Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3828792 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 13, 1974
Filing dateJan 4, 1972
Priority dateNov 18, 1968
Publication numberUS 3828792 A, US 3828792A, US-A-3828792, US3828792 A, US3828792A
InventorsA Valenta
Original AssigneeA Valenta
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe liners
US 3828792 A
Abstract
A shoe liner, which in one embodiment comprises a covering layer having fine nodules, a pad underneath the layer for supporting the arch of the foot, a support part supporting the foot arch, a heel bone support with a kidney shape cooperating with the support part to form a heel through whose rear limit is formed by the heel bone support; and in another embodiment, the shoe liner comprises two outer layers between which is sandwiched a contoured arch support that extends under the central portion of the wearer's foot.
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Valenta 1 1 SHOE LINERS [76] Inventor: Antonin Valenta, Seestrasse 9, 714

Ludwigsburg, Germany [22] Filed: Jan. 4, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 215,367

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 875,246, Nov. 10,

1969, abandoned.

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Nov. 18, 1968 Germany 6807480 [52] U.S.'Cl. 128/619, 128/614 [51] Int. Cl. A61f 5/14 [58] Field of Search 128/619, 622, 614, 615, 128/607, 581, 582, 586, 621, 623

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,575,490 3/1926 Krech 128/619 X 1,762,025 6/1930 Marks r 128/621 2,088,511 7/1937 Frei 128/619 X 2,440,273 4/1948 Hukill 128/582 2,807,102 9/1957 Sheppard 128/619 Aug. 13, 1974 3,306,300 2/1967 Van Kleef 128/619 3,595,244 7/1971 Kugler 128/582 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS.

1,282,592 1/1960 France 128/582 91,808 12/1961 Denmark 128/582 217,459 10/ 1 941 Denmark 123,187 12/1946 Australia 128/619 Primary ExaminerRichard A. Gaudet Assistant E.raminerJ. Yasko Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Ostrolenk, Faber, Gerb & Soffen 5 7 ABSTRACT 8 Claims, 13 Drawing Figures PATEN TED AUG 1 3 I974 SHEET Q 0F 6 PATENIEUAUB'I 1 14 $828,792

SHEET 6 OF 6 SHOE LINERS This is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 875,246 filed Nov. 10, 1969 now abandoned.

FIELD TO WHICH INVENTION RELATES The present invention relates generally to shoe liners which can be affixed in shoes during the course of manufacture or can be subsequently placed in a pair of shoes by the user and removed if required.

Modern living conditions generally have an unfavorable effect on the human foot and often cause disorders of the foot and painful symptoms.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF INVENTION The present invention provides a shoe liner which can be used advantageously for a foot which is already affected by somedisorder, and which is also suitable for persons with normal feet. The shoe liner of the present invention is suitable for persons who have to stand for long periods of time or must walk on hard floors.

The shoe liner provided in accordance with the invention comprises a part supporting the foot arch. In one embodiment, the shoe liner comprises two layers which sandwich a countoured arch supporting layer between them. The supporting layer extends along the arch region of the foot. In another embodiment, the arch support is so constructed that together with a kidney-shaped heel bone support it forms a heel trough whose rear limit is constituted by the heel bone support. In yet another embodiment, the upper side of the shoe liner is formed by a covering layer which has a finely nodular surface under which there is provided a pad for supporting the arch or central bones of the foot.

Further advantageous developments and features of the invention are given in the claims.

A shoe liner in accordance with the invention is comparatively thin and therefore does not occupy much of the space in the shoe left for the foot. The shoe liner in accordance with the invention is therefore particularly suitable for ladies shoes, even those with high heels, since it does not project upward to a great extent and cannot be seen from outside the shoe. For this purpose the liner canbe sold separately and placed in the shoe by the user. There is a further advantage with the nodule covered embodiment of the shoe liner that despite the fine nodular surface the liner can be easily slipped into the shoe. The nodules ensure there is a layer of air left between the foot and the covering layer of the shoe liner, ensuring that a pleasant atmosphere is maintained in the shoe. The shoe liner in accordance with the invention is furthermore capable of adapting itself to the foot of the user during use, this being particularly appreciated by the user.

LIST OF VIEWS OF DRAWINGS Further advantages and details of the invention will be gathered from the following description of embodiments, referring to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an embodiment of a shoe liner in accordance with the invention which is adapted to be placed in a shoe by the user.

FIG. 2 is a section of the line Il-lI of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a shoe liner in accordance with the invention. This liner, unlike the liner shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, is intended for a left shoe.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view from above of a liner constructed in accordance with the invention, in which the fine nodular finish of the covering layer is shown diagrammatically for only a part of the area of the construction.

FIG. 5 shows a diagrammatic section on a larger scale, through the covering layer in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 6 is a diagrammatic view of a heel bone support constructed in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 7 shows the arrangement of the heel bone support in accordance with the invention in a liner which is already located in the shoe, the covering layer having been removed.

FIG. 8 shows an arrangement in accordance with the invention of the anti-slip means on the undersurface of the shoe liner or sock.

FIG. 9 is an exploded view of the anti-slip means in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of a further embodiment of the shoe liner in accordance with the invention.

' FIG. 11 is a sectional view along the line IIII of FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 is a plan view of a one-piece support unit that is incorporated in the shoe liner of FIG. 10.

FIG. 13 is a side view of the one-piece support unit shown in FIG. 12.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawings and more particularly to FIGS. 1 and 2, it will be seen that a shoe liner constructed in accordance with one embodiment of the invention and denoted by reference numeral 1 comprises a covering layer 2 and an attachment template (referred to in what follows also as an underlay) 8, between which there are support elements in accordance with the shape of the foot. These support elements include an outer wedge 3, an upper inner wedge 4 and a lower inner wedge 5, an arch support 6, a pad 7 and a heel support 30. All support elements are connected together and are connected with the covering layer 2 and the attachment template 8, preferably by adhesive. In order to clarify the terminology used, it is pointed out that the term shoe liner is used to denote any support layer for the foot; e.g., a liner of the type which is placed in the shoe loosely, or a structure which is fixed permanently in the shoe. In the case of a permanently fixed-in liner the underlay 8 can possibly be replaced by the uppermost layer in the shoe structure. The totality of the wedges 3, 4, and 5 and the arch or joint support 6 is termed in what follows a support part.

In accordance with the invention there are furthermore on the inner side of the liner 1 (that is to say, of position adjacent to the arch support 6) only two inner wedges 4 and 5 which are superposed, the outer wedge 3 partially overlapping the upper inner wedge 4. A preferred construction and arrangement of the supporting elements is now described for a liner of the size 7%.

Each wedge 3, 4 and 5 preferably has a thickness on the order of magnitude of 1.7 mm., which on the inner side of the lines 30, 4a and 5a decreases towards the wedge limiting lines 3b, 4b and 5b steadily to zero. This tapering preferably occurs over a length of 18 mm. so that overall a harmonically adjusted, elastic and nevertheless pleasant and comfortable firmness of the support bodies 3, 4 and so that the support bodies are not sensed by the foot of the user as anything like a foreign body.

Over the upper inner wedge 4 and the outer wedge 3 the pad 7 is so attached and constructed that it forms a support for the transverse arch of the central foot bones. The pad 7 is preferably made of a material, for example, synthetic resin such as polyurethane, which is resistant to pressure and cannot be deformed by heat and loading. In this manner a firm support for the central foot bones is provided. The pad has in its middle part preferably a thickness of about 2.6 mm.; from this highest point the pad decreases in thickness towards all sides and at the edge has a thickness of practically zero. The greatest width of the pad is approximately 4 cm.

Finally, on the inner side of the inlay or liner 1 the arch or joint support 6 is attached on the two inner wedges 4, 5, preferably by adhesive. This arch or joint support serves for supporting the longitudinal arch of the foot joint and makes possible a fully adapted three dimensional shaping of the liner which has a favorable elasticity without the shoe being deformed thereby.

The assembly of the individual support element,'

more particularly of the wedges, is facilitated by check notches 14 provided at their outside. Furthermore, the attachment template 8 can be provided with suitable check notches. In the production of the liner 1 it is also possible to stick first of all the separately produced wedges 3, 4, and 5 together and then stick them to the pad 7 and the arch or joint support 6, following which this support unit 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 is attached by adhesive to the attachment template 8 and the covering layer 2.

The covering layer 2 forming the uppermost layer of the liner preferably consists of leather, just as is the case with the wedges 3, 4 and 5 and the arch or joint support 6. In accordance with the invention the covering layer 2 is provided on its upper surface with small projections or nodules so that during walking the foot is gently massaged without there being any danger of a frictional phenomenon leading to blistering of the foot sole. Preferably the nodules are formed artificially. It is also possible to provide the upper surface of the covering layer 2 with a very fine pearl nodulation. The fine nodules in accordance with the invention are shown in FIG. 2 and, more particularly, in FIG. 4see reference numeral l5-for a part of the covering layer. Furthermore, FIG. 5 shows a section of a large scale of the covering layer 2 with fine nodules 9.

In accordance with the invention the nodules are so made that there are about 50 to 65 nodules per square centimeter of the upper surface of the inlay, the height of the nodules preferably being between approximately 0.1 and 0.3 mm. Finally, the hardness of the nodules is so selected that they cannot be flattened quickly so that their effectiveness remains.

The covering layer 2 has a preferred thickness of approximately 1 mm. in the case of a separately sold, detachable inlay. It is provided with ventilation openings 11 close to the pad and to the wedges 3 and 4. In the case of a loose inlay or an inlay which cannot be removed once it has been placed in position by the user-as is shown in the drawing-the covering layer 2 terminates a small distance short of the front end of the pad 7 (FIG. 3) and at its front end is flattened at 12. In the case of a foot sock or shoe liner, on the other hand, which cannot be removed from the shoe, the upper covering layer 2 extends over the whole sole surface of the shoe.

In the case of a loose inlay the above-mentioned attachment template 8 is preferably made of lining leather. The lining leather preferably has a thickness of approximately 0.4 mm. and serves for attachment of the wedges 3, 4, and 5 of the arch support 6 of the pad 7 and the heel bone support 30, which is to be described below. The lining leather also serves for attachment of these parts. The roughened side of the attachment template 8, consisting of lining leather, forms the undersurface of the liner 7. In this manner, the liner lies very securely in the shoe and is displaced neither on putting on the shoe nor during walking. The underlay 8 has a front end 8a, which is adapted to the shape of the pad 7. At a position adjacent the outer central foot bone (the large ball and the small ball of the foot), the attachment template is, however, recessedsee FIG. 3, reference numerals 8b and 8cbecause this provides further clearance in the shoe.

For supporting the heel bone, use is additionally made of a so-called heel bone support, 30, cooperating with the wedges. In accordance with the invention this heel bone support 30 is made of a hard but elastic material in the form of a small plate. Preferably, this small plate or platelet consists of Plexiglas (registered trademark) or celluloid and has a thickness of about 0.4 mm.

The preferred form of the heel bone support 30 in accordance with the invention is shown more particularly in FIG. 6 of the drawings. The rear limiting edge 31 of the heel bone support 30 in this case runs so as to correspond substantially with the shape of the shoe or the shape of the inlay; that is to say, generally following the line of a circular arc. The front limiting edge 32 is not constructed in accordance with the straight line, in accordance with the invention, but has two curved projections 33a, 33b together with a large bay 330. The transition between the rear limiting edge 31 and the front limiting edge 32 occurs gradually, as shown in the drawing. Preferably, the bays or projections 33a and 33b extend somewhat beyond the central line 34 of a circle 35, which can be thought of as being formed by the rear limiting edge 31. Preferably, the distance 1 between the projections 33a and 33b and the bay 33c is approximately equal to a third of the whole length I of the heel bone support 30. The form of the heel bone support preferred in accordance with the invention can be generally said to be that of a kidney.

In the case of a separate or loose liner 1, of the type as is shown by way of example in FIG. 1, the heel bone support 30 is attached by adhesive, in accordance with the invention, both to the covering layer 2 and also with the attachment template 8.

FIG. 7 shows the arrangement of a liner or inlay constructed, in accordance with the invention, in a shoe, the covering layer 2 being shown in a raised position so as to make an exploded view.

The construction of the heel bone support 30, in accordance with the invention, and the various support wedges lead to the formation after a short time of a foot trough 20 in the part 200, as shown in FIG. 7; this trough 20 for the heel is shown in FIG. 1. This automatic adaptation of the shoe liner in accordance with the invention to suit the foot of the respective user is one of the most remarkable advantages of this liner. It is the kidney-shaped construction of the heel bone trough which cooperates with the parameters regarding the nature of the material and its thickness in ensuring that-the heel is'received in a dished depression in the liner in the course of wearing and is supported in this depression.

The liner in accordance with the invention has further a comparatively small height and, therefore, can without any difficulty be used in normal shoes.

In order to provide for a secure location of the liner 1 in the shoe, there is finally an anti-slip means 60 provided, whichSee FIG. 8 and FIG. 9-consists of a disc 61 (a so-called Duplofix disc), which has adhesive layers on both sides. The diameter of this disc is preferably about mm. This disc 61 is stuck with its upper surface against the lower surface of the attachment template 8, preferably in the middle of the heel trough 20. On the side of the disc 60 remote from the attachment template 8 a protective ring 62 is stuck, on which, owing to the self-adhesive action of the disc 61, is stuck on the latter. This protective ring 62 overlaps the disc 61 both in an inward and in an outward direction. This prevents the self-adhesive disc 61 from being damaged at its edge or separated from the undersurface of the liner on changing over from one shoe to another. The protective ring 62 is preferably made of soft PVC foil and has a thickness of 0.08 mm. The ring 62 can be provided with a highly polished or glossy surface. Preferably, however, it isprovided with a rough surface so as to prevent slippage. This prevents the ring 62 from sliding over the disc 61 when the structure becomes warm. Preferably, in accordance with the invention, a further self-adhesive or adhesive disc 63 is provided, which can be stuck in the shoe and cooperates with the three self-adhesive disc 61 so that a secure selfadhesive effect is achieved. This adhesive disc 63 prevents the adherence of particles, such as fragments of the upper insole of the shoe or hairs from socks, from becoming attached when the linei has been changed over from one pair of shoes to another a number of times. The attachment of such foreign particles could impair the self-adhesive action of the disc 61. A further purpose is to prevent any chemically active components which are necessary for satisfactory-long-term adhesion from becoming transportive into the upper insole or leather insole, so that the adhesive effect would be impaired. The adhesive disc 63 is preferably in the form of a foil which has only one adhesive surface which is stuck on the shoe. The upper surface of the adhesive disc 63 is smooth and makes possible, as already mentioned, a secure adhesion of the undersurface of the disc 61. The adhesive disc 63 is preferably a piece of acetate foil with the diameter of about mm. Before adhesion in the shoe the adhesive disc 63 is provided on its self-adhesive side with a covering foil which has a pull-off tab, so that it caneasily be removed before the adhesive disc is stuck in the shoe.

Furthermore, on the free self-adhesive undersurface of the disc 61 an easily removable protective layer can be applied before the liner or inlay is placed in the shoe.

The above-described features, in accordance with the invention, are not only applicable in the case of a loose or detached liner (which can be placed in a shoe by the user and removed again) but are also applicable in the case of a liner which is permanently fixed in the shoe. In this case it is possible to incorporate the support element together with the covering layer in the shoe without the use of a separate attachment template 8 (as already mentioned).

Although the invention provides for the use of support elements 3, 4, 5 and 6, made more especially of leather, there is a provision in accordance with a further embodiment of the invention for producing the support elements or only one of them' of a synthetic resin. Preferably, the support elements can be made by injection molding in this case. Furthermore, the invention provides that the pad along with or together with other support elements can be made of a synthetic resin. Finally, in accordance with a further feature of the invention, the body formed by the support element (including the pad) and the attachment template 8 can be made in a single piece; for example, from leather, rubber, or synthetic resin.

In this case it is preferred to construct the heel bone support 30 simultaneously using the same material. The body produced is then covered with the covering layer 2 constructed in accordance with the invention.

In accordance with a further preferred feature of the invention, only the nodular covering layer 2 can be laid in the shoe, i.e., without any additional support elements, as a shoe liner and may be provided with the anti-slip means 60.

The liner in accordance with the invention is produced in several different sizes; for example, the covering layer 2 can be made of any suitable synthetic resin, for example, polyvinyl chloride.

FIG. 10 shows a shoe liner 1', consisting of a covering layer 2 and an underlay 8', between which a one-piece support unit 30' is inserted. Support unit 30' may have the same surface shape as the arrangement of the support elements 3, 4, 5, 6 and the pad 7 in the heel support 30 of FIG. 3. Support unit 30 is preferably made out of polypropylene having an index of elasticity of about 5,000 kg/cm Support unit 30' is provided at one end with an opening 33 wherein the wearers heel bone is positioned. Near the end of unit 30 opposite opening 33 in the vicinity of the ball of the foot are provided recesses 51, 52 along opposite sides of the support 30. Between and forward of recesses 51, S2 is support pad 32' for the middle foot bones. Pad 32' projects forwardly of support unit 30. FIG. 13 shows how the support unit 30' is vaulted upwardly to improve its resiliency.

In FIG. 10, covering layer 2' and underlay 8 are separate parts which may extend over the whole surface of the shoe insole on which liner 1' is positioned. Support unit 30' only extends from the wearers heel to the ball of his foot or under his middle foot bones.

According to a further embodiment of the present invention, covering layer 2' and underlay 8' are each made from a laminated plastic-textile web. Each of layer 2' and underlay 8 is formed of a textile layer facing the other of layer 2 and underlay 8' and an outer sheating layer of a plastic material, which is relatively soft, that is on only the outward facing side of each of layer 2' and underlay 8'. Both laminated webshave a combined thickness of about three millimeters. The web combination is slitted between the two textile layers over a length corresponding to the length of the support unit 30', and unit 30' is inserted between the two parts of the plastic-textile laminated structure and is stuck to these layers. By this means, unit 30 is'automatically aligned with the covering layer 2' and the underlay 8, and the manufacturing of the shoe liner is greatly simplified.

Although this invention has been described with respect to particular embodiments, it will be understood that many variations and modifications will now be obvious to those skilled in the art, and it is preferred therefore that the scope of the invention be limited not by the specific disclosure herein but only by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A shoe liner, comprising:

a lower liner layer and an upper liner layer superposed over said lower liner layer; both said upper liner layer and said lower liner layers are each a laminated web and each said web comprises a respective first layer of material which faces toward the said first layer of the other said web and each also comprises a sheath layer on the side of each said web that is away from the other said web,

sandwiched between said upper and lower layers is a generally resilient support unit including a support part for supporting the arch of a wearers foot; said support unit being arched; said support unit also including a portion extending back to the wearers heel bone and shaped to define a trough for the wearers heel bone;

said first layers being spaced apart to provide space for receiving said support unit which is inserted therebetween; said support unit being secured to said first layers; said layers being dimensioned so as to extend beyond said support unit;

said first layers at the portions of said upper and lower liner layers that extend beyond said support unit being normally continuously in engagement with each other, thereby forming a four-layer construction comprising one said sheath layer, both said first layers and the other said sheath layer.

2. A shoe liner as claimed in claim 1, wherein each said first layer is comprised of a textile material and each said second sheath is comprised of a plastic material.

3. The shoe liner of claim 1, wherein said support unit further includes a metatarsal bone pad positioned at the metatarsal bones; said upper and lower liner layer first layers being separated for enabling reception of said metatarsal bone pad.

4. The shoe liner of claim 1, wherein said upper and lower liner layers are separated forward from the heel of said liner a sufficient distance to enable insertion of said support unit between said liner layers.

5. The shoe liner of claim 4, wherein said support unit further includes a metatarsal bone pad positioned at the metatarsal bones; said upper and lower liner layer first layers being separated for enabling reception of said metatarsal bone pad.

6. A shoe liner comprising an upper covering layer, a lower layer constituting the underlay of said shoe liner, foot supporting parts sandwiched between said two layers; said supporting parts including a heel bone support having a generally kidney-like shape and cooperating with said foot arch support part to form a heel trough whose rear limit is formed by said heel bone support; an anti-slip means arranged underneath the liner for cooperation with the shoe; said anti-slip means comprising a circular disc which is self-adhesive on both of its sides and which is adhered on the lower surface of the liner and has a free self-adhesive surface; a protective ring stuck on the self-adhesive side of the disc and overlapping the disc in an inward direction and in an outward direction.

7. A shoe liner in accordance with claim 6, in which the protective ring has a rough surface opposite the disc.

8. A shoe liner in accordance with claim 7, in which the self-adhesive disc cooperates with an adhesive disc applied to the inner surface of the shoe.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1575490 *Feb 4, 1924Mar 2, 1926Rene C HansonFoot supporting and correcting device
US1762025 *Aug 6, 1928Jun 3, 1930Marks James NelsonFoot support
US2088511 *Jul 17, 1935Jul 27, 1937Frei ElisabethFootwear
US2440273 *Sep 14, 1943Apr 27, 1948Velva Sole CorpOrthopaedic appliance
US2807102 *May 5, 1955Sep 24, 1957Clarence A SheppardArch supporting shoe insert
US3306300 *Jun 26, 1963Feb 28, 1967Jan H Van KleefFoot support
US3595244 *Oct 30, 1968Jul 27, 1971Scholl Mfg Co IncFoot-massaging sandal
AU123187A * Title not available
DK91808A * Title not available
DK217459A * Title not available
FR1282592A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4510699 *Oct 28, 1982Apr 16, 1985Toshiro NakamuraInsole
US4513518 *Sep 30, 1982Apr 30, 1985Rogers Foam CorporationShoe inner sole
US4541186 *Apr 6, 1983Sep 17, 1985Nike, Inc.Gymnastic shoe with cushioning and shock absorbing insert
US4947498 *Aug 7, 1989Aug 14, 1990Boxtel Leonardus J J VanPortable collapsible bed
US5216825 *Jan 21, 1992Jun 8, 1993Brum Kenneth AOdor adsorbing contoured support inner sole
US5692581 *Oct 10, 1995Dec 2, 1997Nelson; John RobertAnti-slip device for ladder rungs
US6328761 *May 19, 1997Dec 11, 2001Kiribai Chemical Co., Ltd.Disposable body warmer for use in footwear
US20120174436 *Aug 27, 2010Jul 12, 2012Josef HanakInsole
US20140053430 *May 10, 2012Feb 27, 2014Nomaco Inc.Orthotic insole
US20150047221 *Aug 13, 2013Feb 19, 2015Jason R. HanftOrthotic Insert Device
US20150101213 *Apr 24, 2013Apr 16, 2015Hallufix AgHallux valgus sandal
US20150196090 *Jan 7, 2015Jul 16, 2015Jesse James Sluder, SR.Cast Sole Insert
CN102370535A *Aug 11, 2010Mar 14, 2012梁清祥Arch cushion for rectification
CN103619287A *May 10, 2012Mar 5, 2014艾玛露西苏普利An orthotic insole
WO1999004662A1 *Sep 30, 1997Feb 4, 1999Lunge Lauf- Und Sportschuhe GmbhShoe insert
WO2006133894A2 *Jun 13, 2006Dec 21, 2006Mario SchiavonForm-fitting arch support
WO2006133894A3 *Jun 13, 2006Mar 8, 2007Mario SchiavonForm-fitting arch support
WO2012156267A1 *May 10, 2012Nov 22, 2012Supple Emma LucyAn orthotic insole
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/178
International ClassificationA43B13/40, A43B7/14, A43B17/02, A43B13/41, A43B17/14
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/40, A43B7/1435, A43B7/1445, A43B7/144, A43B7/142, A43B7/14, A43B7/146, A43B7/1425, A43B17/023, A43B13/41, A43B7/143, A43B17/14
European ClassificationA43B7/14A20B, A43B7/14A20A, A43B7/14A20C, A43B7/14A20H, A43B7/14A20F, A43B7/14A20M, A43B7/14A30A, A43B13/41, A43B17/02B, A43B17/14, A43B7/14, A43B13/40