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Publication numberUS3826296 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 30, 1974
Filing dateMar 8, 1972
Priority dateMar 8, 1972
Publication numberUS 3826296 A, US 3826296A, US-A-3826296, US3826296 A, US3826296A
InventorsMorris M
Original AssigneeMorris M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-lining handbag or the like
US 3826296 A
Abstract
A self-lining receptacle such as a handbag or the like is provided which includes a pair of closure strips or tapes which are secured to opposite inner surfaces of the bag and which provide closure of the bag when pressed together. The bag is manufactured by folding a blank of material to which the strips have been secured, lengthwise along the longitudinal centerline thereof so the unfinished side is exposed. Adjacent edges at one end, and the side opposite the fold, are sewn together after which the folded blank is turned inside out through the open end. This end is then sewn closed and is inserted back into the pocket formed by the other end, one half being tucked into the other half so that the finished surface of this half forms a lining and that the strips are located on the lining opposite one another, adjacent the opening at the top produced by this step.
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United States Patent 1 Morris SELF-LINING HANDBAG OR THE LIKE [76] inventor: Myrtle Ellen Morris, 8564 Freyman Dr., No. 110, Chevy Chase, Md. 20015 22 Filed: Mar. 8, 1972 21 Appl. No.: 232,789

[52] US. Cl 150/3, 150/1, 150/32' I [51] Int. Cl. B63d [58] Field of Search 150/1, 1.7, 3, 32,42; 229/62 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 361.619 4/1887 Cussen 150/1 735.560 8/1903 Muller 150/1 1.172.708 2/1916 Hoard '190/53 2.212.390 8/1940 Conklin ISO/1.7

2.530.746 11/1950 Wetherby ISO/.1

2.580.796 1/1952 Kleiss ct a] ISO/1.7 3.632.029 1/1972 Sonner 150/3 11] 3,826,296 [451 July 30, 1974 Primary Examiner-William 1. Price Assistant ExaminerStephen P. Garbe Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Larson, Taylor & Hinds 5 7 ABSTRACT A self-lining receptacle such as a handbag or the like is provided which includes a pair of closure strips or tapes which are secured to opposite inner surfaces of the bag and which provide closure of the bag when pressed together. The bag is manufactured by folding a blank of material to which the strips have been secured, lengthwise along the longitudinal centerline thereof so the unfinished side is exposed. Adjacent edges at one end, and the side opposite the fold, are sewn together after which the folded blank is turned inside out through the open end. This end is then sewn closed and is inserted back into the pocket formed by the other end, one half being tucked into the other half so that the finished surface of this half forms a lining and that the strips are located on the lining opposite one another. adjacent the opening at the top produced by this step.

2 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures SELF-LINING HANDBAG OR THE LIKE FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to handbags, pocketbooks, purses and like article holding cases and receptacles and, more particularly, to an improved receptacle of this type and the method for making same.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION A number of different kinds of pocketbooks, handbags and like receptacles have found public acceptance. However, these receptacles, in general, share common disadvantages. For example, these receptacles are generally relatively difficult and costly to manufacture because of the number of separate pieces required, the difficulties encountered in assembly of the receptacle, the number of sewing steps required, the expense associated with the closures, i.e., zippers, snaps and the like, and so on. Further, the less expensive receptacles are not lined and the raw seams are visible when the receptacles are opened. Such receptacles are difficult to clean and in many instances are heavy, stiff and bulky.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an improved receptacle, suitable for use as a purse, handbag or the like, and a method of making such a receptacle. The receptacle of the invention is relatively simple to manufacture as compared with similar commercially available receptacles and, as explained below, is prepared from a single blank which is sewn and folded to provide a self-lined bag. The seams produced in the sewing steps are not visible and a simple closure, in the form of a pair of adhesive closure blank are sewn together as are the edges at the side opposite the fold. The folded blank is then turned inside out through the open, unsewn end so that the finished side is exposed. The open end is then sewn closed to produce an intermediate form of the receptacle. This end is inserted back into the pocket formed by the other end of this intermediate form or intermediate, one half of the intermediate being tucked or stuffed down into the other half so that the finished surface of the one half forms a lining and so that the closure strips lie opposite each other adjacent the top opening of the bag so formed.

The receptacle of the invention has a number of uses other than as a purse, pocketbook or the like and, for example, can be used as a case for eye glasses, a pipe case and the like. Other features and advantages of the invention will be set forth in or apparent from the detailed description ofa preferred embodiment found hereinbelow.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a plan'view of a basic blank from which is made a receptacle in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the blank of FIG. 1 illustrating, inter alia, a folding step and a first sewing step in the manufacture of the'receptacle of the invention;

FIG. 3 is plan view of the blank of FIG. 2 illustrating, inter alia, a further sewing step;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view showing insertion of one endof the completed intermediate blank back into the other end thereof;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view showing the completed receptacle, the intermediate blank of FIG. 3 being shown in dashed lines; and

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the completed receptacle illustrating the manner in which the receptacle is opened.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS As mentioned hereinabove, the receptacle of the invention is not limited to use as a purse or handbag but can be used for a number of other similar purposes. For example, among other uses, the receptacle can be used as a case for eye glasses, a pipe case, a cigarette case, a school bag, a pencil and/or pen holder. Hence, although in the specific embodiment discussed hereinbelow the receptacle is referred to as a purse or handbag, and, more particularly, as a bag of the clutch purse type, this should not, of course, be taken as being limiting in any way.

Referring to FIG. 1, a basic blank of material from which a handbag in accordance with the invention is made is denoted 10. The bag can be made of vinyl, leather, cloth or any material that can be sewn and, as is illustrated in FIG. 1 the blank 10 is laid flat with the finished side of the material, denoted 10a, facing up, the unfinished side, a corner of which is shown in FIG. 1, being denoted 10b.

First and second closure strips or self-closing tapes l2 and 14 are secured to the finished side 10a of blank 10 along a transverse line which lies adjacent to but spaced from a transverse fold line 16 which divides the blank into two halves. In a specific embodiment, using a rectangular blank 15 inches long by l 1% inches wide, the closure strips or tapes l2 'and 14 are 5 inches in length and are located approximately one-half inch from the center fold line 16.-The closure strips 12,14 are of conventional construction and can, for example, comprise a first strip presenting a closely spaced series of semi-rigid hooked or barbed bristles and a second strip which presents a matte of fibres. Pressing of strips 12 and 14 together causes adhesion between the two which can be broken simply by pulling or peeling the strips 12,14 apart. It will be appreciated that the closure strips may take other forms and because such strips are conventional further description thereof is deemed unnecessary.

After securing the strips 12 and 14 to blank 10, blank 10 is folded along the longitudinal center line thereof, denoted 18, so that the unfinished side 10b is exposed and hence strips 12 and 14 are inside of the folded blank as indicated. The longitudinal edges of the folded blank 10 opposite the fold are sewed together as indicated at 20, as is the end of the folded blank 10 furthest from the strips 12,14, as indicated at 22. Each of these dicated locations. The folded blank is then turned inside out from the open end thereof so that the finished side 10a is again exposed as shown in FIG. 3 to produce what might be termed an intermediate form of the purse. This intermediate form is completed by sewing the adjacent edges of the open end of the folded blank 10 together as indicated at 24, preferably by turning these edges under about one-fourth inch and stitching the edges twice.

The completed intermediate form of the bag, whichis denoted 26, is converted into the complete bag by inserting the end of the intermediate 26 nearest the strips 12,14 back into the pocket formed by the other end. This can best be understood by considering FIGS. 4 and 5. Asv shown in FIG. 5, one half of the intermediate 26 shown in dashed lines is tucked down into the pocket formed by the other half so that strips 12 and l4 lie opposite one another and the finished surface of the first half forms a lining for that pocket. Thus, the

with inexpensive bags which are, in many instances, un-

' lined, and with more expensive bags which. are lined in bag of FIG. 5 can be considered to be formed by an outer pocket, denoted 28, the finished, outside surface of which forms the outside of the bag and an inner pocket, denoted 30, which is nested in outer pocket 28 and the innermost finished surface of which forms the inner lining for the bag. As shown in FIG. 5, the strips 12 and 14 lie adjacent the opening at the top of the bag produced when the first half is inserted into the other. FIG. 4 illustrates an intermediate step in this inserting process.

The completed purse which is shown in FIG. 6 and in solid lines in FIG. 5 is closed merely by pressing strips 12 and 14 together and is opened, as shown in FIG. 6, by pulling or peeling the strips 12,14 apart. The purse or bag shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 is of the clutch purse" type but by suitable sizing of the purse and the addition of straps or the like many different types of purses can be made. Further, as mentioned above, receptacles other than purses, handbags or pocketbooks can be made in accordance with the invention. For example, a case for eye glasses can be made simply by suitable sizing and selection of the material used. The ready closure provided by the closure strips prevents the glasses from falling out and provides a distinct advantage over conventional cases.

As mentioned hereinabove the receptacle of the invention provides a number of advantages as compared with conventional receptacles of this type. For example, it will be readily apparent from the foregoing that the receptacle of the invention is very simple to manufacture especially as compared with prior art purses and the like. In particular, the fact that the intermediate stage is folded into a bag rather than sewn into a bag from separate pieces, provides substantial savings in handling, assembling and the like. Further, the seams are not visible as is the case with many inexpensive purses. In addition, the bag is self-lining as compared a manner which requires substantially more labor. The bag of the invention is easy to clean, lightweight, flexible and compact and is simple yet elegant in appearance. The use of closure strips which are hidden from view provides substantial advantages in cost, ease of manufacture and maintenance, as compared with zippers, snaps, buttons, drawstrings and other closure devices of the prior art.

It will be appreciated that the method steps outlined above need not necessarily be performed in the sequence outlined although this sequence is preferred. For example, the closure strips 12 and 14 can actually be added at any time during the manufacture of the bag and, for example, can be added after all of the sewing steps. Further, the bag obviously need not be rectangular and the inserted portion does not necessarily have to be substantially equal to the portion into which it is inserted, although this approach is preferable for obvious reasons. Other variations and modifications in the exemplary embodiment described above will be apparent to those skilled in the art and it will be understood that such variations and modifications can be effected without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention.

I claim:

1. A one piece portable receptacle for articles comprising:

an outer pocket comprising a folded over section of a single blank of material and internal stitching for joining together the lower adjacent edges of the folded, over section of material and for joining together the adjacent edges of the sides'of the section of material lying opposite the fold, so as to form the pocket,

an inner pocket within said outer pocket comprising an extension of said folded over section of said blank of material inserted into said outer pocket, internal stitching for joining together the edges of the sides of thesection of material lying opposite the fold and external stitching for joining together the lower adjacent edges of the folded over section,

is rectangular in shape.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US361619 *Sep 10, 1886Apr 19, 1887 William j
US735560 *Dec 5, 1902Aug 4, 1903Josephine MuellerFlexible bag.
US1172708 *May 12, 1915Feb 22, 1916Frederick R HoardHand-bag and the like.
US2212390 *Jun 14, 1939Aug 20, 1940Conklin Alice VDouble capacity bag
US2530746 *Jan 2, 1947Nov 21, 1950Wetherby John KPouch type golf ball cleaner having a washable inner lining
US2580796 *Jun 24, 1950Jan 1, 1952Kleiss Eva BShopping bag
US3632029 *Dec 29, 1969Jan 4, 1972May B SonnerLitter bag
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3917160 *Nov 26, 1973Nov 4, 1975Octagon Med ProdDevice for the sterile enclosure of non-sterilizable objects
US3972309 *Jan 30, 1975Aug 3, 1976Dale Alley Co.End opening dusting bag
US4079767 *Jun 22, 1976Mar 21, 1978Howard Langhorne MBag construction
US4196762 *Aug 16, 1978Apr 8, 1980Goodwin Jerry LSki bag
US4205765 *Feb 23, 1978Jun 3, 1980May Karen MPastry bag
US4228834 *Aug 30, 1979Oct 21, 1980Shirley DesnickSoap bag
US4240480 *Jun 26, 1979Dec 23, 1980Strobel Lucille CMultiple use bag with dual purpose straps
US4471872 *Sep 30, 1982Sep 18, 1984General Dynamics, Pomona DivisionConductive resealable pouch
US4496406 *Jul 11, 1983Jan 29, 1985General Dynamics, Pomona DivisionProtecting electrosensitive components
US4523678 *Dec 10, 1980Jun 18, 1985Fox Paul WExternal coat pocket for luggage
US4546999 *Oct 12, 1983Oct 15, 1985Lehr Steven RFlexible skateguard
US4716947 *Jan 6, 1986Jan 5, 1988Haddock Sharon KAll weather soft-sided carrier system
US4979833 *Feb 13, 1990Dec 25, 1990Cook Teel MMultiple use bag
US5118201 *Nov 19, 1990Jun 2, 1992Cook Teel MBag mouth closure structure
US5666906 *Sep 1, 1995Sep 16, 1997Moore; Gilbert A.Self-dusting livestock powdered insecticide applicator
US5730530 *Jun 28, 1993Mar 24, 1998Stoddard; James T.Autoclave receptacle
US5795282 *Jul 30, 1996Aug 18, 1998Demunnik; MaryCloth box sleeve and its method of construction
US5961034 *Jul 14, 1998Oct 5, 1999Demunnik; MaryCloth box sleeve
US5996799 *Jan 22, 1998Dec 7, 1999Exakt Technologies, Inc.Shipping container and method
US6612741Nov 27, 2002Sep 2, 2003James HorneSandbag with spring-like self-closing opening
US7594883 *Oct 3, 2005Sep 29, 2009Rhonda G. HarringtonFabric gift bag
US20110088132 *Oct 19, 2010Apr 21, 2011Mcnamee-Sollars BettyCough cuff
WO1994002382A1 *Jun 28, 1993Feb 3, 1994Charles D StoddardAutoclave receptacle
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/95, 383/111, 383/109
International ClassificationA45C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45C3/00
European ClassificationA45C3/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 19, 1985AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: LIVESTOCK AGRI PRODUCTS, LTD.
Effective date: 19850531
Owner name: UNITED AGRI PRODUCTS, INC., GREELEY, COLORADO (GRA
Jul 19, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: UNITED AGRI PRODUCTS, INC., GREELEY, COLORADO (GRA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:LIVESTOCK AGRI PRODUCTS, LTD.;REEL/FRAME:004431/0656
Effective date: 19850531