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Publication numberUS3827056 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 30, 1974
Filing dateOct 4, 1972
Priority dateOct 4, 1972
Publication numberUS 3827056 A, US 3827056A, US-A-3827056, US3827056 A, US3827056A
InventorsVano G
Original AssigneeAlden Res Found
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Graphic electric recorder scanning device with printed recording strips
US 3827056 A
Abstract
For use in a facsimile recorder with a linear marking electrode blade for marking on a recording web, an array of flexible parallel conductive strips is carried on a flexible insulating sheet backed by a foam rubber body which yieldingly presses the strips against the paper and the paper against the blade with uniform pressure. A solid state integrated circuit commutator, physically co-extensive with terminal portions of the conductive strips, distributes graphic signals to the strips.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [19 Vano July 30, 1974 GRAPHIC ELECTRIC RECORDER 3,638,237 1/1972 Alden 346/74 E SCANNING DEVICE WITH PRINTED OTHER PUBLICATIONS RECORDING STRIPS Inventor: Gerald Lawrence Vano, Brockton,

Mass.

Assignee: Alden Research Foundation, Westboro, Mass.

Filed: Oct. 4, 1972 Appl. No.: 294,314

US. Cl 346/74 E, 178/66 A, 317/101 F,

IBM Tech. Disc. Bulletin, Vol. 15, 3, pg. 775, Aug. 1972.

Primary Examiner-Bernard Konick Assistant Examiner-Jay P. Lucas Attorney, Agent, or Firm-James H. Grover, Esq.

[5 7] ABSTRACT conductive strips, distributes graphic signals to the strips.

17 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures 346/139 A Int. Cl. G0ld 15/06, H05k 3/20 Field of Search 346/74 E, 74 ES, 74 S, 346/74 SB, 74 CH, 74 SC; 317/101 F References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 72 7/1962 Proudfit 346/74 S 18 11/1971 Lloyd 346/74 E SOURCE OF MARKING 81 SYNC. SIGNALS PATENTEUJUHOIQYK Y 3,827.056 SHEETIOFS PATENTEDJUL30I974 3827'056 SHEET? or 3 SOURCE OF MARKING 8 SYNC. SIGNALS .1 MARKING AMP SYNC. PULSE DETECTOR 4 FIG? GRAPHIC ELECTRIC RECORDER SCANNING DEVICE WITH PRINTEDRECORDING STRIPS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to facsimile recorders for marking a conductive electrosensitive web such as electrolytic or heat sensitive recording paper in which current flows through the paper, as in US. Pat. Nos. 3,430,254 or 3,553,178, and to recorders which capacitatively apply an electrostatic charge to the paper, as in US. Pat. No. 3,576,585. In these patents multiple wire or deposited styli are disposed in contact with and across the recording for scanning the paper and effecting marking of the paper when electrical signals are distributed to them by commutator circuits.

The objects of the present invention are to provide an improved stylus assembly, which is greatly simplified in structure and economical to manufacture, which makes better contact with the recording paper and which cooperates with improved means for distributing signals to the styli.

STATEMENT OF IN VENTION According to the invention a signal marking device comprises a flexible supporting sheet carrying a plurality of mutually insulated flexible conducting strips along one surface, the strips having recording portions, and a resilient body at the other surface of the support sheet for yieldingly backing the sheet and the recording portions of the strips, the body, sheet and strips being jointly flexible to conform to the paper.

DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an isometric view of a facsimile recorder having one form of multiple styli signal marking device according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the marking device of FIG. 1; partly assembled;

FIG. 3 is a section on line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a plan view of an alternate form of marking device;

FIG. 5 shows schematically mechanical apparatus for distributing signals to the marking device of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is an isometric assembly view of the marking device of FIGS. 1 to 3 and an electronic signal distributron;

FIG. 7 is a schematic view of the marking device and circuit of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is the assembled marking device of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 9 is a modified form ofthe device of FIG. 8.

DESCRIPTION FIGS. 1 to 3 it from the well through a recording zone 11 between a blade electrode 9 and the multiple styli marking assembly which is the subject of the present invention.

The unassembled multiple styli marking device of FIGS. 2 and 3 comprises a thin, flexible insulating sheet 12, for example, an 0.003 inch Mylar film, on which is formed by photoetching or deposition an array of stainless steel, copper or the like conducting strips 13. The conducting strips are thin enough, e.g., 0.002 inch, to flex with their supporting sheet 12. The strips have recording portions 13a approximately 0.008 to 0.016 inch wide and insulatively spaced 0.002 to 0.004 of an inch providing a density of 50 to strips per inch along the recording zone 11. The strips converge to an equal or lower density at their terminal ends 13b where they are connected to the terminals of a solid state signal distributing circuit.

FIGS. 6 and 7 As shown in FIG. 6 the conducting strips 13 and the supporting sheet 12 are flexed from the planar form of FIG. 2 so that their terminal ends 13b lie out of the plane of the recording portions 13a in the recording zone 11 through which the recording paper P is fed between the blade electrode 9 and the strips 13. On the opposite side of the supporting sheet 12 from the strips 13 a body of foam rubber or similar resilient material is attached so as to yieldingly back the sheet and recording portions 13b of the strips. Behind the resilient body 14 is a rigid plate 16 joined integrally with the resilient body 14 and sheet 12, and serving as a mounting secured to the base I of FIG. 1.

At the terminal ends 13b of the conducting strips a signal distributor in the form of an integrated circuit module 17 is physically attached to the sheet 12 and electrically connected to the conducting strip terminal ends 131). From a standard source 18 of marking and synchronization signals such as a transmission line or facsimile receiver a marking amplifier 20 connected through terminals 21 increases the power of the signals, applying them to the blade electrode 9 and to the graphic signal input terminal 23 of the module. The graphic signals occur as varying amplitude or frequency pulses and-are also applied by the marking amplifier to a conventional facsimile synchronization pulse detector 24, which in turn detects the synchronization pulse only and applies it to the module 17 through terminal 26. A clock 19 also applies pulses to the module at a frequency described below.

As shown inFIG. 7 the integrated circuit module 17 consists of shift register units SUI to SUn corresponding in number n to the conducting strips 13. The detected synchronization pulses occur once every line of graphic signals, corresponding approximately to the scan width of the paper P and the number n of shift units and conducting strips. The clock pulses occur n times during each scan. As in a conventional shift register coincidence of the sync pulse and a clock pulse causes the first shift unit SUI to produce an output pulse which is applied to the base of a corresponding switching transistor Q1. The transistor then conducts, completing a circuit from the marking amplifier 20 through the blade 9, the recording paper P, the first conductive strip 13, and the transistor Q and thence through a ground return to the marking amplifier. If at the instant of coincidence of clock and sync pulses the marking amplifier is carrying a facsimile signal the paper will be marked by cooperation of the blade 9 and stylus 13. The shift register then shifts successively through units SU2 to SUn as one scan line of facsimile signals is received.

rate may be varied furing each scan to provide nonlinear sweeps. As shown in FIG. 7 the last shift unit SUn is connected through a manual switch S1 to the first unit SUI to provide a feedback pulse which, when applied to the first unit S1, causes continued repetition of the scan until the switch S1 is transferred, for example. Alternatively, with the switch S1 transferred from the position shown in FIG. 7 the output of the last shift unit SUn is fed to a termination 26 and dissipated. Successive scans are then initiated by coincidence of a sync pulse and a clock pulse as previously described.

As shown in FIG. 7, the terminal end of the supporting sheet 12, resilient backing body 14 and rigid substrate 16 are adhered together to form a unitary sandwich. As appears in FIG. 1 the sandwich is secured to a mounting plate 27 on the base 1 by screws 28, the mounting plate having a window 29 through which the recording ends 13a of the conducting-strips extend. The terminal ends are preferably masked by adhesive insulating tape 31 except in the recording zone 11 opposed to the blade 9 during recording. The IC module 17 in addition to being electrically connected to the terminal ends 13b of the conducting strips and physically adhered to the insulating sheet 12, is physically coextensive with the sheet at its terminal end. A suitable module which is a seven inch span across the terminal ends 13b has 350 terminals 32 soldered directly to the conducting strips ends 13b.

Because the insulating support sheet 12 and the conducting strips 13 thereon are flexible, they can flex with the underlying foam pad to conform to the blade electrode 9 and insure uniform electrolytic marking across the width of the paper despite irregularities in the blade recording edge. Such uniform conformation is particularly important with minimum pressure on the moist electrolytic paper.

The flexibility of the support sheet 12 and conducting strips 13 also permits the terminal end of the sheet to be folded out of the plane of the strip ends 13a in the recording zone, for example to allow housing the terminal ends 13b and IC module 17 in the base 1 behind the window 29 through which the recording ends 13a extend.

FIG. 8

The flexibility of the sheet 12 and its conducting strips 13 further permits the IC module 17 to be combined in the previously described sandwich by folding the sheet 12 and strips 13 180 and adhering the backside of the 1C module 17 to the underside of the rigid backing plate 16. The sheet 12, foam body 14, plate 16 and module 17 are then adhered in one integral sandwich.

FIG. 9

To increase the number of conducting strips above the number of step units in a single IC module two or more support sheets 12a and 12b are folded in opposite directions with their recording ends 13a positioned edge to edge in one continuous recording zone 11. The

two recording ends of sheets 12a and 12b are backed I 4 by-a common foam body 14a and rigid plate 16a. Their terminal ends to which two IC modules 17a and 17b are respectively attached are wider than the recording ends and are folded out of the plane of the recording zone to different spacial locations. I

FIGS. 4 and 5 Instead of the integrated circuit signal distributing circuit a mechanical signal distributor may be used with a modified signal marking sheet 12c. The sheet l2c has conducting strips whose recording ends 13d are arrayed across a recording zone 11 as in the device of FIGS. 1 to 3. The terminal ends 132, however, converge in a planar, circular array concentric with a split commutating ring conductor 33 deposited or adhered to the sheet 120.

As shown in FIG. 5 a rotor 34 carries two conductive wipers 36 and 37 respectively sweeping the terminal ends 18c and the split ring 33. The rotor 34 is driven through a gear box 38 by a motor 39 synchronized with the source of marking signals in a known way. The wipers replace the IC module 17 of FIG. 1 in completing a circuit from the marking amplifier 20 through the blade electrode 9, recording paper P and a selected conductive strip 13c. The signal marking device of FIGS. 4 and 5 has the advantage of providing circular scan of the coplanar terminal ends 13a, while allowing the recording ends 13d to be resiliently backed as described with reference to FIGS. 1 to 3, 6 and 7 and to be folded to another plane. I

It should be understood that the present disclosure is for the purpose of illustration only and that this invention includes all modifications and equivalents which fall within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a graphical electric signal recorder for marking on a longitudinally moving recording web, a signal marking device comprising:

a recorder base,

a flexible supporting sheet on the base carrying a plurality of mutually insulated fleixble conducting strips along one surface, the strips having recording portions,

a soft resilient incrementally compressible elastomeric body at the other surface of the support sheet for yieldingly backing the sheet and the recording portions of the strips, and

a linear electrode on the base and extending in opposition to the recording portions, the linear elec trode cooperating with the recording portions to mark a web drawn therebetween,

the body being incrementally compressible perpendicularly to the web, and the sheet and strips being jointly flexible therewith to conform to irregularities of the electrode across the width of the web.

2. A device according to claim 1 wherein said support sheet is of insulating material.

3. A device according to claim 1 wherein the body, sheet and strips are joined in a unitary sandwich.

4. A device according to claim 1 wherein said strip recording portions are planar disposed and said strips have terminal portions spaced from the recording portions.

5. A device according to claim 4 wherein the sheet is flexed to dispose the recording portions and terminal portions of the strip in different planes.

6. A device according to claim 4 in combination with means for distributing signals to the terminal portions.

7. A device according to claim 6 wherein the distributing means comprises a plurality of solid state switches.

8. A device according to claim 7 wherein said switches are unitarily contained in an integrated circuit chip.

9. A device according to claim 8 wherein the body, sheet, strips and chip are joined in a unitary sandwich.

10. A device according to claim 8 wherein said chip is co-extensive with the terminal portions of the conductive strips.

11. A device according to claim 8 wherein a plurality of supporting sheets are backed by a common body, the

sheets and strips being folded away from the body.

12. A device according to claim 4 wherein the terminal portions of the strips are arrayed circularly.

13. A device according to claim 12 wherein the terminal portions are coplanar.

14. A device according to claim 4 wherein the terminal portions of the strips have a greater spacing than the recording portions.

15. A device according to claim 1 wherein a plurality of supporting sheets are backed by a common body.

16. A device according to claim 15 wherein the recording portions of the conducting strips on the plurality of sheets are disposed in a coplanar array.

17. A device according to claim 16 wherein the sheets and strips are folded away from the array.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3047872 *Dec 22, 1959Jul 31, 1962Hazeltine Research IncStyli unit
US3618118 *Jul 28, 1969Nov 2, 1971Varian AssociatesElectrographic writing head of plural printed circuit construction
US3638237 *Aug 15, 1969Jan 25, 1972Alden Res FoundElectrical recorder utilizing a chemically-treated web
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *IBM Tech. Disc. Bulletin, Vol. 15, -3, pg. 775, Aug. 1972.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4082619 *Dec 29, 1976Apr 4, 1978Heinz DehnertMethod of forming a comb-like electrode structure
US4145584 *Apr 25, 1977Mar 20, 1979Otterlei Jon LFlexible keyboard switch with integral spacer protrusions
US4163980 *Oct 26, 1977Aug 7, 1979Firma Dr. -Ing. Rudolf Hell GmbHRecording electrode assembly for use in electrostatic reproduction
US4180824 *Jun 9, 1978Dec 25, 1979Compagnie Industrielle Des Telecommunications Cit-AlcatelHead for electrically printing an image
US4296457 *Dec 21, 1979Oct 20, 1981Vdo Adolf Schindling AgApparatus for electrically connecting a plurality of contacts
US4308548 *Jul 23, 1979Dec 29, 1981Burroughs CorporationElectrode assembly having particular pressing plate and backplane board arrangement for facsimile machine
US4315270 *Dec 6, 1979Feb 9, 1982Xerox CorporationBackup electrode for an electrostatic recorder
US4616291 *Dec 5, 1985Oct 7, 1986Siemens AktiengesellschaftElectronic device with densely packed components
US5057907 *Jun 11, 1990Oct 15, 1991National Semiconductor Corp.Method and structure for forming vertical semiconductor interconnection
US5659773 *Nov 14, 1990Aug 19, 1997International Business Machines CorporationPersonal computer with input/output subsystem
US6613979 *Aug 27, 1997Sep 2, 2003Quell CorporationElectrical circuit suspension system
WO1981000300A1 *Jun 17, 1980Feb 5, 1981Burroughs CorpElectrode assembly for facsimile machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification347/166, 347/164, 346/139.00A, 361/749, 346/139.00C
International ClassificationH04N1/032
Cooperative ClassificationH04N1/032
European ClassificationH04N1/032
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 24, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: ALDEN ELECTRONICS, INC., MASSACHUSETTS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:ALDEN RESEARCH FOUNDATION;REEL/FRAME:005021/0344
Effective date: 19890216