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Publication numberUS3828585 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 13, 1974
Filing dateNov 13, 1972
Priority dateNov 13, 1972
Publication numberUS 3828585 A, US 3828585A, US-A-3828585, US3828585 A, US3828585A
InventorsThorneburg J
Original AssigneeThorneburg Hosiery Mills Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Denim sock and method of knitting same
US 3828585 A
Abstract
Three yarns are knit in plated relationship throughout the major portion of at least the leg of the sock with the first of the yarns being positioned predominantly on the outside, the third of the yarns being positioned predominantly on the inside and the second of the yarns being normally positioned between the first and third yarns but appearing on the outer surface of the sock in portions of irregularly spaced stitch loops to provide a variegated pattern resembling denim. The second yarn is of a different color than the first yarn and is approximately one and one-half times as large as the first yarn while the third yarn is approximately twice as large as the second yarn. The tension and feeding positions of the three yarns are controlled to maintain the three yarns in plated relationship with the first yarn on top of the second yarn but the relatively thin or smaller first yarn will not always stay on top of the larger second yarn so that the second yarn is irregularly exposed as it moves from one side to the other of the smaller first yarn to produce the variegated pattern resembling denim.
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[ Aug. 13, 1974 Thorneburg DENlM SOCK AND METHOD OF KNITTING SAME [75] Inventor: James L. Thorneburg, Statesville,

[73] Assignee: Thorneburg Hosiery Mills, Inc.,

Statesville, NC.

[22] Filed: Nov. 13, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 305,849

[52] US. Cl 66/136, 66/180, 66/182, 66/202 [51] Int. Cl. D04b 9/34, D04b 9/46 [58] Field of Search 66/180, 201, 136, 137, 66/194, 178 R, 182, 185, 202

[56] References Cited UNlTED STATES PATENTS 1,745,620 2/1930 Houseman 66/201 1,805,624 5/1931 Houseman 66/201 X 2,402,744 6/1946 Fregeolle 66/136 2,436,318 2/1948 McDonough 66/136 X 2,627,736 2/1953 Lawson 66/180 X 2,728,210 12/1955 Stevens et al 66/180 X 2,934,923 5/1960 Elwell 66/202 X 2,942,442 6/1960 Miehael-Lohs 66/202 X 3,098,368 7/1963 Miles 66/202 X 3,478,545 11/1969 Engelhard 66/202 X FORElGN PATENTS OR APPLlCATlONS 214,279 4/1908 Germany 66/194 11,863 1894 Great Britain 66/136 OTHER PUBLICATIONS Lancashire, The Knitter, June 1964, p. 36.

Primary Examiner-Wm. Carter Reynolds Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Parrott, Bell, Seltzer, Park & Gibson ABSTRACT Three yarns are knit in plated relationship throughout the major portion of at least the leg of the sock with the first of the yarns being positioned predominantly on the outside, the third of the yarns being positioned predominantly on the inside and the second of the yarns being normally positioned between the first and third yarns but appearing on the outer surface of the sock in portions of irregularly spaced stitch loops to provide a variegated pattern resembling denim. The second yarn is of a different color than the first yarn and is approximately one and one-half times as large as the first yarn while the third yarn is approximately twice as large as the second yarn. The tension and feeding positions of the three yarns are controlled to maintain the three yarns in plated relationship with the first yarn on top of the second yarn but the relatively thin or smaller first yarn will not always stay on top of the larger second yarn so that the second yarn is irregularly exposed as it moves from one side to the other of the smaller first yarn to produce the variegated pattern resembling denim.

9 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures DENIM SOCK AND METHOD OF KNITTING SAME This invention relates generally to a sock having a variegated pattern resembling denim on the outer surface and to the method of producing the sock on a circular knitting machine.

It is well known to produce various types of patterns by knitting one yarn in plated relationship with another yarn of a different color. However, these known patterns are of a predetermined design or configuration and the yarn which is positioned on the outside of the knit sock is determined by changing the feeding position of the yarns, changing the tension on the yarns, and/or changing the movement of the sinkers relative to the feeding position of the yarns.

In contrast to the known methods of plating yarns, it is an object of the present invention to produce a denim sock knit with three yarns and wherein the tension and feeding positions of the yarns are maintained the same during the knitting of the sock but the relative plated positions of the first and second yarns change in portions of irregularly spaced stitch loops to provide a variegated pattern which resembles denim.

In accordance with the present invention, the second yarn is of a different color than the first yarn and the second yarn is approximately one and one-half times as large-as the first yarn while the third yarn is approximately twice as large as the second yarn. Although the knitting conditions are maintained to normally plate the first yarn on the outside of the sock to hide and cover the second yarn, the larger second yarn is occasionally moved from one side to theother of the smaller first yarn so that it is exposed on the outer surface of the sock and in irregularly spaced stitch loops to produce the variegated pattern resembling denim.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will appear as the description proceeds, when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which FlG. l is a side elevational view of the denim sock of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a greatly enlarged fragmentary portion of the fabric in the leg of the sock, illustrating the manner in which the yarns are plated together in the stitch loops of the sock; and

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary isometric view of the yarn feeding throat of a circular knitting machine and illustrating the manner in which the three yarns are fed to the needles for knitting.

The sock of the present invention may be knit of any desired length and may be provided with an upper ribbed cuff 10, a leg ll, a heel pocket 12, a toe pocket 13, and a foot including a lower sole portion 14 and an upper instep portion 15. A high splice area 16 may be provided in the area above the heel pocket 12 and terry loops may be formed onthe inner surface in the high spliced area 16, the heel 12, the sole portion 14 and the toe pocket 13.

As illustrated in H0. 2, three yarns are knit throughout the major portion of at least the leg of the sock. The first of the yarns-indicated at Y-l and being speckled for ease of identification, is positioned predominantly on the outside of the sock. The second yarn, indicated at Y-2 and being left plain, is normally plated beneath the first yarn Y-l. The thirdyarn', indicated at Y-3 and being striped, is positioned predominantly on the inside of the sock and is plated beneath the first and second yarns Y-l and Y-2. However, in accordance with the present invention, the second yarn Y-2 appears on the outer surface of the sock in irregularly spaced stitch loops to provide a variegated pattern resembling denim on the outer surface of the sock.

The sock of the present invention may be knit of various types, sizes and colors of yarns, however, it has been found necessary that the second yarn be larger than the first yarn in order to produce the desired denim appearance. It has been found that a particularly attractive denim appearance can be produced by utilizing a textured nylon /2 denier yarn Y-l, a 16/ 1 cotton yarn Y-2 and a bulked orlon 2/24 yarn Y3. The size of the cotton yarn is given as the count under the cotton system while the size of the orlon yarn is given as the count under the worsted system. Comparing the two yarns Y-2 and Y-3 to the denier of the yarn Y-1, the yarn Y-l has a total denier of 200, the yarn Y-2 has a total denier of 332 and the yarn Y-3 has a total denier of 664 denier. Thus, the second yarn Y-2 is approximately one and one-half times as large as the first yarn Y-l while the third yarn Y-3 is twice as large as the second yarn Y-2. The textured nylon yarn Y-l may be of any desired color and is preferably of the same color as the bulked yarn Y-3 while the cotton yarn Y-2 is white to produce the denier appearance when it is exposed in an irregular manner on the outer surface of the sock.

METHOD The sock of the present invention is preferably knit on a circular hosiery knitting machine and the tension and feeding position of the yarn Y-3 is controlled so that the third yarn is knit predominantly on the inside of the sock while the tension and feeding position of the first yarn Y-l is controlled so that this yarn is normally knit on the outside of the sock. The tension and feeding position of the second yarn Y-2 is controlled to normally knit between the first and third yarns while the second yarn is permitted to knit on the outer surface of portions of irregularly spaced stitch loops to provide the variegated pattern resembling denim on the outer surface of the sock.

The manner of feeding the yarns to the needles N of the knitting machine is illustrated in FIG. 3 wherein a fragmentary portion of the latch ring 20 of the knitting machine is illustrated. A yarn feed throat 21 is provided in the latch ring 20 and yarn feed fingers 22, 23 are supported for movement into and out of yarn feeding position in the throat 21. The first yarn Y-l and the second yarn Y-2 are fed through the same yarn feed finger 22. The yarns Y-l and Y-2 are fed through adjacent openings in the finger 22 and downwardly through a tubular extension which passes through an opening in the throat 21 so that both yarns are fed to the needles at a low level, just above the stitch forming ledge and in front of the nebs of the sinkers, not shown. The third yarn Y-3 is fed through the yarn feed finger 23 which has a wide yarn opening at its inner end so that the feeding position of the third yarn may switch from one side to the other when the needles reciprocate, during the knitting of the heel and toe pockets. The third yarn Y-3 is fed at the level of the throat 21 and at a higher level than the yarns Y-l and Y-2.

As the yarns are fed to the needles, they pass through conventional types of tensioning devices, not shown, and the greatest amount of tension is maintained on the yarn Y-l while a lesser tension is maintained on the yarn Y-2 and the least amount of tension is maintained on the yarn Y-3. The feeding positions and the tension applied to the yarns causes the yarn Yl to be fed to the hooks of the needles at an uppermost level, the yarn Y-2 to be fed to the hooks of the needles at an intermediate level, and the yarn Y-3 to be fed to the hooks of the needles at a lowermost level.

The least amount of tension and the lower position in the hooks of the needles causes this third yarn Y-3 to knit predominantly on the inside of the sock as shown in FIG. 2. The lesser amount of tension on the yarn Y-2 v and the intermediate position in the hooks of the needles normally dictates that the yarn will knit in plated relationship between the first and third yarns while the greater tension and higher position in the hooks of the needles of the yarn Y-l dictates that this yarn will normally knit predominantly on the outside of the sock. However, due primarily to the variation in size between the first and second yarns, it is impossible to maintain the smaller yarn Y-l directly above and on top of the larger yarn Y-2 as the stitch loops are drawn. The yarn Y-'-2 is at times maintained directly beneath the yarn Y-l and at other times moves from one side to the other of the yarn Y- l and is thus exposed on the outer surface in portions of irregularly spaced stitch loops to provide the variegated pattern resembling denim on the outer surface of the sock. At times, the smaller yarn 'Y-l does completely cover the larger yarn Y-2, as

shown in portions of the stitch loops of wales W-l through W-4 of course C-l, wales W-l, W-2 and W-3 of course C-2, and wales W-l and W-4 of course C-3 of FIG. 2. Although this yarn Y-l is smaller than the Y-2, it expands when not under tension and the individual filaments crimp and curl. While the yarn Y-l is illustrated as being solid in FIG. 2, the yarn actually is very open as the filaments separate from each other because of the crimp and curl in the individual filaments.

The terry loops are formed in the high splice area 16, the heel pocket 12, the sole portion 14 and the toe pocket 13 by advancing the inward movement of the sinkers, not shown, so that the yarn Y-3 is laid over the nebs, in the well known manner. Since the yarn Y-3 is fed at a higher level than the yarns -Y-l and Y-2 (FIG.

3) there is sufficient separation between the yarns that the nebs of the sinkers may move inwardly above the yarns Y-l and Y-2 and beneath the yarn Y-3.

In the drawings and specification, there has been set forth a preferred embodiment of the invention, and although specific terms are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation.

That which is claimed is:

l. A circular knit seamless sock having a variegated appearance on its outer surface and being knit of at least three yarns, said three yarns being knit in plated relationship and in all the stitch loops throughout the major portion of at least the leg of said sock, the first provide a variegated pattern resembling denim on the outer surface thereof.

2. A sock according to claim 1 wherein said first and third yarns are synthetic multifilament textured yarns, and said second yarn is composed of natural fibers.

3. A sock according to claim 1 wherein said third yarn is approximately twice as large as said second yarn.

4. A sock according to claim 1 wherein said first and third yarns are synthetic multifilament textured yarns, said second yarn is composed of natural fiber and is approximately one and one-half times as large as said first yarn, and said third yarn is approximately twice as large as said second yarn. I

5. A sock according to claim 1 including a heel pocket, a foot comprising sole and instep portions, and a high splice area above said heel pocket, and including terry loops formed of said third yarn and being formed in said heel pocket.

6. A sock according to claim 5 wherein said terry loops are also formed in said sole portion of said foot and in said high splice area.

7. A sock according to claim 1 wherein said first and third yarns are the same color.

8. A method of knitting a circular seamless sock having a variegated appearance on the outer surface, said method comprising the steps of knitting the major portion of at least the leg of said sock of three yarns in plated relationship while controlling the tension and feeding position of the first of said'yarns to normally knit on the outside of said sock, controlling the tension and feeding position of the third of said yarns to knit predominately on the inside of said sock, and controlling the tension and feeding position of the second of said yarns to normally knit between said first and third yarns while permitting said second yarn to be knit on the outer surface of portions of irregularly spaced stitch loops to provide a variegated pattern resembling denim on the outer surface of said sock.

9. A method according to claim 8 wherein the sock is knit on a circular knitting machine having latch needles with hooks on the upper ends thereof, and wherein said third yarn is fed into the hooks of said needles at a lowermost level, said second yarn is fed into the hooks of said needles above the level of said third yarn, and said first yarn is fedinto the hooks of said needles above the level of said second yarn.

UNiT D STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION lzatent No. 3,828, 58 5 I Dated. AuguiSt 1.3, 1974 i inventofls "James L. Thorneburg 7 It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

IN THE CLAIMS:

, Column 4', Line 37, after "knitting", *insert all of the stitch i loops in;

I Column 4, Line 39, after "relationship' insert--, the second of said yarns being approximately one and one-half times as large as said first'yarn and being of a different color than the first yarn,

Signed and. sealed this 22nd day of October 1974.

lismL)v Attest: ricscoY M. GIBSON JR. c. MARSHALL'DANN Attesting Officer I Commissioner of Patents Foam po oso (10-69) USCOMM-DC GOS'H-PGD i 0.. IOVIIIIIKNT PIINIIIIG orncl "I! O-JlI-Jll

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Lancashire, The Knitter, June 1964, p. 36.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4104892 *Nov 15, 1976Aug 8, 1978Thorneburg Hosiery Mill, Inc.Cushioned sole tube sock and method
US4216662 *Mar 3, 1978Aug 12, 1980Pickett Hosiery Mills, Inc.Cushion stitch construction for men's hosiery
US4282728 *Mar 23, 1978Aug 11, 1981Rudin & Roth, Inc.Knee protective sock
US4499742 *Mar 4, 1982Feb 19, 1985Crescent Hosiery MillsCrew sock with nonroll selvage top
US4613336 *Oct 3, 1984Sep 23, 1986Michael QuinnenKnitted fabric produced from indigo-dyed yarn
US4733546 *Feb 24, 1987Mar 29, 1988Toray Industries, Inc.Knitted fabric for clothing
US4905692 *Nov 5, 1987Mar 6, 1990K. T. Medical, Inc.Medical and orthopedic support fabric
US5335517 *Jul 23, 1993Aug 9, 1994James L. ThroneburgAnatomical isotonic sock and method of knitting the same
US5842230 *Jul 18, 1996Dec 1, 1998Laudick; William P.Halter top and method of making same
US6230525 *May 4, 2000May 15, 2001Albert Ray DunlapSock with impact absorbing sole and method
US7530241 *Oct 24, 2005May 12, 2009Dabus Co., Ltd.Method for knitting denim
US20060075579 *Oct 24, 2005Apr 13, 2006Dabus Co., Ltd.Two-stage laser system for aligners
US20110126344 *Mar 5, 2009Jun 2, 2011Dennis DePair of socks or stockings that can be removably connected to one another and have an improved durability
CN103334214A *Jul 10, 2013Oct 2, 2013江西井竹实业有限公司Multi-layer signature cotton socks and weaving method thereof
CN103334214B *Jul 10, 2013Mar 11, 2015江西井竹实业有限公司Multi-layer signature cotton socks and weaving method thereof
EP1785515A1 *Nov 15, 2005May 16, 2007Dabus Co., LtdMethod for knitting denim
WO1985003091A1 *Jan 9, 1985Jul 18, 1985More Marcos AMedical and orthopedic support fabric
WO2001040559A1 *Oct 31, 2000Jun 7, 2001Becker, BernardMethod for producing socks or stockings
WO2007065729A2 *Dec 7, 2006Jun 14, 2007Crönert Italiana S.P.A.Sock consisting of knitted yarn, used as footwear
WO2007065729A3 *Dec 7, 2006Oct 11, 2007Croenert Italiana S P ASock consisting of knitted yarn, used as footwear
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/136, 66/202, 66/182, 66/180
International ClassificationA41B11/00, D04B9/00, D04B1/22, D04B9/34, D04B1/26
Cooperative ClassificationD04B9/34, D04B1/26, A41B11/00
European ClassificationA41B11/00, D04B9/34, D04B1/26
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 17, 1983AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: THORNEBURG HOSIERY CO., INC. A NC CORP.
Owner name: THORNEBURG, JAMES L. P.O. BOX 503, 629 NORTH RACE
Effective date: 19830427
Jun 17, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: THORNEBURG, JAMES L. P.O. BOX 503, 629 NORTH RACE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:THORNEBURG HOSIERY CO., INC. A NC CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004141/0242
Effective date: 19830427