Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3826361 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 30, 1974
Filing dateDec 13, 1972
Priority dateDec 13, 1972
Publication numberUS 3826361 A, US 3826361A, US-A-3826361, US3826361 A, US3826361A
InventorsW Heckrodt
Original AssigneePresto Prod Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Plastic bag dispenser system
US 3826361 A
Abstract
Plastic bags which are each folded a number of times along parallel fold lines are arranged in overlapping sequence in the direction of the fold lines and are rolled up to form a cylindrically shaped coreless roll of bags. The cylindrical roll is contained within a package having an opening through which the leading bag can be pulled off the roll. The package is large enough to allow the roll to rotate when the bag is pulled off, and the bags are overlapped sufficiently so that the leading edge of the next bag will be rotated to a position of access through the package opening when the leading bag is pulled off the roll.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 1 1111 3,826,361 Heckrodt 1 1 July 30, 1974 [54] PLASTIC BAG DISPENSER SYSTEM 3,718,251 2/1973 I Barnett 206/58 5 l t: W'll' F.H kodt,Mnaha,W'. [7 1 nve n or l ec r e S ls Primary Examiner-W1l11am 1. Prlce [73] Ass1gnee: Presto Products Incorporated, Assistant E h M pu M Appleton, Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Whee1er, Morsell, House & 22 Filed: Dec. 13, 1972 Fuller [21] App]. No.: 314,865 [57] ABSTRACT Plastic bags which are each folded a number of times [52] US. Cl 206/409, 221/47, 220066789041, along parallel fold lines are arranged in Overlapping 1 sequence in the direction of the fold lines and are 251 g 'rfzrsn B65 2 rolled up to form a cylindrically shaped coreless roll of 1 0 can 6/56 i bags. The cylindrical roll is contained within a package having an opening through which the leading bag can be pulled off the roll. The package is large enough [56] References Cned to allow the roll to rotate when the bag is pulled off, UNITED STATES PATENTS and the bags are overlapped sufficiently so that the 789,707 5/1905 Bellamy 206/58 leading edge of the next bag will be rotated to a posi- 2,068,167 1/1937 Dwight 206/59 R tion of access through the package opening when the 3.325.003 6/1967 Bilezerian 206/57 R leading bag is puued ff the n 3,477,624 11/1969 Branyon ct a1. 206/58 1 3.698.548 10/1972 Stcnzel 2061/58 6 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to dispenser systems for pieces of folded sheet material such as plastic bags which are used as liners for garbage cans, trash cans, and general household and institutional use. In the past, large plastic bags such as used in dry cleaning plants to cover cleaned suits and dresses have been stored on large dispensing rolls in which the individual bags are joined to each other along perforated lines that can be relatively easily severed to separate one bag from the roll. Rolls of this type are, however, too large to be used for household garbage bags, which require a dispensing package that is small enough to conveniently fit on the average household cabinet shelf. In order for the garbage bags to fit into a small enough package, it is necessary to fold them several times along their length and this has precluded the use of perforated rolls. Accordingly, in the past, plastic bags for household garbage cans and trash cans have been folded into rectangles and stacked one on top of the other in relatively thin rectangular dispensing packages. A typical dimension for one such prior art packageis 9 /2 inches long, 7 inches wide, and 1% inches deep.

But although these prior art packages fulfilled their primary function of holding anddispensing the bags, they have several drawbacks. In the first place, thin rectangular packages are not conveniently shaped for storage on cabinet shelves. They take up toomuch room along their wide dimensions and not enough room .along their thin dimension. In addition, such packages are not conveniently shaped for display on market shelves. In order to be stable, they must be stacked with their large surface in a horizontal plane, which exposes only their thin edge on the outside of the stack. This thin edge is too small to carry an advertising message or to attract attention to the packages. Moreover, because of their awkward shape, they are relatively hard to handle when they are being filled with bags at the factory and when they are being packed into cartons or removed from cartons or otherwise being handled individually. Finally, stacking the folded bags one on top of the other results in a relatively low density package that requires more storage volume per bag than would be required in a higher density package.

In view of the above, one object of the invention is to provide a dispenser system for pieces of folded sheet material which has a higher package density than those hereinbefore mentioned.

A further object of this invention is to provide a dispenser system or package for pieces of folded sheet material which is easier or more convenient to use, easier to handle and to store and takes up less space than those hereinbefore mentioned.

An additional object of this invention is toprovide a dispenser system for pieces of folded sheet material in which the pieces are arranged in an overlapping sequence and are rolled up to form a substantially cylindrically shaped coreless roll.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with this invention, the above-noted objects are achieved by arranging the pieces of folded material in overlapping sequence in the direction of the fold lines, rolling the overlapped sequence of pieces up to form a substantially cylindrically shaped roll, placing the roll in a substantially square cross section carton which is large enough to allow the roll to rotate therewithin, providing an opening in the carton through which pieces of folded material can be pulled off the roll, and the individual pieces being sufficiently overlapped so that the leading edge of the next piece is rotated to a position adjacent to the opening when the leading piece is pulled off the roll.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view taken through a folded plastic garbage bag or trash bag with the individual sheets being separated from one another for clarity of illustration.

FIG. 2 is a plan view of several such folded plastic garbage bags or trash bags arranged in an overlapped sequence.

FIG. 3 is a sideview of the overlapped sequence shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of one illustrative package of this invention containing a cylindrically shaped roll of overlapped plastic garbage or trash bags.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a second package of this invention containing a cylindrically shaped roll of over-lapped plastic garbage or trash bags.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The drawings show two illustrative dispensing packages of this invention which are specifically adapted to handle flat plastic garbage ortrash bags.

The plastic bags which are to be used in connection with the illustrated embodiments of the invention are made of relatively thin plastic sheet material. The flattened condition of one size and style of such 'a bag measures approximately 3 feet long by 2% feet wide. In order to reduce their width to a manageable size, i.e., a size that can be conveniently-stored on a household cabinet shelf, the bags are preferably folded three times alongs fold lines l0, l2 and 14 as shown in FIG. 1 to reduce their width to approximately 8 inches. It should be understood, however, that the disclosed folds are exemplary and other folds could be employed if desired. The fold lines 10, 12 and 14 preferably extend parallel to the side edges 16 and 18 of the flattened bags, but it may be possible to have the fold lines extend parallel to the top and bottom edges of the bags if desired. The first described folds are, however, preferable because they leave the open edge of the bag exposed so that the user can find it without having to unfold the bag first and they also leave an open end through which air may be expelled during the rolling process to prevent the formation of air bubbles in the rolled bags.

In FIG. 1, the distance between adjacent side panels of the folded bag has been enlarged to illustrate the nature of the folds. In practice, however, the adjacent side panels are in contact with each other except when air bubbles are trapped between them.

'The above-noted folds produce a folded configuration that has eight panels positioned one on top of the '3 other in contact with each other. When such a configuration is rolled up, there is a problem of keeping the panels straight and also of keeping air from being trapped between the panels. This is one of the reasons why it has been the practice in the past to fold such bags into rectangles and package them one on top of the other. In accordance with this invention, however, it has been found that such folded bags can be rolled up neatly and that the rolls provide a denser, more con venient and compact package than the thin rectangular packages used in the past.

Referring to FIGS. 2 and 3, physically discrete folded bags are arranged in an overlapping sequence in the direction of the fold lines. In the final product, the sequence of bags is rolled up, but for illustration purposes, the bags are shown as being flat in FIGS. 2 and 3. Thus the physically discrete folded bags are serially related and are sequentially dispensible. Three folded bags 20, 22 and 24 are shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, each of which has a leading edge L, a trailing edge T, and two parallel side edges S1 and S2. With the method of folding shown in FIG. 1, the side edge 51 would correspond to the fold line in FIG. I and the side edge S2 would correspond to the fold lines 12 and 14 laid one on top of the other. The leading edges L are preferably the open ends of the bags and the trailing edges T are preferably the closed ends of the bags. The sequence of bags is arranged in the direction of the fold lines'with the leading edge of each bag overlapping the trailing edge of the next bag in the sequence'by a predetermined amount which will be discussed hereinafter.

The overlapped, folded bags are rolled up about an axis transverse to their side edges S1 and S2 to form a substantially cylindrically shaped roll of bags as indicated by the numeral 26 in FIG. 4. This roll may have a core but it is preferably coreless to increase the packing density; The bags are rolled from their closed end first to prevent the formation of air bubbles in the rolled bags. In this example, the closed end of the bags corresponds to the trailing edge T shown in FIGS. 2 and 3.

The roll 26 shown in FIG. 4 contains of the abovenoted plastic bags and is. approximately 3 1 inches in diameter and 8% inches long. The roll 26 is inserted within a square cross-section paperboard box or package 28 which is slightly larger in its dimensions that the roll 26 so that the roll is free to rotate within the package when the leading bag 30 is pulled off the roll. The

ing moment which causes the roll 26 to rotate. It is desirable for the roll 26 to rotate just enough so as to bring the leading edge L of the next bag adjacent to the opening when the trailing edge T of bag 30 clears roll 26. The amount of rotation for roll 26 is determined by the amount of overlap between the adjacent folded bags and the degree of slip or coefficient of friction between them. In the case of some plastic bags, which tend to slip past each other quite easily, an overlap in the neighborhood of 50 to 60 percent of the bag length is preferred to achieve the desired degree of rotation. With other materials, where the bags tend to cling together, because of static electricity-or otherwise, the

overlap can be quite short. Accordingly, the amount of overlap may vary in proportion to the'slipperiness of the overlapped portions. v

FIG. 5 shows a different carton 38 for holding a cylindrical roll 40 of plastic bags, the roll 40 being the same size as the roll 26. This carton has an elongated corner opening or slot 42 through which the leading bag 44 can be pulled off roll 40. The slot 42 is defined by a perforated tear line and is openedby the consumer when he or she is ready to remove one of the bags from the package. The slot 42 could haveother shapes and positions, and it-should therefore be understood that any opening which allows the bags to be conveniently removed therethrough is suitable. i

The packages 28 and 38 are both 8% inches long, 3% inches wide, and 3% inches deep. This size is very convenient for handling and storage, and each side of the package is large enough to carry a clearly legible advertising message. The balanced configuration of the packages reduces the amount of paperboard required for the package and the coreless cylindrical roll gives a relatively high package density. The roll of bags within the packages turns easily so that the individual bags may be removed from the package quite readily. The removal of each bag pulls the leading edge of the next bag into a position adjacent to the opening in the package where the next bag can be easily grasped to be removed.

For the purpose of description, it has been assumedthat the bags are arranged in overlapping sequence before they are rolled up, but in practice the two operations may proceed simultaneously, i.e., the bags may be rolled up while they are being arranged in overlapping sequence. For example, the bags may be wound on a turning roll one at a time with the trailing edge of each bag overlapping the leading edge of the previous bag by the required amount. This may be done either manually or by automatic machinery as desired. The insertion of the rolls intothe packages may also be carried out either manually or by automatic machinery as may the closing and sealing of the packages.

While in the illustrated embodiment the cross section of the carton 28 is square, other cross sections which closely surround the roll 26 with little waste space can be used.

I claim:

1. In a dispenser for physically discrete, serially related, sequentially dispensible plastic bags, each of which is folded a plurality of times along substantially parallel fold lines, the improvement in which said folded bags are arranged in overlapping sequence in the direction of said fold lines and are rolled up to form a generally cylindrically shaped roll, a package dimensioned to contain said roll, means defining an opening in said package through which the leading folded bag can be pulled off said roll, said package being large enough to allow said roll to rotate when said leading bag is pulled off said roll, and said bags being overlapped sufficiently to that the leading edge of the next bag is rotated to a position of access adjacent to said opening when said leading bag is pulled off said roll.

2. A dispenser as defined in claim 1 in which said roll is coreless.

3. A dispenser as defined in claim 1 in which the means defining an opening in said package comprises a perforated line defining a slot in said package, said slot being shaped to allow said folded bags to be withdrawn therethrough.

4. A dispenser as defined in claim 1 in which the means defining an opening in said package comprises a hinged top on said package which can be opened to allow said folded bags to be withdrawn therethrough.

5. A dispenser as defined in claim 1 wherein the and closed ends of said bag.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US789707 *Feb 27, 1904May 16, 1905Charles J BellamyMethod of forming rolls of sheets of paper or other flexible material.
US2068167 *May 19, 1934Jan 19, 1937Stearns & Foster CompanyBatting package
US3325003 *Oct 15, 1965Jun 13, 1967Bilezerian Oscar APackaged treated tissues
US3477624 *Apr 17, 1967Nov 11, 1969Reynolds Metals CoDispensing carton for web material and blanks for making same
US3698548 *Jun 15, 1970Oct 17, 1972Robert N StenzelBox for dispensing flexible sheet material
US3718251 *May 15, 1970Feb 27, 1973Cadillac Prod IncBag dispenser
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4151787 *Sep 1, 1977May 1, 1979Union Carbide CorporationMultiple folded plastic bag method
US4191307 *Mar 24, 1978Mar 4, 1980Presto Products IncorporatedDispenser for plastic bags
US4567984 *Aug 17, 1984Feb 4, 1986Custom Machinery Design, Inc.Plastic bag package
US4583642 *May 25, 1984Apr 22, 1986Mobil Oil CorporationDispenser package for a collection of inter-connected severable sheet material and method of dispensing
US4642084 *Nov 1, 1985Feb 10, 1987Custom Machinery Design, Inc.Plastic bag making machine
US5020302 *Sep 17, 1990Jun 4, 1991Reynolds Consumer Products, Inc.Roll inserter
US5121995 *Aug 27, 1990Jun 16, 1992Kimberly-Clark CorporationLoop-handle bag with improved accessibility feature
US5170957 *Sep 3, 1991Dec 15, 1992Len CarpenterDispenser of plastic bags with handles
US5207368 *Aug 16, 1991May 4, 1993Sonoco Products CompanyDispensing apparatus for plastic bags
US5228632 *May 11, 1990Jul 20, 1993Addison F ClarkDispenser for rolled material
US5282687 *Feb 28, 1992Feb 1, 1994Kimberly-Clark CorporationFlexible packaging with compression release, top opening feature
US5344225 *Nov 6, 1992Sep 6, 1994Blyth Clinton ALawn mower attachment
US5361905 *Sep 22, 1993Nov 8, 1994Kimberly-Clark CorporationFlexible packaging with center opening feature
US5509570 *Sep 19, 1994Apr 23, 1996Dematteis; Robert B.Dispenser of plastic bags
US5570878 *Mar 21, 1995Nov 5, 1996Fmc CorporationInterleaving apparatus for rolled-up segments
US5630511 *Sep 26, 1995May 20, 1997Union Camp CorporationDispensing box and method for the continuous feed of fan-folded computer paper
US5875985 *Sep 8, 1997Mar 2, 1999Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Indented coreless rolls and method of making the same
US6070821 *Apr 10, 1997Jun 6, 2000Kimberly-Clark WorldwideIndented coreless rolls and methods of making and using
US6082664 *Nov 20, 1997Jul 4, 2000Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Coreless roll product and adapter
US6092758 *Aug 21, 1998Jul 25, 2000Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Adapter and dispenser for coreless rolls of products
US6092759 *Aug 24, 1998Jul 25, 2000Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.System for dispensing coreless rolls of product
US6138939 *Jun 25, 1999Oct 31, 2000Kimberly Clark Worldwide, Inc.Coreless adapter for dispensers of cored rolls of material
US6360985Apr 23, 1999Mar 26, 2002Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Dispenser adapter for coreless rolls of products
US6439502Sep 8, 1997Aug 27, 2002Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Dispenser for coreless rolls of products
US6508381Nov 28, 2000Jan 21, 2003Ahmed SadiBag dispensing assembly
US7481393 *Apr 29, 2004Jan 27, 2009Thomas TrinkoProduce bag dispensing system for reducing wasted bags
US7913875 *Apr 18, 2005Mar 29, 2011Esselte Leitz Gmbh & Co. KgDispenser for folders
US8668159 *Dec 19, 2007Mar 11, 2014Sca Hygiene Products AbFolded perforated web
US8936174 *Mar 12, 2013Jan 20, 2015Kurt R. KramerPlastic bag dispenser pipe
US20040217122 *Apr 29, 2004Nov 4, 2004Thomas TrinkoProduce bag dispensing system for reducing wasted bags
US20050189366 *Feb 4, 2004Sep 1, 2005Jerry SommersBag packaging dispenser and method
US20060065095 *Sep 30, 2004Mar 30, 2006Michael AmbroseRoll dispenser and storage product
US20060110574 *Nov 22, 2004May 25, 2006David FreierInterleaved disposable tablecloth roll
US20060231564 *Apr 18, 2005Oct 19, 2006Goddard George HDispenser for folders
US20060261079 *May 19, 2005Nov 23, 2006Ahmed SadiBag dispensing assembly
US20070227924 *Mar 30, 2006Oct 4, 2007Ching-Feng OuGarbage bag dispenser
US20100270412 *Dec 19, 2007Oct 28, 2010Sca Hygiene Products AbFolded perforated web
US20140346083 *Dec 4, 2012Nov 27, 2014Photo Field Inc.Container for packaging paper sheets, and paper sheet package body
US20150023614 *Aug 5, 2013Jan 22, 2015Poly-America, L.P.Flexible Pouches for Goods on a Roll
USD428286May 29, 1998Jul 18, 2000Kimberly-Clark WorldwideDispenser adapter for coreless rolls of products
USD746672 *Jan 6, 2014Jan 5, 2016Punch IndustriesBox
EP0169692A2 *Jul 11, 1985Jan 29, 1986The Wiggins Teape Group LimitedA carton
EP0169692A3 *Jul 11, 1985Nov 4, 1987The Wiggins Teape Group LimitedA carton
WO1981003479A1 *May 29, 1981Dec 10, 1981Surgical Systems IncRefuse receptable with bag liners supplied through the bottom from replaceable liner cartridges
WO1999047441A1Mar 19, 1998Sep 23, 1999Sacchetti Alfred DApparatus for opening and dispensing plastic bags
WO2007062540A1 *Nov 28, 2006Jun 7, 2007Sac-O-Mat (Ch) AgBag dispensing apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/409, 221/47, 206/494
International ClassificationB65D83/08, B65H5/28
Cooperative ClassificationA47F2009/044, B65D83/0847, B65H5/28, B65H2701/191
European ClassificationB65H5/28, B65D83/08D
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 21, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: REYNOLDS CONSUMER PRODUCTS, INC.,
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNORS:PRESTO PRODUCTS, INC., A CORP. OF WI (MERGED INTO);PRESTO INDUSTRIES INC., A CORP.OF DE (CHANGED TO);REYNOLDS CONSUMER PRODUCTS, INC., A DE CORP.;REEL/FRAME:005026/0381;SIGNING DATES FROM