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Publication numberUS3826253 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 30, 1974
Filing dateFeb 2, 1973
Priority dateFeb 2, 1973
Publication numberUS 3826253 A, US 3826253A, US-A-3826253, US3826253 A, US3826253A
InventorsLarsh R, Urbansky D
Original AssigneeKleen Test Prod Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical drape with closed fenestration
US 3826253 A
Abstract
A surgical drape includes a main drape body of suitable material, with a fenestration disposed therein. A sheet of imperforate transparent film is provided with at least one surface coated with a tacky adhesive. The film is dimensioned larger than the fenestration and is positioned with the tacky surface adhering to the drape body surrounding the fenestration, which is completely closed by the sheet. The tacky surface is exposed through the fenestration, and a release liner is peelably secured thereto. Upon removal of the release liner and draping of the patient, the exposed tacky film is immediately pressed directly onto the area to be incised, and the said area remains fully protected from contamination.
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United States Patent [191 Larsh et al.

11] 3,826,253 1451 July 30, 1974 SURGICAL DRAPE WITH CLOSED FENESTRATION [75] Inventors: Ray E. Larsh; Donald 1. Urbansky,

both of Milwaukee, Wis.

[73] Assignee: Kleen Test Products, Inc.,

Milwaukee, Wis.

[22] Filed: Feb. 2, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 328,905

[52] US. Cl 128/132 D [51] Int. Cl. A6lf 13/00 [58] Field of Search 128/132 D, 132 R, 156,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,260,260 7/1966 Questcl 128/132 D 3,667,458 6/1972 Krebs 128/132 D 3,741,206 6/1973 Binard et al. 128/132 D OTHER PUBLICATIONS Gerspacher, et al., Modern Plastics Vinyl Surgical Drapes; May 1951.

Primary Examiner-Richard A. Gaudet Assistant Examiner-Henry J. Recla Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Andrus, Sceales, Starke & Sawall [5 7] ABSTRACT A surgical drape includes a main drape body of suitable material, with a fenestration disposed therein. A sheet of imperforate transparent film is provided with at least one surface coated with a tacky adhesive. The film is dimensioned larger than the fenestration and is positioned with the tacky surface adhering to the drape body surrounding the fenestration, which is completely closed by the sheet. The tacky surface is exposed through the fenestration, and a release liner is peelably secured thereto. Upon removal of the release liner and draping of the patient, the exposed tacky film is immediately pressed directly onto the area to be incised, and the said area remains fully protected from contamination.

3 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures SURGICAL DRAPE WITH CLOSED FENESTRATION BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a surgical drape with closed fenestration, and more particularly to a drape for use in various types of surgical procedures which provides a simplified structure with increased protection against infiltration of bacteria into the area of the incision both before and during surgery.

Cleanliness of the area immediately adjacent the surgical incision is of utmost importance. In accordance with accepted hospital procedure, the incision area is coated with a suitable antiseptic prior to application of a protective drape and performance of surgery to reduce the possibility of infection. However, no antiseptic is 100 percent effective and there remainssome danger of infection of the area from exposure to air or contact by contaminated materials. For this reason, surgical drapes have been designed to be as sterile as possible to enhance the over-all sterility of the surgical area.

Many prior surgical drapes have been constructed in a manner so that the area to be incised is unnecessarily exposed to the air through the drape and prior to the commencement of surgery. In the event the surgeon is delayed from proceeding for any reason, the danger of infection will increase. This problem may be particularly acute in abnormal environments, such as makeshift battlefield hospitals. An example of such a drape is shown in the US. patent to Krebs, No. 3,667,458, wherein a surgical drape having an open fenestration is placed over the patient, thus exposing the surgical area to the possibility of undue contamination.

In addition, some prior surgical drapes require special and time consuming procedures before the drape can be applied to the patient. Thus, in the US. Patent to Pereny et al., No. 3,060,932, an adhesive mustbe sprayed onto the patients skin before a transparent sheet-like drape is applied thereto. Although the adhesive may be sterile, the increased movement of air adjacent the surgical area which is inherent in a spraying technique will also increase the danger of contamination. This, in effect, nullifies any advantage obtained by covering the surgical area with the sheet and requiring the surgeon to cut through it.

The present invention is directed to an improved surgical drape which eliminates the disadvantages of the aforementioned drapes, while providing a simplified structure which is easy to manipulate in the operating room.

In accordance with the invention, the surgical drape includes a main drape body of suitable material, with a surgical fenestration disposed therein. A sheet of imperforate transparent film is provided with at least one surface coated with a tacky adhesive. The film is dimensioned larger than the fenestration and is positioned with the tacky surface adhering to the drape body surrounding the fenestration, which is completely closed by the sheet. The tacky surface is exposed through the fenestration, and a release liner is peelably secured thereto. Upon removal of the release liner and draping of the patient, the exposed tacky film is immediately pressed directly onto the area to be incised, and

the said area remains fully protected from contamination.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING The accompanying drawing illustrates the best mode presently contemplated by the inventors for carrying out the invention.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a surgical drape constructed in accordance with the invention, and with parts broken away;

FIG. 2 is a bottom plan view of the drape, and with parts broken away; and A FIG. 3is an enlarged section taken on line 3-3 of FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT As shown in the drawing, the surgical drape I of the invention comprises a sheet-like main'drape body 2 of a shape and dimension determined by the type of operation to be performed. Body 2 may be made from any suitable well-known material, such as woven or pressed cellulose fibers, plastic or the like.

The drape is adapted to protectively cover at least a portion of the patient, and has means therein for permitting access by the surgeon to the area to be incised. For this purpose, afinite surgical aperture or fenestration 3 is disposed in body 2 so that it is surrounded thereby. That is, the fenestration is disposed completely inwardly of the body edges, and in any desired position. As shown inthe drawing, fenestration 3 is disposed centrally of the body.

After the skin of the patient is suitably treated with an antiseptic, it is desired to firmly secure the drape to the patient in a way which nevertheless permits lifting of the drape edges by a nurse, if necessary. Furthermore, the manner of securement should require a minimum of manipulative procedures, and the area to be incised should be fully protected both before and during the operation.

For this purpose, means are provided to secure the drape to the patients body exclusively throughout the full area of fenestration 3, said means also comprising a complete closure for the fenestration. As shown, a thin film-like imperforate preferably transparent plastic sheet 4' is provided which is normally smooth on its upper side 5 and which has a lower side 6 having a tacky surface throughout its extent. This tacky quality of side 6 may be created by coating the entire side with a suitable pressure sensitive sterile adhesive of a type well known in the art.

As shown, sheet 4 is'larger than fenestration 3 and the edge portion thereof is applied to the upper side of drape body 2 and extends outwardly beyond the finite edge of the fenestration so that the pressure sensitive adhesive firmly adheres in a continuous peripheral bond to the body portion which surrounds the periphery of the fenestration. In addition, sheet 4 extends completely across fenestration 3 to provide an imperforate closure therefor. As best shown in FIG. 2, tacky side 6 is exposed downwardly through the fenestration on the lower or patient side of the drape.

As a protective measure, and to assist in handling and bulk shipping of the drape, a removable release line 7 is applied to the exposed lower tacky side 6, and preferably extends outwardly beyond the periphery of the fenestration.

The entire product is treated at the time of manufacture so that all surfaces are sterile, as by heating in a steam or hot air chamber. This cleanliness is maintained during subsequent shipment and storage by suitable packaging.

At the point of use, the patients skin is antiseptically treated, release liner 7 is quickly peeled from the drape, and sheet side 6 is pressed down so that its tacky surface firmly adheres to the skin at the planned incision line as well as in the surrounding area limited by the fenestration periphery. No additional treatment of the skin, such as spraying with adhesive, is necessary. In addition, the planned incision line and limited surrounding area will remain completely sealed and protected by the fenestration closure against contamination by bacteria in the air or the like. The seal will remain during the entire period prior to the operation, and until the surgeon penetrates through sheet 4 when making the incision. During the surgery, the remaining portions of sheet 4 surrounding the incision line can'be left in adhering relationship to the patients skin, or can be peeled back to the fenestration periphery if desired.

Various modes of carrying out the invention are contemplated as being within the scope of the following claims particularly pointing out and distinctly claiming the subject matter which is regarded as the invention.

We claim:

1. A surgical drape comprising, in combination:

a. a sheet-like drape body for protectively covering a patient,

b. said body having a finite surgical fenestration therein for access through said body by a surgeon to the area of the patients skin to be incised,

c. the periphery of said fenestration being disposed inwardly from the edges of said drape body,

d. transparent penetrable closure means for said fenestration for protecting the said area to be incised from contamination prior to surgery,

e. and sterile means forming part of said closure means for securing said drape to the skin of the patient completely and exclusively within the area defined by the fenestration periphery.

2. A surgical drape comprising, in combination:

a. a sheet-like drape body for protectively covering a patient,

b. said body having a finite surgical fenestration therein for access through said body by a surgeon to the area of the patients skin to be incised,

c. the periphery of said fenestration being disposed inwardly from the edges of said drape body,

d. transparent penetrable closure means for said fenestration for protecting the said area to be incised from contamination prior to surgery, said closure means comprising a film-like imperforate sheet of larger dimension than said fenestration and completely closing the latter,

e. means securing the edge portion of said sheet in a continuous peripheral bond to the areaof said drape body surrounding said fenestration,

f. and sterile adhesive means on said sheet for securing said drape to the skin of the patient completely and exclusively within the area defined by the fenestration periphery.

3. A surgical drape comprising, in combination:

a. a sheet-like drape body for protectively covering a patient,

b. said body having a finite surgical fenestration therein for access through said body by a surgeon to the area of the patients skin to be incised,

c. the periphery of said fenestration being disposed inwardly from the edges of said drape body,

d. penetrable closure means for said fenestration for protecting the said area to be incised from contamination prior to surgery, said closure means comprising a film-like imperforate transparent sheet of larger dimension than said fenestration and completely closing the latter,

e. at least one side of said sheet having a pressuresensitized sterile adhesive thereon,

f. the edge portion of the pressure-sensitized side of said sheet extending outwardly beyond the finite edge of the fenestration and being secured in a continuous peripheral bond to the area of the upper side of said drape body surrounding said fenestration,

g. and the central portion of the said pressuresensitized side of said sheet being exposed downwardly through said fenestration and forming means for securing said drape to the skin of the patient completely and exclusively within the area defined by the fenestration periphery.

* s :r s s

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3260260 *Sep 16, 1964Jul 12, 1966Morgan Adhesives CoSurgical drape or laminate
US3667458 *Mar 2, 1970Jun 6, 1972Kimberly Clark CoSurgical drape sheet
US3741206 *Jul 29, 1971Jun 26, 1973Kendall & CoFenestrated drape
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Gerspacher, et al., Modern Plastics Vinyl Surgical Drapes; May 1951.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3910268 *Dec 12, 1974Oct 7, 1975Johnson & JohnsonSurgical drape
US4344758 *Apr 6, 1981Aug 17, 1982John D. WielhouwerDental face shield
US4524767 *Jul 6, 1982Jun 25, 1985Glassman Jacob ASurgical drapes
US4890628 *Dec 3, 1987Jan 2, 1990Kimberly-Clark CorporationSurgical drape with means for channeling and collecting fluids
US5042507 *Feb 21, 1990Aug 27, 1991Baxter International Inc.Surgical drape for ophthalmic procedures
US5074316 *Jul 18, 1991Dec 24, 1991Baxter International Inc.Brachial angiography surgical drape
US5197493 *Mar 13, 1992Mar 30, 1993Kimberly-Clark CorporationIncise system
US5207703 *Nov 21, 1990May 4, 1993Jain Krishna MSuture organizer
US5341821 *Dec 30, 1991Aug 30, 1994Boundary Healthcare Products CorporationSurgical drape and method of making a surgical drape
US5538012 *Mar 3, 1994Jul 23, 1996Rotecno AgSurgical draping system having a reusable and a disposable component
US5637080 *Nov 8, 1995Jun 10, 1997Geng; Lisa F.Wound dressing
US6043408 *May 17, 1996Mar 28, 2000Geng; Lisa FernandezWound dressing having a movable flap for alternately viewing and covering a wound
US7073507 *Nov 5, 2001Jul 11, 2006David MorrisSterile ocular cover and method
US7096870 *Sep 30, 2004Aug 29, 2006Lonnie Jay LamprichDisposable sterile surgical drape and attached instruments
US7107638 *Dec 21, 2004Sep 19, 2006Thais WilsonThermally-adaptive comforter with aesthetic design variability
US7275544Dec 9, 2005Oct 2, 2007Michael GilCovering for an aseptic treatment site
US7290547Dec 1, 2003Nov 6, 2007Joseph HareCovering for an aseptic treatment site
US7886742 *Jan 14, 2008Feb 15, 2011Medline Industries, Inc.Surgical drape and system having a barrier for preventing the start of a surgical procedure and methods for using same
US8100130 *Nov 8, 2006Jan 24, 2012Medline Industries, Inc.Medical drape
US8371306Jan 5, 2011Feb 12, 2013Medline Industries, Inc.Surgical drape and system having a barrier for preventing the start of a surgical procedure and methods for using same
US20130186413 *Feb 7, 2013Jul 25, 2013Medline Industries, Inc.Surgical drape and system having a barrier for preventing the start of a surgical procedure and methods for using same
EP1804706A2 *Aug 24, 2005Jul 11, 2007Lamprich, Lonnie JayDisposable sterile surgical drape and attached instruments
WO2003082115A1 *Jan 27, 2003Oct 9, 2003Kimberly Clark CoA method of identifying and verifying correct surgical sites
WO2003082136A1 *Jan 27, 2003Oct 9, 2003Kimberly Clark CoCorrect surgical site marking system with draping key
WO2005053754A2 *Nov 30, 2004Jun 16, 2005Joseph HareCovering for an aseptic treatment site
WO2006039024A2 *Aug 24, 2005Apr 13, 2006Bradley Keith LamprichDisposable sterile surgical drape and attached instruments
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/854
International ClassificationA61B19/08, A61B19/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61B19/08, A61B2019/085
European ClassificationA61B19/08