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Publication numberUS3829563 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 13, 1974
Filing dateNov 30, 1972
Priority dateNov 30, 1972
Also published asDE2357335A1
Publication numberUS 3829563 A, US 3829563A, US-A-3829563, US3829563 A, US3829563A
InventorsP Orshitzer, R Barry, Matluck Meyer
Original AssigneeHoffmann La Roche
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Emollient cleansing compositions
US 3829563 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent {109] Barry et al.

[451 Aug. 13, 1974 EMOLLIENT CLEANSING COMPOSITIONS [73] Assignee: Hoffman-La Roche Inc., Nutley,

[22] Filed: Nov. 30, 1972 [21] App]. No.: 311,035

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 6/1971 Roberts et al. 424/70 l/l972 Pence 4/1973 Cella 424/70 Primary ExaminerSam Rosen Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Samuel L. Welt; Jon S. Saxe; R. Hain Swope ABSTRACT Cleansing compositions for the hair and skin which deposit an emollient, conditioning film thereon during washing are disclosed. The compositions, which may be in a liquid or semi-solid form, are oil-in-water emulsions characterized by a particular particle size distribution of the oil phase and are comprised of from about 10 to about 70 percent by weight petrolatum, from about 5 to about 30 percent by weight of one or more organic foaming detergents, from about 1 to about 10 percent by weight of an emulsifier, from about 0.5 to about 5 percent weight of an organic foam stabilizer, from about 0 to about 20 percent by weight of one or more emollient substances other than petrolatum, and water.

9 Claims, No Drawings EMOLLIENT CLEANSING COMPOSITIONS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION It is generally recognized by both laymen and dermatologists that many of the commercially available skin cleansing preparations, i.e., toilet soaps, detergents, foaming paste or cream type cleansing compositions and the like, may remove oils from the skin during use and thus cause skin dryness which manifests itself as roughness, white scaling and, occasionally, itching. Such preparations may also intensify existing dermatological conditions which are characterized by such symptoms. In an effort to relieve or prevent such symptoms, lotions and creams containing humectant or emollient substances are widely used, particularly among women, to help retard moisture loss from the skin and to plasticize and soften the outer cellular layers thereof. Such preparations are often inconvenient in that they must be carried from place to place in the purse or pocket and additionally represent an unwelcome expense to the user. As a result, many persons who suffer with dry skin forego the use of such preparations.

There are a large number of soaps and other skin cleansing preparations on the market which neither exhibit a softening effect nor contain a residual emollient substance. However, even those cleansing preparations containing emollient substances such as cold creams, fats, oils and the like which are claimed to adhere to the skin during use and leave an emollient film after washing generally do not satisfactorily meet such claims. The failure of such products to realize their claims results from the fact that most of the mineral, animal or vegetable oils they contain possess poor adhesion to the skin in the presence of the required amount of detergent necessary to produce copious foam. In the case of shampoos parallel situations exist with regard to the products currently on the market many of which adequately clean the hair but do not satisfactorily impart smoothness, body and manageability thereto. The failure of such products to condition the hair during use is evidenced by the substantial commercial success of after-shampoo conditioning rinses and other conditioning preparations for both men and women.

It can therefore be clearly seen that there exists a need for hair and skin cleansing preparations which possess excellent cleansing and foaming characteristics and which additionally act to condition the hair and skin by depositing a palpable emollient film thereon during the cleansing operation. Such unique preparations are furnished in accordance with the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to liquid or semi-solid compositions suitable for the cleansing and conditioning of the hair and skin. By conditioning is meant the deposition of a palpable emollient film on the hair and/or skin during the cleaning operation. On the skin, such a film works to retard moisture loss from the epithelium and to maintain or restore the softness and smoothness of the skin surface. On the hair, the emollient film deposited by the novel preparations of this invention acts to impart combability and manageability thereto. The aforementioned emollient film is comprised principally of petrolatum which may be supplemented by additional oily or fatty emollient substances such as are recognized in the art.

The present invention is concerned with the discovery that petrolatum can be formulated with certain organic detergents into oil-in-water emulsions which are unique in that they possess adequate foaming properties, cleanse exceptionally well and simultaneously deposit a film of fine particles of petrolatum on the skin or hair. This film, which acts to condition and soften the hair or skin, adheres sufficiently well thereto to remain after the latter is rinsed off with water.

It has been found that the particle size distribution of the oil phase of the oil-in-water emulsions of the invention must be within certain limits for maximum physical stability and functional efficacy. Specifically, the great majority of these particles must be smaller than five microns for maximum stability of the emulsion. On the other hand, a minimal portion of the particles of the oil phase, i.e. petrolatum and other optional emollient substances, must be relatively large for functional efficacy. Therefore, the particles of the oil phase of the novel oilin-water emulsions of the invention have the following approximate distribution by size: up to about 98 percent are smaller than about five microns in their largest dimension: about 2 percent are five microns or larger and about 0.2 percent of the particles are 10 microns or larger. The preferred particle size distribution by count is: from about to about 98 percent are smaller than five microns: from about 2 to about 5 percent are between five and 10 microns; from about 0.2 to about 1.0 percent are between 10 and 100 microns; and essentially none are larger than 100 microns at their largest dimension.

The above specified size distribution of the oil phase particles of the compositions of the invention can be achieved by continued agitation of the emulsion after formation. Such agitation is carried out at a temperature below 40C. i.e. from about 20 to about 40C., preferably from about 20 to about 30C. Agitation of the emulsion at these temperatures causes coalescence of the particles of the oil phase with a resultant increase in the mean or average size of such particles and an increase in the proportion by count of oil particles in the five to 100 micron size range. The length of time required to achieve the desired particle size distribution will vary with the exact composition of the emulsion, the speed and type of equipment utilized, the batch size and the like. Generally, however, from about onefourth to 4 hours preferably about 2 hours is sufficient. Increasing the proportion of oil phase particles in the five to 100 micron range increases the amount of oil phase particles deposited on skin or hair during use of the preparations of the invention for personal cleansing. The particle size distribution of the oil phase may be determined by use of a Coulter counter.

. The compositions of the invention, in general, comprise from about 10 to about 70 percent, preferably from about 10 to about 55 percent by weight of petrolatum; from about 5 to about 30 percent by weight, preferably from about 10 to about 30 percent by weight of one or more organic foaming detergents; from about 1 to about 10 percent by weight, preferably from about 3 to about 8 percent by weight of a suitable emulsifier; from about 0.5 to about 5 percent by weight, preferably from about 1 to about 3 percent by weight of an organic foam stabilizer; from about 0 to about 20 percent by weight, preferably from about 3 to about 15 percent by weight of one or more additional art-recognized emollient substances other than petrolatum and the remainder water.

The amount of water to be included in the compositions of the invention will vary depending on the desired consistency of the final product. As the compositions of the invention are oil-in-water emulsions, it is possible by varying the amount of water present to formulate, for example, a'thick-flowing liquid, a semiliquid thick creme, a paste and the like. Generally, the compositions of the invention should not contain less than about 25 percent by weight nor more than about 80 percent by weight water if a liquid form is desired and not less than about percent by weight nor more than about 50 percent by weight of water where a paste preparation is desired. The compositions preferably contain from about to about 50 percent by weight water wherein a paste composition is desired and from about 30 to about 80 percent by weight water where a liquid formulation is desired. In compositions containing from about 30 to about 50 percent by weight water, the consistency will vary between liquid and semi-solid depending on the characteristics of the non-aqueous ingredients.

The petrolatum suitable for use in the invention comprises any grade of white or yellow petrolatum which is recognized as being safe for application to the human skin or hair. The preferred types are Petrolatum USP XVIII and NFXII. Also, any viscosity or consistency grade of petrolatum recognized in the art can be used in the invention. It is within the scope of the invention, however, to partially replace petrolatum with mixtures of hydrocarbon materials which can be formulated to resemble petrolatum in appearance and consistency. For example, such a combination can be formed by melting mineral oil in various proportions with substances such as, for example, microcrystalline wax, paraffin wax, ceresin and ozokerite. It is also within the purview of the invention to augment the petrolatum in the compositions to be utilized to cleanse the hair with one or more additional emollient materials known in the art to impart sheen, luster, smoothness and static charge reduction to the hair. lt is, however, essential that the compositions of the invention contain at least [0 percent petrolatum by weight.

The above-mentioned emollient agents which can be utilized in augmenting'the emollient properties of petrolatum include one or a mixture of art-recognized substances such as, for example, fatty alcohols, liquid esters of monoand di-basic fatty acids, vegetable oils, modified fatty acid glycerides, silicone oils, acetylated lanolin alcohols, esters of lanolin fatty acids, cholesterol, lanolin, liquid lanolin, myristyl myristate, mineral oil, squalene, squalane (perhydrosqualene), and the like. Such additional emollient substances may be present in the compositions of the present invention up to about 20 percent by weight.

The synthetic organic foaming detergents utilized in the compositions of the invention may be of the anionic, non-ionic or amphoteric types. An important consideration in the selection of a suitable detergent ingredient is the relative irritant properties of the individual detergents. Additional criteria to be met are the ability of each detergent to stabilize the emulsion, produce viscosity, achieve the desired foam level and remain stable at the pH level of the formulation, i.e. a pH of from about 7 to about 9. Examples of suitable detergents include the following:

Anionic: alkali and triethanolamine lauryl sulfates, lauryl ether sulfates, sodium alkylbenzene sulfonate, secondary alkyl sulfates, salts of higher acyl esters of isethionic acid, sodium salts of higher acyl derivatives of taurine or methyl taurine, alkyl phenol polyether sulfates, higher acyl derivatives of glycine and methylglycine, di-higher alkyl sulfosuccinates, higher alkyl alkanolamide ester sulfosuccinates, higher alkyl monoglyceride sulfates, alpha-olefin sulfonates; Nonionic: alkyl aryl polyether alcohols, alpha-hydro-omegahydroxy-poly (oxypropylene)polyoxyethylene block copolymers; and Amphoteric:

disodium salts of higher alkyl substituted imidazolinium dicarboxylic acids wherein the connecting group linking said carboxyl groups to the imidazolinium ring contains an ether linkage, higher acyl betaaminopropionates, higher acyl peptides, higher alkyl amido betaines, and the like.

The preferred detergent ingredient in the compositions of the invention is a combination of about one part by weight of an alkali metal lauryl or lauryl ether sulfate and from about one-half to about 10 parts, preferably from about 1 to about 4 parts by weight of one or more disodium salts of higher alkyl substituted imidazolinium dicarboxylic acids such as, for example, the Miranol detergents which are manufactured by Miranol Chemical Co., Irvington, New Jersey and which have the following general formula X CHaCOONs wherein R is higher alkyl radical having, preferably, nine to 11 carbon atoms and X is an anion such as, for example, hydroxyl or lauryl sulfate. These detergents, when formulated into the compositions of the invention, yield the ideal balance of low irritation, quality and volume of foam and viscosity.

The detergent component of the compositions of the invention, as stated above, comprises from about 5 to about 30 percent by weight, preferably from about l0 to about 30 percent by weight thereof. In no instance, however, does the percent by weight of the detergent ingredient utilized exceed two times the percent by weightof the petrolatum present in the composition.

The emulsifiers suitable for use in the compositions of the invention include those amphiphilic organic emulsifiers recognized in the art as being safe for the type of products contemplated herein and of which the HLB values are from about 1 to about 19. The preferred emulsifiers in accordance with the invention are those with HLB values of from about 1 to about 6. It is also within the practice of the invention to utilize more than one emulsifier the cumulative l-lLB value of which falls within the desired range. Examples of suitable types of emulsifiers in accordance with the invention are the following: sorbitan fatty acid esters, polyoxy-ethylene sorbitan fatty acid esters, polyoxyethylene sorbitol esters of fatty acids, lanolin, rosin, beeswax and tallow acids, polyoxyethylene fatty acid esters, polyoxyethylene fatty alcohol ethers, fatty acid monoand di-glycerides, polyglycerol fatty acid esters, polypropylene glycol fatty acid esters, fatty alcohol phosphate esters, polyethoxylated fatty alcohol phosphate esters and the like.

Specific emulsifiers which are preferred in the practice of the invention include, for example, sorbitan monooleate, sorbitan sesquioleate, sorbitan trioleate, sorbitan monostearate, sorbitan tristearate, polyoxyethylene (2) oleyl ether, polyoxyethylene (2) stearyl ether, polyoxyethylene (2) cetyl ether, ethylene glycol monostearate, diethylene glycol oleate, diethylene glycol stearate, propylene glycol monostearate, propylene glycol distearate, glyceryl monostearate, glyceryl monooleate, decaglyceryl octaoleate, hexaglyceryl distearate and triglyceryl monooleate.

Suitable organic foam stabilizers, which may additionally function as thickening agents in the compositions of the invention, include one or more of substances such as, for example, lauric, myristic and coconut oil fatty acid di-ethanolamides, monoethanolamides and isopropanolamides, stearyl trialkanol ammonium chlorides, fatty acid dimethylamine oxides, fatty acid diethanolamine oxides and the like. Preferred among this group are the coconut fatty acid diethanolamides wherein the fatty acids are predominantly l2 and 14 carbon atom acids, capric acid diethanolamide, lauric-myristic (70-30 monoethanolamide and stearyl trihydroxymethyl ammonium chloride.

It is also within the purview of the present invention to include in the emollient cleansing compositions thereof certain optional ingredients which are recognized as being conventional in the art for such preparations. These include, for example, organic or inorganic acids for pH adjustment, dyes, perfumes, preservatives, antioxidants, chelating agents and the like. Additionally, from about to about 3 percent by weight preferably from about 0.5 to about 1.5 percent by weight polyvinyl pyrrolidone may be included in the compositions of the invention for viscosity adjustment, and irritancy reduction. Oil soluble medicinal agents such as are recognized in the art for use in skin and hair cleansing preparations e.g. antidandruff agents, may also be included in the preparations of the invention to impart medicinal properties to the emollient film deposited on the skin or hair thereby.

The compositions of the invention are prepared, generally, by first melting together all the fatty ingredients and combining the melt with agitation with the aqueous phase comprising a mixture of the detergents, the foam stabilizer and water, both phases being at a temperature of from about 60 to 80C. The oily phase may be added to the aqueous phase or vice versa. The mixture is then cooled to a temperature of below about 30C. with constant agitation. Perfume ingredients are added to the mixture during the cooling process when the temperature thereof is at between 50 and 40C. After the temperature of the mixture has reached about 30C., the emulsion is observed under a microscope at 15 minute intervals while agitation is continued, and the temperature is maintained between 25 and 30C. Agitation is continued until a substantial proportion, i.e. about 2 percent of the visible particles of the oil phase are larger than 5 microns, about 90 percent of said large particles being between 5 and microns and the remainder between about 10 and 100 microns. At temperatures below 30C., the average particle size of the oil phase of the emulsion increases rapidly as the mixing time is extended and/or mixing speed increased.

The amount of oil phase deposited on the skin or hair during use of the compositions of the invention is directly related to the average particle size of the oil phase of the emulsion. Thus, the oil deposition may be controlled within certain limits by the duration and speed of agitation during mixing of the emulsion at a temperature below about 30C. Washing tests on the skin and hair, as will be described hereinafter, may be utilized to determine standards whereby a termination point for the mixing may be determined. As a general rule, the compositions of the invention should be agitated on conventional equipment while cooling to below 30C. such as, for example, by agitating with an anchor type stirrer running at 10-50 rpm for a period of from about one-half to about 4 hours, preferably about 2 hours. These figures will vary with the specific equipment utilized, the desired consistency of the product, the amount of oil deposition desired and the like. The manipulation of these variables is considered to be within the purview of one skilled in the art utilizing the disclosure made herein.

Additional adjustments of the characteristics of the composition to yield the particular type desired may be made within the metes and bounds of the invention. For example, the consistency of the product may be varied by adjusting the relative proportions of water, detergent, oil and thickener, and also by varying the melting point of the oil phase. A water content of from about 20 to about 40 percent by weight will, in general, yield a product with the consistency of a thick paste whereas a water content above about 40 percent will yield products of increasing liquidity. The foam volume produced by agitation with water may also be varied by varying the amount and kinds of foaming detergents utilized. For example, sodium lauryl sulfate possesses a large foam capacity but also a high irritancy. Its use in compositions of the type contemplated herein is thus limited. It is, however, preferred in the compositions of the invention to utilize at least 3 percent by weight, more preferably between about 5 and about 10 percent by weight sodium lauryl sulfate in combination with other foaming organic detergents which are lower in both foam production and irritancy.

The following tests demonstrate the amount of oil deposition during use of the various compositions within the scope of the present invention.

For the testing of hair cleaning compositions, a swatch of human hair about 8 inches long, of average fineness and weighing about 5 grams was tied together at one end and was cleansed by immersion in three 15 ml. portions of hexane, draining after each immersion. The hair was towel-dried and then allowed to completely dry in the air. The clean hair was thoroughly soaked in warm tap water, squeezed dry and treated with exactly 1 gram of the test composition which was spread over the swatch and worked vigorously with the fingers to produce maximum foam. After about one minute, the cleansing composition was removed by thoroughly rinsing the hair with warm tap water. The excess water was squeezed from the swatch and it was then dried with a towel, combed out and thoroughly dried in a current of hot air. The dried swatch was then exhaustively extracted with hexane. The extract was filtered through paper and evaporated to dryness. The oily residue was than accurately weighed and the milligrams of oil deposited per gram of product tested was calculated.

To test the amount of oil deposited on the skin utilizing the cleansing compositions of the invention, a rectangular area cm. X 10 cm. was marked along the flat, hairless, inner side of the forearm with a pencil. The arm was held so that the marked area was downward and a stream of hexane was sprayed on the area from a wash bottle until about 25 ml. was used. The hexane washings were then discarded. The dried, washed area, which appeared white and scaly, was then thoroughly wetted with water. Exactly 0.25 gram of test sample was distributed evenly over the test area. Using a little water, the composition was worked up to maximum lather by rubbing vigorously with the fingertips. The arm was thoroughly rinsed with warm water until all slippery, soapy feel had disappeared from the test area which was then patted dry with a towel and allowed to dry in the air. The treated area was then extracted with a stream of approximately 25 ml. of hexane collecting the drainings in a cm. diameter funnel held over a 50 ml. tared beaker. The solvent was then evaporated and the weight of the oily residue determined and reported as mg. of oil deposited per gram of product tested.

It has been demonstrated utilizing gas/liquid chromagraphic analysis techniques of the hexane extracted fatty deposit obtained in the above tests that the deposit contains the same ingredients as are present in the oil phase of the test composition.

The following examples serve to further illustrate the invention. All temperatures are given in degrees Centigrade.

EXAMPLE 1 A foaming emollient body cleanser for use in the bath or shower was prepared from the following formula.- tion:

Acetulan-Amcrican Cholesterol Products Division of CPC International, Inc. Neobcc-Drcw Chemical Corp., Inc.

The first five ingredients (oil phase) were combined and heated in a stainless container to about 80 with stirring. The remaining ingredients were combined in a separate jacketed stainless steel kettle equipped with an anchor mixer and heated to about 80. The sodium lauryl sulfate was added as a 42 percent aqueous paste and the imidazolinium salt was added as a 38 percent aqueous solution. The oil phase was then added slowly to the aqueous phase while mixing rapidly (about 2,000 rpm) with an inserted impeller mixer. After incorporation and emulsification of the oil were complete, the impeller was removed and mixing was continued by anchor blade rotating at about 30 rpms. The temperature of the emulsion was lowered to 50 by cold water circulating through the kettle jacket. At 50 the perfume was added and the temperature of the emulsion was then gradually lowered to 30. Mixing was continued for an additional two hours during which the temperature of the emulsion cooled to about 25. Stirring was continued until microscopic observation of the emulsion at magnifications indicated proper particle size distribution. Stirring was then discontinued and the product was packaged into suitable containers.

The product was a stable, opaque, viscous yet pourable lotion. When applied to the skin and lathered with water it provided very good foam quality. When tested on the skin of the forearm as described, the product deposited about 30 mg. of oil per gram applied and the skin surface felt soft and supple.

EXAMPLE 2 A foaming emollient facial washing cream was prepared in accordance with the method of Example I from the following formulation:

Percent Ingredient by Weight White Petrolatum Coconut Oil Sesame Oil Squalene Squalene Cholesterol Lanolin sterols and alcohols Spermaceti Myristyl myristate Sorbitan sesquioleate Sodium lauryl sulfate l-CarboxymethyL l -carboxymethyloxyethyI-2-coco-imidazolinium ihydroxide disodium salt I-Carboxymethyl-l-carboxymethyloxyethyl-2-coco'imidazolinium llauryl sulfate disodium salt 6.8

Stearyl trihydroxy methyl ammonium chloride Polyvinylpyrrolidone Citric Acid q.s. to pH 7.2, about Water Amcrchol-American Cholesterol Products Division of CPC International, Inc.

As this preparation is to be applied to the face, the pH was adjusted downward to about 7.2 to minimize eye-sting and irritancy. Likewise, the oil content of this preparation was made higher than the preparation of Example 1 to facilitate removal of makeup and to deposit a heavier oil film on the face to combat dry skin. The preparation was a soft cream which produced a moderate lather and deposited a perceptible film on the skin. In the forearm test described herein, the product was found to deposit about 40 mg. of oil per gram applied and leave the skin soft and supple.

EXAMPLE 3 A grooming and conditioning shampoo for mens hair was prepared from the following formulation in accordance with the method of claim 1.

Acetylated lanolin alcohols, liquid -Continued Percent lngredient by Weight fraction (Acetulan) 1.0 Sorbitan sesquioleate 5.0 Sodium lauryl sulfate 5.0 l-Carboxymethyll -carboxymethyloxyethyl-2-coco-imidazolinium 1- hydroxide disodium salt 16.0 l-Carboxymethyll -carboxymethyloxyethyl2-coco-imidazolinium 1- lauryl sulfate disodium salt 3.5 Lauric-Myristic (70-30) monoethanolamide 2.0 Water Balance The product was a soft, stable cream with satisfactory foam and superior conditioning effects of mens hair. Hair washed with the preparation did not have the squeaky feel commonly experienced with currently available soaps or shampoos but instead was smooth and, after drying, had a light dressed appearance without feeling or looking oily or greasy. The product was found by the hair test described herein to deposit about 30 mg. of oil per gram.

EXAMPLE 4 A conditioning shampoo for womens hair was prepared in accordance with the method of claim-1 from the following formulation:

The product provided good foam and excellent conditioning properties. Hair washed with this composition was free from squeakiness and combed out with little or no tangling. There was no need to treat the hair with an after-shampoo conditioning agent except in some exceptional cases. The dry hair had good gloss, body and hold and was free of frizziness and excessive flyaway. The product, a soft, stable creme, provided a lighter dressing or grooming effect (10 mg. of oil per gram by the hair test described herein) than the mens shampoo of Example 3 in keeping with the softer finish preferred by women.

We claim:

1. A foaming, emollient composition suitable for the cleansing of the skin and hair consisting essentially of an oil-in-water emulsion wherein from about 95 to about 98 percent of the particles of the oil phase thereof are smaller than about 5 microns at their largest dimension, from about 2 to about 5 percent of said particles are from about 5 microns to about microns at their largest dimension, from about 0.2 to about 1.0 percent of said particles are between about 10 microns and 100 microns at their largest dimension and substantially no particles are greater than 100 microns at their largest dimension, said emulsion comprising:

a. from about IO'percent to about percent by weight petrolatum;

b. from about 5 percent weight to about 30 percent by weight of an organic foaming detergent component comprising a mixture of one part by weight sodium lauryl sulfate and from about one-half to about 10 parts by weight of one or more amphoteric detergents selected from those represented by the formula i\ X CHr-C OONa wherein R is an alkyl radical containing from nine to 11 carbon atoms and X is hydroxyl or lauryl sulfate;

c. from about 1 percent by weight to about 10 percent by weight of an emulsifier component having an HLB value of from 1 to 6 and selected from the group consisting of sorbitan monooleate, sorbitan sesquioleate, sorbitan trioleate, sorbitan monostearate, sorbitan tristearate, polyoxyethylene (2) oleyl ether, polyoxyethylene (2) stearyl ether, polyoxyethylene (2) cetyl ether, ethylene glycol monostearate, diethylene glycol oleate, diethylene glycol stearate, propylene glycol monostearate, propylene glycol distearate, glyceryl monostearate, glyceryl monooleate, decaglyceryl octaoleate, hexaglyceryl distearate and triglyceryl monooleate;

d. from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 5.0 percent by weight of an organic foam stabilizer selected from the group consisting of capric acid diethanolamide, stearyl trihydroxymethyl ammonium chloride and lauric-myristic (70-30) monoethanolamide;

e. from about 0 percent to about 20 percent by weight of one or more pharmaceutically acceptable emollient substances other than petrolatum; and

f. from about 10 percent by weight to about percent by weight water, the percent by weight of said component b) in said composition not exceeding two times the percent by weight of said component a).

2. A composition in accordance with claim 1 wherein said component a a) is present in from about 10 to about 55 percent by weight, said component b) is present in from about 10 to about 30 percent by weight, saidcomponent 0) is present in from about 3 to about 8 percent by weight and said component d) is present in from about 1 to about 3 percent by weight.

3. A composition in accordance with claim 1 wherein said component e) is present in from about 3 to about 15 percent by weight.

4. A composition in accordance with claim 1 wherein said component b) comprises one part by weight sodium lauryl sulfate and from about 1 to about 4 parts by weight of one or more of said amphoteric detergents.

5. A composition in accordance with claim 1 wherein said component 0) is sorbitan sesquioleate.

6. A composition in accordance with claim 1 additionally containing from about 0.5 by weight to about 1.5 percent by weight poly-vinylpyrrolidone.

9. A method of preparing a foaming emollient composition suitable for the cleansing of the skin and hair said composition comprising:

a. from about 10 by weight to about 70 percent by weight of petrolatum;

b. from about by weight to about 30 percent by weight of an organic foaming detergent component comprising a mixture of one part by weight sodium lauryl sulfate and from about one-half to about parts by weight of one or more amphoteric detergents selected from those represented by the formula wherein R is an alkyl radical containing from 9 to 11 carbon atoms and X is hydroxyl or lauryl sulfate;

c. from about 1 by weight to about 10 percent by weight of an emulsifier component having an HLB value of from 1 to 6 and selected from the group consisting of sorbitan monooleate, sorbitan sesquioleate, sorbitan trioleate, sorbitan monostearate, sorbitan tristearate, polyoxyethylene (2) oleyl ether, polyoxyethylene (2) stearyl ether, polyoxyethylene (2) cetyl ether, ethylene glycol monostearate, diethylene glycol oleate, diethylene glycol stearate, propylene glycol monostearate, propylene glycol distearate, glyceryl monostearate, glyceryl monooleate, decaglyceryl octaoleate, hexaglyceryl distearate and triglyceryl monooleate;

. from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 5.0 percent by weight of an organic foam stabilizer selected from the group consisting of capric acid diethanolamide, stearyl trihydroxymethyl ammonium chloride and lauric-myristic (-30) monoethanolamide;

. from about 0 percent by weight to about 20 percent by weight of one or more pharmaceutically acceptable emollient substances other than petrolatum; and

. from about 10 to about percent water, the percent by weight of said component b) being not greater than two times the percent by weight of said component a) which comprises:

1. heating a mixture of said components a), c) and e) to a sufficient temperature to form a melt thereof;

2. mixing together components b), d) and f);

3. heating the mixture of step 2) to a temperature approximating that of said melt;

4. combining said melt and said mixture with agitation to form an oil-in-water emulsion;

5. gradually cooling said emulsion to about 30C.

while maintaining agitation; and

6. continuing agitation of said emulsion at a temperature between about 25C. and about 30C. until the particle size of the oil phase of said emulsion is such that from about to about 98 percent of said particles are smaller than about 5 microns at their largest dimension, from about 2 to about 5 percent of said particles are from about 5 to about 10 microns at their largest dimension, from about 0.2 to about 1.0 percent of said particles are between about 10 microns and 100 microns at their largest dimension and substantially no particles are greater than 100 microns at their largest dimension.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification510/124, 514/942, 510/121, 424/70.21, 510/125, 514/846, 510/480, 510/122, 424/70.24, 510/417, 510/159, 510/505
International ClassificationA61K8/49, A61K8/81, A61K8/92, A61K8/06, A61Q19/10, A61Q5/02, A61K8/31, A61Q5/12, A61Q1/14, A61K8/42, A61Q1/02, A61K8/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61K8/8176, A61K8/922, Y10S514/942, Y10S514/846, A61K8/4973, A61K8/31, A61K8/4946, A61Q5/12, A61K8/925, A61K8/062, A61Q19/10, A61Q5/02, A61K8/42
European ClassificationA61K8/06A, A61K8/92C, A61K8/42, A61K8/49F1, A61Q5/02, A61Q19/10, A61K8/31, A61K8/49H, A61K8/81R2, A61Q5/12, A61K8/92F
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 25, 1983AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: HOFFMANN-LA ROCHE INC.
Effective date: 19830128
Owner name: RICHARDSON-VICKS INC., 10 WESTPORT RD., WILTON, CT
May 25, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: RICHARDSON-VICKS INC., 10 WESTPORT RD., WILTON, CT
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:HOFFMANN-LA ROCHE INC.;REEL/FRAME:004134/0481
Effective date: 19830128
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HOFFMANN-LA ROCHE INC.;REEL/FRAME:004134/0481