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Publication numberUS3828304 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 6, 1974
Filing dateDec 6, 1972
Priority dateDec 6, 1972
Publication numberUS 3828304 A, US 3828304A, US-A-3828304, US3828304 A, US3828304A
InventorsD Winn
Original AssigneePhelps Dodge Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Slide-on rf connector
US 3828304 A
Abstract
A slide-on connector including a plug and jack for electrically connecting the ends of two radio frequency coaxial cables to minimize radio frequency (RF) current leakage when fully butted and slightly unbutted.
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Winn [451 Aug. 6, 1974 1 SLIDE-0N RF CONNECTOR [75] Inventor:

[73] Assignee: Phelps Dodge Industries, Inc., New

York, NY.

[22] Filed: Dec. 6, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 312,687

Donald J. Winn, New Haven, Conn.

[52] US. Cl 339/177 R [51] Int. Cl H01r 17/06 [58] Field of Search 24/ 106-108,

24/213, 208 A, 216 R, 216 B, 216 CS; 339/177, 252, 256, 258

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 439,696 11/1890 Shipman 24/216 1,078,763 11/1913 Andersen 339/177 R X 9/1948 Johannesen 339/177 R X 2,719,279 9/1955 Muckler 339/177 E 3,323,098 5/1967 OKeefe et a1. 339/177 R FQREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 392,088 7/1908 France 24/108 226,792 4/ 1 963 Austria Primary ExaminerBobby R. Gay

Assistant Examiner--Lawrence .1. Staab Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Davis, l-loxie, Faithfull & Hapgood [57] ABSTRACT A slide-on connector including a plug and jack for electrically connecting the ends of two radio frequency coaxial cables to minimize radio frequency (RF) current leakage when fully butted and slightly unbutted.

2 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures SLIDE-N RF CONNECTOR The present invention relates to coaxial cable connectors, and more particularly to slide-on RF connectors which shield against radio frequency current leakage.

Various RF connectors are known in the art. These known connectors generally require that the mating elements be fully butted to obtain the desired electrical performance. However, even when fully butted, these mating elements are often loose fitting resulting in several paths for RF current leakage.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a slide-on RF connector which overcomes the deficiencies of the prior art connectors and provides high electrical performance.

It is a further object to provide a slide-onRF connector which minimizes RF current leakage when the mating elements are fully butted and slightly unbutted.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a slide-on RF connector whose mating elements are tight fitting, even when slightly unbutted, to minimize RF current leakage.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a slide-on RF connector whose mating elements are capable of rapid and positive connection.

It is still a further object of the present invention to provide a slide-on RF connector suitable for printed circuit and computer applications.

Other objects, aspects and advantages of the present invention will be more apparent when the detailed description is considered with the drawing.

' Briefly, the connector of the present invention in cludes a jack having a bore extending therethrough, the jack is mounted on one end of a first coaxial cable and electrically coupled to the outer conductor, the free end of the jack is slightly divergent and slotted, a plug having a bore extending therethrough is mounted on one end of a second coaxial cable and electrically coupled to the outer conductor, the free end of the plug is slotted, flared, and crimped to receive and retain the jack, the diameter of the plug bore is slightly less than the diameter of the divergent slotted end of the jack for tight-fitting of the jack within the bore of the plug, the plug includes a stop surface formed by reduced diameter portion against which the free end of the jack abuts in a fully mated position, the jack and plug maintain high electrical performance characteristics even when the jack and plug are slightly unmated, and means within the plug and jack for electrically coupling the inner conductors of the two coaxial cables.

The present invention is illustrated with the following drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a sectional view of the jack, female contact and jack insulator coupled to a first coaxial cable end;

FIG. 2 is an end view of the jack, female contact and jack insulator of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view of the plug, male contact and plug insulator coupled to a second coaxial cable end;

FIG. 4 is an end view of the plug, male contact and plug insulator of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of the jack and plug assembled in a fully butted position; and

FIG. 6 is a partial sectional view of the jack and plug assembled in a slightly unbutted position.

Referring to FIG. 1, a generally cylindrical hollow jack 10 is mounted at the end of a first coaxial cable 12 and electrically coupled to the outer conductor 14 with solder 15. (When using flexible RF cables the jack 10 may be crimped or clamped to the cable.) The hollow jack 10 includes an axial bore 18 to receive the cable 12 with a reduced diameter portion or flange 20 which abuts against the end 22 of the outer conductor 14 of the cable 12. Axially aligned with the bore 18 and extending from the reduced diameter portion 20 to the uncoupled or free end 24 of the jack 10 is an enlarged bore portion 26. A cylindrical jack insulator 28 is dimensioned to snugly fit within the enlarged bore portion 26. The jack insulator 28 includes a central conductor or female contact 30 surrounded by an insulating cylinder 32. The female contact 30 includes two end receptacles 34 and 36. Receptacle 34 receives the inner conductor 37 of the cable 12 and is soldered thereto at 33. The cable 12 is then inserted into the jack 10 so that the female contact 37 is positioned within the enlarged bore portion 26 of the jack 10. The insulating cylinder 32 is then positioned over the fe male contact 37 within enlarged bore portion 26.

The free end 24 of the jack 10 diverges slightly from the remainder of the jack l0 and includes a plurality of equally spaced slots 38, six as shown in FIG. 2, forming a plurality of slightly divergent tines 39 at the free end 24. The tines 39 extend from the free end 24 and terminate at a point intermediate the free end 24 and the coupled end 35.

Referring to FIG. 3, a generally cylindrical hollow plug 40 is mounted on the end of a second coaxial cable 42 and electrically coupled to the outer conductor 44 with solder 46. (When using flexible RF cables the plug 40 may be crimped or clamped to the cable.) The hollow plug 40 includes an axial bore 50 to receive the cable 42 with a reduced diameter portion or flange 52 which abuts against the end 54 of the outer conductor 44 of the cable 42. Axially aligned with the bore 50 and extending from the reduced diameter portion 52 to the uncoupled or free end 55 of the plug 40 is an enlarged bore portion 56. The enlarged bore portion 56 is in the shape of a stepped cylinder having a flange or annular stop 58 against which the free end 24 of the jack 10 abuts when the jack 10 and plug 40 are in a fully butted position, see FIG. 5.

A cylindrical plug insulator 60 is dimensioned to snugly fit within the smaller diameter portion 61 of the enlarged bore portion 56. The plug insulator 60 includes a central conductor or male contact 62 surrounded by an insulating cylinder 64. The male contact 62 includes an end receptacle 66 to receive the inner conductor 68 of the cable 42 and is soldered thereto at 67. The cable 42 is then inserted into the plug 40 so that the male contact 62 is positioned within the smaller diameter portion 61 of the enlarged bore portion 56 of the plug 40. The insulating cylinder 64 is then positioned over the male contact 62 within the smaller diameter portion 56 of the enlarged bore portion 56 of the plug 40. The male contact 62 includes at its opposite end, a pin member 69 which is received in receptacle 36 of the female contact 30 when the jack l0 and plug 40 are assembled.

The free end 55 of the plug 40 is flared outwardly to facilitate reception of the jack l0 and has a plurality of slots 70, six as shown in FIG. 4, forming a plurality of tines 74 at the free end 55. The tines 74 extend from the free end 55 and terminate at a point intermediate the free end 55 and the coupled end 72. The non-flared or horizontal portion 75 of the plug 40 adjacent the free end 55 is crimped slightly to firmly retain the jack 10 within the plug 40 and increase the shielding effect against RF current leakage.

Referring to FIG. 5, the jack 10 and plug 40 are shown in a fully butted position with the free end 24 of the jack l abutting against the flange 58 of the plug 40. The jack and plug 40 are tightly held in this position by the compressive action of the solid sidewall 76 of the enlarged bore portion 56 of the plug 40 against the divergent tines 39 of the jack 10, which provides adequate grounding even when the jack 10 and plug 40 are slightly unmated, and by the action of the crimped portion 75 of the plug 40 (horizontal tine portion) against the sidewall 78 of the enlarged bore portion 26 of the jack 10. The solid sidewall 76 of the enlarged bore portion 56 of the plug 40 surrounds or overlies the free end 24 of the jack 10 and extends beyond the point of termination of the slots 38 and tines 39. The inner conductors 37 and 68 of the cables 12 and 42 are electrically connected through female contact 30 and male contact 62. The outer conductors 14 and 44 of the cables 12 and 42, respectively, are electrically connected through the jack l0 and plug 40.

Referring to FIG. 6, the jack l0 and plug 40 are shown tightly held in a slightly unmated assembled position with the free end 24 of the jack 10 not abutting the flange 58 of the plug 40. The solid sidewall 76 of the enlarged bore portion 56 of the plug 40 surrounds or overlies the free end 24 of the jack l0 and extends beyond the point of termination of the tines 39. The tines 39 of the jack l0 coact with the sidewall 76 of the plug 40 and the crimped portion 75 of the plug 40 coacts against the sidewall 78 of the enlarged bore portion 26 of the jack 10 to effectively shield against RF current leakage when the jack 10 and plug 40 are slightly abutted.

The connector of the present invention has a characteristic impedance of 500 and an RF current leakage of l20db minimum at 1 GHz. Tests on the connector of the present invention indicate that a 1 GHz signal at a level of l25db, with the jack 10 and plug 40 fully butted, showed no deterioration when unmated up to .050 inch. Thus, the connector of the present invention is capable of maintaining its high electrical performance when the jack 10 and plug 40 are unmated (includes an air gap) of up to about .050 inch.

The connector of the present invention provides a slide-on RF connector in which the jack 10 and plug 40 are held tightly together to minimize RF current leakage when fully butted and slightly unbutted. The connector of the present invention advantageously does not require complete abutment to maintain high electrical performance, particularly shielding against RF current leakage.

It should be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications may be made in the present invention without departing from the spirit and scope thereof as described in the specification and defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A connector for electrically coupling the ends of two RF coaxial cables, comprising:

a tubular conductive jack having one end for connection to the outer conductor of the first coaxial cable, a slightly diverging free end opposite the connecting end, the free end including a plurality of axially extending slots forming a plurality of resilient tines, and a tubular intermediate section;

a tubular conductive plug for receiving said jack and having one end for connection to the outer conductor of the second coaxial cable, a free end opposite the connecting end, the free end including a plurality of axially extending slots forming a plurality of resilient tines, and a tubular intermediate section;

the external diameter of the tubular intermediate section of the jack being substantially equal to the internal diameter of the tubular intermediate section of the plug;

the divergence of the free end of the jack being such that the circle described by the outermost ends of the resilient jack tines before the jack is received into the plug has a diameter larger than the internal diameter of the tubular intermediate section of the p g;

a section of the plug tines spaced from the unattached ends of said tines having an internal diameter before receipt of the jack smaller than the external diameter of the tubular intermediate section of the jack;

the length of the axially extending slots in the plug and the jack being such that the jack tines extend into the plug beyond the beginning of the plug lines and the plug tines extend along the outside of the jack beyond the beginning of the jack tines when the jack is fully received by the plug; and

means within the plug and the jack for electrically connecting the inner conductors of the two coaxial cables when the jack is received by the plug.

2. The connector of claim 1 wherein the unattached ends of the plug tines are flared outwardly.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US439696 *Mar 17, 1888Nov 4, 1890 Separable button
US1078763 *Mar 23, 1912Nov 18, 1913Albert And J M Anderson Mfg CompanyElectrical connection.
US2449073 *Aug 6, 1945Sep 14, 1948John D JohannesenCoaxial line connector
US2719279 *Dec 1, 1952Sep 27, 1955Collins Radio CoSliding coaxial connector
US3323098 *Mar 22, 1965May 30, 1967Amp IncSub-miniature coaxial connector
AT226792B * Title not available
FR392088A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4917630 *Nov 21, 1988Apr 17, 1990The Phoenix Company Of Chicago, Inc.Constant impedance high frequency coaxial connector
US5879188 *Oct 11, 1996Mar 9, 1999Elco U.S.A. Inc.Coaxial connector
US6048212 *Mar 19, 1998Apr 11, 2000Lucent Technologies, Inc.Radio frequency connector
US6235985Apr 13, 1998May 22, 2001Lucent Technologies, Inc.Low profile printed circuit board RF shield for radiating pin
EP0339067A1 *Oct 7, 1988Nov 2, 1989Palco Connector IncConstant impedance high frequency coaxial connector.
WO1984004428A2 *Apr 16, 1984Nov 8, 1984Smith Tech Dev H RCoaxial cables and couplings therefor
WO1989003600A1 *Oct 7, 1988Apr 20, 1989Palco Connector IncConstant impedance high frequency coaxial connector
WO1998016971A1 *Oct 10, 1997Apr 23, 1998Elco CorpSubminiature matched impedance rf coaxial connector
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/578
International ClassificationH01R13/646
Cooperative ClassificationH01R24/40, H01R2103/00
European ClassificationH01R24/40