Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3827186 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 6, 1974
Filing dateMay 30, 1972
Priority dateMay 30, 1972
Also published asCA1018314A, CA1018314A1, DE2327784A1
Publication numberUS 3827186 A, US 3827186A, US-A-3827186, US3827186 A, US3827186A
InventorsEhnot D
Original AssigneeAir Prod & Chem
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Deflashing apparatus
US 3827186 A
Abstract
Apparatus includes connecting rods which each pivot about a connection on a disc which is eccentric with respect to the axis of the shaft driving the disc to supply vertical reciprocatory motion. Particular ranges of amplitude, frequency and loading are utlilized to cause impacting of articles against at least one surface and abrading against each other in the cryogenic deflashing of the articles.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

States Ehnot Aug. 6, 1974 DEFLASHING APPARATUS 3,305,977 2/1967 Kellard 51/163 3,694,968 10 1972 lsaacson 51/163 [75] ihvehioi- Diiiiaid Ehmi Coopeisbuig, 3,728,825 4/1973 Barrett 51/314 x [73] Assignee: Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.,

Allentown, Pa. Primary ExaminerDona1d G. Kelly [22] Filed, May 30 1972 Attorney, Agent, or FirmRonald B. Sherer 1 A 1.N .12576 2 [2 1 pp 0 8 57 ABSTRACT 52 us. (:1. 51/7 51/314 Apparatus ihchides Connecting which each Pi)t 51 1m. (:1 B341} 1/01) B24 b 31/06 limit a connection a disc which is eccentric with [58] Field of Search 51/6 7 313 316 respect to the axis of the shaft driving the disc to sup- 51/322 ply vertical reciprocatory motion. Particular ranges of amplitude, frequency and loading are utlilized to 56] References Cited cause impacting of articles against at least one surface and abrading against each other in the cryogenic de- UNITED STATES PATENTS flashing of the articles. 2,912,803 11/1959 Simjian 51/7 X 3,128,577 4/1964 Guibert 51/7 24 Claims, 13 Drawing Figures PATENTEU B 6 7 HIM.

PATENIEMuc 81974 SHEEY 0F 5 This invention relates to the field of cryogenic deflashing of articles formed from normally resilient material.

Such deflashing involves applying a cooling medium to embrittle the flash and applying forces to break away the embrittled flash. Conventionally, apparatus is utilized where the force application consists either of tumbling or of shot blast impingement. Vibratory apparatus supplying amplitudes significantly lower and frequencies significantly higher than those described hereinafter has sometimes been used.

An important objective of this invention is the provision of improved apparatus and method for deflashing.

Referring to the accompanying drawings:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of a preferred apparatus within the scope of this invention.

FIG. 2 is a left side elevational view of the apparatus of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a plan view partially in section taken at line 3-3 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a view taken at line 4-4 of FIG. 1 with parts omitted for the sake of clarity.

FIGS. 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 5e and 5f show in detail amplitude adjusting mechanism for the apparatus of FIG. 1; FIG. 5c is an exploded view, partially in section, taken at lines 5c5c of FIGS. 5a and 5b with connecting elements added; FIG. 5d is a view partially in section taken at lines 5d-5d of FIGS. 5a and 5b with connecting elements added.

FIG. 6 is a view partially in section taken at lines 6-6 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 7 is a view partially in section taken at line 77 of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a graph defining a preferred amplitude versus frequency relationship.

In the apparatus of FIGS. 1-3, a base 10 comprises a horizontally oriented rectangular plate 10a with a mounting flange 10b running from its left side to its right side depending downwardly along each of its front and rear sides.

Energy absorbing means, such as air cushions 12 resiliently support the base 10 on a foundation 13. A cushion I2 is attached near each of the corners of plate 10a along its front and rear sides.

A deflashing chamber 14 is supported above base 10 by connecting rods 57 (57a, 57b, 57c, 57d) which coact to supply vertical reciprocatory motion to chamber 14 by means described below. Chamber 14 comprises an elongate container and is essentially horizontally disposed.

A motor 16 which functions as a prime mover is mounted on a motor base 18 which in turn is mounted on plate 10a of base 10. Motor 16 is positioned toward the front side of base 10 and is slidable along base 18 parallel to the transverse dimension of base 10. A gearmotor 19 provides power for such transverse movement.

Motor 16 drives main shaft 20 which in turn drives a variable pitch pulley 21 which in turn through a belt 22 and a pulley 23 drives a shaft 24.

Shaft 24 is supported by bearings 26 which are mounted on base 10. It extends in opposite directions parallel to the longitudinal dimension of base 10.

A flexible coupling 28a connects the left end of shaft 24 to a shaft 30. A flexible coupling 28b connects the right end of shaft 24 to a different shaft 30. Each shaft 30 connects with a different gear box 32.

Through each gear box 32, each shaft 30 drives two shafts 34 which extend in opposite directions parallel to the transverse dimension of base 10. Each shaft 34 has its axis oriented horizontally.

Bearings 36 support shafts 34.

The outer end of each shaft 34 is connected by an amplitude adjusting mechanism 37 to one of the connecting rods 57a, b, c, d at a connection shaft 55 so that a shaft 34 connects with an adjusting mechanism 37 toward each corner of base 10.

FIGS. 5a-5f show an amplitude adjusting mechanism 37. Each such mechanism 37 comprises a vertically oriented inner disc 38 and a vertically oriented outer disc 39 which are side-by-side and are separated by spacers 40 held in place by bolts 41. The shaft 34 which connects to the mechanism 37 is rigidly attached at the central portion of the inner side of the disc 38 so as to be coaxial therewith. The disc 39 is spaced from the outward side of disc 38. The discs 38 and 39 both have their axes oriented horizontally. Means 55 connect to the outward side of disc 39 at a location eccentric of the axis 56 of the disc 39.

The disc 38 in each mechanism 37 has a hole 44 and two slots 46. Hole 44 is located toward the circumference of the disc 38 and runs axially. Slots 46 each have their center lines formed by arcs on a common circle having its center on the axis of hole 44. It also has seven aligning holes 48 which are spaced from each other and have their centers on the circumference of a second common circle having its center on the axis of hole 44.

The disc 39 in each mechanism 37 has a hole 50 and two adjusting holes 52. Hole 50 is located toward the circumference of the disc 39 and runs axially. Adjusting holes 52 each have their centers on a common circle having its center on the axis of hole 50 and having a radius equal to that of the circle defining the relationship between hole 44 and slots 46. The disc 39 also has an aligning hole 54 having its center on the circumference of a circle having a center on the axis of hole 50 and having a radius equal to that of the circle defining the relationship between hole 44 and aligning holes 48.

The discs 38 and 39 in each mechanism 37 are relatively positioned with respect to each other so that each hole 50 is opposite a hole 44, each adjusting hole .52 is opposite an adjusting slot 46, and each aligning hole 54 is opposite one of the aligning holes 48. In each instance where there are opposite openings, a bolt 41 extends between such openings and the separation of the discs is maintained by a spacer 40.

By utilizing the bolt 41 extending between the holes 44 and 50 as a pivoting site and pivoting to move discs 38 and 39 relative to each other to adjust the position of each hole 52 with respect to each slot 46, the eccentricity of the shaft 55 with respect to the axis of the shaft 34 can be varied. FIG. 5e shows the discs 38 and 39 adjusted with respect to each other so that such eccentricity is maximized. FIG. 5f shows the discs 38 and 39 adjusted with respect to'each other so that such eccentricity is essentially nil. The discs in each mechanism 37 can be adjusted the same with respect to each other by utilizing the same relative positioning of each aligning hole 54 with respect to an aligning hole 48. Preferably, all the adjustments are the same so that each of the connecting rods 57a, b, c and d operates in phase.

Each of the connecting rods 57a, b, c and d is positioned with its elongate dimension oriented vertically and is pivotally attached at its lower end at its associated shaft 55.

Thus, as seen in FIGS. 13, there are four connecting rods 57a, 57b, 57c and 57d extending upwardly of base 10. Each is positioned toward one of the corners of base 10. Each is positioned longitudinally opposite a connecting rod and also transversely opposite a con necting rod.

Rod 57a is pivotally connected at its upper end to one end ofa cross bar 58a and rod 570 is pivotally connected at its upper end to the other end of the cross bar. Rods 57b and a are connected in similar fashion to a cross bar 58b. Each cross bar is positioned transverse to chamber 14 and extends transversely of it and is rigidly connected to the underside thereof by bolts 60 and mounting structure consisting of horizontally oriented plates 62 (FIG. 1) each having three spaced vertically oriented flanges 64 which are welded to the exterior of the sidewalls of chamber 14. Thus, the connecting rods 57a, b, c and d support the chamber 14 above the base 10. Because the chamber is removably fastened to the cross bars, different sized and shaped chambers can be used on the same underlying mechanism.

Two gusset plates 66 are mounted on base and are positioned opposite each other along a portion of opposite long sides of base 10. Each plate 66 extends upwardly with a progressively decreasing width. Plates 66 are reinforced by gussets 68 and interconnected by square cross section member 69. Two sets of spaced tabs 70 depend from member 69 (see FIG. 4). A rocker arm 71 is connected at one end at a pivot 72 extending between the tabs 70 in each set and at the other end at a pivot 73 extending between two spaced plates 74 which are rigidly connected to the underside of chamber 14. The arrangement described in this paragraph restricts lateral movement of the chamber.

With reference to FIGS. 6 and 7, chamber 14 has an insulated cover 76 defining an upper wall, an insulated lower wall 78, sidewalls 79 (one is shown in FIG. 1 an insulated entrance endwall 80 and an insulated exit endwall 82. Wall 82 is a door which is hinged at its top end from cover 76 at 84.

A feed hopper 86 is positioned at the entrance end of chamber 14. It extends through cover 76 and is supported by cover 76 and endwall 80. It contains a gate 88 adjustable to vary the feed rate in continuous operation. It also contains a square cross section channel 90 adjacent a portion of the feed hopper wall removed from endwall 80.

A spray header 91 extends along the width of the interior of feed hopper 86 adjacent the transverse feed hopper wall removed from endwall 80. It can be, for example, a copper tube with holes drilled therein so as to provide spray on the articles in the hopper.

A spray header 92 extends transversely of the interior of chamber 14. It is positioned toward the entrance end of chamber 14. Nozzles 94 are screwed into orifices in the spray header. The nozzles are positioned to spray liquefied gas cooling medium downwardly and obliquely toward the inner surface of bottom wall 78.

Spray headers 98 extend along the length of the interior of the chamber at each sidewall. Spray headers 98 can be, for example, copper tubing with holes drilled therein.

A vent 99 extends through cover 76.

An upper deck 100 defining a ceiling is positioned in the interior of chamber 14. It comprises a major flat surface 101 and minor flat surfaces 102 and 104 with surfaces 101 and 102 interconnected by hinge 106 and surfaces 102 and 104 interconnected by hinge 108. The deck 100 is supported from cover 76 by four bolts 110. These bolts are useful to adjust the vertical distance of deck 100 from the inner surface of bottom wall 78. Plate 104 is slidably supported on a bracket 112 which extends along the transverse dimension of chamber 14 in the interior of the chamber close to the inner surface of cover 76 near the entrance end of the chamber.

A dam 114 consisting of a metal plate with slots therein (not shown) is attached with bolts (not shown) to wall 78 near the exit end of chamber 14. It is adjustable upward or downward by loosening the bolts and sliding the plate to the desired position.

The cover 76 is removably attached to the sidewalls of chamber 14 by hold down clamps 116 (FIGS. 1, 2 and 7).

The apparatus is operated continuously or batehwise.

In continuous operation, articles to be deflashed are introduced continuously into chamber 14 via hopper 86. Deflashing media, if any, is added via channel 90. Liquefied gas is introduced via spray headers 91 and 92 or 98. The spray header 91 supplies liquefied gas cooling medium to chill the articles to be deflashed to the extent that they will be fed into the chamber at a fast rate. In the case where the articles treated are in common strips, such spray has the additional advantage of embrittling articles in the hopper to facilitate removal of the articles from the strips in the hopper thereby facilitating feeding. Spray headers 92 or 98 add liquefied gas cooling medium to assure that the flash on the articles being processed has reached and is maintained at its embrittlement temperature. Such cooling medium addition negates the frictional heat generated in chamber 14 and makes up for heat leak through the insulation of chamber 14.

In such continuous operation door 82 is maintained open.

Vertical reciprocating motion is supplied to chamber 14 as a result of the following: motor 16 through shaft 20 drives pulley 21. Pulley 21 in turn through belt 22 and pulley 23 drives shaft 24 which through gear boxes 32 drives shafts 34. The shafts 34 drive inner discs 38 which in turn transmit motion to outer discs 39. Discs 39 in turn transmit the horizontal rotational motion supplied by gear boxes 32 to cause cyclical vertical movement of connecting rods 57 which as a result of lateral movement of the chamber 14 being restricted by rocker arms 71 causes vertical reciprocating movement of chamber 14. The horizontal rotational motion of shafts 34 is translated into vertical motion of connecting rods 57 as a result of the eccentric mounting of each rod 57 with respect to the axis of the shaft 34 which drives it.

The amplitude of the reciprocatory movement relative to the base 10 is defined by and equal to the distance in a radial direction between the axis of the connection of the connecting rod to the outer disc and the is isolated from the foundation of the apparatus by the v air cushions 12.

As a result of the vertical reciprocatory motion, the articles being deflashed are suspended within chamber 14, undergo random turbulent motion and impact against surfaces of the interior of chamber 14 and upper deck 100 and abrade against each other and against the deflashing medium (if any) whereby embrittled flash is broken away. A substantial portion of the deflashing is accomplished as a result of the impacting on the two parallel horizontally oriented plane surfaces, namely the lower surface of deck 100 and the lower interior surface of chamber 14. Such two surface impaction presents a substantial advantage in terms of flash removal rate and in terms of ability to remove large amounts of flash compared to deflashing primarily by abrasion and a lesser but meaningful advantage compared to deflashing by impacting against a single surface.

Because of the weight of articles in hopper 86, articles are forced through chamber 14, over dam 114 and out of door 82. Vaporized liquefied gas also passes out of door 82.

For the achievement of substantial deflashing in one pass through this apparatus, it is important that the amplitude of the reciprocatory motion relative to the base be in the range of 0.5 inch to 1.5 inches. Preferably amplitude ranges from 0.75 inch to 1.25 inches.

The frequency is interrelated with the amplitude. For any given amplitude, the frequency must be sufficiently high to impart to the articles being processed a random turbulent motion. As the frequency is increased, a frequency is reached for each particular amplitude where the articles are suspended to the extent that there is little or no impact of the articles against the deflashing zone boundaries such frequency is uneconomically used except for the deflashing of very fragile articles. Generally, useful frequencies usually range from 325 to 500 cycles per minute and a preferred amplitude versus frequency relationship is defined by the cross-hatched area of FIG. 8.

In general the loading of articles in the deflashing zone ranges from about 2 to about 20, preferably from about 4 to about pounds of articles per square foot of lower interior surface of the deflashing zone. The vertical position of the upper deck establishes the density of articles in the deflashing zone. If this density is too high, the articles will be so tightly packed in the deflashing zone that impacting action will be inhibited. If the loading density is too low, abrasion between articles is decreased resulting in need for increased retention time to achieve a specified amount of deflashing and retention time per unit weight of articles processed is increased. As used herein, the term deflashing zone is that zone where deflashing is carried out by impacting of articles against a surface. In the depicted embodiment the deflashing zone is bounded by the lower interior surface of chamber 14, the interior surfaces of the sidewalls of chamber 14 and the lower surface of member 101 of deck 100. Thus, when vertical reciprocatory motion is applied to chamber 14, the same motion is applied to the boundaries of the deflashing zone.

The time period during which reciprocatory motion is imparted to an article in the deflashing zone (denoted herein the retention time) depends upon the degree of deflashing, as well as the amount of flash and the size of the articles being processed. Generally, substantial deflashing is accomplished with a retention time ranging from 1 minute to 15 minutes. Preferably, a retention time is selected, usually 3 minutes to 10 minutes, so that substantially complete deflashing is achieved.

The amplitude can be adjusted by moving disc 39 relative to disc 38 in each adjusting mechanism 37 utilizing holes 44 and and adjusting holes 52 and slots 46 and the spacers 40 and bolts 41 to vary the eccentricity of each shaft 55 with respect to the axis of its associated shaft 34. Increasing this eccentricity increases the amplitude.

The frequency can be varied by moving motor 16 parallel to the transverse dimension of the base 10 and expanding or contracting the sheave 0f pulley 21 thereby varying the speed of shaft 24 which in turn varies the speed of shafts 34 and discs 38 and 39. A variable speed motor could be used for this purpose in place of the combination of constant speed motor 16 and variable pitch pulley 21.

The loading density can be varied by the adjustment of feed gate 88, darn 114 and upper deck 100. It also can be varied by inclining the chamber upwardly or downwardly as a result of inflating air cushions 12 at one end of the chamber to a greater degree than the air cushions at the other end. For a particular dam setting, upper deck position and inclination, opening the feed gate increases the loading density and closing it decreases the loading density. For a particular feed gate setting, upper deck position and inclination, raising dam 114 increases loading density and lowering it decreases the loading density. For a particular feed gate setting, dam setting and inclination, lowering the upper deck increases loading density and raising it decreases loading density. For a particular feed gate setting, dam setting and upper deck position, inclining chamber 14 upwardly toward its exit end will increase loading density and inclining it downwardly toward such end will decrease loading density.

The retention time can be increased by tilting, that is inclining, the chamber upwardly toward its exit end. The retention time is also increased by raising dam 114 so as to restrict the material from leaving thechamber, by closing the feed gate or decreasing the frequency.

The upper deck is adjustable in a vertical direction to modify the force of impact supplied to the articles being deflashed or to maintain the proper orientation of the articles being deflashed.

At the end of a run, emptying of the chamber 14 can be expedited by inclining the chamber downwardly toward its exit end, for example, 10 percent from the horizontal, by adjusting the pressure in the air cushions 12.

In batch operation, the apparatus is operated the same as above except a single batch of articles to be deflashed is added via hopper 86, only spray headers 98 are utilized, and door 82 is maintained closed to keep the articles in the chamber until the desired degree of deflashing is completed. Amplitudes and frequencies and loading densities used are the same as in continuous operation.

In a specific example of continuous processing, spark plug covers are eryogenieally deflashed in apparatus as depicted herein where the inside dimensions of the chamber are 2 feet wide by 7 inches high by 8 feet long with the deck positioned 4.5 inches above the lower in terior surface of the chamber. Dam 114 is positioned to provide a dam height of 3.25 inches and feed gate 88 is positioned to provide an opening of 2 inch height.

The spark plug covers being processed are formed of rubber in a split molding process. They have a bulk density of 25 pounds per cubic foot.

The spark plug covers are introduced into the chamber of the deflashing apparatus at a rate of 20 pounds per minute. The loading is approximately 7.5 pounds per square foot of the lower interior surface of the chamber. The spray header in the feed hopper introduces liquefied nitrogen at a flow rate varying during the run from approximately 9 to approximately 10 pounds per minute which corresponds to a pressure in the spray header ranging from 7 to 8 p.s.i.g.

In the chamber, deflashing is carried out utilizing vertical reciprocatory motion with amplitude of 0.75 inch, a frequency of41 5 cycles per minute and no deflashing media. The temperature in the chamber is maintained at minus 150F. by the addition ofliquefied nitrogen by spray header 92; such temperature assures that the flash is maintained in embrittled condition. When operating, spray header 92 functions at a pressure ranging from 16 to 18 p.s.i.g. which provides a flow rate of approximately 16 pounds per minute.

Essentially complete deflashing is achieved with an average retention time of approximately 6 minutes. The liquefied nitrogen consumption is 0.56 pounds of liquefied nitrogen per pound of throughput. Essentially the same deflashing results are obtained when the temperature in the chamber is maintained at minus 150F. by addition of liquefied nitrogen by spray headers 98 instead of by spray header 92.

In a specific example of batch operation with the apparatus described above, 100 pounds of the aforedescribed spark plug covers are processed. An amplitude of 0.75 inch, a frequency of 415 cycles per minute and a loading density of 6.2 pounds per square foot of the lower interior surface of the chamber are utilized. Essentially complete deflashing is achieved with a retention time of six minutes. Liquefied nitrogen is introduced by spray headers 98 to maintain the temperature in the chamber at minus 150F.

The normally resilient articles processed within the scope of the present invention are, for example, of rubber or of a thermoplastic material. Articles formed of silicones are especially adapted for processing within the scope of this invention.

While liquid nitrogen is the preferred cooling agent, especially for silicones, other cooling agents can be used. For example, liquid carbon dioxide is suitable for use in deflashing many materials. Liquid helium is useful for a wide range of materials but is very expensive. Liquid air or liquid nitrous oxide can be used in certain cases.

The term deflashing" as used herein includes not only removing thin excess fin-configuration material which is present as a result of the article forming process but also finishing to remove other excess surface material and removal of articles from a common strip into which they have been molded.

Besides the spark plug covers described above. any of the other articles typically deflashed can be deflashed herein. For example, lamp mountings, heels or O-rings are suitably deflashcd using the method and apparatus of this invention.

The invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof.

For example, motor 16 can drive discs 38 through a system of pulleys, belts and shafts without using gear boxes. Gate 88 and darn 114 can be motorized to facilitate adjustment of loading density and retention time. Cover 76 can be hinged on one side to facilitate introduction of articles in batch operation and to facilitate cleaning. Cross bars 58a and b can pass through the insulation of bottom wall 78 instead of being bolted to the bottom of chamber 14. The adjustment of the discs in each mechanism 37 can be carried out utilizing aligning pins which are removed after proper adjustment is achieved instead of using a bolt 41 extending between hole 54 and one of the holes 48 and an associated spacer 40. Other methods of venting can be used; for example, in batch operation small holes drilled in dam 114 and hopper gate 88 are desirably used for venting. Moreover, the apparatus depicted in FIGS. l-3 is advantageously used for deflashing articles formed of nonresilient materials, for example articles formed of nonresilient plastics or metals such as steel. Additionally, the depicted apparatus is useful for cooling articles even where deflashing is not a concern; for example cooling articles which tend to stick together when in hot condition.

Thus the scope of the invention is indicated by the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A method of deflashing articles by embrittling at least the flash portions of such articles and subjecting the articles to vibrating forces characterized by:

a. continuously introducing said articles into the inlet of a deflashing chamber having elongated bottom, top and side walls extending at least several feet in length,

b. continuously passing said articles through said elongated deflashing chamber from said inlet adjacent one end to a spaced apart outlet adjacent the opposite end of said elongated chamber and continuously discharging deflashed articles therefrom,

c. introducing a cryogenic cooling medium at a temperature below 0F. into said elongated chamber in the vicinity of said inlet and into contact with said articles for embrittling at least the flash portions of said articles, and

d. vertically vibrating said elongated deflashing chamber at a frequency and amplitude to break the embrittled flash portions from said articles.

2. Deflashing method as recited in claim 1 wherein the loading ranges from about 4 to about 10 pounds per square foot of said lower interior surface.

3. Deflashing method as recited in claim 1 wherein the amplitude ranges from 0.75 inch to 1.25 inches.

4. Deflashing method as recited in claim 1 wherein the frequency ranges from 325 to 500 cycles per minute.

5. Deflashing method as recited in claim 1 wherein the amplitude and frequency are defined by the cross hatched area of FIG. 8.

6. The method as claimed in claim 1 wherein step (d) comprises vibrating said elongated deflashing chamber at an amplitude within the range of 0.5 to 1.5 inches.

7. Deflashing method as recited in claim 1 wherein cooling medium is applied to articles prior to the time they enter the deflashing zone.

8. Apparatus for cryogenically deflashing articles formed from normally resilient material comprising means defining a deflashing zone in a chamber having a lower interior surface,

means for introducing said articles and a cryogenic refrigerant into the deflashing zone,

means for maintaining said articles in said zone with the flash thereon embrittled and at a loading rang ing from about 2 to about pounds per square foot,

means for applying to said chamber vertical reciprocatory motion having an amplitude ranging from 0.5 inch to 1.5 inches and a frequency sufficiently high to impart random turbulent motion to said articles and cause said articles to impact at least against said lower interior surface to break away embrittled flash.

9. Apparatus for cryogenically deflashing articles as recited in claim 8 wherein the means for maintaining the articles in the deflashing zone at the specified loading comprises adjustable feed means and adjustable exit means.

10. Apparatus for cryogenically deflashing as recited in claim 8 wherein the deflashing zone is bounded by parallel impacting surfaces perpendicular to the direction of said motion, and the means for applying vertical reciprocatory motion causes articles to impact against said surfaces to break away embrittled flash.

11. Apparatus for cooling and vibrating articles to remove flash portions therefrom characterized by:

a. means forming a base,

b. means resiliently supporting said base for absorbing vibrations of the apparatus,

0. means forming an insulated deflashing container for holding said articles to be deflashed,

d. means attaching said deflashing container relative to said base, said attaching means including a drive motor supported by said base and including adjustable amplitude means capable of vibrating said deflashing chamber at an amplitude in the order of ii. elongate first drive means having a first end and a second end, the first end being pivotally connected to said connection means iii. second drive means pivotally connected to the second end of said first drive means iv. third drive means to drive said second drive means.

14. Apparatus for deflashing articles as recited in claim 13 wherein said connection means extends transversely of said container, said first drive means comprises a connecting rod having its elongate dimension oriented vertically, said second drive means comprises a disc having its axis oriented horizontally, said third drive means comprises a shaft having its axis oriented horizontally, the connection of the second drive means to the second end of the first drive means being eccentric from the axis of said shaft.

15. Apparatus for deflashing articles as recited in claim 14 wherein said attaching means comprises four structures each comprising connection means, first drive means, second drive means and third drive means, each structure positioned to support the container above the base.

16. Apparatus for deflashing as recited in claim 15 wherein each of the four structures has associated with it means for adjusting said amplitude.

17. Apparatus for deflashing as recited in claim 16 wherein each amplitude adjusting means comprises a first disc which is rigidly attached to a third drive means and a second disc which is a second drive means, said discs positioned side-by-side and adjustable relative to each other to vary the eccentricity of the connection of the second drive means to the second end of the first drive means with respect to the axis of said shaft of said third drive means.

18. Apparatus for deflashing as recited in claim 11 which additionally comprises a feed hopper communieating with said container, said hopper having a gate adjustable to vary the feed rate in continuous operation.

19. Apparatus for deflashing as recited in claim 11 wherein said container includes a ceiling adjustable in the vertical direction.

20. Apparatus for deflashing as recited in claim 19 wherein said container defining means has a lower interior surface and said attaching means is adapted to supply vertical reciprocatory motion to cause articles to impact against said ceiling and against said lower interior surface.

21. Apparatus for deflashing as recited in claim 11 wherein said container has an inlet and an outlet and includes at its outlet a dam adjustable to vary retention time in continuous operation.

22. Apparatus for deflashing as recited in claim 11 wherein said supporting means is adapted to incline said container.

23. Apparatus for deflashing as recited in claim 11 which additionally comprises a feed hopper communi' eating with said container and cooling medium supply means in said feed hopper.

24. Apparatus for deflashing as recited in claim 11 which additionally comprises a feed hopper communicating with said container including a channel through which deflashing media can be fed into said container independent of said articles.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2912803 *Oct 14, 1957Nov 17, 1959Luther G SimjianAbrading device
US3128577 *Mar 5, 1963Apr 14, 1964Boeing CoMethod for deburring components of considerable length
US3305977 *May 27, 1964Feb 28, 1967Almco Supersheen Division Of GVibratory barrel finishing machines
US3694968 *Jan 2, 1970Oct 3, 1972Vibrodyne IncVibratory apparatus
US3728825 *Oct 12, 1971Apr 24, 1973Burdett Oxygen Co IncCryogenic deflashing apparatus and operating system for same
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4519812 *Oct 28, 1983May 28, 1985Aga AbCryogen shot blast deflashing system with jointed supply conduit
US4598501 *Oct 28, 1983Jul 8, 1986Aga AbCryogen shot blast deflashing system with bellows return conduit
US4648214 *Oct 28, 1983Mar 10, 1987Aga AbCryogen shot blast deflashing system
US4670210 *Sep 3, 1985Jun 2, 1987Allied CorporationMethod for removing protruding reinforcing fibers from a deflashed fiber reinforced plastic article
US4878623 *Dec 21, 1985Nov 7, 1989Rheinisch-Westfalische Kalwerke AgProcess and device for mechanically removing the surface of lumped goods
US4892018 *Sep 3, 1985Jan 9, 1990Allied-Signal Inc.Deflashing method and apparatus
US5018312 *Oct 17, 1988May 28, 1991Al SteckisDeflashing apparatus
US5556649 *Aug 30, 1993Sep 17, 1996Yamaha Motor Co., Ltd.Device for removing runners from molded products
Classifications
U.S. Classification451/33, 451/113
International ClassificationB24B31/067, B24B31/06, B23P25/00, B24B55/02, B24B55/00, B24B31/00
Cooperative ClassificationB24B55/02, B24B31/06
European ClassificationB24B55/02, B24B31/06