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Publication numberUS3829015 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 13, 1974
Filing dateJun 22, 1972
Priority dateJun 22, 1972
Publication numberUS 3829015 A, US 3829015A, US-A-3829015, US3829015 A, US3829015A
InventorsR Monro
Original AssigneeCombustion Equipment Ass Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Acoustic nozzle
US 3829015 A
Abstract
A nozzle for finely dispersing a liquid in a gas stream, usually air or steam, has therein a reverberation chamber for producing acoustic energy in the gas stream. The gas then flows through a plurality of tubular passages which are intersected by tubular passages carrying therethrough a liquid to be nebulized, said liquid usually being oil. The nozzle is particularly useful for nebulizing oil in preparation for combustion thereof.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 9 Monro 451 Aug. 13, 1974 ACOUSTIC NOZZLE [75] Inventor: Richard J. Monro, Bronxville, NY.

[73] Assignee: Combustion Equipment Associates,

Inc., New York, NY.

[22] Filed: June 22, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 265,399

[52] US. Cl 239/102, 239/425, 239/430 [51] Int. Cl B05b 17/06 [58] Field of Search 239/102, 425, 433, 424.5, 239/431, 430, 426

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,090,150 8/1937 Pontius, Jr. 239/425 2,519,200 8/1950 Schumann 239/425 X 3,072,344 1/1963 McKenzie 239/431 X. 3,297,255 1/1967 Fortma'n 239/102 3,371,869 3/1968 Hughes 239/102 3,570,763 3/1971 Hughes 239/102 X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 945,692 l/1964 Great Britain 239/102 Primary Examiner-M. Henson Wood, Jr.

Assistant ExaminerJohn J. Love Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Blum, Moscovitz, Friedman & Kaplan [5 7] ABSTRACT A nozzle for finely dispersing a liquid in a gas stream, usually air or steam, has therein a reverberation chamber for producing acoustic energy in the gas stream. The gas then flows through a plurality of tubular passages which are intersected by tubular passages carry-' ing therethrough a liquid to be nebulized, said liquid usually being oil. The nozzle is particularly useful for nebulizing oil in preparation for combustion thereof.

9 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures 1 ACOUSTIC NOZZLE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION A variety of nozzles have been devised in which a rapidly moving gas stream is caused to generate pressure waves at sonic or supersonic frequencies for the purpose of nebulizing a liquid. In the process, the energy in the pressure waves is transferred to the liquid causing the liquid stream to break up into droplets which present a large surface for combustion or other types of reaction.

The energy transferred in the process is substantial, so that improvements in nozzle design which results in an increase in the efficiency of atomization can yield substantial savings. This is particularly the case where large quantities of fluid must be dispersed.

Heretofore, attempts to increase the efficiency of atomization by nozzles had been directed at modifying the shape of the axial passage through which the gas stream flows. In general, modifications have consisted of contractions or expansions of the interior of the nozzle so that flow through the nozzle may be successively convergent, constant in cross section, and divergent. Although resonant chambers may be provided by such an arrangement, the results have been less than optimum as measured by efficiency of dispersion, the required pressure at which the gas must be supplied to the nozzle and the quantity of gas which must be supplied to disperse a given amount of liquid.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A high efficiency of dispersion of a liquid is obtained by the use of a nozzle having a resonant chamber therein from which the gas flows through a plurality of tubular passages to the exterior of the nozzle. Simultaneously, oil flows through a plurality of tubular passages equal in number to those carrying the gas stream to the exterior of the nozzle, each of the oil passages intersecting one of the gas passages proximate the surface of the nozzle. The energy of the gas stream atomizes the flowing liquid into fine droplets.

In a second embodiment, an axial stem is disposed centrally within the resonance chamber, modifying the resonant chamber into an annulus for the purpose of increasing the efficiency of energy transfer by the resonant chamber.

Accordingly, an object of the present invention is to provide an improved nozzle for atomizing a liquid stream by means of a gas stream.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved nozzle for generating acoustic energy within a gas stream to be used for atomizing a liquid.

. ment of parts which will be exemplified in the construction hereinafter set forth, and the scope of the invention will be indicated in the claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS For a fuller understanding of the invention, reference is had to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying-drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is an end view of a nozzle in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 33 of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of another embodiment of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRE EMBODIMENTS A nozzle in accordance with the present invention is generally indicated by the reference numeralll. Gas,

which is usually air or steam, is brought to nozzle 11 through inner tube 12. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2 nozzle 11 is joined to the inner tube 12 by threaded section 13. Nozzle 11 is positioned axially with respect to inner tube 12 by seating of end 14 on shoulder 15. Gas flowing at high rate through inner tube 12 reaches resonant chamber 20 in which part of the energy of flow is converted into acoustic energy. Chamber 20 terminates in an end 16. The gas carrying the acoustic energy departs resonant chamber 20 through tubular passages 17.

Simultaneously, the liquid to be dispersed, usually oil, flows through annular passage 18 defined by outer tube 19 and inner tube 12. The flowing oil on leaving annulus l8 enters tubular passages 21 which intersect gas passages 17 proximate surface 22 of nozzle 11. Atomization of the flowing liquid takes place at the intersection between the plurality of passages 17 and 21 at high efficiency.

In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 thru 3, outer tube 19 is connected gas-tightly with nozzle 11 by the use of gasket 23. Axial location of nozzle 11 with respect to outer tube 19 results from seating of shoulder 24 on end 26 of outer tube 19. For purposes or removal of nozzle 11 from inner tube 12, nozzle 11 is provided with flats 27.

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, stem 28 is centrally disposed within passageway 29 leading to resonant chamber 20. Chamber 20 terminates in an end 16. Stem 28 has a flange 31 which is held between end 32 of inner tube 12 and shoulder 33 of nozzle 11. Ducts 34 in flange 31 provide for the flow of gas from inner tube 12 to resonant chamber 20. Upper end 36 of stem 28 seats within aperture 37 provided in nozzle 11.

The purpose of the stem 28 is to increase the efficiency of resonant chamber 20 in producing acoustic energy in the gas flowing therethrough. Where it is desired to use the nozzle of FIG. 4 without stem 28, the embodiment of FIG. 2 results.

It will thus be seen that the objects set forth above, among those made apparent from the preceding description, are efficiently attained and, since certain changes may be made in the above construction without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

It is also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention herein described, and all statements of the scope of the invention which, as a matter of language, might be said to fall therebetween.

What is claimed is:

1. An improvement in an acoustic nozzle for nebulizing oil in preparation for combustion thereof, said acoustic nozzle having a central axis and being supplied with a gas through an inner tube and with oil through an annulus defined by said inner tube and an outer tube surrounding said inner tube, wherein said improvement comprises an axial resonant chamber in said nozzle for introducing acoustic energy into said gas, said chamber being continuous with said inner tube and supplied with gas therefrom, a plurality of first tubular passages leading from said innertube adjacent said resonant chamber to the exterior surface of said nozzle for conducting said gas containing acoustic energy to said exterior surface of said nozzle, and a plurality of second tubular passages, each of said second tubular passages having an inner and an outer end, all of said inner ends making connection with said annulus for receiving flowing oil, and each of said outer ends intersecting one of said first tubular passages at a region proximate the exterior surface of said nozzle, thereby serving to bring together gas and oil streams for nebulizing said oil by said acoustic energy in said gas stream.

2. The improvement as defined in claim 1, wherein the exterior surface of said nozzle is frustoconical in shape.

3. The improvement as defined in claim 2, wherein the outer ends of said tubular passages lie on a circle the plane of which is perpendicular to the axis of said nozzle.

4. The apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein a stem is located axially in said resonant chamber in order to increase the efflciency of acoustic energy transfer to said gas.

5. The apparatus as defined in claim 4 wherein said stem has a flange at its upstream end, said flange being held between said nozzle and the downstream end of said inner tube, said flange having passages therethrough connecting said inner tube with said nozzle for flow of gas therethrough.

6. The improvement as defined in claim 1, wherein the number of first tubular passages equals the number of second tubular passages.

7. An acoustic nozzle having a downstream exit end and an upstream inlet end comprising a central passage extending between said inlet and exit ends for receiving gas supplied at said inlet end, a resonant chamber communicating with said central passage and located adjacent said exit end, a plurality of exit passages extending between said central passage and the exterior of said nozzle to deliver gas outwardly of said nozzle at acoustic energies from said central passage, said exit passages communicating with said central passage upstream of the end of said resonant chamber, and a plurality of fuel passages within said nozzle for receiving fuel to be nebulized, said fuel passages having inlet and outlet ends, said outlet ends communicating with said exit passages intermediate the ends thereof.

8. An acoustic nozzle as claimed in claim 7 wherein said central passage includes a stem positioned centrally thereof and extending into said resonant chamber.

9. An acoustic nozzle as claimed in claim 8 wherein said stem carries radially extending flanges at the upstream end thereof for segmenting a portion of said central passage intermediate the ends thereof.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2090150 *Apr 29, 1936Aug 17, 1937Internat Engineering CorpBurner nozzle
US2519200 *Mar 19, 1946Aug 15, 1950Hauck Mfg CoPressure-responsive burner nozzle
US3072344 *Dec 19, 1960Jan 8, 1963Babcock & Wilcox LtdUnitary y-jet spray head assembly
US3297255 *Apr 19, 1965Jan 10, 1967Astrosonics IncReverse flow acoustic generator spray nozzle
US3371869 *Oct 19, 1965Mar 5, 1968Sonic Dev CorpCompressible fluid sonic pressure wave atomizing apparatus
US3570763 *Nov 22, 1968Mar 16, 1971Energy Sciences IncStreaming
GB945692A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4014961 *Apr 21, 1975Mar 29, 1977Vitaly Fedorovich PopovEjector mixer for gases and/or liquids
US4614490 *Apr 1, 1985Sep 30, 1986Exxon Research And Engineering Co.Method and apparatus for atomizing fuel
US4893752 *May 6, 1988Jan 16, 1990Turbotak Inc.Spray nozzle design
US5829683 *Dec 20, 1996Nov 3, 1998L'air Liquide, Societe Anonyme Pour L'etude Et L'exploitation Des Procedes George ClaudeDevice for atomizing a liquid fuel using an atomizing gas
US7686093Oct 31, 2007Mar 30, 2010Victaulic CompanyDual extinguishment fire suppression system using high velocity low pressure emitters
US7695672 *Mar 27, 2002Apr 13, 2010Force TechnologyMethod and apparatus for disinfecting a product by surface treatment thereof
US7721811Jun 13, 2006May 25, 2010Victaulic CompanyHigh velocity low pressure emitter
US7726408Jun 13, 2006Jun 1, 2010Victaulic CompanyFire suppression system using high velocity low pressure emitters
US7921927Mar 29, 2010Apr 12, 2011Victaulic CompanyGaseous and liquid agent fire suppression system using emitters with closed end cavity deflector
US8141798Apr 8, 2010Mar 27, 2012Victaulic CompanyHigh velocity low pressure emitter with deflector having closed end cavity
US8356473 *Feb 6, 2007Jan 22, 2013Stt Emtec AbInjection device
US8376059Apr 8, 2010Feb 19, 2013Victaulic CompanyFire suppression system using emitter with closed end cavity deflector
US20040105779 *Mar 27, 2002Jun 3, 2004Niels KrebsMethod and apparatus for disinfecting a product by surface treatment thereof
US20060278410 *Jun 13, 2006Dec 14, 2006Reilly William JFire suppression system using high velocity low pressure emitters
US20060278736 *Jun 13, 2006Dec 14, 2006Reilly William JHigh velocity low pressure emitter
US20090211237 *Feb 6, 2007Aug 27, 2009Micael BlomquistInjection Device
US20100181081 *Mar 29, 2010Jul 22, 2010Victaulic CompanyGaseous and Liquid Agent Fire Suppression System Using Emitters with Closed End Cavity Deflector
US20100193203 *Apr 8, 2010Aug 5, 2010Victaulic CompanyFire Suppression System Using Emitter with Closed End Cavity Deflector
US20100193609 *Apr 8, 2010Aug 5, 2010Victaulic CompanyHigh Velocity Low Pressure Emitter with Deflector Having Closed End Cavity
US20130199150 *Feb 3, 2012Aug 8, 2013General Electric CompanySteam injection assembly for a combined cycle system
USRE34586 *Jul 12, 1991Apr 19, 1994Turbotak Inc.Spray nozzle design
EP0203274A1 *Feb 28, 1986Dec 3, 1986VDO Adolf Schindling AGElectrically actuated fuel injection valve for internal-combustion engines
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/425, 239/589.1, 261/DIG.480, 239/430
International ClassificationB05B17/04, B05B17/06, F23D11/34
Cooperative ClassificationY10S261/48, B05B17/0692, F23D11/34
European ClassificationB05B17/06C, F23D11/34