resin into continuous fibers 7 which are collected ona moving collecting device 8 such as drum 9 to form a continuous mat 10.

The hot gas stream, preferably air, which attenuates block 16. The dimensions of troughs l9 and 20 are selected so that when in operating position they just hold the desired number of capillary tubes 6 as determined by the outer diameter (O.D.) of capillary tubes 6.

Troughs 19 and 20 extend into the upper and lower die blocks and 16 ending near shoulder 29 in upper die block 15 and near shoulder 30 in lower die block 16. The height of shoulders 29 and 30 should preferably not exceed the outer diameter tubes 6.

FIG. 4 illustrates the relationship of the various parts prior to final assembly and prior to the actual soldering operation. Solder reservoirs 31 and 32 are seen in cross sectional view. A solder reservoir 31 is in the upper block plate 15 and a solder reservoir 32 is in the lower block 15 where die reservoir 31 and slot 31a are milled.

- For assembly, solder reservoirs 31 and 32 are filled with solder 21. After it has hardened the solder is machined flat so that it does not extend out of the reservolts. The desired number of capillary tubes are then the thermoplastic resin-is supplied through gas jets or The resin is forced into chamber 18 between the upper and lower die blocks 15 and 16, respectively.

According to the present invention, upper and lower die blocks 15 and 16 have been milled beyond chamber 18 to form troughs 19 and 20 to provide a seating cavity for capillary tubes 6. Capillary tubes are rigidly positioned in troughs 19 and 20between die blocks 15 and 16 by solder 21.

In this embodiment, the tubes 6 terminate exterior to chamber 18 in a sharp-angled point indicated as A. Die nose 22 is of generally triangular cross section and can be formed by machining the exterior surfaces of die blocks 15 and 16 as will be described in more detail hereinafter. The point A of the tubes 6 are formed in the machining operation. The angle of the point is within the range of 30 to 90, preferably 55 to 65, most preferably 60.

An upper gas cover plate 23 and a lower gas cover plate 24 are connected to upper and lower die blocks 15 and 16. Hot gas is supplied by inlet 25 in gas plate 23 and inlet 26 in gas plate 24. Suitable baffling means (not shown) can be provided in both upper gas chamber 27 and lower gas chamber 28 to provide a uniform flow of gas through the gas slot 11 and 12.

FIG. 3 shows the relationship of the tubes 6 to each other after having been aligned and soldered into a preferred configuration.

Referring to FIGS. 4-10, inclusive, there isillustrated a technique for making the inventive die. An identical groove or trough 19 is machined in die blocks 15 and 16 and a groove or trough 20 is machined in lower die 'placed in trough 20 of lower die block 16. Upper die block 15 and lower die block 16 are then bolted together. I

As shown in FIG. 7, the two are bolted together by bolts 33 so as to hold capillary tubes 6 firmly within troughs 19 and 20 with the inner ends of capillarytubes 6 abutting shoulders 29 and 30 of the upper die block 15 and lower die block 16. Die blocks 15 and 16 are usually machined to provide the chamber 18 necessary for the introduction of thermoplastic resin to the capillary tubes 6.-

Prior to the heating operation for heating the-solder 21 and introducing more solder 21 to securely hold the capillary tube 6, insulating packing 34 (shown in FIG. 7) is packed in the chamber 18 so that solder 21 will not flow into chamber 18 while the die is heated for soldering. I

In FIGS. 8 and 9, external solder reservoir 35 is shown attached to die blocks 15 and 16 which is bolted to said blocks with screws 36 and 37. The solder reservoir 35 serves to provide a pressure head of solder to replenish solder.

After die blocks 15 and 16 are securely clamped with bolts 33 and tubes 6 are firmly in troughs 19 and 20 and one end of each tube abuts shoulders 29 and 30, die assembly 3 is placed in an oven to heat the solder 21.

When die assembly 3 is placed in the oven, solder 21 melts and flows through solder reservoirs 31 and 32 completely contacting the capillary tubes 6 and filling the space between the capillary tubes 6 in the trough 19 and 20, as shown in FIG. 3. Upon cooling, tubes 6 are rigidly placed between die blocks 15 and 16. It is preferred that the position of the die blocks 15 and 16 be that as shown in FIG. 8 while in the oven or while being heated. Insulating packing 34 prevents flow of solder 21 into the capillary tubes 6 or chamber 18.

It is apparent that the heating must allow solder 21 to completely fill the space around the capillary tubes 6 and provide a complete barricade in troughs 19 and 20 to any possible flow of thermoplastic resin.

Preferably tubes 6 have a length that permits one end of each tube to extend exteriorly past the ends of the die blocks 15 and 16 and lower die block 16 before they are machined.

In the final machining operation, die blocks 15 and 16 are machined to provide a die nose 22 of a triangular cross section which terminates in an angular cross sectional tip A. The angle or as shown in FIG. 10 is between 30 and 90, preferably between 55 and 65, and

most preferably about 60.

In one embodiment, die blocks and 16, and tubes 6 are machined so that tubes 6 have surfaces which are integral with surface 38 of upper die block 15 and 39 of lower die block 16, to form the included angle a. See FIG. 10.

Some even more specific details of preferred embodiments follow. In FIG. 6, trough extends into the lower die block 16 for about A inch to about 1 inch, preferably about 7% inch (as indicated by the dimension x).

The capillary tubes 6 have internal diameters of between about 0.010 to about 0.025 inch, and may have outside diameters of between 0.025 and 0.050 inch, preferably 0.03 to 0.04 inch.

Capillary tubes 6 actually used to construct an embodiment of the invention were 316 stainless steel seamless tubes. This type of steel has the ability to resist the temperatures used in the soldering operation. The tubes were 0.015 t 0.0005 inside diameter x .031 inch outside diameter by 1.0 inch long.

Although capillary tubes having circular cross sections are illustrated, the cross section may be square or rectangular, or any other shape.

It is to be understood that the outside diameter (O.D.) of the capillary tubes controls the spacing of the die openings. This distance is preferably within the range of to 40 mil from center to center.

. The dimensions of the shoulder 30 and depth of the trough 20 in the lower die block 16 will vary depending on the size and shape of the capillary tubes 6 used.

Usually, the dimensions are such that die block 15 and die block 16 when in operating position will snugly hold the capillary tubes in the troughs 19 and 20. Hence, if the dimensions of troughs 19 and 20 are identical, depth Z will be one-half the CD. of the capillary tube used, and-the height Y of the shoulder will be equal to or less than the wall thickness of the capillary tube used.

A suitable solder when capillary tubes of 316 stainless steel are used is Eutectic 1801 silver solder having a composition of 51 percent silver, 22 percent copper, 19 percent zinc, 7 percent cadmium, and 1 percent tin. The flux used with such a solder is Eutectic 1801-8 flux. This particular solder melts at l,l00 F. and bonds at l,l F., according to the manufacturer. While other solder and fluxes may be utilized, if such a solder is used, the clamped upper die block 15 and lower die block 16 would be placed in an oven or otherwise suitably heated to temperatures in excess of the bonding temperature of the solder used. Accordingly, a temperature of at least l,l35 F. is used when Eutectic 1801 solder is employed.

FIG. 11 illustrated a die head embodiment which does not require machining of the die block or capillaries to obtain the desired angular cross sectional tip of each of the capillaries. In contrast it utilizes capillary tubes with conical shaped tips.

Thus, die head 40 is made up of an upper die block 42 and a lower die block 43. Upper die block 42has'a groove or trough 44 and die block 43 also has a groove or trough machined therein for receiving capillary tubes 41. Troughs 44 and 45 end in shoulders 46 and 47. Capillary tubes 41 abut these shoulders.

In operation thermoplastic resin is introduced into the back of the die head 40 through an inlet 48 which enters into a chamber 49 which supplies the resin to the capillaries of the capillary tubes 41.

In this embodiment, capillary tubes 41 project outwardly from the die blocks 42 and 43 at a distance up to about half the length of the tube without requiring any external support other than said die blocks. Upper gas cover plate 50 and a lower gas cover plate 51 forms an upper air or gas chamber 52 and a lower gas chamber 53.

The capillary tubes 41 have a conically formed apex A having an included angle within the range of 30 to 90, and preferably within the range of to 65.

' Tips 54 and 55 of the upper air plate 50 and lower air plate 51, respectively, have an angle which is the same as that of the apex A of the capillary tubes 41. Furthermore, tips 54 and 55 of the air plate can be positioned so that they are positioned essentially opposite the taper of capillary tubes 41 within the range of l to 5 mils.

The die of the present invention has several fabrication and operational advantages over other dies which are in the art or have been developed for the meltblowing process. Since the tolerances in dimensions are critical in a melt-blowing die, the dies of the present invention allow melt-blowing dies to be made having the uniform small die openings which extend for large widths (40 inches to inches or more, i.e., requiring 500 to 2,000 or more capillary tubes) without the high fabrication cost of the methods before suggested.

Furthermore, as has been discovered by another in the research project the die openings must be in line over a long distance.

Accordingly, by the fabricating method of the present invention, a novel die apparatus is produced wherein the machining operations are all relatively simple, can be carried out to very close tolerances, and still provide a die having the tolerances necessary for use in the melt-blowing process. Still further, the dies of the present invention are more readily cleaned and can be used to produce larger outputs of melt-blown materials.

It is also an advantage of the apparatus of the present invention that the hole length can be much longer than those obtained by the drilling approach.

What is claimed is: l. A melt-blowing die having a generally triangular cross-section which comprises in combination:

a die block having a chamber for thermoplastic material, and g a plurality of discrete smooth bore, uniform diameter, capillary tube means, having an internal diameter of from 0.010 to 0.025 inches and an external diameter of 0.025 to 0.050 inches each having one end and another end, rigidly held within said die block, and each of said tube means in a touching essentially planar relationship with each of said another ends in a precise alignment defining a sharp edge,

said one end of said tube means in fluid connection with said chamber and said another end of said tube means having a shaped tip with a cross sectional angle within the range of 30 to 90 in fluid communication with the exterior of said die, and

upper and lower gas slots defined by gas plates with tip means adjacent to said shaped tip in a spaced, parallel planar relationship to said shaped tip whereby said air plates form the same angle as said shaped tip.

2. A die according to claim 1 wherein said tip is triangular in cross section.

3. A die according to claim 1 wherein said tip is conical.

4. A die according to claim 1 wherein the centers of said tube means are aligned in substantially a single plane.

5. A die according to claim 1 wherein said angle is within the range of 55 to 65. l

6. A die according to claim 1 wherein said die block comprises an upper die block and a lower die block.

7. The die of claim 1 wherein said tube means are of circular cross section.

8. The die of claim 4 wherein the center of each tube means is offset from a straight line no more than 3 mils.

9. The die of claim 1 wherein said tube means are stainless steel capillary tubes aligned in a bed of solder.

10. The die of claim 9 wherein said die block has two discrete components and said tubes are rigidly mounted between said components.

11. The die of claim 1 wherein said gas plate tips are positioned essentially opposite said shaped tips.

12. The die of claim 1 which is at least 40 inches-long and has at least 500 tube means.

13. In a melt-blowing apparatus comprising:

extruder means in combination with die means,

said die means having gas attenuating means and fiber collecting means the improvement which comprises said die means having a generally triangular cross-section which comprises in combination:

a die block having a chamber for thermoplastic material, and

a plurality of discrete smooth bore, uniform diameter, capillary tube means, having an internal diameter of from 0.010 to 0.025 inches and an external diameter of 0.025 to 0.050 inches each having a one end and another end, rigidly held within said die block, and each of said tube means in a touching essentially planar relationship with each of said another ends in a precise alignment defining a sharp edge.

said one end of said tube means in fluid connection with said chamber and said another end of said tube means having a shaped tip with a cross sectional angle within the range of 30 to in fluid communication with the exterior of said die, and

upper and lower gas slots defined by gas plates with tip means adjacent to said shaped tip in a spaced, parallel planar relationship to said shaped tip whereby said air plates form the same angle as said shaped tip.

14. The melt-blowing apparatus of claim 13 wherein the die has an angle within the range of 55 to 65.

15. The melt-blowing apparatus of claim 13 wherein the tube means in said die are of circular cross-section.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3888610 *Aug 24, 1973Jun 10, 1975Rothmans Of Pall MallFormation of polymeric fibres
US3942723 *Apr 24, 1974Mar 9, 1976Beloit CorporationTwin chambered gas distribution system for melt blown microfiber production
US3954361 *May 23, 1974May 4, 1976Beloit CorporationMelt blowing apparatus with parallel air stream fiber attenuation
US3970417 *Apr 24, 1974Jul 20, 1976Beloit CorporationTwin triple chambered gas distribution system for melt blown microfiber production
US3981650 *Jan 16, 1975Sep 21, 1976Beloit CorporationMelt blowing intermixed filaments of two different polymers
US3985481 *Sep 24, 1975Oct 12, 1976Rothmans Of Pall Mall Canada LimitedExtrusion head for producing polymeric material fibres
US4073850 *Dec 9, 1974Feb 14, 1978Rothmans Of Pall Mall Canada LimitedExtrusion, fibers
US4295809 *Sep 14, 1979Oct 20, 1981Toa Nenryo Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaDie for a melt blowing process
US4380570 *Apr 8, 1980Apr 19, 1983Schwarz Eckhard C AApparatus and process for melt-blowing a fiberforming thermoplastic polymer and product produced thereby
US4486161 *May 12, 1983Dec 4, 1984Kimberly-Clark CorporationMelt-blowing die tip with integral tie bars
US4526733 *Nov 17, 1982Jul 2, 1985Kimberly-Clark CorporationMeltblown die and method
US4631013 *Feb 29, 1984Dec 23, 1986General Electric CompanyApparatus for atomization of unstable melt streams
US4774001 *Oct 13, 1987Sep 27, 1988Pall CorporationNo adhesives
US4774109 *Jul 21, 1987Sep 27, 1988Nordson CorporationSlits in blades, hot melt adhesives
US4785996 *Apr 23, 1987Nov 22, 1988Nordson CorporationAdhesive spray gun and nozzle attachment
US4815660 *Jun 16, 1987Mar 28, 1989Nordson CorporationMethod and apparatus for spraying hot melt adhesive elongated fibers in spiral patterns by two or more side-by-side spray devices
US4818463 *Nov 20, 1987Apr 4, 1989Buehning Peter GProcess for preparing non-woven webs
US4826415 *Oct 21, 1987May 2, 1989Mitsui Petrochemical Industries, Ltd.Melt blow die
US4844004 *Apr 26, 1988Jul 4, 1989Nordson CorporationMethod and apparatus for applying narrow, closely spaced beads of viscous liquid to a substrate
US4934433 *Nov 15, 1988Jun 19, 1990Polysar Financial Services S.A.Devolatilization
US4969602 *Sep 29, 1989Nov 13, 1990Nordson CorporationNozzle attachment for an adhesive dispensing device
US4983109 *Jan 14, 1988Jan 8, 1991Nordson CorporationHot melt adhesive
US4987854 *Dec 12, 1988Jan 29, 1991Nordson CorporationApparatus for gas-aided dispensing of liquid materials
US5017112 *Mar 22, 1989May 21, 1991Mitsui Petrochemical Industries, Ltd.Melt-blowing die
US5026450 *Oct 13, 1989Jun 25, 1991Nordson CorporationMethod of applying adhesive to the waist elastic material of disposable garments
US5030303 *Jul 28, 1989Jul 9, 1991Nordson CorporationMethod for forming disposable garments with a waste containment pocket
US5065943 *Sep 6, 1990Nov 19, 1991Nordson CorporationNozzle cap for an adhesive dispenser
US5075068 *Oct 11, 1990Dec 24, 1991Exxon Chemical Patents Inc.Method and apparatus for treating meltblown filaments
US5080569 *Aug 29, 1990Jan 14, 1992ChicopeePrimary air system for a melt blown die apparatus
US5114752 *Dec 21, 1990May 19, 1992Nordson CorporationDischarging a stream from a nozzle, directing a flow of gas
US5143776 *Jun 24, 1991Sep 1, 1992The Procter & Gamble CompanyTissue laminates having adhesively joined tissue laminae
US5169071 *Aug 13, 1991Dec 8, 1992Nordson CorporationNozzle cap for an adhesive dispenser
US5171512 *Mar 7, 1991Dec 15, 1992Mitsui Petrochemical Industries, Ltd.Dividing molten resin; preventing fiber twisting
US5176952 *Sep 30, 1991Jan 5, 1993Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyTensile strength
US5190812 *Sep 30, 1991Mar 2, 1993Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyTurns opaque when stretched
US5196207 *Jan 27, 1992Mar 23, 1993Kimberly-Clark CorporationHeated air
US5207970 *Sep 30, 1991May 4, 1993Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMethod of forming a web of melt blown layered fibers
US5232770 *Sep 30, 1991Aug 3, 1993Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyHigh temperature stable nonwoven webs based on multi-layer blown microfibers
US5238190 *Jun 16, 1992Aug 24, 1993Nordson CorporationOffset nozzle assembly
US5238733 *Sep 30, 1991Aug 24, 1993Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyLayers of low modulus and high modulus material
US5240479 *May 17, 1991Aug 31, 1993Donaldson Company, Inc.Pleated filter media having a continuous bead of adhesive between layers of filtering material
US5248455 *Feb 19, 1993Sep 28, 1993Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMethod of making transparent film from multilayer blown microfibers
US5258220 *Sep 30, 1991Nov 2, 1993Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyWipe materials based on multi-layer blown microfibers
US5286182 *Jan 6, 1992Feb 15, 1994Mitsubishi Kasei CorporationSpinning nozzle for preparing a fiber precursor
US5316838 *Mar 26, 1993May 31, 1994Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyRetroreflective sheet with nonwoven elastic backing
US5350624 *Oct 5, 1992Sep 27, 1994Kimberly-Clark CorporationAbrasion resistant fibrous nonwoven composite structure
US5354378 *Jul 8, 1992Oct 11, 1994Nordson CorporationSlot nozzle apparatus for applying coatings to bottles
US5382312 *Apr 8, 1992Jan 17, 1995Nordson CorporationDual format adhesive apparatus for intermittently disrupting parallel, straight lines of adhesive to form a band
US5407619 *Oct 6, 1993Apr 18, 1995Mitsubishi Kasei CorporationProcess for preparing a fiber precursor of metal compound, and a process for preparing a fiber of metal
US5409733 *Jun 15, 1994Apr 25, 1995Nordson CorporationApparatus and methods for applying conformal coatings to electronic circuit boards
US5418009 *Jul 8, 1992May 23, 1995Nordson CorporationApparatus and methods for intermittently applying discrete adhesive coatings
US5421921 *Jul 8, 1992Jun 6, 1995Nordson CorporationSegmented slot die for air spray of fibers
US5423783 *Mar 29, 1994Jun 13, 1995Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyOstomy bag with elastic and heat sealable medical tapes
US5423935 *Apr 8, 1994Jun 13, 1995Nordson CorporationMethods for applying discrete coatings
US5429840 *May 26, 1994Jul 4, 1995Nordson CorporationApparatus and methods for applying discrete foam coatings
US5458721 *Sep 22, 1994Oct 17, 1995Nordson CorporationDual format adhesive process for intermittently disrupting parallel lines of adhesive to form adhesive bands
US5478224 *Feb 4, 1994Dec 26, 1995Illinois Tool Works Inc.Apparatus for depositing a material on a substrate and an applicator head therefor
US5508102 *Jun 20, 1994Apr 16, 1996Kimberly-Clark CorporationComprising a matrix of meltblown fibers with at least one other dispersed fibrous material; tensile strength, elongation; moist wipe
US5524828 *Mar 8, 1995Jun 11, 1996Nordson CorporationApparatus for applying discrete foam coatings
US5533675 *May 25, 1995Jul 9, 1996Nordson CorporationApparatus for applying discrete coatings
US5540804 *Mar 7, 1995Jul 30, 1996Nordson CorporationDual format adhesive apparatus, process and article
US5582907 *Jul 28, 1994Dec 10, 1996Pall CorporationFilters; tensile strength
US5586997 *Feb 16, 1995Dec 24, 1996Pall CorporationBag filter
US5591335 *May 2, 1995Jan 7, 1997Memtec America CorporationFilter cartridges having nonwoven melt blown filtration media with integral co-located support and filtration
US5607766 *Jun 6, 1995Mar 4, 1997American Filtrona CorporationFilter, wick
US5620641 *Jul 29, 1996Apr 15, 1997American Filtrona CorporationPolyethylene terephthalate sheath/thermoplastic polymer core bicomponent fibers, method of making same and products formed therefrom
US5629079 *Jan 18, 1995May 13, 1997Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyExtensible nonwoven web comprising melt blown multilayered microfibers having layers of elastomeric material and of heat bondable material with layer of pressure sensitive adhesive on one face
US5633082 *Jul 29, 1996May 27, 1997American Filtrona CorporationPolyethylene terephthalate sheath/thermoplastic polymer core bicomponent fibers, method of making same and products formed therefrom
US5652050 *Mar 1, 1996Jul 29, 1997Pall CorporationMicroporous membranes for separating, analyzing biological fluids
US5667749 *Aug 2, 1995Sep 16, 1997Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for the production of fibers and materials having enhanced characteristics
US5681469 *Jul 2, 1996Oct 28, 1997Memtec America CorporationMelt-blown filtration media having integrally co-located support and filtration fibers
US5683036 *Jun 10, 1996Nov 4, 1997Nordson CorporationApparatus for applying discrete coatings
US5685911 *Jan 27, 1995Nov 11, 1997Nordson CorporationApparatus for intermittently applying discrete adhesive coatings
US5711970 *Aug 2, 1995Jan 27, 1998Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Apparatus for the production of fibers and materials having enhanced characteristics
US5733581 *Jul 2, 1996Mar 31, 1998Memtec America CorporationApparatus for making melt-blown filtration media having integrally co-located support and filtration fibers
US5807795 *Jun 2, 1997Sep 15, 1998Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for producing fibers and materials having enhanced characteristics
US5811178 *Nov 15, 1996Sep 22, 1998Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.High bulk nonwoven sorbent with fiber density gradient
US5846438 *Jan 20, 1995Dec 8, 1998Pall CorporationFibrous web for processing a fluid
US5863565 *May 15, 1996Jan 26, 1999Conoco Inc.Apparatus for forming a single layer batt from multiple curtains of fibers
US5882573 *Sep 29, 1997Mar 16, 1999Illinois Tool Works Inc.Adhesive dispensing nozzles for producing partial spray patterns and method therefor
US5902540 *Oct 8, 1996May 11, 1999Illinois Tool Works Inc.Meltblowing method and apparatus
US5904298 *Apr 14, 1997May 18, 1999Illinois Tool Works Inc.Meltblowing method and system
US5911224 *May 1, 1997Jun 15, 1999Filtrona International LimitedBiodegradable polyvinyl alcohol tobacco smoke filters, tobacco smoke products incorporating such filters, and methods and apparatus for making same
US5913329 *Mar 19, 1997Jun 22, 1999Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.High temperature, high speed rotary valve
US5951942 *Jun 23, 1998Sep 14, 1999Conoco Inc.Process for forming a single layer batt from multiple curtains of fibers
US6022818 *Apr 2, 1996Feb 8, 2000Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.A fluid intake exterior surface of matrix fibers (pololefins) and a fluid retention exterior surface of absorbent fibers (wood pulp); interior of a fiber mixture twisted together; personal care, disposable products; diapers; sanitary napkins
US6026819 *Feb 18, 1998Feb 22, 2000Filtrona International LimitedFibrous cylindrical element
US6051180 *Aug 13, 1998Apr 18, 2000Illinois Tool Works Inc.Extruding nozzle for producing non-wovens and method therefor
US6074597 *Feb 20, 1999Jun 13, 2000Illinois Tool Works Inc.Dispensing an adhesive
US6074869 *Jul 27, 1995Jun 13, 2000Pall CorporationPreparing a melt-blown nonwoven web; comprising surface adjusting a melt-blown non-woven web characterized by timed fluid flow in different directions
US6102039 *Dec 1, 1997Aug 15, 20003M Innovative Properties CompanyMolded respirator containing sorbent particles
US6133173 *Dec 1, 1997Oct 17, 20003M Innovative Properties CompanyNonwoven cohesive wrap
US6171985Dec 1, 1997Jan 9, 20013M Innovative Properties CompanyLow trauma adhesive article
US6174603Aug 25, 1999Jan 16, 2001Filtrona International LimitedContinuous bicomponent fibers comprising a core of thermoplastic polymer surrounded by a sheath of a blended polymer which includes vinyl acetate and a given weight % of the thermoplastic polymer forming the core
US6197406Mar 16, 2000Mar 6, 2001Illinois Tool Works Inc.Omega spray pattern
US6198016Jun 10, 1999Mar 6, 20013M Innovative Properties CompanyArticle comprising backing substrate comprising fibrous web and absorbent particulate material having discontinuous adhesive layer disposed thereon
US6200635Aug 31, 1998Mar 13, 2001Illinois Tool Works Inc.Omega spray pattern and method therefor
US6234171May 11, 2000May 22, 20013M Innovative Properties CompanyMolded respirator containing sorbent particles
US6342561Feb 16, 2000Jan 29, 20023M Innovative Properties CompanyVinyl monomer, acid monomer, metal oxide, and surfactant; ionomeric particulate dispersed in water-soluble polymer; used in cosmetics
US6358417Apr 21, 1999Mar 19, 2002Osmonics, Inc.Non-woven depth filter element
US6364647Oct 8, 1998Apr 2, 2002David M. SanbornThermostatic melt blowing apparatus
US6368687Dec 1, 1998Apr 9, 20023M Innovative Properties CompanyLow trauma adhesive article
US6383958Jun 18, 1999May 7, 2002David P. SwansonNonwoven sheets, adhesive articles, and methods for making the same
US6454096Jun 1, 2000Sep 24, 20023M Innovative Properties CompanyPackage for dispensing individual sheets
US6461430Mar 16, 2000Oct 8, 2002Illinois Tool Works Inc.Omega spray pattern and method therefor
US6503855Nov 19, 1999Jan 7, 20033M Innovative Properties CompanyLaminated composites
US6533119May 8, 2000Mar 18, 20033M Innovative Properties CompanyBMF face oil remover film
US6565344Mar 9, 2001May 20, 2003Nordson CorporationApparatus for producing multi-component liquid filaments
US6602554Jan 14, 2000Aug 5, 2003Illinois Tool Works Inc.Vacillating flow in predominately nonparallel direction to that of moving article; uniform, efficient economical deposition
US6635704Nov 29, 2001Oct 21, 20033M Innovative Properties CompanyFor use as repulpable adhesive and as a cosmetic adhesive
US6638611Jun 7, 2001Oct 28, 20033M Innovative Properties CompanyOil absorbers
US6645611Feb 9, 2001Nov 11, 20033M Innovative Properties CompanyDispensable oil absorbing skin wipes
US6652800Mar 12, 2001Nov 25, 2003Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for producing fibers
US6680021Oct 20, 2000Jan 20, 2004Illinois Toolworks Inc.Meltblowing method and system
US6756098Jun 25, 2002Jun 29, 20043M Innovative Properties CompanyHas a yield strength and a tensile strength, and wherein the tensile strength is about 0.7 mpa or greater, and at least about 150% of the yield strength.
US6814555Mar 9, 2001Nov 9, 2004Nordson CorporationApparatus and method for extruding single-component liquid strands into multi-component filaments
US6835256Oct 29, 2002Dec 28, 20043M Innovative Properties CompanyLaminated composites
US6890167Mar 18, 2000May 10, 2005Illinois Tool Works Inc.Meltblowing apparatus
US6894204May 2, 2001May 17, 20053M Innovative Properties CompanyTapered stretch removable adhesive articles and methods
US6916395Oct 23, 2002Jul 12, 2005Osmonics, Inc.Process for making three-dimensional non-woven media
US6938781Oct 23, 2002Sep 6, 2005Osmonics, IncorporatedThree-dimensional non-woven filter
US6972104Dec 23, 2003Dec 6, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Meltblown die having a reduced size
US6986427Oct 23, 2002Jan 17, 2006Ge Osmonics, Inc.Three-dimensional non-woven media
US7001555Mar 18, 2003Feb 21, 2006Nordson CorporationApparatus for producing multi-component liquid filaments
US7018031Dec 22, 2003Mar 28, 2006Filtrona Richmond, Inc.Porous substrate for ink delivery systems
US7018188Apr 8, 2003Mar 28, 2006The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for forming fibers
US7078582Aug 21, 2001Jul 18, 20063M Innovative Properties CompanyStretch removable adhesive articles and methods
US7157093Dec 4, 1998Jan 2, 20073M Innovative Properties CompanyOil cleaning sheets for makeup
US7192896Nov 15, 2001Mar 20, 20073M Innovative Properties CompanyCapable of multiple uses or rinsings, for example, for use in personal care or home care
US7316552Dec 23, 2004Jan 8, 2008Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Low turbulence die assembly for meltblowing apparatus
US7798434Dec 13, 2006Sep 21, 2010Nordson CorporationMulti-plate nozzle and method for dispensing random pattern of adhesive filaments
US7939010Nov 17, 2005May 10, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod for forming fibers
US8074902Apr 14, 2008Dec 13, 2011Nordson CorporationNozzle and method for dispensing random pattern of adhesive filaments
US8257626Sep 7, 2010Sep 4, 2012Groz-Beckert KgFelt body manufacturing method
US8435600Nov 3, 2011May 7, 2013Nordson CorporationMethod for dispensing random pattern of adhesive filaments
US8721943Dec 17, 2010May 13, 20143M Innovative Properties CompanyProcess of making dimensionally stable nonwoven fibrous webs
US8728960Jan 19, 2007May 20, 2014Exxonmobil Chemical Patents Inc.Spunbond fibers and fabrics from polyolefin blends
US20100224702 *Apr 27, 2009Sep 9, 2010Illinois Tool Works Inc.Pneumatic atomization nozzle for web moistening
US20110092076 *May 19, 2009Apr 21, 2011E.I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyApparatus and method of vapor coating in an electronic device
USRE33481 *Apr 28, 1989Dec 11, 1990Nordson CorporationAdhesive spray gun and nozzle attachment
DE19609143C1 *Mar 8, 1996Nov 13, 1997Rhodia Ag Rhone PoulencMelt-blown-Vlies, Verfahren zu dessen Herstellung und dessen Verwendungen
DE19956368A1 *Nov 24, 1999Jun 13, 2001Sandler C H GmbhMelt blown thermoplastic plastic fiber fleece production involves blowing fiber flow leaving nozzle to form angle with nozzle axis
DE19956368C2 *Nov 24, 1999Jan 3, 2002Sandler C H GmbhVerfahren zur Herstellung von schmelzgeblasenen Vliesstoffen, daraus hergestellte schmelzgeblasene Vliesstoffe und Verwendung der schmelzgeblasenen Vliesstoffe
EP0334653A2 *Mar 23, 1989Sep 27, 1989Mitsui Petrochemical Industries, Ltd.Spinning method employing melt-blowing method and melt-blowing die
EP0701010A1Oct 11, 1991Mar 13, 1996Exxon Chemical Patents Inc.Meltblowing Die
EP2145695A1 *Jul 14, 2008Jan 20, 2010Sika Technology AGDevice for applying an adhesive
EP2302121A1Sep 15, 2009Mar 30, 2011Groz-Beckert KGFelt body production method
WO1996039054A1Jun 4, 1996Dec 12, 1996American Filtrona CorpPolyethylene terephthalate sheath/thermoplastic polymer core bicomponent fibers, method of making same and products formed therefrom
WO1999027880A1Apr 3, 1998Jun 10, 1999Minnesota Mining & MfgNasal dilator
WO2008091432A2Nov 14, 2007Jul 31, 2008Exxonmobil Chem Patents IncSpunbond fibers and fabrics from polyolefin blends
WO2009026207A1Aug 18, 2008Feb 26, 2009Exxonmobil Chem Patents IncSoft and elastic nonwoven polypropylene compositions
WO2012051479A1Oct 14, 2011Apr 19, 20123M Innovative Properties CompanyDimensionally stable nonwoven fibrous webs, and methods of making and using the same
WO2012078826A2Dec 8, 2011Jun 14, 20123M Innovative Properties CompanyAdhesive article for three-dimensional applications
Classifications
U.S. Classification425/72.2, 264/DIG.750, 425/464, 264/211.17
International ClassificationD01D4/02, B29C47/00, B29B7/00, D04H3/03, B29C47/20, B29C47/30, D01D5/08, B29C47/12
Cooperative ClassificationD01D4/025, B29C47/14, B29C47/0014, B29C47/085, B29C47/0837, B29C47/0828, B29C47/30, Y10S264/75
European ClassificationD01D4/02C