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Publication numberUS3829019 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 13, 1974
Filing dateFeb 2, 1972
Priority dateFeb 2, 1972
Publication numberUS 3829019 A, US 3829019A, US-A-3829019, US3829019 A, US3829019A
InventorsPetsch H
Original AssigneeChaska Chem Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spinner assembly
US 3829019 A
Abstract
A cleaning apparatus having a pan-shaped housing carrying burshes engageable with a surface to be cleaned. Mounted on the top of the housing is a spinner assembly having a body containing a longitudinal passage. A tubular shaft rotatably mounted in the passage carries tubular arms located within the housing. The fluid flows from the hollow shaft into the arms and is discharged through the slots in the nozzles. Nozzles having slit orifices are mounted on the ends of the arms. The shaft has a head located in a chamber at one end of the passage. The diameter of the head is larger than the diameter of the passage and is dynamically balanced by the flow of fluid under pressure through the passage and chamber into the hollow shaft.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ Aug. 13, 1974 Poppitz SPINNER ASSEMBLY [75] Inventor: Harold A. Petsch, Excels1or,Mmn. Primary Examiner uoyd L. g

Assignee: Chaska Chemical Company, Inc.,

ABSTRACT A cleaning apparatus having a pan-shaped housing carrying burshes engageable with a surface to be cleaned. Mounted on the top of the housing is a spinner assembly having a body containing a longitudinal passage. A tubular shaft rotatably mounted in the passage carries tubular arms located within the housing. The fluid flows from the hollow shaft into the arms and is discharged through the slots in the nozzles. Nozzles having slit orifices are mounted on the ends of the arms. The shaft has a head located in a chamber at one end of the passage. The diameter of the head is larger than the diameter of the passage and is dynamically balanced by the flow of fluid under pressure through the passage and chamber into the hollow 20 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures 7 a 5 h l. S 8 5 80000 59% 2 999 ww whom fim l m W 222 3 052 mu: 2 W1 W N a 35 n R W22 mm m m w is N u 00 E u n" 5 "000 u H l A m I 1 a up "u w 2 5 M 3 C n mm .1 7 n "00 SE w m M 9 9 ""8 e le l "2 T h 6 3 n m 0... 6 2 .9 e 0e. n g2 00 "n3 rThoam a a u .RSTLFS v .b 2 u h e a e 2 U 0 D S F 2 n E7669 u T2556 0 u wwwm C [0 U m d M Cd B S and .l 9111 F A U IF 3 08 ll. 1 ll. %M% 2 l 2 1100 6 0 774 mm H UH H 1 223 "'llll' ll SPINNER ASSEMBLY BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION High fluid pressure cleaning equipment utilize handoperated guns having nozzles for directing cleaning solutions to the surfaces to be cleaned. A portable cleaning apparatus having hand-operated nozzles is disclosed by Poppitz in US. Pat. No. 3,433,415. The guns are manually moved to distribute the cleaning fluid, as water, in the cleaning operation. These nozzles do not have a continuous rotary cleaning action and are not used in conjunction with a brush to scrub the surface to be cleaned. In most cleaning operations it is desirable that a high pressure fluid jet cleaning action be used in connection with mechanical scrubbing.

The spinner assembly for mounting the rotating members of the cleaner on a housing must be freely rotatable and withstand high pressures without leakage. Swivel joints, as shown by Comlossy et al. in US. Pat. No. 2,963,304 are used in fluid lines to provide relative movement of separate parts of the equipment. The swivels have considerable frictional resistance to rotation of the parts and substantial longitudinal thrust on the bearings. It has been found that these types of swivel joints are not suitable for use with the spinner assemblies on the cleaner apparatus of the invention.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention broadly relates to an apparatus for discharging fluid under pressure to a specific location. The apparatus is used with a housing and includes a body mounted on the housing. The body has a longitudinal passage rotatably carrying a shaft means. The shaft means hasa longitudinal passage and a head located in the chamber open to the passage in the body. The head is subjected to fluid under pressure in opposite longitudinal directions to dynamically balance the shaft means on the body. The shaft means is connected to a fluid discharging means which rotates the shaft means and discharges fluid under pressure. The fluid discharging means includes nozzles having nipples. Slots in the nipples providefluid discharge openings for directing jet streams of cleaning fluid into the surface to be cleaned.

IN THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 isa perspective view of the cleaner of the invention used by an operator to clean an upright wall;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged'top plan view of the cleaner of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2; g

FIG. 4 is an enlarged view of the top end of the spinner apparatus with the housing in outline;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged top view of the head on the rotatable shaft of the spinner apparatus;

'FIG. 6 is a reduced sectional view taken along the line 66 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line 7-7 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a sectional view taken along the line 8-8 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a side elevational view similar to FIG. 8 showing a modified nozzle;

FIG. 10 is a side elevational view partly sectioned similar to FIG. 8 showing a further modificationof a nozzle; and

FIG. 11 is a sectional view taken along the line 11l1 of FIG. 10.

Referring to FIG. 1, there is shown a portable cleaner, indicated generally at 20, used by an operator 21 on an upright wall 22. The cleaner 20 functions to dispense high pressure fluid, as water, onto the surface of the wall 22 and mechanically scrub the wall 22 to effect a cleaning operation. The cleaner 20 is usable to clean other surfaces, as ceilings, floors and outside surfaces of trucks and buses, highway signs, buildings, swimming pools, and the like. The cleaner 20 is a portable unit that can be readily moved by the operator and used in numerous places, including but not limited to food processing, meat packing, dairy processing, and the like. The discharge end of the cleaner 20 has a cleaning head or housing 23 connected to the end of an elongated tubular handle 24. The handle 24 has a continuous passage 25 connected to a supply of cleaning fluid, as water under pressure, with an elongated flexible hose or tube 26. Suitable control valves (not shown) can be employed with the handle to control the discharge of cleaning fluid from the housing 23. The hose 26 can be connected to a central cleaning system or a portable cleaning apparatus as shown in US. Pat. No. 3,433,415.

Housing 23 is a generally square, pan-shaped member having a substantially flat top wall 27 joined to a continuous side wall 28. The housing can have other shapes, as rectangular, circular, triangular, hexagonal or octagonal. The lower or outer edge of the side wall 28 terminates in an outwardly directed lip 29 having a continuous bottom edge 31. The bottom edge 31 lies in a generally horizontal plane, as shown in FIG. 2, whereby the bottom edge 31 of the housing is located at a generally uniform and close distance to the surface 22 which is being cleaned. A drain tube 32 is secured to one corner of the top wall 27. The tube 32 is closed with a cap 33. When the cleaner is being used to clean a ceiling or other surface wherein the cleaner is in the inverted position, the cap 33 is removed and a drain hose is connected to the tube whereby the fluid in the housing is drained therefrom. The drain tube 32 is a short tubular nipple that projects through a short hole in the top wall 27 and is retained therein by expanding an end portion of the tube.

A generally square brush assembly indicated generally at 34 is positioned adjacent the inside of the lip 29. Brush assembly 34 comprises a generally U-shaped back 36 clamped about fibers or bristles 37 turned over a core 38, as a wire. The bristles 37 diverge outwardly and have substantially the same length so that the bottom ends 40 lie in substantially the same horizontal plane of the surface of the wall 22. A plurality of downwardly directed clips or fingers 39 are secured with fas teners 41 to the side wall 28. The lower ends of the clips 39 engage the back 36 of the brush assembly and retain the brush assembly 34 in the inner peripheral groove formed by the lip 29. Each clip 39 has a downwardly and inwardly directed finger 42 which permits the brush assembly 34 to be snapped into the groove formed by the lip 29. The fingers 42 permit the brush assembly 34 to be removed, as they bias and hold the back 36 into engagement with the lip 29. The bristles 37 are of substantially uniform length, and thereby hold the housing 23 at a generally uniform and close distance from the surface 22. In addition, the brush assembly 34 confines the high pressure cleaning fluid to the immediate surface to be cleaned.

Mounted in the center portion of the top wall 27 is a spinner assembly indicated generally at 43. Cleaning fluid under pressure is supplied to the spinner assembly through the passage 25 in the elongated handle 27.

Spinner assembly 43 has a short, upright cylindrical body 44. The lower end of body 44 is attached to the top of the wall 27 with a plurality of fasteners 46, as bolts or the like. The body 44 has a central longitudinal passage 47. An elongated sleeve bearing 44 is located in a substantial portion of the passage 47. An elongated tubular shaft 49 is rotatably mounted on bearing 48. The bearing 48 preferably is made of plastic material, as Nylon, and has self-lubricating characteristics with respect to the material of the shaft 49. An annular seal 50 surrounds shaft 49 adjacent the lower end of bearing 48. Shaft 49 has a longitudinal passage 51 for carrying the cleaning fluid under pressure into the inside of the housing 23. Secured to the upper end of shaft 49 is an enlarged head52. The head 52 is located in an enlarged chamber 53 at the upper end of housing 44. Chamber 53 is open to the top of passage 47. A plug or cap 54 is threaded onto the top of housing 44 to close the top of chamber 53. As shown in FIG. 4, head 52 has an annular flat bottom surface or face 56. The outer peripheral portion of surface 56 faces a flat annular surface 57 on the body 44. The surfaces, when in engagement with each other, as shown in broken lines, limit the axis movement of the shaft in the passage 47. The surface area of annular bottom face 56 is substantially equal to the cross sectional area of shaft 49 whereby the pressure of the fluid in chamber 53 acting on head 52 longitudinally balances the shaft in housing 44.

As shown in FIGS. 3, 4 and 5, the top of head 52 has a plurality of radial grooves 58 leading to the center passage 51. The outer peripheral face59 of the head has an upwardly andinwardly tapered shape to permit the free flow of cleaning fluid through the passage.

The upper portion of body 44 has a lateral bore 61 accommodating an elbow pipe fitting 62. The cleaning fluid under pressure flows through the fitting 62 and into the passage 47 via bore 61. The fluid moves upwardly in passage 47 and places an axial upward force on the head 52. This fluid under pressure will separate the bottom surface 56 of the head from its engaging surface 57 of the body 44. The flowing fluid adjacent surface 57 serves as an annular fluid thrust bearing reacting against longitudinal movement of the shaft 49. The fluid flows through chamber 53 and into the shaft passage 51. The grooves 58 insure that there is a flow of fluid into the passage 51 even when the upper surface of the edge engages the plug 54. The forces of the fluid under pressure in passage 47 acting in an upward 'direction against the head are substantially equal to the forces in the chamber 53 acting downwardly on the head. These opposite fluid forces on the head 52 will dynamically balance the shaft 49 longitudinally of body 44 and permit substantially free rotation of shaft 49 on the bearing 48. The shaft 49 has a substantial surface in bearing engagement with sleeve bearing 48. The fit between shaft 49 and bearing 48 is a rotational close fit sufficient to prevent leakage of fluid from the spinner assembly.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, the handle 24 has a yoke or generally Y-shaped member 64 pivotally connected to the body 44 of the spinner assembly. The yoke 64 has bifurcated arms 65 located on opposite sides of the body 44 and are pivotally secured thereto with separate pivot bolts 66 and 67. Arms 65 have outer ends 64A that engage top wall 27 when the arms are in an upright position. Thus, the handle 24 is only free to move about degrees. An elongated rigid pipe or tube 68 is connected to the upper end of handle 64 with a coupling 69. Tubes of varying lengths can be connected to the yoke 64. The yoke has a chamber 71 which receives the fluid under pressure from the pipe 68. A flexible hose or tube member 72 is connected to the fitting 62 and the member 64 to provide a path for the flow of fluid under pressure to the body 44 of the spinner assembly.

As shown in FIG. 2, a hub 73 located under the top wall 27 is mounted on the lower end of the shaft 49. The hub 73 has a central passage 74 threaded to receive the threaded lower end of the shaft 49. I-Iub 73 has a pair of oppositely directed lateral bores 76 and 77 accommodating outwardly projected tubular arms 78 and 79. As shown in FIG. 6, the arms 78 and 79 have outer end sections 78A and 79A, respectively, that are turned to a circumferential direction.

Nozzles 81 and 82 are attached to the outer ends of arms 78 and 79. Each nozzle has a fluid discharge opening or orifice operable to direct a jet curtain of fluid under pressure in the direction of the open side of the housing 23. Located adjacent the outer side of the arms 78 and 79 is a circular guard plate 83 covering the arms and nozzles. The outer peripheral edge of the guard plate 83 has a section 84 turned toward the top wall 27, thereby providing a rounded corner to avoid the possibility of cutting or scarring objects that are cleaned. A plurality of fasteners 86, as bolts or the like, attach the plate 83 to the bottom of the hub 73. The plate 83 has a pair of holes 87 and 88, as shown in FIG. 6, aligned with outer end portions of the nozzles 81 and 82 so that the nozzles can discharge cleaning fluid under pressure from the housing 23.

The nozzle 81, as shown in FIGS. 7 and 8, is a onepiece member having a body 89. The outer peripheral surface of the body 89 has a hexagonal shape to accommodate a wrench. Axially projected from one side of the body 89 is a cylindrical neck or nipple'91. An axial passage 92 extends through the body 89 and into the nipple 91. The portion of the body 89 surrounding passage 92 is threaded to accommodate'the threads on the end of arm 78. The discharge orifice of the nozzle 81 is a transverse slot 93 in the nipple 91. As shown in FIG. 7, the slot 93 extends from the outer surface of the side of the nipple into the nipple 91 and is open to the passage 92. The size of the discharge opening is controlled by the width and depth of the slot 93. As shown in FIG. 8, the slot 93 is inclined rearwardly and downwardly at an angle of approximately 30 with respect to the horizontal or longitudinal axis of the passage 92. The jet 94 of cleaning fluid is discharged as a substantially flat curtain of high pressure fluid at an angle from the nozzle 81 through the opening 87 toward the surface to be cleaned. The angular discharge of the cleaning fluid provides the nozzle 81 with a horizontal force component which rotates the arms 78 and 79, the hub 73 connected to the arms, and the shaft 49 connected to the hub in the direction of arrow 111, shown in FIG.

6. The angle of inclination of the jet 94 can be changed to vary the tangential force component of the jet of cleaning fluid.

Referring to FIG. 9, the nozzle 82 is similar in construction to nozzle 81. This nozzle has a body 96 carrying a crylindrical neck or nipple 97. A passage 98 extends through the body and into the nipple. A slot 99 in the nipple 97 provides an angular discharge orifice for the jet 101 of cleaning fluid. The slot 99 is inclined in a forward and downward direction at an angle of approximately The angle of inclination as well as the depth of the slot can be changed to increase the size of the discharge opening. The inclined jet 101 is a generally flat curtain of high pressure fluid having a retarding tangential force component that is opposed to the force component of the jet 94 from nozzle 81. However, the angle of inclination of the slot 99, being closer to the vertical, will provide the jet 101 with a tangential force component that is substantially less than the tangential force component of the jet 94 of the cleaning fluid. The forwardly directed jet 101 will strike the cleaning surface at a forward incline or angle to loosen, cut into, and peel off any foreign material on the surface. The force of the jet 101 is proportional to the speed of the jet. The speed of the jet is increased by the amount of the speed of rotation of the arms 78 and 79, thereby aiding in peeling the foreign material from the surface to be cleaned. K

Referring to FIGS. 10 and 11, there is shown a modification of the nozzle indicated generally at 102. Nozzle 102 is attached to a tube 103 for delivering fluid under pressure to the nozzle. Nozzle 102 is a one-piece member having a base or body 104 having a hexagonal outer configuration to receive a wrench toturn the nozzle onto the tube 103. Extended axially from one side of the base 104 is a cylindrical neck or nipple 106. An axial passage 107 extends through the base 104 and into the nipple 106. The nipple 106 has a longitudinal slot 108 in the outer side wall extended to the passage 107 providing the nipple with a discharge orifice for directing a jet 109 of fluid from the nozzle. The jet 109 is a substantially flat curtain of high pressure fluid. The slot 108, as shown in FIG. 11, is in vertical alignment with the longitudinal center axis of the passage 107. The size of the jet 109 can be varied by varying the length of the slot 108. The slot 108 may be formed in the nipple 106 with a rotating cutting tool, as a disc cutter.

In use, fluid under pressure is delivered by pipe 68 to the yoke 64. The fluid can be water, air, a mixture of air and water, cleaning liquids, and the like. The flexible hose 72 carries the fluid from the yoke 64 to the spinner assembly 43. The handle 24, being pivotally mounted on the spinner assembly 43, can be moved relative to the housing 23 so that the brush assembly 34 can be maintained on the surface to be cleaned. The fluid under pressure enters the passage 47 below the head 52. The fluid flows from passage 47 around head 52 and into chamber 53 longitudinally balancing the shaft in the body 44. The fluid in chamber 53 flows downwardly into the shaft passage 51 which is open to the central passage 74 in the hub 73. The lateral bores 76 and 77, being open to the central passage 74, deliver the fluid under pressure to arms 78 and 79. The fluid is carried by arms 78 and 79 to the discharge nozzles 81 and 82. The nozzle 81, having a downwardly and rearwardly directed slot 93 forming a discharge opening, directs the fluid in a relatively wide, flat pattern at an angle onto the surface to be cleaned. This angular orientation of the discharged jet of cleaning fluid provides the arm with a tangential force component that drives the arms and hub in the direction of the arrow 111 in FIG. 6.

The nozzle 82, as shown in FIG. 9, has a forwardly inclined discharge slot 99, which directs the jet 101 of cleaning fluid in a forward direction. This forwardly directed jet of cleaning fluid peels foreign material from the surface to be cleaned. The rotary jet cleaning action of the fluid functions in cooperation with the brush assembly 34 to clean the wall 22 as the cleaning apparatus is moved over the wall.

The handle 24 can be pivotally mounted to the side wall 28 of the housing in lieu of body 44. A movable or swivel connector can be used with a flexible hose to connect the handle to the body so that fluid can flow from the handle to the body. A short handle can be fixed to the body or housing whereby the cleaner can be moved with one hand.

The spinner assembly can be used without the housing 23 or brush assembly 34 to discharge fluid, as water, to a desired location. Also, the nozzles can be used with other fluid discharge means. Other modifications and changes in structure may be made without departing from the invention. The invention is defined in the following claims.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. An apparatus for discharging fluid under pressure comprising: a body having a passage extended into said body and chamber, one portion of said passage open to said chamber; shaft means located in said passage and rotatably mounted on said body, said shaft means having a head located in said chamber and a longitudinal passage open to the chamber, said head having a transverse dimension larger than the transverse size of the passage in the body whereby the head limits axial movement of the shaft means relative to the body; means for carrying fluid under pressure to the passage in the body whereby fluid flows from said passage in the body into the chamber and around the head and into the passage in the shaft means, said fluid subjecting the head to opposite longitudinal forces to substantially V longitudinally balance the shaft means in the body, and

fluid discharging means mounted on the shaft means to receive fluid from the longitudinal passage in the shaft means, said fluid discharging means being operable to rotate the shaft means in response to the discharge of fluid therefrom.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said fluid discharging means comprises: arm means secured to the shaft means, said arm means having passages for carrying fluid, and nozzle means mounted on the arm means receiving fluid from the arm means, said nozzle means having fluid discharge opening means.

3. The apparatus of claim 2 including: guard means to cover the arm means.

4. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein: the guard means is a plate means having holes adjacent the nozzle means.

5. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein: said arm means comprise a first arm and a second arm, said nozzle means having a first nozzle mounted on the first arm and a second nozzle mounted on the second arm, said first nozzle having a fluid discharge opening directed away from the direction of rotation of the arm means and said second nozzle having a fluid discharge opening means directed toward the direction of rotation of the arm means.

6. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein: said fluid discharging means has a first nozzle having a fluid discharge opening means operable to direct fluid away from the direction of rotation of the shaft means and a second nozzle means spaced from the first nozzle means having fluid discharge opening means operable to direct fluid in the direction of rotation of the shaft means.

7. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein: the fluid discharge means includes an arm means and nozzle means mounted on the arm means, said arm means having a generally radially extended inner portion and a generally circumferentially projected outer portion, said nozzle means being mounted on the outer portion.

8. The apparatus of claim 1 including handle means attached to the body, said handle means having portions located adjacent opposite sides of the body, and means pivotally connecting the portions to the body.

9. The apparatus of claim 1 includingzsleeve bearing means located in the passage in the body rotatably mounting the shaft means.

10. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein: said chamber is in one end of the body, and means attached to said one end of the body to close said chamber.

11. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein: said head means has an annular transverse portion engageable with an annular transverse shoulder of the body to limit axial movement of the shaft means relative to the body.

12. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein: said head has a top portion, said top portion having a plurality of grooves open to the passage in the shaft means and the chamber.

13. The apparatus of claim 1 including: hub means secured to the shaft means, said fluid dischargin means being attached to the hub means.

14. The apparatus of claim 13 including: guard plate means attached to the hub means to cover the arm means.

15. The apparatus of claim 14 wherein: the guard plate means has holes adjacent the nozzle means.

16. A spinner assembly comprising: a body having a passage and a chamber at one end of the passage, tubular shaft means located in the passage and rotatably mounted on the body, a head secured to the shaft and located in the chamber, said head having an outwardly directed flange having a cross-sectional area substantially equal to the cross-sectional area of the shaft means, means for carrying fluid under pressure to the passage whereby fluid flows from said passage into the chamber, around the head and through the tubular shaft means, said fluid subjecting the head to opposite longitudinal forces to substantially longitudinally balance the shaft means in the body, and fluid discharging means mounted on the shaft means to receive fluid from the tubular shaft means, said fluid discharging means being operable to rotate the shaft means in re-' sponse to the discharge of fluid therefrom.

17. The spinner assembly of claim 16 including: sleeve bearing means located in the passage rotatably mounting the shaft means.

18. The spinner assembly of claim 16 including: cap means removably mounted on the housing means providing an access to said chamber.

19. The spinner assembly of claim 16 wherein: said head has a top portion, said top portion having a plurality of grooves open to the chamber.

20. The spinner assembly of claim 16 wherein: said head has a plurality of radial grooves and an upwardly and inwardly tapered shape to permit the flow of fluid through said chamber and into the tubular shaft means. l

- UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

On the title page, the address of the assignee is incorrectly shown as "Savage, Mich.". The correct address is -Savage,

l li nn esota j .7 v M 7 Column 1, line 45, "into" should be -onto-.

Column 4, line 6, "64A" should be we Signed and sea-led this 26th day of November 1974.

(SEAL) Agtest:

McCQY GIBSON JR. c; DANN Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patemzd" CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION P t t No, 3,829,019 Dated Aug'UfSt 13, 1974 Inventor(s) Harold A. Petsch It is certified that error appears in theabove-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

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Classifications
U.S. Classification239/251, 239/288.5, 239/598, 15/50.1
International ClassificationB05B3/06, A47L11/38, A47L11/00, B08B3/02, B05B3/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/38, B08B3/026, A47L11/4075, A47L11/4088, B05B3/06, A47L11/4077
European ClassificationA47L11/40L, A47L11/40M, A47L11/40N6, B05B3/06, B08B3/02H, A47L11/38