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Publication numberUS3826061 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 30, 1974
Filing dateAug 27, 1973
Priority dateMay 15, 1972
Publication numberUS 3826061 A, US 3826061A, US-A-3826061, US3826061 A, US3826061A
InventorsD Hunter
Original AssigneeDelamere & Williams Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bag making and filling machine
US 3826061 A
Abstract
A bag making and liquid filling machine characterized by a drip-free structure whereby to prevent contamination of the bag making material in an area where a heat seal is to be made.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 1111 3,826,061

Hunter 1 1 July 30, 1974 BAG MAKING AND FILLING MACHINE 2,134,709 11/1938 Drew 222/571 2,874,733 2 1959 S l t l. 222 I08 X [75] Inventor: Donaltl Arthur Hunter, Mississauga, 2,966,166 1241960 i i 2 I I I 137:3 X O Canada 3,381,441 5/1968 Condo et al. 53/182 x signeez D e e & Co p y, .lud1ce X Limited, Toronto, Canada [22] Filed: 1973 Primary Examiner-Robert L. Spruill 2 App] 391 4 Attorney, Agent, or FirmDike,'Bronstein, Roberts &

C shmen a d Ro ert G mmgns Related US. Application Data [62] Division of Ser. No. 253,128, May 15, 1972, Pat. No.

[52 us. 131 53/182, 137/312, 222/109 [57] ABSTRACT [51] Int. Cl B65b 9/12, B65b 39/04 l [58] Field of Search 53/180,182; 137/312; A g making and llquid filling machine characterized 141 15 H6, 1 19; 32 103 109 571 by a drip-free structure whereby to prevent contamination of the bag making material in an area where a [56] Ref r nces Cit d heat seal is to be made.

UNITED STATES PATENTS l,654,|85 12/l927 Mrozek 222/108 11 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures Pmmmmsmm sum uur 4 BAG MAKING AND FILLING MACHINE This is a division of application Ser. No. 253,128, filed on May 15, 1972 and now US. Pat. No. 3,788,245.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The invention resides in the field of bag making and liquid filling machines of the type wherein successive thermoplastic film bags are produced by the application of heat and pressure at spaced intervals, successive bags being provided with successive charges of liquid.

2. Description of the Prior Art Prior to the present invention, the bag making and liquid filling machines of the type described have been employed for filling film bags with liquids whose characteristics were such that dripping from the outlet tube wasnegligible, or the nature of the liquid was such that any drip onto the confronting surfaces to be sealed did not interfere with the production of an efficient seal.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a novel and improved bag making and liquid filling machine of the type which is particularly adapted for filling thermoplastic film bags with a multigrade or detergent lubricating oil whose characteristics are such that any inadvertent drip of oil onto the surfaces to be heat sealed would interfere with the production of an efficient heat seal. Provision is made in the present machine for preventing drip from the filling tube whereby to prevent interference with the heat sealing operation. The present invention is also provided with means for quickly and accurately measuring successive loads or charges of liquid and for depositing such charges under pressure into successive bags in a rapid and gentle manner, the outlet of the filling tube being of a structure such as to prevent any leakage or drip therefrom after the filling operation is completed.

Accordingly, the invention has for one object to provide a novel and improved filling machine having novel provision for preventing any drip or leakage from the filling tube after the filling operation is completed.

The invention has for another object to provide a novel and improved bag making and filling machine of the character defined having provision for measuring and depositing accurate loads into successive containers each cycle of operation in a simple and efficient manner.

The invention has for a further object to provide a novel and improved bag making and filling machine having provision for measuring and depositing under pressure in a rapid and gentle manner an accurate charge of liquid into successive bags each cycle of operation in a simple and efficient manner.

With these general objects in view and such others as may hereinafter appear, the invention consists in the filling machine and in the various structures, arrangements and combinations of parts hereinafter described and particularly defined in the claims at the end of this specification.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the drawings illustrating the preferred embodiment of the invention:

FIG. 1 is a front elevation of the present bag making and filling machine embodying the present invention;

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The invention is embodied in a bag making and filling machine of a known type wherein the bag making material comprises a sheet material or thermoplastic film of a type capable of being heat sealed when confronting surfaces are pressed together with the application of heat and pressure to provide a seam. As diagrammatically illustrated in FIG. 2, in operation, the sheet material 10 is withdrawn from a supply roll, not shown, and drawn over a shaping form '12 and about a hollow, cylindrical tube or mandrel 14 in a manner such as to present the longitudinal edges of the film sheet or strip into overlapping relation. The tubular film material is advanced intermittently one bag length each cycle of operation by opposed driven belts 15, 16 and the overlapped portions 17 are sealed together to form a side seam by heating elements 18. A transverse seal 20 is made in the tubular film by opposed heat sealing elements 22 which provide a top seal 24 for a previously filled bag and a bottom seal 26 for a succeeding bag when the transverse seal is severed medially thereof by cooperating cutter blades 25 carried by the sealing elements 22 as shown. The bag material is then advanced one bag length and the bag is filled with a charge of material through a filling tube 28 whereupon the bag is provided with a subsequent transverse seal and simultaneously severed from the tubular film to produce a filled and sealed bag 30 as shown. 7

The illustrated machine, as shown in FIG. 1, is characterized by structure particularly adapted for packaging lubricating oil, such as detergent or multigrade motor oil, and includes novel piston type load measuring or charge forming means indicated generally at 32 and a filling tube 28 having a novel end structure 34 devised to reduce to a minimum any liability of drip from the filling tube after a measured charge has been deposited into the bag. The importance of the drip-free structure will be realized when it is considered that any oil which may drip onto the confronting surfaces of the material at the transverse seal area 20 might possibly interfere with the heat sealing operation to form an imperfect seal.

As shown in FIG. 1, the novel measuring device consists of a piston 36 operating in a cylinder 38 which is enclosed in a casing 40 supported by a stand 42 attached to the frame of the machine. The piston rod 44 extends through the upper end of the casing 40 into a chamber formed by an extension 46 of the casing. The upper end of the piston rod 44 extends into an air cylinder 48 provided with upper and lower air pipes 52, 54 leading to a controlled source of compressed air and having provision for raising and lowering the piston 36 so as to provide successive measured loads or. charges in timed relation to the operation of the bag making mechanism.

The piston 36 operates in a chamber 56 and is in communication with a supply pipe 58 which leads to a source of supply of the liquid, such as a tank 50, the supply pipe having a one-way valve 60 incorporated therein and arranged to permit passage of liquid upwardly into the chamber 56 but is arranged to prevent passage of liquid in the opposite direction. The chamber 56 is also in communication with the open upper end of the filling tube 28, the latter being extended to accommodate the film bag making mechanism. The filling tube is provided with one or more one-way valves, herein shown as two valves 62, 64, which are spring pressed to close and which are arranged to permit passage of liquid downwardly into the endmost bag section and which are automatically closed upon completion of the filling operation. Thus, in operation, when the piston 36 is drawn upwardly, the valves 62, 64 in the filling tube are closed and the valve 60 is opened by the suction to draw liquid from the tank 50 into the measuring chamber. As soon as the upward movement of the piston terminates the valve 60 closes, and upon downward movement of the piston 36, the valves 62, 64 are opened by the pressure and a measured charge of liquid is deposited into the endmost bag.

From the description thus far, it will be seen that accurate measured charges of oil are produced and deposited into successive bags by novel mechanism capable of providing an exceedingly rapid filling operation, in order of one United States or one Imperial quart per second without foam. Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 5, the non-drip structure 34 formed at the outlet end of the filling tube 28 comprises a structure which includes an inwardly curved end portion 66 of the filling tube, a second tube 68 surrounding the lower end of the filling tube, also having an inwardly curved end portion 70 spaced from the curved end portion 66 and forming therewith an annular space 72 which extends upwardly into an annular space 74 defined by the outside diameter of the inner tube 28 and the inside diameter of the tube 68. A cylindrical band 76 between the inner and outer tubes 26, 68, respectively, serves to close the upper end of the annular space 72, leaving the lower end of the annular space open to the atmosphere. A pair of opposed pipes 78 in communication with said annular space through the side wall of the outer tube 68 are connected by flexible conduits 80 to a source of suctionof any usual or preferred construction, herein diagrammatically shown as comprising a vacuum pump 81. Surplus material withdrawn by the pump may drain into an accumulating tank 83 as shown.

The lower end of the non-drip structure 34 comprises a conical screen 82 connected at the periphery of its base portion to the lower end of a circular band 84 which is fitted over the lower end of the outlet, the apex of the cone extending upwardly into the outlet of the filling tube 28 as shown. In practice, the mesh of the screen 82 is such that the oil will not pass through unless some form of pressure is behind it so that in operation, when the valves 62, 64 are closed at the end of a filling operation, any oil clinging to the inner sides of the tube 28 or any oil which remains on top of the screen 82 willflow into a peripheral area 86 defined by the ends of the curved portions 66 and 70 and the angular portions of the conical screen 82. Any oil collected in the area 86-will be held in suspension or withdrawn upwardly by the suction in communication with the annular space 72, 74, thus preventing any liability of drip from the outlet after the valves 62, 64 are closed.

From the above description, it will be seen that in operation, when the piston 36 in the measuring chamber 56 is moved upwardly, oil from the supply is drawn through the normally closed valve 60 by the suction created by the piston 36. The travel of the piston is adjustable to accommodate different loads to be measured, and after the piston comes to rest, the latter is moved downwardly to effect opening of the normally closed valves 62, 64. and to pass the measured load through the screen 82 and into the endmost bag section with a pressure which may vary from 5 to 15 psi. during the filling operation. The bag material is then advanced one bag length whereupon the material is sealed transversely to provide a top seal for the filled bag 30 and a bottom seal for the succeeding bag upon severing the seal medially thereof. The filled bag 30 may rest on a platform 92 where it may be removed manually, or it may be deposited on a conveyor, not shown, to be transported to a packing area.

It will be understood that the basic machine known in the trade as a Rovema milk filler is operated in successive timed cycles, each cycle including a bag forming, advancing and heat sealing operation, a load forming operation and a filling operation. In practice, the filling operation is timed to be completed in one second when a load of one Imperial or one United States quart is deposited into the container under pressure, the relatively large diameter filling tube and the small mesh screen effecting a gentle and foam-free flow such as to preclude any excessive pressure on the newly formed and still warm heat seals. The screened outlet also permits rapid filling in a gentle and efficient manner with a minimum of agitation.

As above stated, any liquid which may flow down the conical surfaces of the screen 82, or down the inner surfaces of the filling tube 28 will collect at the base of the cone and be drawn upwardly through the opposed pipes 78 and flexible conduits 80. The source of vacuum may comprise the motor driven pump 81 and any filling material drawn upwardly will be trapped in the receptacle indicated at 83. In the illustrated embodiment of the invention, the vacuum is on continuously, but in practice, such action could be modified to apply suction only when the valves 62, 64 are closed. The conical screen 82 is provided with a small radius at its apex, as shown at 98, and the base of the screen is extended laterally to provide a flat portion connected to the underside of the ring 84.

It will be observed that the filling sequence is such that after the endmost bag has been filled and the valves 62, 64 closed, the bag is advanced one bag section to present the following bag section in position to be heat sealed transversely and filled. Thus, during the bag film advancing operation, any drip of oil onto the confronting surfaces to be heat sealed would render it impossible to effect an efficie'nt seal. The present dripfree structure permits a rapid and gentle filling operation and provides a structure capable of preventing drip so that a perfect heat seal between confronting film surfaces may be obtained.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed 1. In a bag making and filling machine operating in cycles said machine being of the kind in which a pliable sheet of bag forming material is formed continuously about a hollow mandrel and wherein there is means for forming and advancing one bag length each cycle into tubular form about the hollow mandrel said bag forming means including means for forming a transverse heat seal providing the top closure for a filled bag and a bottom closure for a succeeding bag, a filling tube within the hollow mandrel having an outlet through which liquid material is adapted to be introduced into the bags as they are formed, means for measuring and depositing a liquid material through said filling tube into successive bags, a screen at the outlet end of the filling tube said screen being arranged to cause liquid to collect at its periphery at the completion of a filling operation, a circular band attached to and concentric with said filling tube and with said tube defining an annular space in communication with the periphery of the screen, and suction means in communication with said annular space to effect suspension of any liquid gathered around said periphery to prevent drip from the outlet end of the filling tube upon completion of the filling operation.

2. Apparatus according to claim 1, wherein said screen is conical in shape with its apex extending up into said outlet.

3. Apparatus according to claim 1, wherein the outlet end of said filling tube engages said screen and is curved inwardly so as to have a diameter which is less than that of the screen.

4. Apparatus according to claim 1, which is particularly adapted to filling liquids having the viscosity of oil in a rapid and drip free manner wherein the filling tube is of relatively large diameter conducive to a gentle and rapid filling operation.

5. Apparatus according to claim 1, wherein said annular suction space is defined by the outside surface of the filling tube and the inside surface of the band and wherein the lower end of the circular band engages said screen and is curved inwardly so as to have a diameter less than that of the screen.

6. Apparatus according to claim 1, wherein a ring is fitted over the lower open end of the circular band and the peripheral edge of the screen is connected to the ring.

7. Apparatus according to claim 2, wherein the outlet end of said filling tube is curved inwardly for cooperation with the base of said conical screen. I

8. Apparatus according to claim 7, wherein said annular space is defined by the outside surface of the filling tube and the inside surface of said circular band and wherein the lower end of the circular band is also curved inwardly for cooperation with said curved screen.

9. Apparatus according to claim 1, wherein the measuring means includes a cylinder chamber and a piston moveable in said chamber, an inlet pipe in communication with said chamber and connected to a source of supply, a one-way valve arranged in said inlet pipe to permit passage of liquid in said chamber only upon upward movement of the piston, a filling tube also in communication with said chamber, a one way valve arranged in said filling tube to permit passage of liquid under pressure only upon downward movement of said piston.

10. Apparatus according to claim 2, wherein the conical screen is provided with a small radius at its apex and has a lateral extension at its periphery providing an annular flat portion.

11. Apparatus according to claim 1, wherein the suction means comprise tubes connected at one end to the annular space and extending upwardly therefrom through said hollow mandrel.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1654185 *Jan 21, 1927Dec 27, 1927Gustav MrczekCoffeepot attachment
US2134709 *Oct 22, 1937Nov 1, 1938Drew Frank LNondrip nozzle
US2874733 *Jun 20, 1956Feb 24, 1959Union Carbide CorpContainer filler
US2966166 *Aug 19, 1955Dec 27, 1960Separator AbOutlet device for liquids which foam when discharged
US3381441 *Jul 19, 1965May 7, 1968Atlantic Richfield CoSystem for producing liquidfilled packages
US3507422 *Mar 27, 1968Apr 21, 1970Texaco IncFlexible dispensing nozzle for use in an automatic bag filling machine
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3879917 *Jan 10, 1973Apr 29, 1975Fmc CorpMethod and apparatus for packaging particulate material
US3886714 *Jul 11, 1974Jun 3, 1975Prepac SarlMachine for making and filling sachets
US3983682 *Nov 27, 1974Oct 5, 1976Pneumatic Scale CorporationApparatus for forming, filling and inserting filled bags into cartons
US4869048 *Aug 5, 1988Sep 26, 1989Zip-Pak IncorporatedStretcher for package forming
US6718735Mar 19, 2002Apr 13, 2004Baxter International Inc.Albumin in a flexible polymeric container
US7594616Apr 19, 2005Sep 29, 2009Evergreen Packaging Inc.Fluid discharge nozzle
US20040159574 *Feb 17, 2004Aug 19, 2004Lewis James D.Albumin in a flexible polymeric container
WO2002072429A1 *Mar 12, 2002Sep 19, 2002Baxter IntAlbumin in a flexible polymeric container
Classifications
U.S. Classification53/552, 222/109, 137/312
International ClassificationB65B39/00, B65B39/04, B67C3/26, B65B9/20
Cooperative ClassificationB65B2210/08, B67C3/2608, B65B9/2028, B65B39/04, B65B39/00, B65B9/213
European ClassificationB65B9/213, B65B9/20M4, B65B39/00, B65B39/04, B67C3/26B