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Publication numberUS3826459 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 30, 1974
Filing dateMay 3, 1972
Priority dateMay 3, 1972
Publication numberUS 3826459 A, US 3826459A, US-A-3826459, US3826459 A, US3826459A
InventorsWarren W
Original AssigneeWarren W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable form support bracket
US 3826459 A
Abstract
A bracket for supporting overhead framework comprises a pair of telescoping sleeves supported between two horizontal parallel beams extending from a plate attachable to a vertical building column. The sleeves are supported vertically between the beams by a flange extending about the top portion of a first sleeve and resting on the beams. The second sleeve is elevated and lowered relative to the first sleeve by a screw rotatable in the first sleeve and threaded in the second sleeve. The second sleeve has a roller journalled in the top end which is adapted to be engaged by a beam of a frame to be supported and permits the beam to roll across the top of the bracket for placement and removal of the framework from a construction site. Discs at the ends of the roller and having larger diameters than the roller provide guides to maintain the beam on the roller.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 91 Warren [11] 3,826,459 [451 July 30, 1974 ADJUSTABLE FORM SUPPORT BRACKET [76] Inventor: Wayne E. Warren, 3801 41st St.,

Tampa, Fla. 33610 [22] Filed: May 3, 1972 [2]] Appl. No.: 249,796

[52] U.S. Cl. 248/287, 248/295, 248/354 S 511 int. Cl. E04g 11/56 [58] Field of Search 248/287, 354 S, 298, 124, 248/354 H, 354 R, 295; 254/133 R Primary Examiner-Edward C. Allen 5 7 ABSTRACT A bracket for supporting overhead framework comprises a pair of telescoping sleeves supported between two horizontal parallel beams extending from a plate attachable to a vertical building column. The sleeves are supported vertically between the beams by a flange extending about the top portion of a first sleeve and resting on the beams. The second sleeve is elevated and lowered relative to the first sleeve by a screw rotatable in the first sleeve and threaded in the second sleeve. The second sleeve has a roller journalled in the top end which is adapted to be engaged by a beam of a frame to be supported and permits the beam to roll across the top of the bracket for placement and removal of the framework from a construction site. Discs at the ends of the roller and having larger diameters than the roller provide guides to maintain the beam on the roller.

1 Claim, 2 Drawing Figures ADJUSTABLE FORM SUPPORT BRACKET BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In the building industry a practice has arisen of pouring concrete floors in multi-story building by first erecting vertical support columns and then providing a temporary floor form between the columns adjacent the tops thereof and into which concrete may be poured to form the flooring. After the concrete has solidified, the floor forms are lowered from their forming positions and are moved laterally from the building and elevated above the last formed floor and moved laterally into position for forming the next floor. To facilitate the handling and positioning of the flooring forms, brackets have been provided which may be attached to the vertical columns and include support surfaces which comprise rolling members which permit beams of the floor forms to be moved laterally on the brackets while supported by the brackets. The brackets also provide means for elevating and lowering the support surfaces to facilitate positioning and transportation of the floor forms. An example of the type of brackets referred to is shown in US. Pat. No. 3,504,879.

One objection to the brackets now available is that they are of relatively costly construction and they are subject to becoming impaired in operation or wholly inoperative because of accumulationof dirt, cement, etc., in the moving parts.

THE PRESENT INVENTION gree of adjustable positioning.

More specifically, the invention provides a support bracket of the type mentioned comprising two telescoping sleeves, adapted to be supported vertically, one

sleeve being supported by a base structure and the other sleeve being movable relative to the first sleeve in vertical directions, the upper end of the second sleeve having a cylindrical roller journalled thereon on a horizontal axis, and at least one disc of larger diameter than the roller disposed at one end of the roller to form a guide for a beam supported by the roller. Preferably, the roller has end axles supported in semicylindrical bearings at the sides of the sleeve whereby the roller is disposed in the open end of the sleeve. The roller may be readily removed and replaced for emptying the sleeves of dirt and foreign materials to prevent interference with the operation of the bracket.

The invention also provides a support bracket of the type mentioned in which one sleeve member is supported upright between two spaced parallel beams by abutments projecting laterally from the sleeve and resting on the parallel beams with the sleeve depending between the beams. The sleeve can be readily shifted along the beams to conveniently position the bracket proper relative to the beam of a floor form.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description of a preferred.

form of the invention, reference being made to the as companying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a support bracket embodying the invention; and

FIG. 2 is an exploded view, partly broken away, of the bracket shown in FIG. 1, excluding the support structure.

Referring to the drawings, a support bracket 5 is shown which is particularly suited to supporting floor forms (not shown) in the pouring of concrete floors in multiple storied buildings. The bracket 5 comprises a support base 6 which is adapted to be temporarily bolted to a vertical column of the building (not shown) under construction. The base 6 comprises a plate 7 and two parallel flanged beams 8,9 having ends integral with the plate and extending at right angles with the plate. A pair of openings 10 are formed through the plate to accommodate securing bolts (not shown) for attaching the plate to a column. The ends of the beams 8,9 are interconnected by an end plate 11 secured thereto. Preferably, the plate 7 extends sufficiently high to provide a shield for the column to which it is attached, which shield protects the column from gouges and marking by accidental sidewise movement of the floor frames.

A jack unit 12 is supported by the beams 8,9. The jack unit comprises an outer sleeve 13 and an inner sleeve 14 which telescopes into the outer sleeve. Preferably, the sleeves 13,14 are of rectangular crosssectional configuration and may be cut from suitable commercially available stock. A rectangular collar or flange 15 is attached to the sleeve 13 adjacent the upper end thereof and extends laterally from about the sleeve. The space between the beams 8,9 is sufficient to receive the sleeve 13 therebetween, and the flange 15 rests on the top flange of the beams. It will be appreciated that the jack unit 12 can be positioned laterally relative to the plate 7 merely by sliding the unit along the beams 8,9.

YET-he sleeve 14 is adpated to be moved into and out of the sleeve 13 more or less, as desired, by a screw 17. The screw extends freely through an opening 20 in a bottom plate 21 secured to the lower end of the sleeve 13. A collar 22 attached to the screw bears on the upwardly facing surface of plate 21 about the opening 20 to retain the screw in place while permitting rotation of the screw. The upper portion of the screw 17 is threaded through a nut 23 which is secured to an end plate 24 attached in the lower end of the sleeve 14. The screw 17 may be rotated by a suitable tool, such as a wrench, engaging a hexagonal head 25 formed in the lower end of the screw. By rotating the screw in one direction or the other, the sleeve 14 is raised and lowered in the sleeve 13 inasmuch as the sleeve 14 cannot rotate with the screw.

A roller 26 is journalled in the upper end of the sleeve 14 and is adapted to be engaged by and support horizontal beams of a floor form. The roller 26 has axles 27,28 projecting from opposite ends, which axles rest in bearings 30,31 at opposite sides of the sleeve. In the form shown, the bearings 30,31 each comprises a semicylindrical member having an inside diameter slightly larger than the diameters of the axles 27,28. One end of the bearing members 30,31 is welded or otherwise secured to the outsides of the sleeve 14 with the inside surfaces in alignment with notches 32,33 formed in the top and edge portion of the sleeve. The notches 32,33 are formed so as to provide extended surfaces of the inside surfaces of the bearing members. It will be seen that the roller 26 can be lifted from the bearings 30,31 and replaced without removal of. bearing parts, etc.

A pair of guide discs 34,35 are attached to the ends of the axles 27,28 and lie outside the bearing members 30,31. The diameters of the discs 34,35 are appreciably greater than the diameter of the roller 26 and serve to limit lateral movements of the floor form frame beam supported by the roller 26 as the form is moved laterally of the bracket during installation and removal of the floor forms.

A suitable number of brackets 5 are employed to support the particular floor form to be used. Each of the brackets is attached to one of the building columns by bolting the plate 7 to the column. The jack unit 12 is located along the beams 8,9 to align the roller 26 with a support beam extending along the underside of the floor form to be used. The screws 17 of the brackets are adjusted, if necessary, to properly support a floor form to permit the form to be rolled on the rollers 26 laterally of the brackets and into a position beneath the site of the floor to be poured. The screws 17 are then rotated to elevate the form to its proper level. After the floor has been poured and set in the form, the screws 17 are rotated to lower the sleeves 14 and the form supported by the brackets, after which the form is rolled laterally on the rollers 26 and removed from the building site.

The jack unit 12 can be readily cleaned of accumulations of cement, dirt and other debris by merely removing the roller 26 and separating sleeve 14 from the sleeve 13. The dirt, etc., may then be emptied from the sleeves through their open ends.

I claim:

1. A support bracket for floor forms and the like and comprising, a base plate adapted to be attached to the side of a vertically extending column, a pair of parallel spaced beams projecting from said plate, a jack unit supported between said beams and comprising first and second sleeve members rectangular in cross section and telescoped with one another and adapted to extend vertically between said beams when said beams extend horizontal, flange means on one of said sleeves engaging said beams and supporting said one sleeve on said beams, means for forcing the other of said sleeves longitudinally from said one sleeve, a cylindrical roller, bearing means for rotatably supporting said roller at the outer end of said other sleeve, said bearing means comprising two semicylindrical bearing members at opextension of the cylindrical surfaces of said roller.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US230404 *May 3, 1880Jul 27, 1880 Machine for holding up ceiling-paper while hanging the same
US2456878 *Jan 31, 1945Dec 21, 1948Jack Krupka JosephTimberman's jack
US2587232 *Jun 13, 1949Feb 26, 1952Thomas SchmaderShape cutting machine arm
US3172634 *Feb 1, 1963Mar 9, 1965Superior Scaffold CoAdjustable shoring bracket
US3204933 *Sep 12, 1963Sep 7, 1965Anton BrenceTimber setting jack
US3504879 *Feb 29, 1968Apr 7, 1970Strickland James KColumn shore bracket
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3900179 *Jun 5, 1974Aug 19, 1975Waco Scaffold & Shoring CoColumn roll out support
US3967806 *Mar 17, 1975Jul 6, 1976Strickland Systems Inc.Adjustable apparatus for supporting concrete formwork
US4519236 *Sep 10, 1984May 28, 1985Celette, S.A.Clamping device to be mounted on a frame or bench jig for checking any deformations of a vehicle body
US6752453 *Mar 29, 2003Jun 22, 2004Charles YappSeat adjusting device of an exercising cycle
US7360341Sep 12, 2003Apr 22, 2008Barry W. JacksonSlab support truss system
US7407225 *Oct 10, 2006Aug 5, 2008Selle Italia S.R.L.Saddle including a device for coupling said saddle to a bicycle and the like
US7494181 *Sep 5, 2006Feb 24, 2009Samuel TuckerBicycle seat
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/287.1, 248/354.3, 248/295.11, 248/298.1
International ClassificationE04G17/16
Cooperative ClassificationE04G17/16
European ClassificationE04G17/16