Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3826235 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 30, 1974
Filing dateNov 14, 1972
Priority dateNov 26, 1971
Also published asCA962906A1, DE2158849A1
Publication numberUS 3826235 A, US 3826235A, US-A-3826235, US3826235 A, US3826235A
InventorsPasbrig M
Original AssigneeLacrex Brevetti Sa
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for use in conjunction with a carburetor of an internal combustion engine for improving the combustion of fuel
US 3826235 A
Abstract
Means for use in conjunction with the carburetor of an internal combustion engine wherein, for improving the mixture of air and fuel, an atomizer sleeve is arranged in a suction channel directly behind the throttle valve. The atomizer sleeve is provided with guide elements possessing approximately radially extending impact elements and throughpassage openings. The guide elements extend essentially over the entire cross-section of the suction flow and are arranged in spaced relationship with regard to one another. The atomizer sleeve is provided at its end neighboring the throttle valve with a substantially segmented spherical-shaped recess, the configuration of which exactly corresponds to the compartment swept by one-half of the throttle valve upon opening the throttle valve.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Pasbrig 1111 3,826,235 1451 July 30, '1974 MEANS FOR USE IN CONJUNCTION WITH A CARBURETOR OF AN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE FOR IMPROVING 6/1910 Great Britain 123/141 1,190,803

5/1970 Great Britain 5 7] ABSTRACT Means for use in conjunction with the carburetor of an internal combustion engine wherein, for improving the mixture of air and fuel, an atomizer sleeve is arranged in a suction channel directly behind the throttle valve. The atomizer sleeve is provided with guide elements possessing approximately radially extending impact elements and throughpassage openings. The guide elements extend essentially over the entire cross-section of the suction flow and are arranged in spaced relationship with regard to one another. The atomizersleeve is provided at its end neighboring the throttle valve with a substantially segmented sphericalshaped recess, the configuration of which exactly corresponds to the compartment swept by one-half of the throttle valve upon opening the throttle valve.

12 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures I MEANS FOR USE IN CONJUNCTION WITH A CARBURETOR OF AN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE FOR IMPROVING THE COMBUSTION OF FUEL BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention broadly relates to the internal combustion art and, more specifically, relates to means for use in conjunction with the carburetor of an internal combustion engine, wherein such means incorporates an atomizer sleeve arranged in the suction channel behind the throttle valve of the carburetor for'improving the fuel-air mixture.

It is known that not all of the fuel, in the form of a homogeneous fuel-air mixture, atomized by the nozzles of the carburetor of an Otto-cycle engine, reaches the combustion chambers of the engine, rather a portion thereof deposits along the walls of the'carburetor and the suction channel in the form of a condensate. This undesired condensation especially occurs at the region of the throttle valve of the carburetor and impairs the homogeneity of the mixture of air and fuel. Consequently, there is only a partial combustion of the fuel as complete combustion cannot be obtained. This again leads to the well-known exhaust gas problems, a reduction in engine efficiency, and increased consumption of fuel.

In order to improve upon the formation of the mixture and the combustion, different proposals have already been made in the art without, however, actually realizing a satisfactory solution with the use of relatively simple means. Thus, for instance, one proposal contemplates arranging in the suction channel, at a certain spacing behind the throttle valve, a ring-shaped intermediate flange, the purpose of which is to detach the fuel condensate by means of a withdrawal edge which flows along the wall, to release such and deliver same to the main suction mixture stream. The primary drawback of this arrangement, although relatively simple, resides in the fact that apart from the outer ring-shaped flow of the mixture along the walls, the main stream remains essentially unaffected by the intermediate flange insert which essentially only consists of a flat ring, the diameter of which is slightly smaller than the diameter of the suction conduit.

A certain influencing of the main core flow of the mixture can be realized by a different proposal known in the art which contemplates using an insert consisting of an atomizer sleeve which is arranged in the suction channel behind the throttle valve in the direction of flow. This atomizer sleeve is provided with radially inwardly protruding ribs which extend in the direction of the lengthwise axis of the sleeve at a certain angle and should finely atomize the mixture. A primary drawback which can be attributed to this known atomizer sleeve, intended to be arranged at the inlet or outlet of the carburetor, resides in the fact that the flow and gas formation is not influenced in particular at the critical space directly behind the throttle valve, since an additional turbulence can only first be attained after a certain distance downstream of the throttle valve. Moreover, the degree of additional turbulence appears to leave something to be desired, since the ribs do not extend over the entire flow cross-section. Thus, just as was previously the case, here also there remains a more or less non-influenced core flow at the center of the suction channel, even though a certain improvement is'realized in contrast to the previously mentioned prior art proposed intermediate flange insert, which does not exhibit any built-in elements or attachments and on] comprises a smooth ring.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Therefore, starting with the aforementioned considerations of the prolems existing in the art and the aforediscussed state-of-the-art proposals, it is a primary object of the present invention to further improve upon thehomogeneity of the fuel-air mixture and to realize as complete combustion thereof as possible.

Another and more specific object of the present invention aims at the provision of means for use in conjunction with the carburetor of an internal combustion engine interposed at or between the carburetor and internal combustion engine for increasing the homogeneity of the fuel-air mixture and realizing a more complete combustion thereof.

Yet a further significant object of the present invention relates to means for improving upon the homogeneity of the fuel-air mixture of an internal combustion engine and the complete combustion of such mixture, so as to increase engine performance, and produce exhaust gases which have more completely burned so as to minimize air pollution.

Now in order to implement these and still further objects of the invention, which will become more readily apparent as the description proceeds, there is proposed an atomizer sleeve arranged directly behind the throttle valve and equipped with guide elements or members, for instance in the form of sheet metal guides, possessing impact elements and throughpassage openings. The guide members extend essentially over the entire cross section of the suction flow and are arranged in spaced relationship from one another. The atomizer sleeve is provided at its end neighboring the carburetor throttle valve with a segmented spherical-shaped recess, the configuration of which essentially exactly corresponds to the space across which moves or sweeps one-half of the throttle valve upon opening such throttle valve.

Hence, according to the invention, the formation of the fuel-air mixture is notably improved at the particularly critical space directly behind the throttle valve since the atomizer sleeve of this development advantageously connects or merges without any spacing directly with the throttle valve, so that there are avoided possible dead spaces.

Moreover, with this arrangement the pivotability of the carburetor throttle valve is not impaired in any way since the inventive atomizer sleeve is provided at its end neighboring the throttle valve with a segmented spherical-shaped recess, the shape of which exactly corresponds to the shape which one-half of the throttle valve assumes when such is pivoted in the direction of the atomizer sleeve when the throttle valve is opened.

Apart from the direct connection of the atomizer sleeve of the invention at the region of the throttle valve, there also contributes to the improvement of the formation of the fuel-air mixture the feature that the atomizer sleeve of this development is provided with guide members for the fuel-air mixture which extend over the entire cross-section of the suction flow, so that there is realized an intimate admixture and turbulence of the entire mixed stream of fuel and air, including the core flow. This intimate admixture of fuel and air is still further promoted by the impact elements and throughflow openings which are provided according to the invention and which are formed at the guide members and preferably arranged at equidistant spaces from one another.

A particularly advantageous physical manifestation of the inventive atomizer sleeve can be realized if the latter is equipped with at least one air suction opening communicating with the atmosphere for the purpose of sucking-in supplementary air into the internal compartment of the atomizer sleeve.

The axial length of the atomizer sleeve preferably amounts to about 1.5 times the diameter of the suction conduit. Since the atomizer sleeve is therefore relatively short, there is practically no increase in the flow resistance, so that any possible impairment of the charge or filling weight of the cylinder of the engine can be avoided.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING The invention will be better understood and objects other than those set forth above, will become apparent when consideration is given to the following detailed description thereof. Such description makes reference to the annexed drawing wherein:

FIG. 1 is a longitudinal sectional view through a portion of the carburetor equipped with an atomizer sleeve construction of this development;

FIGS. 2 and 3 are respective cross-sectional views of the arrangement of FIG. 1, taken substantially along the line II-II and III-III thereof, showing two preferred constructional embodiments of atomizer sleeves;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of one embodiment of sheet metal guide members provided for the atomizer sleeve andviewed along the section region IV; and

FIG. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view, similar to the showing of FIG. 4, of a modified construction of sheet metal guide members.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Considering now the drawing, it is to be understood that essentially only the components of the invention necessary for a complete understanding of the underlying principles thereof, have been shown in the drawing, and specifically at the region of the throttle or flap valve of FIG. I, and all other components of the carburetor and engine of conventional design not absolutely required for understanding such concepts have been omitted for the purpose of preserving clarity in illustration. Hence, by referring to FIG. 1 in particular, it will be seen that there is provided a throttle valve 1 which is associated with the conventional carburetor, and such valve is pivotably mounted at a pivot shaft and comprises the two valve halves la. The throttle valve 1 can be mounted as part of the carburetor or in a conduit extending between the carburetor and the internal combustion engine. Irrespective of whether the throttle valve is installed as part of the carburetor or arranged in a conduit between the carburetor and the internal combustion engine, such will be generally conveniently considered as the carburetor throttle valve 1. Now directly behind this carburetor throttle valve 1, generally arranged to be rotatable in a cylindrical carburetor outlet or discharge channel 2, there is arranged an atomizer sleeve or conduit 3 which constitutes an essential component of this development. This atomizer sleeve 3 extends over a portion of its axial length into a suction channel 4 which is flanged to the channel 2, the channel 4 leading to the cylinder or cylinders of a not particularly illustrated but conventional internal combustion engine, particularly an Otto-cycle engine.

As will be readily apparent by inspecting the drawing, the atomizer sleeve 3 occupies the entire cross-section of the channels 2 and 4 and assuming that the channels 2 and 4 have a circular cylindrical configuration, then such atomizer sleeve 3 likewise has a circular cylindrical configuration. The entire suction cross-section of the atomizer sleeve 3 is provided with guide members or elements 5, in the form of, for instance, sheet metal guide members, arranged at a spacing from one another. The guide members 5 are provided with radially extending impact elements 6 (FIG. 4) or 12 (FIG. 5), and throughpassage openings 7 which are uniformly distributed over the surface of each guide member 5. With the embodiment depicted in FIG. 4, these impact elements 6 and throughpassage openings 7 can be simply formed by a suitable punching or stamping operation, to produce the flexed impact portions 6 which are displaced out of the plane of the material. Another extremely simple technique for forming the impact elements l2 and the throughpassage openings7 as shown in the modified embodiment of FIG. 5, is to bend the guide members at the desired locations by a stamping or punching operation in a direction transverse to the plane of the material. By virtue of these flexed or bentout portions there are thus formed, in a single working operation, the impact elements 12 and the throughpassage openings 7 and there is produced an arrangement which can be compared in appearance to the wellknown vegetable and fruit grating implements, as such are employed for instance for grating apples and potatoes.

A further improvement in the turbulence and atomization produced by the guide members can be realized if the atomizer sleeve 3 is equipped with at least one air suction opening 8 which communicates with the surrounding or ambient atmosphere and serves for the sucking-in of supplementary air into the atomizer sleeve. The throughflow cross-section of the air suction opening 8 advantageously arranged directly behind the throttle valve 1 is, as a general rule, controlled as a function of the position of the throttle valve, specifically in such a way that upon opening the throttle valve the cross-section is simultaneously increased. This control can occur in different ways. A particularly simple way is a control wherein there is provided a slide which is fixedly connected with the throttle valve and which upon opening the throttle valve more or less closes the air suction opening.

As also can be clearly seen by referring to FIG. 1, the atomizer sleeve 3 of this development is arranged directly behind the throttle valve 1. In a strict sense, this is only applicable for the one-half i.e. the illustrated left half, of the atomizer sleeve 3 of FIG. 1 which is disposed opposite that half of the throttle valve which during opening of the throttle valve rotates away from the atomizer sleeve 3. In order to avoid impairing the pivotal and rotational movement of the throttle valve 1, the other half of the end of the atomizer sleeve 3 is provided with a segmented spherical-shaped recess 9, the

shape of which exactly corresponds to the space across which sweeps or wipingly moves the other half of the throttle valve when the throttle valve is open. In this case one is referring to the half of the throttle valve 1 which moves in the direction of the atomizer sleeve, i.e. the right-half of the throttle valve 1 of FIG. 1.

As should be apparent from the previous considerations, within the realm of the technical possibilities, the inventive atomizer sleeve 3 is directly connected at the throttle valve 1, so that within the realm of the possible, there are prevented all dead spaces at the, region behind the throttle valve and there is realized a very intimate and homogeneous mixture formation.

With regard to the distribution of the guide members or elements 5 over the suction cross section of the atomizer sleeve 3, there are no further requirements or prerequisites, provided that the guide members are extensively uniformly distributed over the flow crosssection. Thus, for instance, the sheet metal guide members or elements can be arranged parallel to one another at a uniform spacing, as such has been illustrated in FIG. 2. If desired, there can be provided transverse to this arrangement according to FIG- 2, a further sheet metal guide arrangement, so that in cross-section there is produced a grid-like pattern. Depending upon the requirements of the individual situation, the sheet metal guide members can be extended directly to the outer ring-shaped wall of the atomizer sleeve, so that there are formed a number of separate channels which are only interconnected with one another via the throughflow openings 7. Such type arrangement can then, for instance, be advantageous if there should be especially realized an improvement in the formation of the fuelair mixture at the part throttle or load mode. With the throttle valve only slightly open during the part throttle mode there is formed mainly at the region of the throttle valve a fuel-air flow which in crosssection possesses the shape of a narrow ring-shaped or annular channel. If this ring-shaped channel flow, without increasing its cross-section, should be first of all also initially further conveyed through the atomizer sleeve, then there can be maintained an unchanged high velocity which favorably influences the admixture and atomization. At least initially the ring-shaped channel flow is only guided within the outermost ring-shaped channel of the atomizer sleeve which is extensively separated from the inner ring-shaped channels. In so doing, there is of advantage a constructional arrangement of the sheet metal guide elements according to the illustration of FIG. 3. This arrangement is also advantageous from the standpoint of manufacturing same since the sheet metal guide elements serving to form the different ringshaped channels can be constituted by a single spirally wound sheet metal guide member or element. Of course instead of using this proposed construction it would be possible to provide a number of concentric guide members or elements, wherein however the manufacturing costs are somewhat greater.

The connection of the sheet metal guide elements with one another and with the outer ring-shaped wall 3' of the atomizer sleeve 3 can occur in any random desired manner, for instance through the use of spacers and webs 10.

The construction and arrangement of the throughflow openings and the radial extending impact elements can be randomly selected.

As trails have shown, there can be realized with the device of the invention employed with a carburetor a decisive reduction in the exhaust gases, especially as concerns CO-content. Additionally, the efficiency of they engine is increased while simultaneously reducing the consumption of fuel. A further decisive advantage is that all of these advantages can be realized with a really simple arrangement which moreover can be subsequently installed at already existing carburetors. The inventive atomizer sleeve can be readily and very simple subsequently installed at existing carburetors, wherein it is of importance to recognize that thecarburetors may be generally of any random design and construction.

Accordingly, the carburetor, which already during its fabrication can be provided with the aforediscussed atomizer sleeve, is not limited to a certain type of carburetor, such as an inverted type or downdraft carburetor or the like.

While there is shown and described present preferred embodiments of the invention, it is to be distinctly understood that the invention is not limited thereto, but may be otherwise variously embodied and practiced within the scope of the following claims.

Accordingly, what is claimed is:

1. Means for use with a carburetor of an internal combustion engine for improving the fuel-air mixture, and employed in combination with a throttle valve and a suction channel, said means comprising an atomizer sleeve arranged in the suction channel directly behind the throttle valve and extending axially therefrom, guide element means provided for said atomizer sleeve, said guide element means possessing approximately radially extending impact elements and throughflow openings, said guide-element means extending essentially over the entire suction flow cross-section and arranged in spaced relationship from one another, said atomizer sleeve being provided at its end neighboring the throttle valve with a substantially segmented spherical-shaped recess, the shape of which corresponds exactly to the space across which sweeps one-half of the throttle valve upon opening the throttle valve.

2. Means as defined in claim 1, wherein the atomizer sleeve possesses at least one air suction opening communicating with the surrounding atmosphere for sucking supplementary air into the atomizer sleeve.

3. Means as defined in claim 1, wherein said guide element means comprises guide members substantially uniformly distributed over the entire internal space of the atomizer sleeve and substantially equidistantly spaced from one another.

4. Means as defined in claim 1, wherein the guide element means have radially inwardly protruding impact elements in the manner of a grating sheet.

5. Means as defined in claim 1, wherein the axial length of the atomizer sleeve amounts to approximately 1.5 times its diameter.

6. Means as defined in claim 1, wherein said guide element means at least at the region of the atomizer sleeve neighboring the throttle valve forms substantially ring-shaped channels which are closed from one another and which only communicate with one another via the throughflow openings.

7. Means as defined in claim 1, wherein the guide element means comprises a number of individual guide members and the impact elements and throughflow openings are uniformly distributed over the entire surface of each guide member.

8. Means as defined in claim 1, wherein said guide element means comprises a number of individual guide members of substantially rectangular configuration arranged substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of an outlet channel of the carburetor.

9. Means as defined in claim 1, wherein said guide element means comprises a single spirally wound guide member.

10. Means as defined in claim 2, wherein the throughflow cross-section of the air suction opening can be controlled as a function of the position of the throttle valve.

11. Means as defined in claim 2, further including means for controlling the air suction opening.

12. Means for use with a carburetor of an internal combustion engine for improving the mixture of air and fuel, and employed in combination with a throttle valve and a suction channel, said means comprising an atomizer sleeve arranged in the suction channel directly behind the throttle valve and extending axially therefrom, guide elements means provided for said atomizer sleeve, said guide element means possessing axially spaced impact elements and throughflow openings, said guide element means extending essentially over the entire suction flow cross-section of the suction channel and arranged in spaced relationship from one another, said impact elements extending approximately radially to form extended surfaces within each of said guide element means upon which an air-fuel mixture impinges, said impact elements and throughflow openings causing said air-fuel mixture to move radially as well as downwardly as it traverses said atomizer sleeve, said atomizer sleeve being provided at its end confronting the throttle valve with a recess through which moves a part of the throttle valve upon opening of the throttle valve and supplemental air inlet means for said atomizer sleeve.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3449098 *Jun 17, 1964Jun 10, 1969Larson Raymond C SrFuel atomizing unit
US3735744 *Jul 18, 1971May 29, 1973Brody OIntake manifold fuel system
FR1036659A * Title not available
GB1190803A * Title not available
GB191013333A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3960133 *Mar 1, 1974Jun 1, 1976Barry J. NaceFuel saving apparatus
US3998195 *Feb 3, 1975Dec 21, 1976Scott Alfred EFlow control and vaporizing chamber
US4019482 *Feb 5, 1976Apr 26, 1977Pugliese Rocco JFuel separator
US4192273 *Jul 17, 1974Mar 11, 1980Stan GrayCombustion mixture mixing device
US4335698 *Nov 13, 1979Jun 22, 1982Max-Mi CorporationVaporization chamber
US4711225 *Mar 2, 1987Dec 8, 1987Andreas StihlConnecting piece between the carburetor and the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine
US5970963 *Mar 4, 1998Oct 26, 1999Nippon Soken, Inc.Apparatus for preventing flow noise in throttle valve
US6073609 *Jul 13, 1998Jun 13, 2000Buswell; Mark L.Intake device for use with internal combustion engines
US6170460Apr 4, 2000Jan 9, 2001Mark L. BuswellIntake device for use with internal combustion engines
US6192872 *May 5, 1999Feb 27, 2001Gabriel ZecchiniMethod and article of manufacture for improving fuel/air mixing in internal combustion engines
US6269806 *Nov 24, 1997Aug 7, 2001Centro Richerche Tecnologiche S.R.L.Intake and exhaust device with multiple sections of specific geometry, for internal combustion engines
US6601562Jan 3, 2001Aug 5, 2003Cmb Enterprises, LlcIntake device for use with internal combustion engines
US6758461 *Jun 28, 1999Jul 6, 2004Kristian Bjorn OmarssonFuel-air mixture apparatus
US6895924Aug 4, 2003May 24, 2005Cmb Enterprises, LlcIntake device for use with internal combustion engines
USRE40621 *Jul 19, 2001Jan 13, 2009Ford Global Technologies, LlcFlow improvement vanes in the intake system of an internal combustion engine
DE3345345A1 *Dec 15, 1983Jun 27, 1985Volkswagen AgFuel injection device
WO2000001940A1 *Jun 28, 1999Jan 13, 2000Kristjan Bjorn OmarssonFuel-air mixture apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/590
International ClassificationF02M29/00, F02M29/04, F02B1/00, F02B1/04
Cooperative ClassificationF02B1/04, F02M29/04
European ClassificationF02M29/04