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Publication numberUS3826360 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 30, 1974
Filing dateFeb 20, 1973
Priority dateFeb 20, 1973
Publication numberUS 3826360 A, US 3826360A, US-A-3826360, US3826360 A, US3826360A
InventorsP Shore
Original AssigneeShorewood Packaging Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Phonograph record jacket
US 3826360 A
Abstract
An improved phonograph record jacket having at least one pocket to receive a phonograph record is provided. The jacket is formed from at least two blanks of sheet material, one superimposed upon the other with each blank containing two side by side panels. Glue flaps extend from the top and bottom edges of both panels of one of the blanks and are adhesively joined to the panels of the other blanks. A spine is formed by folding the joined blanks along the line separating the two panels. In the fold condition, the glue flaps cooperate to provide a palletlike support for the records to be contained therein thereby maintaining the records in a flat position so as to minimize the danger of warpage during record storage periods.
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United States Patent [191 Shore 1 1 PHONOGRAPI-I RECORD JACKET [75] Inventor: Paul B. Shore, Kings Point, N.Y. [73] Assignee: Shorewood Packaging Corporation, New York, N.Y.

[22] Filed: Feb. 20, 1973 [211 App]. No.: 333,962

[52] US. Cl. 206/312, 229/l.5 R, 229/68 R, 229/72, 150/39 [51] Int. Cl B65d 27/08, B65d 85/30 [58] Field of Search 206/312, 313, 311, 307; 229/68 R, 72, 75, 87 R, 87 A, 1.5 R; 150/39 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 951,814 3/1910 Hay ISO/39 1,720,679 7/1929 Karn 229/87 A 1,906,311 5/1933 Burgstaller...f 229/l.5 R 2,333,798 11/1943 Kncr 206/309 2,861,680 ll/1958 Frasch 229/87 R 3,077,263 2/1963 Froehlig 206/313 [11] 3,826,360 [451 July 30, 1974 3,717,297 2/1973 Perry 229/72 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,224,339 3/1971 Great Britain 229/68 R Primary Examiner-William Dixson, Jr.

[5 7] ABSTRACT An improved phonograph record jacket having at least one pocket to receive a phonograph record is provided. The jacket is formed from at least two blanks of sheet material, one superimposed upon the other with each blank containing two side by side panels. Glue flaps extend from the top and bottom edges of both panels of one of the blanks and are adhesively joined to the panels of the other blanks. A spine is formed by folding the joined blanks along the line separating the two panels. In the fold condition, theglue flaps cooperate to provide apalletlike support for the records to be contained therein thereby maintaining the records in a flat position so as to minimize the dangerof warpage during record storage periods.

6 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PHONOGRAPH RECORD JACKET Phonograph record jackets have heretofore commonly been formed from a one-piece unitary blank of sheet material such as cardboard, suitably folded and secured in the folded position by various adhesives to form one or more record receiving pockets. Typical of the prior art are my US. Pat. Nos. 3,301,467 and 3,426,960 both of which disclose a single pocket jacket and US. Pat. No. 3,556,391 which discloses a mu]- tipocket jacket. Each of these jackets is formed from a unitary blank.

Record jackets of the type described in the above noted patents and commercially available, while acceptable to the recording industry and the buying public, may be subject to certain disadvantages. One such disadvantage occurs in the construction of certain multipocket jackets from a unitary blank. In such constructions, one sealed edge of the jacket pocket is formed by a fold line separating two panels whereas the opposed jacket.

sealed edge is formed by a glue flap extending from one panel and adhesively engaging the other panel. With this construction, the first sealed edge is defined by a double ply of cardboard stock whereas the opposed edge has a triple ply of cardboard stock. While this difference may not detract from the aesthetics of the individual jackets, it does present problems during stacking and storage of large quantities of such jackets when filled with records. It should be apparent that unless the double and triple ply sides are alternated in a stack of such jackets, the triple ply edge side of the stack will build up more quickly than the double ply edge side. This results in unequal stress being placed on the enclosed records and thereby can contribute to the warpage of the enclosed records.

Another disadvantage of the prior art jackets formed from the single blank is that unless costly techniques are employed, all the panels of the blank must be printed in a single operation andformed of the same material. In many cases, certain of the panels may bear multicolor indicia whereas other panels may be blank or bear only single color printed matter. With the prior art, since all the panels are formed from a single blank,

' ing to prevent warpage.

if any of the panels require multicolor printing all the panels must be printed on multicolor presses thus, needlessly tying up expensive equipment and adding to the expense of the final product.

Also, it is often desirable to have a record jacket having outer surfaces formed from a special material, as for example, a metal foil-covered cardboard or flocked cardboard. Usually, it is only the outer panels of the jacket which need be formed from the special material while the inner panels may be formed of ordinary cardboard stock either printed or unprinted. Since the prior art jackets are formed from a single blank, if any of the panels are to be formed of such special materials, the entire blank must be formed of the special material or special techniques must be employed in assembling the jackets which, in either case, adds to the cost of the final jacket. A similar situation also arises if certain of the blanks are to have die cut interior sections. With the prior art unitary blanks, the die cutting equipment must be sufficiently large to accommodate the entire blankeven though only portions will be. die cut. This results in expensive equipment being required and tied up which is reflected in the price of thefinal product.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In view of the above, it is the principal object of the present invention to provide an improved record jacket which provides a pallet-like support for the enclosed record disc or discs which supports the discs equally and thereby minimizes the danger of record warpage occurring.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a record jacket formed from two separate blanks, each of which, if desired, may be formed of a different material and each of which may independently be printed, die cut, or otherwise treated prior to assembly of the The above and other beneficial objects and advantages are attained in accordance with the present invention by providing an improved phonograph record jacket formed with at least one pocket to receive a phonograph record. The present jacket comprises a first elongated blankof cardboard sheet material including two. side by side panels, each panel having a top and bottom edge, an outside edge and a common inside edge and a second elongated blank of cardboard sheet material also including two-side by side panels with each panel having a top and bottom edge, an outside edge and a common inside edge. A pair of top and bottom glue flaps extend from the top and bottom edges of both of the panels of the first blank. The glue flaps are folded along the top and bottom edges to overlie portions of the first blank panels and are adhesively joined to the second blank panels adjacent their top and bottom edges. The construction of the jacket is completed by folding the joined blanks along the two superimposedcommon edges between the panels of each blank. In the folded position, the glue flaps form a pallet-like arrangement for the record disc or discs stored therein when the jackets are stored flat thereby enabling a plurality of such jackets to be readily stacked with each record maintained flat thereby help- BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the accompanying drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a phonograph record jacket formed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the component parts of the record jacket of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a side e'levational view of a record jacket produced in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a diagrammatic view depicting a plurality of record jackets in accordance with the present invention in stacked position;

FIG. 5 is an alternate embodiment of the record jacket of the present invention; and,

FIG. 6 is a side elevational view of the record jacket of the alternate embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT jacket is formed with two pockets l2 and 14, each of a size sufficient to snugly accommodate therein a phonograph record disc 13 which is ultimately to be carried therein.

The jacket 10is formed from two elongated blanks of cardboard sheet material. A first blank 16 has a lateral dimension substantially equal to the diameter of the record disc 13 and a longitudinal dimension roughly twice that size. The blank may be printed with any desired indicia 15 such as title, artist, artwork, etc. Also, the blank may be formed of a clay-coated cardboard as is. commonly used in record jackets or any desired other suitable sheet material such as a foil-coated or flocked cardboard. Blank 16 is divided by a transverse axis 18 into two generally square panels 20 and 22. Panel 20 has a top edge 24 which is continuous with the top edge 26 of panel 22 and a bottom edge 28 continuous with the bottomedge 30 of panel 22. Panel 20 has an outer free edge 32 and an inner edge 34 defined by transverse axis 18. The inner edge 34 is common with panel 22. Panel 22 has an outer free edge 36.

Glue flaps 38 and 40 extend from the upper edges 24 and 26 of panels 20 and 22 substantially parallel and coextensivewith these edges. Similarly, glue flaps 42 and 44 extend from the bottom edges of panels 20 and 22 from edges 28 and 30 respectively substantially parallel and coextensive with these edges. The glue flaps 38, 40, 42 and 44 are each folded back along the .respective edges of their associated panels to overlie portionsof panels 20 or 22 as shown. In this regard, a cutout notch 46 separates the top glue flaps 38 and 40 and a similar notch 48 separates the bottom glue flaps 42 and 44. The notches 46 and 48 facilitate the folding of panel 16 along edge 18.

The present phonograph record receiving jacket is further formed from a second elongated blank of cardboard sheet material 50 which may also be preprinted, coated, or otherwise treated as desired. As previously pointed out, it is important to the present invention that blank 50 need not be formed of the same material as blank 16. Thus, while blank 16 may be a foil-coated cardboard,- blank 50 could be ordinary clay-coated cardboard, flocked cardboard or uncoated cardboard and vice versa. Also, one or both of blanks l6 and 50 could have die cut interior segments on either of their panels such as that indicated by reference numeral 71 on panel 54 in FIG. 2. The dimensions of blank 50 are substantiallyequal to those of blank 16 except that blank 50 does not have glue flaps. Accordingly, blank 50 is formed of two side by side, substantially square panels 52 and 54, separated by' transverse axis 55. Panel 52 is defined by top edge 56 which is continuous with the top edge 58 of panel 54 and bottom edge 60 which is continuous with the bottom edge 62 of panel 54. Further, panel 52 is defined by free, outer, side edge 64 and an inner, side edge 66 which coincides I with axis and is common to panel 54. The outer side blanks along the superimposed axes l8 and 55 in book fashion as shown in FIG. 1. This results in a double score line spine 69 along the rear of the jacket. The double scoreline spine construction serves to avoid pinching the rear of the records stored therein and also permits indicia to be readily printed and displayed. The jacket is thus formed with two pockets 12 and 14, each pocket having sealed edges along the top and bottom, an open front edge, and a closed rear edge formed by spine 69 defined by the transverse axis fold.

As shown in FIG. 3, records 70 and 72 positioned within pockets 12 and 14 respectively are supported on the pallet-like arrangement defined by glue flaps 38 and 42 for pocket 12 and 40 and 44 for pocket 14. The pallet-like arrangement of the record jacket of the present invention enables a plurality of such jackets 74 to be stacked with each record within the jackets of the plurality maintained in a substantially flat position. In this manner, the record discs in the jackets are not subject to'unequal stresses during storage and shipment and thus protected against warpage. In this connection, the double score lines 75 and 77 defining spine 69 are spaced apart a distance sufficient to enable the jacket to close fiat.

FIG. 5 depicts an alternate embodiment of the record jacket of the present invention. In this embodiment, the record jacket 76 is formed with only a single pocket 12 to'hold a single record disc. As shown in FIG. 6, the single pocket jacket 76 is formed in the manner previously described with regard to jacket 10 except that panels 22 and 52 are glued to one another to thereby eliminate pocket 14. As with the primary embodiment, a record 78 packaged within the single pocket l2'of the jacket is supported on a pallet-like arrangement as previously described to insure equal force distribution during stacking. This is so since even in the closed pocket, both edges contain the same number of plies and hence a plurality of jackets 76 will stack substantially flat in the manner illustrated in FIG. 4.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed is:

1. An improved phonograph record jackethaving at least one pocket to receive a phonograph record disc, said jacket comprising: a first elongated blank of cardboard sheet material including two side by side panels, each panel having a top and bottom edge, a free, outer, side edge and a common inside edge; a second elongated blank of cardboard sheet material including two side by side panels, each panel having a top and bottom edge, a free, outside edge, and a common inside edge, said second blank overlying said first blank in superimposed position with the top, bottom, side and common edges of the two blanks in registry; a pair of top glue flaps extending from said top edge of each of the panels of said first blank; a pair of bottom glue flaps extending from the bottom edge of each of the panels of said first blank, said top and bottom glue flaps being folded along said top and bottom'edges to overlie portions of said first blank; glue means overlying saidflaps and adhesively joining said flaps to said second blank panels; and a spine formed by folding said joined blanks over the two, superimposed, common edges.

2. The phonograph record jacket in accordance with claim 1 wherein said panels of said first and second blanks are generally square and substantially equal in area and said spine is formed by two spaced apart score lines extending between said top and bottom edges.

the second blank overlying said one panel.

5. The record jacket in accordance with claim 1 wherein said first and second blanks are formed of dissimilar materials.

6. The record jacket in accordance with claim 1 wherein the panels of at least one of said blanks include interior die cut portions.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US951814 *Dec 26, 1908Mar 15, 1910American Paper Goods CompanyPocketed receptacle.
US1720679 *May 13, 1927Jul 16, 1929Sarah KarnFolding wrapper
US1906311 *Nov 11, 1931May 2, 1933 Folio
US2333798 *Mar 27, 1941Nov 9, 1943Container CorpContainer
US2861680 *Oct 13, 1955Nov 25, 1958Frasch Mary EArticle packaging wrapper
US3077263 *Jul 12, 1961Feb 12, 1963Modern Album And Finishing IncContainer
US3717297 *Mar 11, 1971Feb 20, 1973Creative Posters IncDisc record carrier
GB1224339A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4199061 *Jun 12, 1978Apr 22, 1980Franklin Mint CorporationRecord album and booklet
US4315571 *Jun 9, 1978Feb 16, 1982"Octropa" B.V. Internationale Octrooi MaatschappijSleeve for gramophone records
US4420112 *May 6, 1981Dec 13, 1983Cline Robert CPortfolio construction
US4604200 *Jun 6, 1985Aug 5, 1986Igc, Inc.For sealed pans requiring folded element
US4687101 *Oct 21, 1985Aug 18, 1987Barker John L SrDisk protector/holder
US4736840 *Nov 24, 1986Apr 12, 1988Deiglmeier Jay DProtective holder for a compact disc or the like
US5318222 *Feb 1, 1993Jun 7, 1994Ames Safety Envelope Co.Mailer for computer disks
US5422875 *May 20, 1993Jun 6, 1995Bribach; Christopher J.Compact disc slip lock case (and booklet)
US6505739 *Apr 22, 2001Jan 14, 2003The Mead CorporationCarton and carton blank
US6634495Aug 31, 2001Oct 21, 2003Ivy Hill CorporationModular storage system for recording media
US7178568 *Mar 18, 2004Feb 20, 2007Krystal WynonaNovelty purse
WO1993024927A1 *May 27, 1993Dec 9, 1993Christopher James BribachCompact disc slip lock case (and booklet)
WO1995026917A1 *Mar 31, 1995Oct 12, 1995Sun Microsystems IncCompact disc package
WO2003020610A1 *Aug 30, 2002Mar 13, 2003Ivy Hill CorpModular storage system for recording media
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/312, 229/72
International ClassificationB31B41/00, B65D85/57
Cooperative ClassificationB31B41/00, B65D85/548, B31B2241/007, G11B33/0494
European ClassificationG11B33/04D5, B31B41/00, B65D85/54C2