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Publication numberUS3828201 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 6, 1974
Filing dateMay 23, 1973
Priority dateMay 23, 1973
Publication numberUS 3828201 A, US 3828201A, US-A-3828201, US3828201 A, US3828201A
InventorsH Allen
Original AssigneeH Allen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable power package
US 3828201 A
Abstract
A portable power supply which may be strapped to the body or carried by hand, including a carrying case adapted to receive batteries and appropriate electrical connections, the case further including a switch which aids in converting from 6 to 12 volt power. The package output may be typically adapted to power a head lamp, which lamp or other output is typically connected to the carrying case by a cord of sufficient length to allow freedom of movement of the output with respect to the carrying case.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States min [a 11] 3,828,201 Allen, Sr. Au 6 1974 PORTABLE POWER PACKAGE 2,649,493 8/1953 Temple 320/16 ux [76] Inventor: Harry E. Allen, Sr. 25 Crape 2,978,696 4/1961 Keller et al. 240/6.4 W

Myrtle St., Shreveport, La. 71106 [22] F1 d M 23 1973 Primary Examiner-Herman Hohauser 1e ay A portable power supply which may be strapped to [52] Cl 307/150 240/6'4 36 the body or carried by hand, including a carrying case 5]] 1m Cl 7/00 adapted to receive batteries and appropriate electrical 58] Fieid 8 connections, the case further including a switch which 6 aids in converting from 6 to 12 volt power. The package output may be typically adapted to power a head lamp, which lamp or other output is typically con- [56] References cued nected to the carrying case by a cord of sufficient UNITED STATES PATENTS length to allow freedom of movement of the output 422,438 3/1890 Pennock 320/15 with respect to the carrying case. 953,640 3/1910 Patterson 320/16 1,055,746 3/1913 Hirsch 240/6.4 W 5 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures PORTABLE POWER PACKAGE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to a new and improved portable power supply package for supplying power to such outputs as portable head lamps, adapted for use in the field and remotely located from permanent sources of power. The power package can be strapped to the body or carried by hand, and if a head lamp is utilized as the power output, the lamp may, for example, be mounted on the head by means of a suitable hat arrangement, to provide sufficient light in a selected direction without the necessity of using the hands to direct the light. The power package is capable of providing both 6 and 12 volt energy by adjustment of the battery arrangement in the carrying case. The carrying case may be adapted for belt mounting, back mounting, mounting by shoulder straps, or alternative methods of mounting on the body to leave the hands free while using the package as a source of power. The package may be adapted for use by firemen, police, hunters, soldiers in combat, and has many other uses as a source of light; the invention may also be utilized to power battery-operated tools and equipment at points remotely located from permanent sources of power.

2. Description of the Prior Art Heretofore, various types of apparatus have been developed to allow use of a portable power unit while in the field and away from permanent power sources. Most of these devices have embodied the use of a single, 6 volt dry cell battery, to which is attached a head lamp or other power output utility item, which lamp is generally mounted on the head by a flexible band in order to leave the hands free. These devices are subject to considerable inconvenience in that there has heretofore been no satisfactory carrying case developed to accommodate the battery while the user has his hands otherwise occupied. For example, the conventional dry cell battery is frequently forced into a pocket while working, and may easily fall out, jerking the head lamp off the users head or otherwise constituting an inconvenience to the working operation.

Still another disadvantage frequently found in conventional portable power devices is a lack of capability to vary the power output when such variation is needed. For example, in the case of head lamps, the intensity of the lamp beam cannot be varied from 6 volts to 12 volts as is deemed necessary. A still further inconvenience frequently found in conventional packages is a poorly designed carrying case. Furthermore, in the case of head lamps, the most generally used consists of a flexible band having a head lamp mounting thereon with a direct connection from lamp to battery. Such a band frequently slips loose from a tight mount on the head and causes the light to drop to an undesirable angle from the head, thereby necessitating frequent readjustment.

Accordingly, an object of the instant invention is to provide a portable power package so constructed and designed as to be capable of providing a 12 volt or a 6 volt output by manipulation of at least one of the batteries in the case.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a carrying case for accommodating a battery or batteries, which case is capable of being placed on the belt, hung from the shoulder, or otherwise strapped to the body in a convenient manner, leaving the hands free.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a portable head lamp with accompanying carrying case which is simple and easy to use, and which lamp may be placed on the head without misalignment and ma]- adjustment due to the wearer moving his head up and down and from side to side while the lamp is in use.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a portable power system in which the output power intensity may be varied from 12 volts to 6 volts as desired, by manipulation of at least one of the batteries in the pack.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION These and other objects of the invention are provided in a portable power package for use in areas remotely located from permanent sources of power, which includes the following elements:

I. A carrying case constructed of leather or other suitable material designed for accommodating at least one battery to supply power to a selected out- P 2. Means for attaching the carrying case to the body leaving the hands free;

3. An output means in electrical attachment to the power supply by a cord which is sufficiently long to allow freedom of movement of the output with respect to the carrying case.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The invention will be better understood in view of the following description presented with reference to the accompanying drawings which illustrates a head lamp as the typical output utility of the invention.

FIG. 1 of the drawings is a perspective view of the portable power package of this invention, including carrying case and illustrative head lamp output;

FIG. 2 is a top-sectional view along lines 2-2 in FIG. 1, illustrating the electrical contact points, battery supports, and connections in the carrying case for operation of the head lamp output;

FIG. 3 is a sidesectional view along lines 3-3 of FIG. 2, further illustrating the contact points, electrical connections and typical battery positions in the carrying case;

FIG. 4 is an electrical schematic of the portable power package system;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the back plate of the carrying case illustrating a preferred method of attaching the carrying case to the body;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the battery divider feature of the invention, which divider is used to maintain good contact between the battery and contact points in the invention; and

FIG. 7 is a side elevation of a conventional, 6 volt, dry cell battery of the design preferred for use in the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to FIG. 1 of the drawings, the portable power package of this invention, generally illustrated by reference numeral 1, is disclosed, with carrying case 2 illustrated for accommodation of two-6 volt dry cell batteries 12, and battery divider 22 (illustrated in FIG. 6). Attached to carrying case 2 is back plate 3,

equipped with belt apertures 4, electrical contact plate 6, electrical contact screws 7 for mating with apertures (illustrated in FIG. 5) in electrical contact plate 6 to provide electrical contact connection points, and connectors 9a and 9b attached to electrical contact plate 6 by means of electrical contact screws 7. Back plate 3 is preferably braded onto carrying case 2, but may be otherwise connected as is convenient. Carry case 2 is additionally equipped with shoulder strap apertures 5, and top strap 10 carrying snaps 11, which strap and snaps are positioned to keep batteries-12 from falling out of carrying case 2 if the case were turned upside down or otherwise sharply jolted. In electrical connection with electrical contact screws 7, and electrical contact plate 6, is one end of output head lamp cord 8, the other end of this cord being attached to head lamp 13 or other electrical output, via switch 14 (optional). Head lamp 13 is equipped with bulb 15, which may be adapted for either 12 or 6 volt output, and may be in attachment to head harness 16 for convenient mounting on the head of a user. Head lamp cord 8 is, of course, sufficiently long to permit unrestricted movement of the head and head lamp or other output means with respect to carrying case 2.

FIG. 2 illustrates the bottom section of carrying case 2, more particularly depicting the electrical connections and contact system thereto. Connectors 9A and 9B join contacts 23A and 238, respectively, mounted on the bottom portion of carrying case 2, and contacts 23, 24, and 24A are additionally provided to function as hereinafter discussed. Likewise, switch 9C joins contacts 23A and 24, connector 9D links contact 24 and contact 24A, and connector 9E joins contacts 23 and 23B. Battery supports 21 are provided on the bottom of carrying case 2 to support batteries 12 firmly in position to provide positive electrical contact between negative battery terminal 19, and its respective contact, and positive terminal 20, and its respective contact when the batteries are placed in functional position.

FIG. 3 further illustrates a typical position of batteries 12 with respect to battery supports 21, the respective connectors, and contacts. FIG. 3 also particularly illustrates the battery terminal contact positions.

As illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3, either 6 or 12 volt power can be supplied to output bulb of head lamp 13, or other power output, depending upon the configuration and positioning of batteries 12 in carrying case 2. For example, when switch 9C is open and output cord 8 is attached to connectors 9A and 9B, (and ultimately to contacts 23A and 23B, respectively), and when positive battery terminal of battery 12 is placed on contact 238, and negative battery terminal 19 on contact 23A, 6 volts are supplied to the output (in the illustrated case to bulb 15 in head lamp 13). Subsequent activation of head lamp switch 14 then provides the desired illumination.

When a double amperage, parallel electrical connection to provide longer battery life is desired in the system, the battery connection discussed above is effected, and a second battery is placed in case 2 with positive terminal 20 touching contact 23, and negative terminal 19 touching contact 24A. Switch 9C is then closed, and a double-amperage, parallel power output is effected.

Alternatively, when a 12 volt power supply is desired,

switch 9C is opened and the following battery and connector configuration is utilized: Head lamp cord 8 is positioned on connectors 9A and 93, as above, which provides electrical connection to contacts 23A and 23B, respectively. The first battery is then placed with positive battery terminal 20 on contact 23A, and negative battery terminal 19 on contact 24; the other battery is then positioned as above described, with positive battery terminal 20 on contact 23, and negative battery terminal 19 on contact 24A. This arrangement provides a 12 volt power supply to the output, in the illustrated case, to bulb 15, via head lamp 13 upon activation of head lamp switch 14.

Referring now to FIG. 4 of the drawing, an electrical schematic illustrating bulb 15, head lamp switch 14, electrical contact plate 6, electric connector screws 7, connectors 9A, and 9B, contacts 23, 23A, 23B, 24 and 24A, and batteries 12, is as illustrated. The function of this circuit is to provide a 6 volt, single amperage power output as previously discussed, depending upon battery location and positioning.

FIG. 5 more particularly illustrates back plate 3, showing the position of electrical connector plate 6, threaded apertures 7A (designed to receive electrical contact screws 7), bradapertures 17, designed to re ceive brads 18 in fastening the back plate to the carrying case, and belt apertures 4, for mounting the carrying case on the belt of a user.

FIG. 6 illustrates battery divider 22, equipped with attached cord 22A, for removing the battery divider from its position between batteries 12 when it is desired to remove the batteries from the portable power package. Battery divider 22 serves to hold batteries 12 tightly into position in the carrying case to keep battery terminals 19 and 20 on the contacts as the'package is used, thereby insuring a continuous power supply to the output. The battery divider is removed from its position between the batteries by pulling cord 22A upward when it is desired to remove the batteries from carrying case 2.

While the power package output of this invention has been illustrated as applied to a light, and particularly, a head light or lamp, it will be appreciated that the invention may be similarly used to supply power to battery powered tools, such as direct current hedge clippers, cattle shockers, dental equipment, radios, and explosive equipment. Use of rectifiers for conversion of the direct current into alternating current can be utilized where desired, and several power packages can be utilized in series or parallel connection to provide the desired current and voltage necessary for a designated task.

It will be appreciated that use of switch 9C illustrated in FIG. 2 of the drawing, is not necessary in changing from 6 to 12 volt operation, although it serves as a safety device to prevent bulb burnout. For example, if the power package is adjusted for 6 volt operation and it is desired to convert from 6 to 12 volt use, switch 9C may be first checked to be sure it is closed, the batteries arranged in the appropriate positions as heretofore discussed for 12 volt operation, and the 6 volt bulb removed and a 12 volt bulb inserted. Switch 9C may then be opened to provide 12 volt power to the output without bulb damage, while the process of opening switch 9C prior to changing bulbs would have resulted in burning out the 6 volt bulb.

I claim: v

1. A portable power package comprising:

a. A carrying case adapted to receive a first battery, a second battery, a first, second, and third contact point for selectively receiving the terminals of said first battery, and a fourth and fifth contact point for receiving the terminals of said second battery, said first and said second contact points each being adapted for electrical contact with an output means, said second and said third contact points being selectively interconnected, said third and said fourth contact points being interconnected; and said first and said fifth contact points being interconnected;

b. A switch located between said second and said third contact points, said switch being placed in the open position;

0. Battery supports mounted in said carrying case and adapted to receive said first and said second battery;

d. The positive terminal of said first battery placed in contact with said first contact point, and the negative terminal in contact with said second contact point; and

e. The positive and negative terminals of said second battery placed in contact with said battery supports adjacent said fourth contact point and said fifth contact point.

2. The package of claim 1 wherein:

a. Said switch is closed; and

b. The positive terminal of said second battery is placed in contact with said fifth contact point, and the negative terminal is placed in contact with said fourth contact point.

3. The package of claim 2 further including a battery divider positioned between said first battery and said second battery to provide firm electrical contact between the terminals of said first battery and said second battery and said contact points.

4. The package of claim 2 wherein:

a. Said switch is opened; and

b. The positive terminal of said first battery is placed in contact with said second contact point, and the negative terminal is placed in contact with said third contact point.

5. The package of claim 1 further including a battery divider positioned between said first battery and said second battery to provide firm contact between the terminals of said first battery and said contact points.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US422438 *May 16, 1887Mar 4, 1890 Automatic switch for regulating the power of electric batteries
US953640 *Mar 5, 1909Mar 29, 1910Alice C PattersonBattery-holder system.
US1055746 *May 29, 1911Mar 11, 1913Hiram H HirschPortable electric-lighting system.
US2649493 *Jul 26, 1949Aug 18, 1953Olin Ind IncBattery connection
US2978696 *Sep 8, 1958Apr 4, 1961Clever Things IncIlluminated hat
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4127892 *Apr 27, 1977Nov 28, 1978E. Bakalowits Sohne Gesellschaft M.B.H.Lighted element for decoration
US4392185 *Mar 1, 1980Jul 5, 1983Friemann & Wolf GmbhExplosion-proof and firedamp-proof headlight
US4748344 *Mar 23, 1987May 31, 1988Peter SingPortable power supply carrier
US4818928 *Oct 1, 1987Apr 4, 1989Duracell Inc.Battery pack
US5115382 *Sep 28, 1990May 19, 1992Smith Robert CHeadlamp apparatus
US5667291 *May 23, 1995Sep 16, 1997Surgical Acuity, Inc.Illumination assembly for dental and medical applications
US5680026 *Mar 21, 1994Oct 21, 1997Tyton CorporationTool belt with battery assembly
US5929597 *Apr 23, 1997Jul 27, 1999Fiskars Inc.Portable electrical power system to supply direct current voltage
US6087815 *Nov 7, 1997Jul 11, 2000Fiskars Inc.Portable power system using DC to DC converter
US6501197Jun 16, 2000Dec 31, 2002Snap-On Technologies, Inc.Power tool and convertible remote battery pack therefor
US6575587Jul 26, 2001Jun 10, 2003The Coleman Company, Inc.Light with clamp that fits into a headband
US6955444 *Nov 12, 2003Oct 18, 2005Visiled, Inc.Surgical headlight
US7015675Feb 2, 2004Mar 21, 2006Jorge AndrePortable power tool and power supply combination
US7204713 *Dec 19, 2005Apr 17, 2007What Works, Works! Inc.Apparatus for converting a dive light into a canister light
US7661858Aug 8, 2007Feb 16, 2010Louis ChuangQuick connect/disconnect bicycle power pack
US7814901Mar 3, 2006Oct 19, 2010Ric Investments, LlcNebulizing drug delivery device with increased flow rate
US7825615Oct 16, 2007Nov 2, 2010Glj, LlcIntelligent motorized appliances with multiple power sources
US8001962Aug 23, 2003Aug 23, 2011Sheiman Ultrasonic Research Foundation Pty Ltd.Nebulizing and drug delivery device
US8801643Jan 10, 2013Aug 12, 2014Covidien LpCompression garment assembly
USRE39162 *Apr 7, 1999Jul 11, 2006Kerr CorporationIllumination assembly for dental and medical applications
Classifications
U.S. Classification307/150, 362/105, 320/117
International ClassificationF21L4/06, F21L4/00, H02J7/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21L4/06, F21V21/084, F21L11/00
European ClassificationF21L4/06, F21L11/00